34:10
TEDGlobal 2005

Dan Gilbert: Why we make bad decisions

ダン・ギルバート 私達の誤った予測

Filmed:

ダン・ギルバートがあなたにも挑戦できるいくつかの驚くべきテストと実験を示しながら、幸福の追求とそのデータを発表します。TEDでおなじみの顔が火花を散らす、最後のQ&Aのコーナーをお見逃しなく。

- Psychologist; happiness expert
Harvard psychologist Dan Gilbert says our beliefs about what will make us happy are often wrong -- a premise he supports with intriguing research, and explains in his accessible and unexpectedly funny book, Stumbling on Happiness. Full bio

We all make decisions every day; we want to know
私達は毎日決断をしています
00:18
what the right thing is to do -- in domains from the financial
何が正しい行動なのか―経済的なことから
00:20
to the gastronomic to the professional to the romantic.
食事 職業 恋愛においてまで
00:23
And surely, if somebody could really tell us how to do
確かに もし本当に正しい行動を
00:27
exactly the right thing at all possible times,
いつも教えてくれる人がいたなら
00:30
that would be a tremendous gift.
それは素晴らしい贈り物だと思います
00:33
It turns out that, in fact, the world was given this gift in 1738
実際オランダの博識家 ダニエル・ベルヌーイによって
00:36
by a Dutch polymath named Daniel Bernoulli.
1738年に世界はこの贈り物を授かりました
00:41
And what I want to talk to you about today is what that gift is,
今日私はこの贈り物とは何かについて
00:44
and I also want to explain to you why it is
またなぜこのせっかくの贈り物が 全く役に
00:47
that it hasn't made a damn bit of difference.
立っていないかについて説明したいと思います
00:50
Now, this is Bernoulli's gift. This is a direct quote.
さて これがベルヌーイの贈り物です これは原文の引用です
00:53
And if it looks like Greek to you, it's because, well, it's Greek.
ギリシャ語に見える?そう ギリシャ語です
00:58
But the simple English translation -- much less precise,
簡単な英訳―正確ではありませんが
01:02
but it captures the gist of what Bernoulli had to say -- was this:
ベルヌーイが言いたかった要点を捉えている英訳はこうです
01:06
The expected value of any of our actions --
私達の行動の期待値
01:10
that is, the goodness that we can count on getting --
―私達が手に入れられると期待できる利点―は
01:12
is the product of two simple things:
2つの単純なものから成ります
01:16
the odds that this action will allow us to gain something,
私達があるものを得られる確率と
01:18
and the value of that gain to us.
それが私達にもたらす価値です
01:22
In a sense, what Bernoulli was saying is,
ベルヌーイが言っていた事はある意味で
01:25
if we can estimate and multiply these two things,
この2つを計測して 掛け合わせれば
01:27
we will always know precisely how we should behave.
私達はいつでも正確に どのように振る舞うべきかわかるということです
01:30
Now, this simple equation, even for those of you
さて この単純な方程式は
01:33
who don't like equations, is something that you're quite used to.
方程式を好きでない人にとってさえ 見慣れたものです
01:36
Here's an example: if I were to tell you, let's play
ここに例があります
01:39
a little coin toss game, and I'm going to flip a coin,
例えば コイン投げゲームをして
01:42
and if it comes up heads, I'm going to pay you 10 dollars,
表が出たら10ドルもらえます
01:45
but you have to pay four dollars for the privilege of playing with me,
でもこのゲームに参加するには4ドル払わなければなりません
01:48
most of you would say, sure, I'll take that bet. Because you know
ほとんどの方は この賭けにのるでしょう
01:52
that the odds of you winning are one half, the gain if you do is 10 dollars,
なぜならあなたが勝つ確率は2分の1で 買った場合のもうけは10ドルで
01:55
that multiplies to five, and that's more
それらを掛けると5ドルで ゲームに参加するための金額よりも
02:00
than I'm charging you to play. So, the answer is, yes.
高くなります ですから答えはイエスです
02:02
This is what statisticians technically call a damn fine bet.
これは統計家が言うところの ものすごくいい賭けです
02:06
Now, the idea is simple when we're applying it to coin tosses,
さて コイン投げに当てはめればこの考えは単純ですが
02:10
but in fact, it's not very simple in everyday life.
日常生活ではそう簡単にはいきません
02:13
People are horrible at estimating both of these things,
人々はこれらの事を予測することがひどく下手なのです
02:17
and that's what I want to talk to you about today.
今日私は このことについてお話をしようと思います
02:21
There are two kinds of errors people make when trying to decide
正しい行動を決断しようとする際
02:23
what the right thing is to do, and those are
人々が犯す間違いが2種類あります
02:26
errors in estimating the odds that they're going to succeed,
ひとつは成功する確率を見積もる際の間違いで
02:28
and errors in estimating the value of their own success.
