03:51
TED2008

Gregory Petsko: The coming neurological epidemic

グレゴリー・ペトスコの来るべき神経疾患の流行における考え

Filmed:

生化学者であるグレゴリー・ペトスコはこの50年間に世界人口の高齢化に伴って、アルツハイマー病などの神経疾患の流行が起こるだろうと主張する。彼の解決法としては”脳とその機能についての研究に注力する”ことである。

- Bioengineer
Gregory Petsko is a biochemist who studies the proteins of the body and their biochemical function. Working with Dagmar Ringe, he's doing pioneering work in the way we look at proteins and what they do. Full bio

Unless we do something to prevent it,
私達が何か行動を起こさない限り、
00:15
over the next 40 years we’re facing an epidemic
次の40年間に私達は
00:17
of neurologic diseases on a global scale.
世界規模の神経疾患の流行を目の当たりにすることになります
00:20
A cheery thought.
陽気な考えですよね
00:23
On this map, every country that’s colored blue
この地図で青く塗られている国は
00:27
has more than 20 percent of its population over the age of 65.
その国の人口の20%以上が65歳以上の国を表しています
00:30
This is the world we live in.
これが私達の生きる世界です
00:34
And this is the world your children will live in.
そしてこれが私達の子供が生きる世界なのです
00:36
For 12,000 years, the distribution of ages in the human population
一万二千年もの間、年代別の人口の分布は
00:40
has looked like a pyramid, with the oldest on top.
高齢者が一番上に来る、ピラミッド型でした
00:44
It’s already flattening out.
しかし近年それが平らになり始めています
00:47
By 2050, it’s going to be a column and will start to invert.
2050年までには、その形は柱のようになり、そして逆ピラミッド型に近づき始めます
00:49
This is why it’s happening.
その原因を説明したいと思います
00:53
The average lifespan’s more than doubled since 1840,
1840年以来、平均寿命は2倍以上に伸び
00:56
and it’s increasing currently at the rate of about five hours every day.
毎日5時間という速さでその寿命はまだ伸び続けています
00:59
And this is why that’s not entirely a good thing:
なぜこれが懸念すべき事柄であるかというと
01:04
because over the age of 65, your risk of getting Alzheimer’s
65歳以上になるとアルツハイマー病や
01:07
or Parkinson’s disease will increase exponentially.
パーキンソン病にかかるリスクが急上昇するからなのです
01:11
By 2050, there’ll be about 32 million people in the United States
2050年までに、およそ3200万人が80歳以上となり
01:15
over the age of 80, and unless we do something about it,
何か対策を取らない限り
01:19
half of them will have Alzheimer’s disease
そのうちの半分の人々がアルツハイマー病にかかり
01:22
and three million more will have Parkinson’s disease.
3百万人以上がパーキンソン病を患うことになります
01:24
Right now, those and other neurologic diseases --
そして、現在私達に治療も予防の術も無い
01:27
for which we have no cure or prevention --
この二つの病気とその他の神経疾患には
01:30
cost about a third of a trillion dollars a year.
毎年約3300億ドルもの費用がかかっています
01:33
It will be well over a trillion dollars by 2050.
2050年には1兆ドルを越えるといわれています
01:35
Alzheimer’s disease starts when a protein
アルツハイマー病は
01:39
that should be folded up properly
正しく組織されるべきタンパク質が
01:41
misfolds into a kind of demented origami.
くしゃくしゃの折り紙みたいに組織されることで発症します
01:43
So one approach we’re taking is to try to design drugs
なので、私達が今取り組んでいるアプローチとしては
01:47
that function like molecular Scotch tape,
"分子のためのセロハンテープ"のような薬を作り
01:50
to hold the protein into its proper shape.
そのおかしなタンパク質の組織を元通りに戻そうというものです
01:53
That would keep it from forming the tangles
それによって脳の大部分を
01:56
that seem to kill large sections of the brain when they do.
不能にしてしまう"タンパク質のもつれ"を防ぐことができるのです
01:58
Interestingly enough, other neurologic diseases
さらに興味深いことに、全く異なる部分の
02:02
which affect very different parts of the brain
脳に影響を与える他の神経疾患もまた
02:04
also show tangles of misfolded protein,
その"タンパク質のもつれ"を作り出すのですが
02:07
which suggests that the approach might be a general one,
それから分かるのは、このアプローチがもしかすると一般的なもので
02:10
and might be used to cure many neurologic diseases,
アルツハイマー病だけでなく他の神経疾患にも
02:13
not just Alzheimer’s disease.
適応できるかもしれないのです
02:15
There’s also a fascinating connection to cancer here,
またガンに関わる面白い関係性をここで見ることが出来ます
02:17
