11:08
TED2005

Larry Burns: The future of cars

ラリー バーンズ 未来の車

Filmed:

ゼネラルモーターズ副社長ラリー バーンズは、格好の良い次世代の自動車設計を紹介します: クリーンな水素で走る、流線型で、カスタマイズが可能(しかもコンピューター処理機能付き)な車両 -- そして、アイドリング中には、エネルギーを電力網に充電します。

- Automotive researcher
Larry Burns is the vice president of R&D for GM. His job? Find a new way to power cars. Full bio

People love their automobiles.
人は車が好きです
00:18
They allow us to go where we want to when we want to.
自動車は私達を好きな場所へ 好きな時間に連れて行ってくれます
00:19
They're a form of entertainment,
それらはエンタテーメントの一種で
00:22
they're a form of art,
芸術です
00:24
a pride of ownership.
所有者に誇りをもたらします
00:27
Songs are written about cars.
車の歌が書かれ
00:28
Prince wrote a great song: "Little Red Corvette."
プリンスは「小さな赤いコルベット」という素晴らしい歌を書きました
00:30
He didn't write "Little Red Laptop Computer" or "Little Red Dirt Devil."
「小さな赤いパソコン」でも「小さな赤い掃除機」でもなく
00:33
He wrote about a car.
車についての歌を書いたのです
00:36
And one of my favorites has always been,
私のお気に入りは昔から
00:37
"Make love to your man in a Chevy van,"
「シェビーバンでメイク ラブ」
00:39
because that was my vehicle when I was in college.
シェビーバンは大学生の時の車でした
00:41
The fact is, when we do our market research around the world,
事実 我々が世界中の市場調査をすると
00:44
we see that there's nearly a universal aspiration on the part of people
人は自動車を所有することに普遍的な憧れを
00:47
to own an automobile.
抱いているのが判ります
00:51
And 750 million people in the world today own a car.
世界中で 7億5,000万人が車を所有しています
00:53
And you say, boy, that's a lot.
驚くほど多いです
00:57
But you know what?
でも知ってますか
00:59
That's just 12 percent of the population.
これが人口のたった12%にすぎないということを
01:00
We really have to ask the question:
我々はこう問うべきでしょう
01:02
Can the world sustain that number of automobiles?
世界はこれだけの数の自動車を持続できるのか?
01:04
And if you look at projections over the next 10 to 15 to 20 years,
そして 次の10年 15年 20年の予測を見れば
01:07
it looks like the world car park could grow to on the order of 1.1 billion vehicles.
世界の駐車場はおよそ11億台の車両用に増大するでしょう
01:11
Now, if you parked those end to end
それらを端から端まで並べて駐車して
01:17
and wrapped them around the Earth,
地球のまわりを包んだら
01:19
that would stretch around the Earth 125 times.
地球を125周するでしょう
01:21
Now, we've made great progress with automobile technology over the last 100 years.
自動車技術は過去100年で大きく躍進しました
01:25
Cars are dramatically cleaner, dramatically safer, more efficient
車の排出物は飛躍的に減り より安全で 効率的で
01:29
and radically more affordable than they were 100 years ago.
100年前より かなり身近になりました
01:33
But the fact remains:
しかし 事実は変わりません
01:37
the fundamental DNA of the automobile has stayed pretty much the same.
自動車の基本的なDNAは ほぼ昔のままです
01:39
If we are going to reinvent the automobile today, rather than 100 years ago,
もし我々が100年前ではなく 現代
01:43
knowing what we know about the issues associated with our product
自動車に伴う問題や 存在する技術を理解した上で
01:48
and about the technologies that exist today,
自動車を再発明したら
01:51
what would we do?
どうするでしょう
01:53
We wanted something that was really affordable.
手に入れやすい価格が望ましく
01:55
The fuel cell looked great:
燃料電池は期待できそうです
01:57
one-tenth as many moving parts
可動部品を10分の1にして
01:59
and a fuel-cell propulsion system as an internal combustion engine --
内燃機関は燃料電池推進システムを使って
02:01
and it emits just water.
排出物は水のみ
02:04
And we wanted to take advantage of Moore's Law
電子制御とソフトウェアでは
02:05
with electronic controls and software,
ムーアの法則を利用して
02:07
and we absolutely wanted our car to be connected.