もう一つは 成功の価値を見積もる際の間違いです
02:31
Now, let me talk about the first one first.
では まず初めの間違いから話しましょう
02:35
Calculating odds would seem to be something rather easy:
確率の計算は簡単だと思われるかもしれません
02:39
there are six sides to a die, two sides to a coin, 52 cards in a deck.
サイコロには6面あり コインには2面 トランプには52枚のカードがあります
02:41
You all know what the likelihood is of pulling the ace of spades
スペードのエースを引いたり コインの表を出す見込みがどれくらいか
02:45
or of flipping a heads.
私達は知っています
02:49
But as it turns out, this is not a very easy idea to apply
でも日常生活に当てはめるとなると 話はそう簡単ではありません
02:50
in everyday life. That's why Americans spend more --
これがアメリカ人が他の娯楽を全部合わせたものより
02:55
I should say, lose more -- gambling
ギャンブルにお金を使う―いいえ
02:58
than on all other forms of entertainment combined.
ギャンブルでお金を失う理由です
03:01
The reason is, this isn't how people do odds.
人々は正確な確率を利用しないのです
03:06
The way people figure odds
人々が確率を出す方法を知るために
03:09
requires that we first talk a bit about pigs.
まず豚の話から始めようと思います
03:10
Now, the question I'm going to put to you is whether you think
とある日のオックスフォード
03:13
there are more dogs or pigs on leashes
リードに繋がれた犬と豚
03:15
observed in any particular day in Oxford.
どちらが多く見られると思いますか?
03:18
And of course, you all know that the answer is dogs.
もちろん みなさん答えが犬だとご存じですね
03:21
And the way that you know that the answer is dogs is
答えが犬だとわかるのは
03:23
you quickly reviewed in memory the times
犬や豚がリードにつながれた場面を
03:26
you've seen dogs and pigs on leashes.
素早く思い出すからです
03:28
It was very easy to remember seeing dogs,
犬を思い出すのは簡単ですが
03:30
not so easy to remember pigs. And each one of you assumed
豚はそんなに簡単ではありません
03:33
that if dogs on leashes came more quickly to your mind,
そして もしリードに繋がれた犬がより早く思い浮かぶのなら
03:36
then dogs on leashes are more probable.
犬の方が多くいそうだ ということです
03:40
That's not a bad rule of thumb, except when it is.
この経験則は悪くありません ある場合を除いては
03:42
So, for example, here's a word puzzle.
例えば ここに単語パズルがあります
03:47
Are there more four-letter English words
4文字の単語で Rが3番目に来るものと―
03:49
with R in the third place or R in the first place?
最初に来るものとでは どちらが多いでしょう?
03:51
Well, you check memory very briefly, make a quick scan,
素早く記憶を思い起こしチェックして
03:55
and it's awfully easy to say to yourself, Ring, Rang, Rung,
とても簡単にRING,RANG,RUNGなどは言うことができますが
03:58
and very hard to say to yourself, Pare, Park: they come more slowly.
PARE,PARKなどは難しく なかなか思い出せません
04:01
But in fact, there are many more words in the English language
しかし実際は1番目より3番目にRが来る
04:08
with R in the third than the first place.
英単語の方が多いのです
04:10
The reason words with R in the third place come slowly to your mind
Rが3番目に来る単語がなかなか思い浮かばない理由は
04:13
isn't because they're improbable, unlikely or infrequent.
そういう単語をあまり使わない とか単語自体が少ないからではありません
04:17
It's because the mind recalls words by their first letter.
単語を思い出すのは頭文字から だからです
04:20
You kind of shout out the sound, S -- and the word comes.
Sの音を出してから単語が出てくるというように
04:24
It's like the dictionary;
辞書と同じで
04:27
it's hard to look things up by the third letter.
3番目の文字から調べるのは難しいのです
04:28
So, this is an example of how this idea that
これは物事が心に浮かぶのが速ければ速いほど
04:31
the quickness with which things come to mind
その出来事が起こりやすいという考え方を
04:33
can give you a sense of their probability --
あなたに植え付け 混乱させる例の一つです
04:35
how this idea could lead you astray. It's not just puzzles, though.
これはゲームだけの話ではありません
04:37
For example, when Americans are asked to estimate the odds
例えば アメリカ人がさまざまな変わった要因で
04:41
that they will die in a variety of interesting ways --
死んでしまう確率を尋ねられたら
04:44
these are estimates of number of deaths per year
―こちらはアメリカの国民2億人の
04:47
per 200 million U.S. citizens.
年ごとの死亡数の見積もりです
04:50
And these are just ordinary people like yourselves who are asked
竜巻や花火 喘息や水死で―
04:52
to guess how many people die from tornado, fireworks, asthma, drowning, etc.
