27:13
TED2004

David Holt: The joyful tradition of mountain music

デイビッド・ホルト: マウンテンミュージックの楽しい伝統

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ミュージシャンでストーリーテラーのデイビッド・ホルトが、バンジョーを弾きながら写真やアパラチア山脈の古い知恵を披露します。珍しいマウスボウや、彼が“サンダーウェア”と名付けた驚きのドラムマシンのデモンストレーションも。

- Folk musician
Four-time Grammy Award-winning folk musician David Holt is a born troubadour. Behind his energizing musicianship (often featuring unusual instruments like "the paper bag") is a deep love of hidden Appalachian wisdom and storytelling that shines on every stage he takes. Full bio

This is Aunt Zip from Sodom, North Carolina.
これはノースキャロライナ州ソドムの
ジップおばさん
00:19
She was 105 years old when I took this picture.
この時 彼女は105歳だった
00:23
She was always saying things that made me stop and think, like,
彼女の言葉には いつも考えさせられた
例えば ―
00:25
"Time may be a great healer, but it ain't no beauty specialist."
「時は 心を癒やすけど 美容は苦手なんだよ」
00:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:33
She said, "Be good to your friends.
「友達は大切にしろ」 とも言っていた
00:36
Why, without them, you'd be a total stranger."
「友達がいなかったら お前はよそ者だ」とね
00:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:42
This is one of her songs.
これは彼女の歌だ
00:43
Let's see if we can get into the flow here and all do this one together.
乗ってきたら 一緒に歌ってくれ
00:45
And I'm going to have Michael Manring play bass with me.
マイケル・マンリンがベースを弾いてくれる
00:48
Give him a big old hand.
盛大な拍手を
00:50
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:52
One, two, three, four.
1 2 3 4
00:58
(Music)
(音楽)
01:00
Well, my true love's a black-eyed daisy;
ぼくの恋人は黒い瞳のひな菊
01:14
if I don't see her, I go crazy.
会えないと気が狂いそうだ
01:16
My true love lives up the river;
川の上流に住んでいる
01:18
a few more jumps and I'll be with her.
もう少しで彼女に会える
01:20
Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie! Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie!
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
01:22
Hey, hey black-eyed Susie, hey.
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー ねぇ!
01:25
Now you've got to picture Aunt Zip at 105 years old in Sodom, North Carolina.
ソドムのジップおばさんは105歳だ
01:28
I'd go up and learn these old songs from her.
この古い歌も彼女から教わった
01:32
She couldn't sing much, couldn't play anymore.
もう歌もあまり歌えないし
楽器も弾けない
01:35
And I'd pull her out on the front porch.
その彼女を 家のポーチに引っ張り出した
01:37
Down below, there was her grandson plowing the tobacco field with a mule.
遠くでは彼女の孫が
ロバでたばこ畑を耕してた
01:40
A double outhouse over here on the side.
便所小屋も見えた
01:44
And we'd sing this old song. She didn't have a whole lot of energy,
彼女は高齢だから
体力もない
01:47
so I'd sing, "Hey, hey!" and she'd just answer back with, "Black-eyed Susie."
だから僕が“ねぇねぇ”と歌って
彼女が“黒い瞳のスージー”と歌うんだ
01:49
Oh, hey, hey, black-eyed Susie! Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie!
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
01:52
Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie, hey.
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー ねぇ!
01:56
Well, she and I went blackberry picking.
ブラックベリーを摘みに行った
01:59
She got mad; I took a licking.
つまみ食いしたら怒られた
02:01
Ducks on the millpond, geese in the ocean,
池にはアヒル
海にはガチョウ
02:03
Devil in the pretty girl when she takes a notion.
可愛い彼女は ちょっと意地悪
02:05
Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie! Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie!
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
02:07
Hey, hey black-eyed Susie, hey.
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー ねぇ!
02:10
Let's have the banjo.
バンジョーだ
02:13
Well, we'll get married next Thanksgiving.
感謝祭に結婚するんだ
02:29
I'll lay around; she'll make a living.
オレは怠けて 彼女は働く
02:31
She'll cook blackjacks, I'll cook gravy;
ブラックジャックを作る彼女と
グレイビーを作るオレ
02:33
we'll have chicken someday, maybe.
いつかチキンを食べたいな
02:35
Hey, hey, hey, hey. Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie, hey!
ねぇねぇ ねぇねぇ
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー ねぇ!
02:37
One more time now.