車につながりを追求し
02:09
So we embarked upon the reinvention
我々は 電気化学エンジン
02:12
around an electrochemical engine,
周辺の再開発に着手しました
02:14
the fuel cell, hydrogen as the energy carrier.
燃料電池 水素をエネルギー担体としてつくったのが
02:16
First was Autonomy.
「オートノミー」です
02:20
Autonomy really set the vision for where we wanted to head.
「オートノミー」は我々の方向性を示しました
02:21
We embodied all of the key components of a fuel cell propulsion system.
我々は 燃料電池推進システムの主要な構成部品を全て具体化し
02:24
We then had Autonomy drivable with Hy-Wire,
「ハイワイヤー」を実現しました
02:28
and we showed Hy-Wire here at this conference last year.
そして 昨年ここで「ハイワイヤー」を紹介しました
02:31
Hy-Wire is the world's first drivable fuel cell,
「ハイワイヤー」は世界初の燃料電池車です
02:34
and we have followed up that now with Sequel.
その後 「シークエル」を発表しました
02:37
And Sequel truly is a real car.
「シークエル」は正真正銘の車です
02:40
So if we would run the video --
ビデオをご覧ください
02:42
But the real key question I'm sure that's on your mind:
皆さんの心に 疑問が浮かぶでしょう
04:11
where's the hydrogen going to come from?
水素はいったいどこから得るつもりか?
04:13
And secondly, when are these kinds of cars going to be available?
そして次の質問は この種の車が市場に出るのはいつか?
04:15
So let me talk about hydrogen first.
まず水素ですが
04:19
The beauty of hydrogen is it can come from so many different sources:
水素の良いところは 様々な異なる燃料から得られるところです
04:21
it can come from fossil fuels,
化石燃料からでも
04:24
it can come from any way that you can create electricity,
再生可能エネルギーを含む どんな発電手段からでも
04:26
including renewables.
得ることができます
04:29
And it can come from biofuels.
バイオ燃料からも得られます
04:31
And that's quite exciting.
まったく素晴らしいです
04:32
The vision here is
ここでの構想は
04:34
to have each local community
各地元のコミュニティが
04:35
play to its natural strength
それぞれ独自の方法で
04:37
in creating the hydrogen.
水素を作ることです
04:38
A lot of hydrogen's produced today in the world.
今日 世界で多くの水素が生産されています
04:40
It's produced to get sulfur out of gasoline
皮肉にも ガソリンから硫黄を
04:42
-- which I find is somewhat ironic.
取り除く際に生産されています
04:44
It's produced in the fertilizer industry;
水素は肥料産業で生産されます
04:46
it's produced in the chemical manufacturing industry.
化学製造工業で生産されます
04:49
That hydrogen's being made because
水素が作られるのは
04:52
there's a good business reason for its use.
業務上で使い道があるからです
04:54
But it tells us that we know how to create it,
これが意味するのは
04:57
we know how to create it cost effectively,
我々は水素の作り方 効果的生産法
04:58
we know how to handle it safely.
安全な取り扱い方を知っているということ
05:01
We did an analysis
我々は各都市の
05:04
where you would have a station in each city
どこに スタンドを設置するか分析しました
05:05
with each of the 100 largest cities in the United States,
米国の各100大都市で
05:07
and located the stations
半径3km内に
05:10
so you'd be no more than two miles from a station at any time.
スタンドを置くように設定し
05:12
We put one every 25 miles on the freeway,
高速道路では40kmごとに設置すると
05:15
and it turns out that translates into about 12,000 stations.
全部でおよそ12,000のスタンドが必要です
05:17
And at a million dollars each,
それぞれに100万ドルかかると
05:22
that would be about 12 billion dollars.
合計およそ120億ドルです
05:23
Now that's a lot of money.
これは大金です
05:24
But if you built the Alaskan pipeline today,
でも今日 アラスカのパイプラインを建設すれば
05:26
that's half of what the Alaskan pipeline would cost.
この金額はアラスカパイプラインの半分です
05:28
But the real exciting vision that we see truly is home refueling,
でも 我々が本当に実現したいのは家庭での燃料補給です
05:31
much like recharging your laptop or recharging your cellphone.
パソコンや携帯を充電するように