どのくらいの人が亡くなると思うか尋ねました
04:54
Compare these to the actual numbers.
これらと実際の数を比べてみましょう
04:58
Now, you see a very interesting pattern here, which is first of all,
とても面白いパターンが見えます
05:01
two things are vastly over-estimated, namely tornadoes and fireworks.
まず 2つの死因が過剰に見積もられいます 竜巻と花火です
05:04
Two things are vastly underestimated:
また2つの死因がずっと少なく見積もられていて
05:09
dying by drowning and dying by asthma. Why?
それは水死と喘息によるものです なぜでしょう
05:11
When was the last time that you picked up a newspaper
新聞の見出しにこう書いてあるのを見たことがありますか?
05:14
and the headline was, "Boy dies of Asthma?"
「少年 喘息で死亡」
05:17
It's not interesting because it's so common.
あまりに一般的すぎて 興味を引きません
05:20
It's very easy for all of us to bring to mind instances
私達にとって 竜巻が街を破壊したり
05:23
of news stories or newsreels where we've seen
独立記念日に自分の手を花火で吹き飛ばしてしまうような
05:27
tornadoes devastating cities, or some poor schmuck
間抜けな人達のニュース記事や映像を
05:30
who's blown his hands off with a firework on the Fourth of July.
思い起こすのはとても簡単なことです
05:32
Drownings and asthma deaths don't get much coverage.
水死や喘息死は あまり報道されません
05:36
They don't come quickly to mind, and as a result,
すぐに思い起こせない その結果
05:39
we vastly underestimate them.
私達はその死因を少なく見積もってしまうのです
05:41
Indeed, this is kind of like the Sesame Street game
これはまるで セサミストリートの
05:43
of "Which thing doesn't belong?" And you're right to say
「仲間はずれはどれ」のゲームの様ですね
05:45
it's the swimming pool that doesn't belong, because the swimming pool
仲間はずれはプールです プールだけが
05:49
is the only thing on this slide that's actually very dangerous.
このスライドの中で実際 とても危険なものだからです
05:52
The way that more of you are likely to die than the combination
スライドにある他の3つを合わせるより
05:56
of all three of the others that you see on the slide.
もっと多くの人が死ぬ確率が高いものです
05:58
The lottery is an excellent example, of course -- an excellent test-case
ご存じの通り 宝くじは人々の確率を予測する能力を
06:02
of people's ability to compute probabilities.
見ることができるとてもいい例です
06:06
And economists -- forgive me, for those of you who play the lottery --
そして 経済学者の間では―
06:09
but economists, at least among themselves, refer to the lottery
宝くじを買う人には申し訳ないのですが―
06:12
as a stupidity tax, because the odds of getting any payoff
宝くじは馬鹿が納める税金と呼ばれます
06:15
by investing your money in a lottery ticket
なぜなら宝くじに投資することによって
06:20
are approximately equivalent to flushing the money
利益を得る確率は非常に低く
06:22
directly down the toilet -- which, by the way,
お金を直接トイレに流すのとほとんど同じだからです―ところで
06:24
doesn't require that you actually go to the store and buy anything.
トイレに流せば わざわざお店に行って買う手間もいりません
06:26
Why in the world would anybody ever play the lottery?
いったいなぜ宝くじを買うのでしょう
06:30
Well, there are many answers, but one answer surely is,
たくさん答えはありますが 1つ確かなのは
06:33
we see a lot of winners. Right? When this couple wins the lottery,
多くの当選者を見るからです そうでしょう?このカップルが当選したり
06:36
or Ed McMahon shows up at your door with this giant check --
エド・マクマハンが大きな小切手を持って玄関先に現れたり―
06:40
how the hell do you cash things that size, I don't know.
こんなサイズのものをいったいどうやって現金化するのでしょうね
06:43
We see this on TV; we read about it in the paper.
私達はこれをテレビで見て 新聞でも読みます
06:46
When was the last time that you saw extensive interviews
宝くじに外れた人たちのインタビューなんて
06:49
with everybody who lost?
見たことなんてないでしょう?
06:52
Indeed, if we required that television stations run
もし1人の当選者にインタビューする度に
06:54
a 30-second interview with each loser
外れた人に30秒ずつインタビューするよう―
06:57
every time they interview a winner, the 100 million losers
テレビ局に義務付けたら 1億人のインタビューを
06:59
in the last lottery would require nine-and-a-half years
休みなく9年半流す必要があります
07:03
of your undivided attention just to watch them say,
彼らがただこう言うのを見るためだけに
07:06
"Me? I lost." "Me? I lost."