もう一度
02:43
Oh, hey, hey, black-eyed Susie! Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie!
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー
02:44
Hey, hey, black-eyed Susie, hey.
ねぇねぇ 黒い瞳のスージー ねぇ!
02:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:00
Thank you, Michael.
ありがとう マイケル
03:03
This is Ralph Stanley.
これはラルフ・スタンリー
03:07
When I was going to college at University of California
僕は カリフォルニア大学の学生だった
03:09
at Santa Barbara in the College of Creative Studies,
サンタバーバラ校で ―
03:12
taking majors in biology and art, he came to the campus.
生物と芸術を専攻していた
03:14
This was in 1968, I guess it was.
確か1968年だった
彼がキャンパスに来たんだ
03:19
And he played his bluegrass style of music,
ブルーグラス・ミュージックを演奏してくれた
03:22
but near the end of the concert, he played the old timing style of banjo picking
でもコンサートの最後に
昔風のバンジョーのピッキングをやったんだ
03:24
that came from Africa, along with the banjo.
バンジョーと一緒にアフリカから来た演奏法だ
03:28
It's called claw-hammer style, that he had learned from his mother and grandmother.
クローハンマーと呼ばれる演奏法で
お母さんと おばあさんから習ったそうだ
03:30
I fell in love with that.
僕は恋に落ちた
03:33
I went up to him and said, how can I learn that?
彼に どこで習えるのか 訊ねた
03:35
He said, well, you can go back to Clinch Mountain, where I'm from,
そしたら
「オレの故郷のクリンチマウンテンか ―
03:37
or Asheville or Mount Airy, North Carolina --
ノースカロライナ州のアッシュビルか
マウント・エアリーだ
03:40
some place that has a lot of music.
音楽の盛んな場所がいい
03:42
Because there's a lot of old people still living that play that old style.
昔と同じ演奏をする年寄りが
大勢いるからね」と言った
03:44
So I went back that very summer.
その年の夏に行ったよ
03:47
I just fell in love with the culture and the people.
そこの文化や人々が大好きになった
03:50
And you know, I came back to school, I finished my degrees
その後 大学へ戻って卒業した
03:53
and told my parents I wanted to be a banjo player.
それから両親に
バンジョー奏者になると告げた
03:57
You can imagine how excited they were.
どれだけ喜んだかは想像がつくね
04:00
So I thought I would just like to show you some of the pictures
写真を見てもらいたい
04:03
I've taken of some of my mentors.
僕の師匠たちだ
04:06
Just a few of them, but maybe you'll get just a little hint of some of these folks.
ほんの少しだけど
どんな人たちかが分かると思う
04:08
And play a little banjo. Let's do a little medley.
バンジョーも弾こう
メドレーで演奏するよ
04:13
(Music)
(音楽)
04:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:53
Those last few pictures were of Ray Hicks, who just passed away last year.
最後の数枚は
昨年 他界したレイ・ヒックスだ
06:01
He was one of the great American folk tale-tellers.
アメリカを代表する
民話の伝承者だった
06:04
The Old Jack tales that he had learned -- he talked like this,
彼はこういう話し方だから
聞き取りにくい
06:08
you could hardly understand him. But it was really wonderful.
でも彼の昔話は素晴らしかった
06:11
And he lived in that house that his great-grandfather had built.
彼はこの家に住んでいた
ひいお爺さんが建てた家だ
06:14
No running water, no electricity. A wonderful, wonderful guy.
水道も電気もない 家だ
本当に素晴らしい人だった
06:18
And you can look at more pictures.
もっと写真が見たかったら
06:22
I've actually got a website that's got a bunch of photos that I've done
僕のウェブサイトを見てくれ
06:24
of some of the other folks I didn't get a chance to show you.
紹介できなかった人たちの
写真がたくさんある
06:27
This instrument came up in those pictures. It's called the mouth bow.
この楽器の写真もあるよ
これはマウスボウだ
06:30
It is definitely the first stringed instrument ever in the world,
世界初の弦楽器だと思う
06:33
and still played in the Southern mountains.
南部の山地ではまだ演奏されている
06:36
Now, the old timers didn't take a fancy guitar string and make anything like this.
昔の人はギターの弦なんて使わなかった
06:40
They would just take a stick and a catgut and string it up.
棒に猫の腸を張ったんだ
06:45
It was hard on the cats, but it made a great little instrument.
猫にとってはいい迷惑だけど
素晴らしい楽器ができた
06:50
It sounds something like this.