05:36
So we're pretty excited about the future of hydrogen.
ですから 水素の将来性には非常に期待を抱いています
05:39
We think it's a question of not whether, but a question of when.
問題は出来るかどうかではなく 何時やるかです
05:42
What we've targeted for ourselves
自分達が目標としたのは
05:46
-- and we're making great progress for this goal --
(我々はその目的に向って大きく躍進しています)
05:48
is to have a propulsion system
推進システムの開発です
05:50
based on hydrogen and fuel cells,
水素と燃料電池を基盤にして
05:52
designed and validated,
設計も 確証もされ
05:54
that can go head-to-head with the internal combustion engine --
内燃エンジンと互角に張り合え --
05:56
we're talking about obsoleting the internal combustion engine --
(内燃エンジンは廃れさせる方針です)
05:58
and do it in terms of its affordability,
しかも手ごろな値段で
06:01
add skill volumes, its performance and its durability.
技量 パフォーマンス 耐久性を備えた推進システムです
06:04
So that's what we're driving to for 2010.
それが我々が2010年に向けて行っていることです
06:07
We haven't seen anything yet in our development work
開発作業においては それが不可能と言う
06:10
that says that isn't possible.
兆候は まだ何も見当たりません
06:12
We actually think the future's going to be event-driven.
未来はイベント駆動型になると思います
06:14
So since we can't predict the future,
予測できないので
06:17
we want to spend a lot of our time
沢山の時間を費やして
06:19
trying to create that future.
未来を作ろうとしています
06:20
I'm very, very intrigued by the fact that our cars and trucks
私は車やトラックが90%の時間空回りの状態にあるという
06:22
sit idle 90 percent of the time:
事実に大変興味を惹かれます
06:26
they're parked, they're parked all around us.
そこら中に駐車されていて
06:28
They're usually parked within 100 feet of the people that own them.
たいてい利用者の30m以内です
06:30
Now, if you take the power-generating capability of an automobile
もし 自動車の発電機能を
06:34
and you compare that to the electric grid in the United States,
米国の配電網と比べると
06:37
it turns out that four percent of the automobiles, the power in four percent of the automobiles,
自動車の電力の4%が米国の配電網と
06:41
equals that of the electric grid of the US.
等しいことがわかりました
06:45
that's a huge power-generating capability,
これは莫大な発電機能です
06:48
a mobile power-generating capability.
動く発電機能です
06:51
And hydrogen and fuel cells give us that opportunity
そして水素や燃料電池は車やトラックが
06:53
to actually use our cars and trucks when they're parked
駐車されている時間に配電網へと発電するという
06:56
to generate electricity for the grid.
機会を我々にもたらします
06:59
And we talked about swarm networks earlier.
前に集団ネットワークについて語りました
07:01
And talking about the ultimate swarm, about having all of the processors
そして究極の集団性の話においては すべてのプロセッサーや車を
07:03
and all of the cars when they're sitting idle
遊休時にコンピューター機能の
07:06
being part of a global grid for computing capability.
グローバル網の一部とします
07:08
We find that premise quite exciting.
この前提は大変刺激的です
07:12
The automobile becomes, then, an appliance,
そうすると 自動車は 必需品ではなく
07:14
not in a commodity sense,
電気器具となります
07:17
but an appliance, mobile power, mobile platform
輸送形式であるとともに 情報やコンピューター
07:18
for information and computing and communication,
コミュニケーションの機動力 移動プラットフォーム
07:21
as well as a form of transportation.
といった電気器具になります
07:24
And the key to all of this is to make it affordable,
そして 重要なのは 手ごろな値段にすること
07:26
to make it exciting,
刺激的にすること
07:29
to get it on a pathway where there's a way to make money doing it.
利益が出る方法でやること
07:30
And again, this is a pretty big march to take here.
これは非常に大きな進展です
07:33
And a lot of people say,
多くの人は言います
07:36