「私?ハズレ」「私?ハズレ」
07:09
Now, if you watch nine-and-a-half years of television --
さて もしあなたが9年半テレビを見続けて
07:12
no sleep, no potty breaks -- and you saw loss after loss after loss,
―寝ないで トイレにも行かずに―はずれ はずれ はずれと見てきて
07:14
and then at the end there's 30 seconds of, "and I won,"
最後に「当たった」と言う30秒のインタビューが流れたら
07:19
the likelihood that you would play the lottery is very small.
あなたはおそらく宝くじを買わないでしょう
07:21
Look, I can prove this to you: here's a little lottery.
では これを証明してみましょう
07:24
There's 10 tickets in this lottery.
ここに宝くじが10枚あります
07:27
Nine of them have been sold to these individuals.
そのうち9枚は9人が買ってしまいました
07:29
It costs you a dollar to buy the ticket and, if you win,
この宝くじは1ドルで もしあなたが当たれば
07:32
you get 20 bucks. Is this a good bet?
20ドルもらえます これは良い賭けでしょうか?
07:35
Well, Bernoulli tells us it is.
ベルヌーイはこう言います
07:37
The expected value of this lottery is two dollars;
この宝くじの期待値は2ドルです
07:38
this is a lottery in which you should invest your money.
これは投資しなければもったいない宝くじです
07:41
And most people say, "OK, I'll play."
そしてほとんどの人が「もちろん買う」と言います
07:44
Now, a slightly different version of this lottery:
では この宝くじのちょっと違うバージョンです
07:46
imagine that the nine tickets are all owned
9枚のクジはリロイという名の
07:49
by one fat guy named Leroy.
太った男が買いました
07:51
Leroy has nine tickets; there's one left.
リロイが9枚持っています 残りは1枚です
07:53
Do you want it? Most people won't play this lottery.
買いますか?ほとんどの人は買わないでしょう
07:55
Now, you can see the odds of winning haven't changed,
宝くじの当たる確率は変わっていないのに
07:58
but it's now fantastically easy to imagine who's going to win.
誰が当たるか想像するのは 今やとても簡単です
08:00
It's easy to see Leroy getting the check, right?
リロイが当たるのは確実に思えます そうでしょう?
08:05
You can't say to yourself, "I'm as likely to win as anybody,"
「私は他の人と同じくらい当たる見込みがある」とは言えません
08:08
because you're not as likely to win as Leroy.
リロイほどに当たる見込みはありませんから
08:10
The fact that all those tickets are owned by one guy
1人の男がその宝くじ全部を持っているという事実が
08:13
changes your decision to play,
確率に何も影響しなくても
08:15
even though it does nothing whatsoever to the odds.
あなたの宝くじを買うという決意を変えてしまうのです
08:17
Now, estimating odds, as difficult as it may seem, is a piece of cake
さて 確率を計測することは難しく思えるかもしれませんが
08:20
compared to trying to estimate value:
価値を計測することに比べればたいしたことはありません
08:25
trying to say what something is worth, how much we'll enjoy it,
あるものにどんな価値があるか 私達がどれくらい楽しめるか
08:27
how much pleasure it will give us.
それがどのくらい喜びをもたらすか考えてみましょう
08:30
I want to talk now about errors in value.
これから価値における誤りについて話しをします
08:33
How much is this Big Mac worth? Is it worth 25 dollars?
このビッグマックはいくらでしょう?25ドル?
08:35
Most of you have the intuition that it's not --
ほとんどの方が そんなにしないという直感を持ちます
08:39
you wouldn't pay that for it.
そしてそんなに払わないでしょう
08:42
But in fact, to decide whether a Big Mac is worth 25 dollars requires
しかし実際 ビッグマックが25ドルの価値があるかを決めるのに
08:44
that you ask one, and only one question, which is:
必要な質問はひとつだけです
08:48
What else can I do with 25 dollars?
「25ドルで他に何ができるだろう?」
08:51
If you've ever gotten on one of those long-haul flights to Australia
もしあなたがオーストラリアへの長距離便に乗っていて
08:53
and realized that they're not going to serve you any food,
食事が出ないことに気づいたときに
08:57
but somebody in the row in front of you has just opened
前列の人がマクドナルドの包みを開け
09:00
the McDonald's bag, and the smell of golden arches
おいしそうな香りがシート越しに漂ってきたら
09:02
is wafting over the seat, you think,
こう思うでしょう
09:05
I can't do anything else with this 25 dollars for 16 hours.
16時間もの間25ドルで他にできることはない
09:08
I can't even set it on fire -- they took my cigarette lighter!
お札に火をつけることさえ―煙草のライターを取られてしまったから
09:11
Suddenly, 25 dollars for a Big Mac might be a good deal.
突然 25ドルのビッグマックがいい取引に思えます
09:14
On the other hand, if you're visiting an underdeveloped country,
一方で 低開発国を訪ねていたら
09:17
and 25 dollars buys you a gourmet meal, it's exorbitant for a Big Mac.