こういう音色だ
06:53
(Music)
(音楽)
06:55
Well, have you heard the many stories told by young and old with joy
みんなが楽しそうに話してるのを聞いたかい?
07:08
about the many deeds of daring that were done by the Johnson boys?
ジョンソン兄弟の武勇伝
07:12
You take Kate, I'll take Sal; we'll both have a Johnson gal.
お前はケイト 俺はサル
ジョンソン姉妹を手に入れよう
07:16
You take Kate, I'll take Sal; we'll both have a Johnson gal.
お前はケイト 俺はサル
ジョンソン姉妹を手に入れよう
07:20
Now, they were scouts in the rebels' army,
反乱軍の兵隊で
07:38
they were known both far and wide.
ふたり一緒に名を上げた
07:40
When the Yankees saw them coming, they'd lay down their guns and hide.
北軍兵士は彼らを見ると
拳銃下ろして隠れたとさ
07:42
You take Kate, I'll take Sal; we'll both have a Johnson gal.
お前はケイト 俺はサル
ジョンソン姉妹を手に入れよう
07:45
You take Kate, I'll take Sal; we'll both have a Johnson gal.
お前はケイト 俺はサル
ジョンソン姉妹を手に入れよう
07:49
Ain't that a sound?
いい音色だろ?
07:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:59
Well, it was 1954, I guess it was.
1954年だったと思う
08:08
We were driving in the car outside of Gatesville, Texas,
テキサス州ゲイツビルの郊外を
車で走っていた
08:12
where I grew up in the early part of my life.
幼少期を過ごした場所なんだ
08:15
Outside of Gatesville we were coming back from the grocery store.
買い物の帰り道だった
08:18
My mom was driving; my brother and I were in the back seat.
母親が運転して
僕と兄貴は後部座席に座ってた
08:20
We were really mad at my mom. We looked out the window.
僕らは 母親に腹を立てていた 
窓の外には
08:23
We were surrounded by thousands of acres of cotton fields.
何千エーカーも続く綿花畑が広がっていた
08:26
You see, we'd just been to the grocery store,
食料品店からの帰り道で
08:29
and my mom refused to buy us the jar of Ovaltine
オバルチンを買ってもらえなくて
怒っていたんだ
08:31
that had the coupon for the Captain Midnight decoder ring in it.
キャプテンミッドナイトのオマケが欲しかっんだよ
08:35
And, buddy, that made us mad.
それで 僕らはひどく怒ってたんだ
08:39
Well, my mom didn't put up with much either, and she was driving, and she said,
うちの母親も頑固でね
運転しながらこう言った
08:41
"You boys! You think you can have anything you want.
あんたたち!
いい加減にしなさいよ!
08:44
You don't know how hard it is to earn money. Your dad works so hard.
稼ぐのがどれだけ大変か分かってるの?
パパは一生懸命働いているのよ
08:47
You think money grows on trees. You've never worked a day in your lives.
働いたこともないくせに
何でも手に入ると思って
08:50
You boys make me so mad. You're going to get a job this summer."
全く腹が立つ
夏休みには 働いてもらうからね」
08:52
She pulled the car over; she said, "Get out of the car."
彼女は いきなり車を止めると
「降りなさい!」と言った
08:55
My brother and I stepped out of the car.
兄貴と僕は車を降りた
08:59
We were standing on the edge of thousands of acres of cotton.
目の前には何千エーカーもの
綿花畑が広がっていた
09:01
There were about a hundred black folks out there picking.
100人位の黒人たちが綿花を摘んでいた
09:04
My mom grabbed us by the shoulders. She marched us out in the field.
母親はぼくらの肩をつかんで
畑の中に入って行った
09:06
She went up to the foreman; she said,
作業長の所へ行くと
彼女はこう言った
09:09
"I've got these two little boys never worked a day in their lives."
「この子たちは働いたことがないのよ」
09:11
Of course, we were just eight and 10.
そりゃそうだ
8歳と10歳だから
09:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:16
She said, "Would you put them to work?"
彼女は言った
「働かせてくれる?」
09:17
Well, that must have seemed like a funny idea to that foreman:
作業長も驚いただろうね
09:19
put these two middle-class little white boys out in a cotton field
中流階級の白人の子供が
綿花畑で働くんだ
09:22
in August in Texas -- it's hot.
8月のテキサスは暑いしね
09:25
So he gave us each a cotton sack,
彼はぼくらに 袋を手渡した
09:27
about 10 feet long, about that big around, and we started picking.