because people with neurologic diseases
それは神経疾患を持つ人々の
02:20
have a very low incidence of most cancers.
ガンを患う確率が非常に低いことです
02:22
And this is a connection that most people aren’t pursuing right now,
この関係性については現在それほど多くの研究者が研究している分野ではないですが
02:25
but which we’re fascinated by.
非常に期待できる研究分野です
02:28
Most of the important and all of the creative work in this area
この分野においての重要な創造的な研究の多くが
02:31
is being funded by private philanthropies.
私的な慈善事業の献金によって支えられています。
02:34
And there’s tremendous scope for additional private help here,
この私的援助はより増えてくるでしょう
02:37
because the government has dropped the ball on much of this, I’m afraid.
なぜなら、残念ながら政府がこの研究で大きな失敗をしてしまったからです。
02:40
In the meantime, while we’re waiting for all these things to happen,
これらの研究が実現するまでに
02:43
here’s what you can do for yourself.
あなた方が自分自身で出来ることはいろいろとあります
02:47
If you want to lower your risk of Parkinson’s disease,
パーキンソン病のリスクをおさえる為の予防法には
02:49
caffeine is protective to some extent; nobody knows why.
カフェインがある程度の効果をもたらすと言われています。しかし、その因果関係はまだ分かってはいません
02:51
Head injuries are bad for you. They lead to Parkinson’s disease.
頭部への怪我はパーキンソン病の確率を引き上げます
02:56
And the Avian Flu is also not a good idea.
そして、鳥インフルエンザも、いいものではありません
02:59
As far as protecting yourself against Alzheimer’s disease,
アルツハイマー病に対する予防策としては
03:04
well, it turns out that fish oil has the effect
魚の油がアルツハイマー病の発生確率を
03:07
of reducing your risk for Alzheimer’s disease.
下げることがわかりました
03:10
You should also keep your blood pressure down,
また血圧は低くしておいてください
03:13
because chronic high blood pressure
なぜかというと慢性的な高血圧症は
03:15
is the biggest single risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
アルツハイマー病の最も大きな危険因子であり
03:17
It’s also the biggest risk factor for glaucoma,
それと同時に、緑内障に対する危険因子でもあるからです
03:19
which is just Alzheimer’s disease of the eye.
ちなみに緑内障はただの"目のアルツハイマー病"です
03:22
And of course, when it comes to cognitive effects,
そしてもちろん認知的な効果について言えるのは
03:25
"use it or lose it" applies,
"使わなければ失われる"ものなので
03:27
so you want to stay mentally stimulated.
いつも精神的な刺激を受けてください
03:29
But hey, you’re listening to me.
みなさん、今日は私の話を聞いたのですから
03:31
So you’ve got that covered.
これらの予防策をきちんと取ってくださいね
03:33
And one final thing. Wish people like me luck, okay?
最後に、私のような人々の幸運を祈ってくださいね
03:35
Because the clock is ticking for all of us.
なぜなら、時は万人等しく刻まれているのですから
03:39
Thank you.
ありがとう
03:41
Translated by Hiroaki Yamane
Reviewed by Hiroshi Matsumoto

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Gregory Petsko - Bioengineer
Gregory Petsko is a biochemist who studies the proteins of the body and their biochemical function. Working with Dagmar Ringe, he's doing pioneering work in the way we look at proteins and what they do.

Why you should listen

Gregory Petsko's own biography, on his Brandeis faculty homepage, might seem intimidatingly abstruse to the non-biochemist -- he studies "the structural basis for efficient enzymic catalysis of proton and hydride transfer; the role of the metal ions in bridged bimetalloenzyme active sites; direct visualization of proteins in action by time-resolved protein crystallography; the evolution of new enzyme activities from old ones; and the biology of the quiescent state in eukaryotic cells."

But for someone so deeply in touch with the minutest parts of our bodies, Petsko is also a wide-ranging mind, concerned about larger health policy issues. The effect of mass population shifts -- such as our current trend toward a senior-citizen society -- maps onto his world of tiny proteins to create a compeling new worldview.

More profile about the speaker
Gregory Petsko | Speaker | TED.com