25ドルで豪華な食事が買え ビッグマックが法外に思えます
09:19
Why were you all sure that the answer to the question was no,
なぜあなた方は 私が状況を話す前から
09:23
before I'd even told you anything about the context?
質問の答えがノーだと決めつけたのでしょうか
09:26
Because most of you compared the price of this Big Mac
なぜなら皆さんのほとんどは いつも払っている
09:29
to the price you're used to paying. Rather than asking,
ビッグマックの値段と比べたからです
09:33
"What else can I do with my money," comparing this investment
この投資を他の投資と比べて 「このお金で他に何ができるだろう」
09:36
to other possible investments, you compared to the past.
と尋ねる代わりに 過去と比べたのです
09:39
And this is a systematic error people make.
そして これが人々がいつも起こす間違いです
09:43
What you knew is, you paid three dollars in the past; 25 is outrageous.
あなたが知っているのは 過去に3ドルを払ったことで25ドルは法外だという事です
09:45
This is an error, and I can prove it to you by showing
これが間違いです 私はこの事から生じる不合理な事例を
09:50
the kinds of irrationalities to which it leads.
お見せして その事を証明しようと思います
09:52
For example, this is, of course,
例えばこれは
09:54
one of the most delicious tricks in marketing,
高かったものが急にお買い得になったように見える
09:57
is to say something used to be higher,
マーケティングでいう
09:59
and suddenly it seems like a very good deal.
最もおいしいトリックの例です
10:01
When people are asked about these two different jobs:
人々が2つの仕事を提示された時
10:04
a job where you make 60K, then 50K, then 40K,
1つは給料が6万ドル それから5万ドル 4万ドルと
10:07
a job where you're getting a salary cut each year,
毎年下がる仕事と
10:10
and one in which you're getting a salary increase,
給料がだんだん上がる仕事では
10:12
people like the second job better than the first, despite the fact
後者の方が収入がずっと少ないと知らされていても
10:14
they're all told they make much less money. Why?
1番目よりも2番目の仕事を好みます なぜでしょう?
10:18
Because they had the sense that declining wages are worse
なぜなら彼らは上がっていく給料より
10:21
than rising wages, even when the total amount of wages is higher
下がっていく給料の方が悪いという感覚があるからです
10:25
in the declining period. Here's another nice example.
下がっていく給料の総額が高くてもです もうひとつ良い例があります
10:29
Here's a $2,000 Hawaiian vacation package; it's now on sale for 1,600.
2000ドルのハワイ旅行のパックがセールで1600ドルになっています
10:33
Assuming you wanted to go to Hawaii, would you buy this package?
あなたがハワイに行きたいとして このパックを買いますか?
10:38
Most people say they would. Here's a slightly different story:
ほとんどの人が買うでしょう さて少しだけ違う話です
10:41
$2,000 Hawaiian vacation package is now on sale for 700 dollars,
2000ドルのハワイ旅行のパックが700ドルです
10:45
so you decide to mull it over for a week.
1週間考えてから
10:49
By the time you get to the ticket agency, the best fares are gone --
旅行会社に行った時 その格安旅行はなくなっていて―
10:51
the package now costs 1,500. Would you buy it? Most people say, no.
そのパックは今1500ドルします 買いますか?ほとんどの人がノーと言います
10:53
Why? Because it used to cost 700, and there's no way I'm paying 1,500
なぜでしょう?それは つい先週まで700ドルだったものに
10:58
for something that was 700 last week.
1500ドル払うわけがないからです
11:02
This tendency to compare to the past
過去と比較をするこの傾向のせいで
11:05
is causing people to pass up the better deal. In other words,
人々はよりよい取引を逃してしまいます 言い換えれば
11:07
a good deal that used to be a great deal is not nearly as good
素晴らしい取引だったものが まあまあの取引になる事は
11:11
as an awful deal that was once a horrible deal.
かつてのひどい取引が 少しましな取引になるのに全く及ばないという事です
11:14
Here's another example of how comparing to the past
過去との比較が私達の選択を狂わせる
11:18
can befuddle our decisions.
もうひとつの例があります
11:20
Imagine that you're going to the theater.
劇場に行く場面を想像してみてください
11:24
You're on your way to the theater.
あなたは劇場に向かっています
11:26
In your wallet you have a ticket, for which you paid 20 dollars.
財布には20ドルで買ったチケットがあります
11:27
You also have a 20-dollar bill.
あなたはまた20ドル札も持っています
11:29
When you arrive at the theater,
劇場に着いた時
11:31
you discover that somewhere along the way you've lost the ticket.
どこか途中でチケットを失くしたことに気がつきます
11:33
Would you spend your remaining money on replacing it?
お金を出してまたチケットを買いますか?
11:36
Most people answer, no.