3メートルはある
こんな大きな袋だ
09:29
Now, cotton is soft but the outside of the plant is just full of stickers.
綿花は柔らかいけれど
外側の殻はトゲだらけだ
09:32
And if you don't know what you're doing,
摘み方を知らないと
09:36
your hands are bleeding in no time.
あっという間に 血だらけだ
09:38
And my brother and I started to pick it,
僕と兄貴は 摘み始めた
09:40
and our hands were startin' to bleed, and then -- "Mom!"
手から血が出て
「ママ!」って
09:42
And Mom was just sitting by the car like this.
でも 彼女は車のそばに
こうして座っていた
09:45
She wasn't going to give up.
動じなかったね
09:47
Well, the foreman could see he was in over his head, I guess.
作業長も 仕方がないと思ったんだろう
09:50
He kind of just snuck up behind us and he sang out in a low voice.
そっと僕らの背後に近づいて
低い声で歌い出した
09:54
He just sang: "Well, there's a long white robe in heaven, I know.
天国には長くて白いローブがある
09:58
Don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
10:06
Well, there's a long white robe in heaven, I know.
天国には長くて白いローブがある
10:09
Don't want it to leave me behind."
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
10:13
And from all around as people started singing and answering back, he sang:
すると 周りの人々も
それに合わせて歌い出した
10:16
"Good news, good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 福音だ 馬車が来る
10:20
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
10:24
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
10:27
And I don't want it to leave me behind."
置いてきぼりには されたくない
10:31
Now, my brother and I had never heard anything like that
あんな歌を聴いたのは初めてだった
10:35
in our whole lives. It was so beautiful.
本当に素晴らしかった
10:37
We sat there all day picking cotton, without complaining,
僕らは綿花を摘み続けた
文句も言わずにね
10:40
without crying, while they sang things like:
泣きもしなかった
彼らはこんな歌も歌った
10:43
"Oh, Mary, don't you weep, don't you moan" and "Wade in the water,"
“Oh, Mary, don't you weep, don't you moan”や
“Wade in the water” ―
10:45
and "I done done," "This little light of mine."
“I done done”や
“This little light of mine”といった歌だ
10:49
Finally, by the end of the day,
僕らは最後まで働いた
10:52
we'd each picked about a quarter of a bag of cotton.
袋の1/4しか摘めなかったけどね
10:54
But the foreman was kind enough to give us each a check for a dollar,
でも作業長は1ドル分の小切手をくれた
10:58
but my mother would never let us cash it.
換金はさせてもらえなかったよ
11:02
I'm 57; still have the check.
57歳だけど
まだ小切手を持っている
11:04
Now, my mother hoped that we learned from that the value of hard work.
うちの母親は
労働の価値を教えようとした
11:07
But if you have children, you know it doesn't often work that way.
でも 子供のいる人なら分かるだろう
そんなに上手くいくもんじゃない
11:12
No, we learned something else.
でも 子供のいる人なら分かるだろう
そんなに上手くいくもんじゃない
11:15
The first thing I learned that day
あの日 僕が強く感じたのは
11:17
was that I never ever wanted to work that hard again.
あんな大変は仕事は
二度とやりたくないということだ
11:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:22
And pretty much never did.
そして その通りになった
11:24
But I also learned that some people in this world
でも 世の中には 毎日 ああして
一生懸命 働いている人がいることを知った
11:30
do have to work that hard every day, and that was an eye-opener.
でも 世の中には 毎日 ああして
一生懸命 働いている人がいることを知った
11:32
And I also learned that a great song can make hard work go a little easier.
そして 素晴らしい歌は
つらい仕事を楽にしてくれることも知った
11:36
And it also can bring the group together in a way that nothing else can.
人々の心を繋げてくれるのも歌の力だ
11:41
Now, I was just a little eight-year-old boy that day
僕はまだ8歳だった
11:47
when my mama put me out of the car in that hot Texas cotton field.
テキサスの綿花畑で車を降ろされた
あの暑い夏の日
11:49
I wasn't even aware of music -- not even aware of it.
音楽なんて
気にしたこともなかった
11:52
But that day in the cotton field out there picking,
でも綿花畑で働いた
あの日
11:56
when those people started singing,
彼らの歌を聴いて
11:58
I realized I was in the very heart of real music,
本物の音楽の
ど真ん中にいると感じた
12:00
and that's where I've wanted to be ever since.