how do you sleep at night when you're rustling with a problem of that magnitude?
そんなに大きな問題でワサワサ働きまわっているのに良く寝れるか?
07:37
And I tell them I sleep like a baby:
「赤ん坊のように」と答えます
07:40
I wake up crying every two hours.
「2時間ごとに泣いて起きる」とね
07:41
Actually the theme of this conference, I think, has hit on really one of the major keys to pull that off --
今回のTEDのテーマは成功への重大なヒントを与えてくれました
07:45
and that's relationships and working together.
それは人間関係と 共同作業です
07:50
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
07:52
(Applause).
(拍手)
07:53
Chris Anderson: Larry, Larry, wait, wait, wait, wait, Larry, wait, wait one sec.
クリス アンダーソン: ラリー ラリー ちょっと待って
07:57
Just -- I've got so many questions I could ask you.
聞きたいことが沢山あるんだけど
08:02
I just want to ask one.
一つだけ聞くよ
08:05
You know, I could be wrong about this,
僕が間違っているかもしれないけど
08:07
but my sense is that in the public mind, today,
でも 今日の世論は 私の感覚では
08:08
that GM is not viewed as serious about some of these environmental ideas
GMは日本の競争相手や フォードと比べてさえも これらの環境保護の
08:12
as some of your Japanese competitors, maybe even as Ford.
いくつかの理念を重要視していないと思われてるようだけど
08:19
Are you serious about it,
真剣なんですか
08:22
and not just, you know, when the consumers want it,
消費者が望むからとか
08:25
when the regulators force us to do it we will go there?
規則が強要するからだとかじゃなくて?
08:29
Are you guys going to really try and show leadership on this?
この件で本当にリーダーシップを取ろうとしているんですか?
08:32
Larry Burns: Yeah, we're absolutely serious.
はい我々は本気です
08:34
We're into this over a billion dollars already,
我々は すでに10億ドル以上これに費やしました
08:36
so I would hope people would think we're serious
これだけの金額を投資しているのですから
08:39
when we're spending that kind of money.
我々が真剣だと思っていただきたいです
08:41
And secondly, it's a fundamental business proposition.
二番目は 基本的な事業案だからです
08:43
I'll be honest with you:
正直言って
08:47
we're into it because of business growth opportunities.
ビジネス成長の機会があるからです
08:48
We can't grow our business unless we solve these problems.
これらの問題を解決しない限り 事業の拡大は出来ないでしょう
08:49
The growth of the auto industry will be capped by sustainability issues
問題が解決しなければ 自動車産業の成長は
08:53
if we don't solve the problems.
持続的な問題によって妨げられます
08:55
And there's a simple principle of strategy that says:
そして戦略のシンプルな信条は:
08:57
Do unto yourself before others do unto you.
「他人がする前に自分でせよ」
09:00
If we can see this possible future, others can too.
我々がこの将来的な可能性を想像できるということは 他の人にもできます
09:02
And we want to be the first one to create it, Chris.
我々は それ最初に作りたいのです
09:05
Translated by Kayo Mizutani
Reviewed by Takako Sato

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Larry Burns - Automotive researcher
Larry Burns is the vice president of R&D for GM. His job? Find a new way to power cars.

Why you should listen

Larry Burns is on a mission: to reinvent the automobile using nonpolluting hydrogen fuel cells. As the vice president of R&D and strategic planning at GM, he's one of the people who will be called on to lead the US auto industry into its next incarnation.

Burns has been a persistent advocate of hydrogen power and other advanced propulsion and materials technologies for cars. His thinking is, the industry can keep making small energy improvements in the current cars it makes -- or it can take a big leap forward to build a whole new kind of car.

More profile about the speaker
Larry Burns | Speaker | TED.com