ほとんどの人が ノーと答えます
11:39
Now, let's just change one thing in this scenario.
さてこのシナリオを 1か所変えてみましょう
11:42
You're on your way to the theater,
あなたは劇場に向かっていて
11:45
and in your wallet you have two 20-dollar bills.
財布には20ドル札を2枚持っています
11:46
When you arrive you discover you've lost one of them.
劇場に着いた時 そのうちの1枚を失くしたことに気付きます
11:48
Would you spend your remaining 20 dollars on a ticket?
残っている20ドルでチケットを買うでしょうか?
11:50
Well, of course, I went to the theater to see the play.
ええ もちろんです 芝居を見に劇場に来たのですから
11:52
What does the loss of 20 dollars along the way have to do?
途中で失くした20ドルと何の関係があるでしょうか?
11:55
Now, just in case you're not getting it,
理解していただけない場合には
11:58
here's a schematic of what happened, OK?
こちらに図があります いいですか?
12:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:03
Along the way, you lost something.
途中であなたは落し物をしてしまいます
12:04
In both cases, it was a piece of paper.
どちらの場合も 1枚の紙です
12:06
In one case, it had a U.S. president on it; in the other case it didn't.
一方にはアメリカの大統領がのっています もう一方にはのっていません
12:08
What the hell difference should it make?
いったいどんな違いがあるのでしょう?
12:12
The difference is that when you lost the ticket you say to yourself,
違いは チケットをなくした時は 同じものに2度は払わないぞと
12:14
I'm not paying twice for the same thing.
自分に言い聞かせるということです
12:17
You compare the cost of the play now -- 40 dollars --
あなたは芝居にかかる値段―今や40ドル―を
12:19
to the cost that it used to have -- 20 dollars -- and you say it's a bad deal.
元の値段―20ドル―と比べ 悪い取引だというのです
12:22
Comparing with the past causes many of the problems
行動経済学者や心理学者によると
12:27
that behavioral economists and psychologists identify
人々が価値を割り振るときの問題の原因は
12:31
in people's attempts to assign value.
ほとんどが過去との比較にあるそうです
12:34
But even when we compare with the possible, instead of the past,
しかし 私達は過去の代わりに可能性と比較をするときでさえ
12:36
we still make certain kinds of mistakes.
いくつか間違いを起こします
12:41
And I'm going to show you one or two of them.
1つ2つ その例をお見せしようと思います
12:43
One of the things we know about comparison:
私達が比較について知っていることの1つは
12:45
that when we compare one thing to the other, it changes its value.
何かを他のものと比較すると その価値は変わるという事です
12:48
So in 1992, this fellow, George Bush, for those of us who were
ですから 1992年にこの人 ジョージ・ブッシュは
12:51
kind of on the liberal side of the political spectrum,
政治的にリベラルと言われる人々の目には
12:55
didn't seem like such a great guy.
そんなに素晴らしい人物には映りませんでした
12:58
Suddenly, we're almost longing for him to return.
突然私達は彼に復帰してほしいと切望します
13:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:04
The comparison changes how we evaluate him.
比較が彼に対する評価を変えるのです
13:07
Now, retailers knew this long before anybody else did, of course,
さて小売業者はこのことをもちろんだれよりも知っていて
13:10
and they use this wisdom to help you --
この知識を使ってあなたを手助けします―
13:14
spare you the undue burden of money.
より多くのお金を使わせる為にですが―
13:16
And so a retailer, if you were to go into a wine shop
小売りのワイン店に行って
13:18
and you had to buy a bottle of wine,
ワインを買わなければいけない時に
13:21
and you see them here for eight, 27 and 33 dollars, what would you do?
8ドル 27ドル 33ドルのワインがあったとします どうしますか?
13:22
Most people don't want the most expensive,
ほとんどの人が一番高いワインも
13:26
they don't want the least expensive.
一番安いワインも欲しがりません
13:28
So, they will opt for the item in the middle.
中間のものを選ぶのです
13:30
If you're a smart retailer, then, you will put a very expensive item
賢い小売業者なら 誰も買わないような
13:32
that nobody will ever buy on the shelf,
とても高いワインを棚に並べるでしょう
13:35
because suddenly the $33 wine doesn't look as expensive in comparison.
他と比べた結果 突然33ドルのワインがそんなに高く見えなくなるからです
13:37
So I'm telling you something you already knew:
私は既にみなさんがご存じの話をしています
13:43
namely, that comparison changes the value of things.
比較が物の価値を変えるということです
13:44
Here's why that's a problem:
なぜそれが問題かというと
13:48
the problem is that when you get that $33 bottle of wine home,
その33ドルのワインを家に持ち帰ると
13:49
it won't matter what it used to be sitting on the shelf next to.