そこに ずっといたいと思った
12:04
Try this old song with me. I sing:
この古い歌を一緒に歌ってくれ
12:07
Well, there's a long white robe in heaven, I know.
天国には長くて白くてローブがある
と僕が歌ったら
12:09
You sing: Don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにされたくない
と歌って
12:13
Well, there's a long white robe in heaven, I know.
天国には長くて白くてローブがある
12:16
Don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
12:20
Good news, good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 福音だ 馬車が来る
12:23
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
12:27
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
12:30
And I don't want it to leave me --
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
12:33
It's been a while since you guys have been picking your last bale of cotton, isn't it?
しばらく綿花摘みは していないようだね!
12:35
Let's try it one more time.
もう一度やろう
12:40
There's a starry crown in heaven, I know.
天国には星の王冠がある
12:42
Don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
12:46
There's a starry crown in heaven, I know.
天国には星の王冠がある
12:49
Don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
12:53
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
12:56
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
13:00
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
13:03
And I don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
13:07
It was a few years ago, but I sort of remembered this story,
数年前に この時のことを思い出して
13:10
and I told it at a concert.
コンサートで話をした
13:13
My mom was in the audience.
うちの母親も客席にいた
13:15
After the -- she was glad to have a story about herself, of course,
自分の話が出たので
喜んだ
13:17
but after the concert she came up and she said,
でも コンサートの後で
こう言ったんだ
13:19
"David, I've got to tell you something.
「デイビッド 言わなきゃいけないことがあるの
13:21
I set that whole thing up.
あれは 計画的だったの
13:24
I set it up with the foreman. I set it up with the owner of the land.
作業長と地主に頼んだのよ
13:26
I just wanted you boys to learn the value of hard work.
労働の価値を知って欲しかったの
13:30
I didn't know it was going to make you fall in love with music though."
あんたが音楽に惚れ込んだのは
予定外だったけれど」
13:32
Let's try. Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
13:36
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
13:40
Good news: Chariot's coming.
福音だ 馬車が来る
13:43
And I don't want it to leave me behind.
置いてきぼりにはされたくない
13:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:54
Well, this is the steel guitar. It's an American-made instrument.
これはスティールギターだ
アメリカで作られた楽器だ
14:02
It was originally made by the Dopyera Brothers,
ドピエラ兄弟が考案したんだ
14:06
who later on made the Dobro, which is a wood-bodied instrument
彼らはその後
木製ボディのドブロを作った
14:09
with a metal cone for -- where the sound comes from.
金属の共鳴板を使ったギターだ
14:12
It's usually played flat on your lap.
膝に置いて弾くんだ
14:17
It was made to play Hawaiian music back in the 1920s,
1920年代に ハワイアンの演奏用に作られた
14:19
before they had electric guitars, trying to make a loud guitar.
音を大きくしようとしたんだ
エレキのない時代だからね
14:21
And then African-American folks figured out you could take a broken bottle neck,
その後 アフリカ系の人たちが
ボトルの首を使うことを考えた
14:24
just like that -- a nice Merlot works very well.
こういうのだ
高いワインのがいいね
14:28
That wine we had yesterday would have been perfect.
昨日飲んだワインのなら
完璧だった
14:32
Break it off, put it on your finger, and slide into the notes.
指にはめて
スライドさせて弾くんだ
14:35
This instrument pretty much saved my life.
この楽器に命を救われたんだ
14:42
Fifteen years ago, 14 years ago, I guess, this year,
たしか14年前になるが
14:46
my wife and I lost our daughter, Sarah Jane, in a car accident,
娘のサラ・ジェーンを交通事故で失った
14:50
and it was the most -- it almost took me out -- it almost took me out of this world.
僕は 後を追うことを考えた
この世から消えてしまいたかった
14:54
And I think I learned a lot about what happiness was
その時 幸せについて学んだよ
15:00
by going through such unbelievable grief,
ひどい悲しみが教えてくれたんだ
15:03
just standing on the edge of that abyss and just wanting to jump in.
僕はどん底の縁に立っていて
ただ飛び込みたいと思っていた
15:06
I had to make lists of reasons to stay alive.
だから 一生懸命 生きる理由を
考えて書き出したんだ
15:09
I had to sit down and make lists, because I was ready to go;
腰を据えて取り組まなきゃならなかった
15:14
I was ready to check out of this world.
この世とは
おさらばするつもりだったからね
15:16
And you know, at the top of the list, of course,
もちろん 最初に書いたのは
15:19
were Jenny, and my son, Zeb, my parents -- I didn't want to hurt them.
ジェニー、息子のゼブ、両親だ
傷つけたくなかった
15:21
But then, when I thought about it beyond that,
それ以外のことも考えた
15:25
it was very simple things.
単純なことだよ
15:27
I didn't care about -- I had a radio show,
自分のラジオ番組とか
15:29
I have a radio show on public radio, "Riverwalk,"
『リバーウォーク』という番組をやっているんだ
15:32
I didn't care about that. I didn't care about awards or money or anything.
でも それも どうでも良かったし
名誉もお金も いらなかった
15:34
Nothing. Nothing.
何もいらなかった
15:38
On the list it would be stuff like,
こんな事も 書いた
15:40
seeing the daffodils bloom in the spring, the smell of new-mown hay,
春に咲くスイセンの花
刈りたての藁の香り
15:43
catching a wave and bodysurfing, the touch of a baby's hand,
ボディサーフィンで波に乗ること
赤ちゃんの手の感触
15:49
the sound of Doc Watson playing the guitar,
ドク・ワトソンのギターの音色
15:55
listening to old records of Muddy Waters and Uncle Dave Macon.
マディ・ウォーターズや
アンクル・デイブ・メイコンの古いレコード
15:58
And for me, the sound of a steel guitar,
そして スティールギターの音色
16:02
because one of my parents' neighbors just gave me one of these things.
スティールギターをもらったばかりだった
16:05
And I would sit around with it, and I didn't know how to play it,
弾き方は知らなかった
16:09
but I would just play stuff as sad as I could play.
ただ思い切り悲しい音色を奏でていた
16:11
And it was the only instrument that, of all the ones that I play,
いろんな楽器を演奏してきたけれど
16:17
that would really make that connection.
心を通わせることができたのは
この楽器だけだった
16:19
This is a song that came out of that.
その経験から生まれた歌だ
16:23
(Music)
(音楽)
16:26
Well, I hear you're having trouble.
困っているんだって?
16:58
Lord, I hate to hear that news.
大変だな
17:01
If you want to talk about it, you know, I will listen to you through.
話がしたければ 聞いてやるよ
17:04
Words no longer say it; let me tell you what I always do.
でも オレはいつも こうするんだ
17:10
I just break off another bottleneck and play these steel guitar blues.
ボトルの首をへし折って
スティールギターを奏でるのさ
17:19
People say, "Oh, snap out of it!"
忘れてしまえって言う奴もいる
17:28
Oh yeah, that's easier said than done.
言うのは簡単だよな
17:31
While you can hardly move, they're running around having all kinds of fun.
体が動かなくなるような悲しみを
奴らは知らないんだ
17:34
Sometimes I think it's better just to sink way down in your funky mood
悲しみの底に沈んでいる方が
いいこともある
17:40
'til you can rise up humming these steel guitar blues.
でも スティールギターブルースを
口ずさんでごらん
17:48
Now, you can try to keep it all inside
自分の中に溜め込むこともできる
17:58
with drink and drugs and cigarettes,
酒とドラッグと煙草で
18:01
but you know that's not going to get you where you want to get.
でも なりたい自分にはなれないよ
18:04
But I got some medicine here that just might shake things loose.
スティールギターのブルースは効くんだ
18:09
Call me in the morning after a dose of these steel guitar blues.
これを聴いたら
また明日の朝に電話をくれ
18:19
Open up now.
心を開くんだよ
18:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:00
Oh, I think I've got time to tell you about this. My dad was an inventor.
まだ時間はあるな
発明家の親父の話をしよう
19:13
We moved to California when Sputnik went up, in 1957.
スプートニク打ち上げの1957年に
カリフォルニアに引っ越した
19:16
And he was working on gyroscopes;
親父はジャイロスコープを研究していた
19:20
he has a number of patents for that kind of thing.
そういう特許を
いくつか持っている人だった
19:22
And we moved across the street from Michael and John Whitney.
筋向かいの家には
マイケルとジョンが住んでいた
19:25
They were about my age.
僕と同じ年頃の兄弟だ
19:28
John went on, and Michael did too,
その後 ジョンとマイケルは
19:30
to become some of the inventors of computer animation.
コンピューターアニメーションの
開発に関わった
19:32
Michael's dad was working on something called the computer.