棚の隣に何があったかが関係なくなってしまうからです
13:55
The comparisons we make when we are appraising value,
私達が価値を見積もる時
13:59
where we're trying to estimate how much we'll like things,
つまり商品をどのくらい気に入るかを値踏みする際の比較は
14:04
are not the same comparisons we'll be making when we consume them.
私達が商品を消費する時に行う比較と同じではないのです
14:08
This problem of shifting comparisons can bedevil
この比較の変化が
14:11
our attempts to make rational decisions.
合理的な選択をしようとする私達の判断を迷わせるのです
14:15
Let me just give you an example.
例をあげてみましょう
14:18
I have to show you something from my own lab, so let me sneak this in.
私の研究室から持ってきたものがあるので ちょっとお見せしましょう
14:19
These are subjects coming to an experiment to be asked
実験に参加する被験者たちに
14:23
the simplest of all questions:
次の簡単な質問をします
14:25
How much will you enjoy eating potato chips one minute from now?
1分後にポテトチップスを食べた時 どのくらい楽しめるか?と
14:27
They're sitting in a room with potato chips in front of them.
彼らは部屋で ポテトチップスを前に座っています
14:31
For some of the subjects, sitting in the far corner of a room
一方の被験者の部屋の隅には ゴディバのチョコの箱が置いてあり
14:34
is a box of Godiva chocolates, and for others is a can of Spam.
もう一方の被験者側にはスパムの缶詰めがあります
14:37
In fact, these items that are sitting in the room change
実際にこれらの品は 被験者がどれくらい―
14:42
how much the subjects think they're going to enjoy the potato chips.
ポテトチップスを楽しむかという予想を変えてしまいます
14:46
Namely, those who are looking at Spam
すなわち スパムを見ている被験者は
14:49
think potato chips are going to be quite tasty;
ポテトチップスがとてもおいしいだろうと思い
14:51
those who are looking at Godiva chocolate
ゴディバのチョコを見ている人達は
14:53
think they won't be nearly so tasty.
それほどおいしそうだと思いません
14:55
Of course, what happens when they eat the potato chips?
もちろん 実際に彼らがポテトチップスを食べたら?
14:57
Well, look, you didn't need a psychologist to tell you that
口いっぱいに広がる油 塩 そしてパリパリの―
14:59
when you have a mouthful of greasy, salty, crispy, delicious snacks,
おいしいスナックを食べるとき 部屋の隅にある物が
15:02
what's sitting in the corner of the room
あなたの味覚に―
15:06
makes not a damn bit of difference to your gustatory experience.
何の違いももたらさない事は心理学者に聞かなくてもわかるでしょう
15:07
Nonetheless, their predictions are perverted by a comparison
にもかかわらず 彼らの予想は 長続きもしないし
15:12
that then does not carry through and change their experience.
彼らの経験を変える事もない比較によって 狂わされるのです
15:16
You've all experienced this yourself, even if you've never come
私達の実験室にポテトチップスを食べに来なくても
15:20
into our lab to eat potato chips. So here's a question:
皆さんはご自分で経験済みでしょう ここで質問です
15:22
You want to buy a car stereo.
あなたはカーステレオを買いたいと思っています
15:25
The dealer near your house sells this particular stereo for 200 dollars,
近所のディーラーはステレオを200ドルで売っています
15:27
but if you drive across town, you can get it for 100 bucks.
でも町の反対まで車で行けば100ドルで買えます
15:32
So would you drive to get 50 percent off, saving 100 dollars?
半額の100ドルを節約するために町の反対側まで行きますか?
15:35
Most people say they would.
ほとんどの人が行くと言います
15:38
They can't imagine buying it for twice the price
町の反対側に行くだけで半額になるのに
15:40
when, with one trip across town, they can get it for half off.
その倍の値段を払う事など考えられないのです
15:42
Now, let's imagine instead you wanted to buy a car that had a stereo,
では代わりにステレオ付きの車を探しているとします
15:46
and the dealer near your house had it for 31,000.
近所のディーラーでは31,000ドルで売っているとします
15:50
But if you drove across town, you could get it for 30,900.
でも町の反対側まで車で行けば 30,900ドルで買えます
15:52
Would you drive to get it? At this point, 0.003 savings -- the 100 dollars.
行きますか?この時点で100 ドルは0.003パーセントの節約です
15:57
Most people say, no, I'm going to schlep across town
ほとんどの人が 車の購入の為の100ドルを節約するために
16:01
to save 100 bucks on the purchase of a car?
わざわざ町の反対まで行かないと言います
16:03
This kind of thinking drives economists crazy, and it should.
このような考え方は経済学者をやきもきさせるおかしなものです
16:06
Because this 100 dollars that you save -- hello! --
なぜならあなたが節約した100ドルは―ちょっと!―
16:10
doesn't know where it came from.
どこから来たものですか?