マイケルの親父は
コンピューターの研究をしていた
19:35
This was 1957, I was a little 10-year-old kid;
1957年のことだ
僕はまだ10歳の子供だ
19:37
I didn't know what that was. But he took me down to see one,
何のことか分からなかったが
見せてもらったことがある
19:40
you know, what they were making. It was like a library,
図書館みたいな場所に
19:43
just full of vacuum tubes as far as you could see,
見渡すかぎり真空管が並んでいた
19:45
just floors and floors of these things,
そういうフロアが
何階もあるんだ
19:48
and one of the engineers said,
エンジニアのひとりが言った
19:50
some day you're going to be able to put this thing in your pocket.
将来 これがポケットに入るようになるんだ
19:52
I thought, damn, those are going to be some big pants!
でっかいズボンを
履くようになるんだと思ったよ!
19:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:59
So that Christmas -- maybe I've got time for this --
まだ時間はあるな
その年のクリスマスの話をしよう
20:01
that Christmas I got the Mister Wizard Fun-o-Rama chemistry set.
その年のクリスマスプレゼントは
化学の実験セットだった
20:07
Well, I wanted to be an inventor just like my dad; so did Michael.
僕は親父のような発明家になりたかった
マイケルもだ
20:11
His great-granddad had been Eli Whitney,
彼のひいお爺さんは
イーライ・ホイットニーだからね
20:14
the inventor of the cotton gin.
綿繰り機を発明した人だ
20:16
So we looked in that --
それは 市販の実験セットなのに
20:18
this was a commercial chemistry set.
それは 市販の実験セットなのに
20:20
It had three chemicals we were really surprised to see:
すごい化学物質が3種類入っていた
20:22
sulfur, potassium nitrate and charcoal.
硫黄 硝酸カリウム 木炭
20:24
Man, we were only 10, but we knew that made gunpowder.
まだ10歳だったけど
それで火薬が作れることは知っていた
20:27
We made up a little batch and we put it on the driveway
少量の火薬を作って
家の前の道に置いた
20:30
and we threw a match and phew, it flared up. Ah, it was great.
マッチで火を点けると
燃え上がって 最高だった
20:33
Well, obviously the next thing to do was build a cannon.
もちろん 次は大砲を作った
20:36
So we went over into Michael's garage --
マイケルの家のガレージには
20:41
his dad had all kinds of stuff, and we put a pipe in the vice there,
ありとあらゆるものが揃ってた
20:43
and screwed a cap on the end of the pipe,
僕らはパイプに蓋を付けて
20:46
drilled a hole in the back of the pipe, took some of our firecrackers,
パイプにドリルで穴を開けた
20:48
pulled out the fuses, tied them together, put them in the back there,
花火の導火線を引き抜いて
結び合わせて 穴に差し込み
20:51
and -- down in that hole -- and then stuffed some of our gunpowder
パイプに火薬を詰めて
20:55
down that pipe and put three ball bearings on the top, in the garage.
鉄の玉を3個入れた
ガレージの中でだよ
20:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:03
We weren't stupid: we put up a sheet of plywood about five feet in front of it.
ばかじゃなかったよ
ベニア板を1.5メートル前に置いたんだから
21:04
We stood back, we lit that thing,
僕らは離れて火を点けた
21:09
and they flew out of there -- they went through that plywood like it was paper.
飛び出した玉は
紙みたいにベニアを突き破り
21:11
Through the garage.
ガレージを横切って
21:15
Two of them landed in the side door of his new Citroen.
新しいシトロエンのドアに命中した
21:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:21
We tore everything down and buried it in his backyard.
僕らはすぐに片付けて
裏庭に埋めた
21:24
That was Pacific Palisades; it probably is still there, back there.
太平洋側のパリセーズでのことだ
まだ そこに埋まっているはずだよ
21:28
Well, my brother heard that we had made gunpowder.
兄貴が 火薬のことを聞きつけた
21:32
He and his buddies, they were older, and they were pretty mean.
兄貴と彼の友達は
みんな年上の悪ガキだった
21:35
They said they were going to beat us up
火薬を作らなかったら
21:38
if we didn't make some gunpowder for them.
お前らを叩きのめすと言ったんだ
21:40
We said, well, what are you going to do with it?
僕らは 何に使うのか訊ねた
21:42
They said, we're going to melt it down and make rocket fuel.
溶かしてロケット燃料にすると言った
21:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:48
Sure. We'll make you a big batch.
たくさん作ってあげるよ!
21:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:53
So we made them a big batch, and it was in my --
それでたくさん火薬を作ってやった
21:56
now, we'd just moved here. We'd just moved to California.
カリフォルニアに引っ越したばかりの頃だ
21:58
Mom had redone the kitchen; Mom was gone that day. We had a pie tin.
キッチンはリフォームしたばかり
母親は留守だった
22:00
It became Chris Berquist's job to do the melting down.
火薬を溶かすのは
クリス・バークイストの役割だった
22:04
Michael and I were standing way at the side of the kitchen.
マイケルと僕はキッチンの隅に立っていた
22:08
He said, "Yeah, hey, it's melting. Yeah, the sulfur's melting.
「溶けてる溶けてる 硫黄が溶けてる 大丈夫だ」
22:11
No problem. Yeah, you know."
と クリスが言った瞬間だ
22:14
It just flared up, and he turned around, and he looked like this.
炎が立ち上り
振り返った彼はこうなってた
22:16
No hair, no eyelashes, no nothing.
髪もまつげも燃えていた
22:19
There were big welts all over my mom's kitchen cabinet;
キッチンのキャビネットはボロボロ
22:23
the air was the just full of black smoke.
真っ黒な煙が立ちこめていた
22:26
She came home, she took that chemistry set away, and we never saw it again.
家に戻った母親に実験道具を取り上げられ
2度と見ることはなかった
22:28
But we thought of it often, because every time she'd cook tuna surprise
でも頻繁にそのことを思い出した
母親がグラタンを作るたびに
22:34
it made -- tasted faintly of gunpowder.
ほんのり火薬の味がしたんだ
22:37
So I like to invent things too,
僕は発明好きなんだ
22:41
and I think I'll close out my set with something I invented a good while back.
かなり前に発明したものを
紹介しよう
22:43
When drum machines were new, I got to thinking,
ドラムマシンが出たばかりの頃に
考えたんだ
22:48
why couldn't you take the oldest form of music, the hambone rhythms,
どうやったら古いハムボーンのリズムを ー
22:50
and combine it with the newest technology?
最新の技術で表現できるのか
22:54
I call this Thunderwear.
これはサンダーウェアだ
22:56
At that time, drum triggers were new.
当時はまだドラムトリガーが珍しかった
23:00
And so I put them all together and sewed 12 of them in this suit.
だから このスーツに12個のトリガーを
縫い付けてみた
23:06
I showed you some of the hambone rhythms yesterday;
昨日 ハムボーンのリズムは紹介したね
23:16
I'm going to be doing some of the same ones.
それをやってみるよ
23:18
I have a trigger here, trigger here, here, here. Right there.
いろんな場所にトリガーがついている
23:20
It's going to really hurt if I don't take that off. Okay.
これは外しておかないと
痛いからね
23:32
Now, the drum triggers go out my tail here, into the drum machine,
ドラムトリガーは この尻尾で
ドラムマシンに繋がっている
23:36
and they can make various sounds, like drums.
ドラムみたいに いろんな音がでるんだ
23:43
So let me put them all together. And also, I can change the sounds
それを組み合わせて演奏する
音も変えられるよ
23:47
by stepping on this pedal right here, and --
このペダルを踏むんだ
23:50
let me just close out here by doing you a little
最後に ―
23:55
hambone solo or something like this.
ハムボーンをやって終わりたい
23:58
Thank you, folks.
みんな ありがとう
25:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
25:03
Translated by Mieko Akai
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

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About the Speaker:

David Holt - Folk musician
Four-time Grammy Award-winning folk musician David Holt is a born troubadour. Behind his energizing musicianship (often featuring unusual instruments like "the paper bag") is a deep love of hidden Appalachian wisdom and storytelling that shines on every stage he takes.

Why you should listen

As a youngster, David Holt knew he wanted to master the banjo. His quest to that end brought him into the tucked-away communities of the remote Appalachian Mountains, where traditional folk music is still ingrained in the way of life. In his years there, he met some too-enchanting-to-be-true characters and a few local living legends (Wade Mainer, Dellie Norton) -- complete with anecdotes from older and harder times. He also picked up some unusual musical skills beyond the banjo: he's now a virtuoso of the mouth bow, the bottleneck slide guitar and the paper bag.

Holt has won four Grammys and has starred in several radio and television programs, such as Folkways, which visits regional craftsmen and musicians. (He also performed in the 2000 film, O Brother, Where Art Thou?.) He currently tours the country doing solo performances, and accompanied by his band The Lightning Bolts.

More profile about the speaker
David Holt | Speaker | TED.com