16:14
It doesn't know what you saved it on.
何に節約したかは関係ないのです
16:16
When you go to buy groceries with it, it doesn't go,
そのお金で食料品を買いに行った時 その100ドルが
16:18
I'm the money saved on the car stereo, or,
私はカーステレオで節約されたお金ですとか
16:20
I'm the dumb money saved on the car. It's money.
車で節約されたお金ですとは言いません お金ですから
16:23
And if a drive across town is worth 100 bucks, it's worth 100 bucks
そして 町の反対まで行くのに100ドルの価値があるなら 何に節約したものだろうと
16:27
no matter what you're saving it on. People don't think that way.
100ドルの価値があるのです けれど人々はそのようには考えません
16:30
That's why they don't know whether their mutual fund manager
それが 投資信託のマネージャーにとられる手数料が
16:33
is taking 0.1 percent or 0.15 percent of their investment,
0.1パーセントか0.15パーセントかも知らないのに
16:35
but they clip coupons to save one dollar off of toothpaste.
歯磨き粉の1ドルクーポンは切り取っておくという理由です
16:40
Now, you can see, this is the problem of shifting comparisons,
さて もうこれが比較が変化してしまう問題だとお分かりですね
16:43
because what you're doing is, you're comparing the 100 bucks
というのもあなたは100ドルを
16:46
to the purchase that you're making,
購入するものとは比べますが そのお金を使うときは
16:49
but when you go to spend that money you won't be making that comparison.
比較をしないからです
16:51
You've all had this experience.
どなたもそのような経験がおありでしょう
16:55
If you're an American, for example, you've probably traveled in France.
あなたがアメリカ人なら 例えば おそらくフランスに行ったことがあるでしょう
16:57
And at some point you may have met a couple
そして どこかであなたと同じ出身地のカップルに―
17:01
from your own hometown, and you thought,
会ったかもしれません そしてこう考えます
17:03
"Oh, my God, these people are so warm. They're so nice to me.
「この人たちはなんて温かくて 私に親切なんでしょう
17:04
I mean, compared to all these people who hate me
この国の人は私がフランス語を話すと嫌がり―
17:09
when I try to speak their language and hate me more when I don't,
話さないとさらに嫌な顔をするけれど この人たちは素晴らしい」
17:11
these people are just wonderful." And so you tour France with them,
そこであなたは彼らとフランスを周遊し
17:14
and then you get home and you invite them over for dinner,
家に帰ってから彼らを夕食に招待します
17:17
and what do you find?
そしてどう思うでしょう?
17:19
Compared to your regular friends,
あなたの普段の友達に比べ
17:20
they are boring and dull, right? Because in this new context,
彼らは退屈でつまらない でしょう?なぜならこの新しい状況下では
17:22
the comparison is very, very different. In fact, you find yourself
比較の仕方が甚だしく異なっているからです 実際―
17:26
disliking them enough almost to qualify for French citizenship.
フランスの市民権を付与されるのと同じくらい彼らが嫌なのです
17:30
Now, you have exactly the same problem when you shop for a stereo.
さて ステレオを買う時にも 全く同じ問題にぶつかります
17:34
You go to the stereo store, you see two sets of speakers --
あなたはステレオ店に行き 2つのスピーカーのセットを見つけます
17:37
these big, boxy, monoliths, and these little, sleek speakers,
ひとつは大きくて野暮ったく もうひとつは小さく しゃれています
17:40
and you play them, and you go, you know, I do hear a difference:
両方を試し そして違いが分かります
17:44
the big ones sound a little better.
大きい方の音がちょっといいと
17:46
And so you buy them, and you bring them home,
あなたはそれを買い 家に持ち帰り
17:48
and you entirely violate the décor of your house.
家の装飾をすっかり台無しにしてしまいます
17:50
And the problem, of course, is that this comparison you made in the store
問題は もちろん あなたが店でした比較は
17:53
is a comparison you'll never make again.
二度とすることのない比較だということです
17:57
What are the odds that years later you'll turn on the stereo and go,
何年後かにステレオをつけて「あの小さいのよりずっといい音だ」
17:59
"Sounds so much better than those little ones,"
―という見込みはありますか?
18:01
which you can't even remember hearing.
その音を思い出すこともできないのに
18:04
The problem of shifting comparisons is even more difficult
比較の仕方が変わるという問題は これらの選択の
18:06
when these choices are arrayed over time.
時間の間隔が大きいほど より難しくなります
18:09
People have a lot of trouble making decisions
人々は時間差のある出来事に対して
18:12
about things that will happen at different points in time.
選択をすることが苦手です
18:15
And what psychologists and behavioral economists have discovered
そして心理学者と行動経済学者が発見したのは
18:18
is that by and large people use two simple rules.
たいていの人は2つの単純な法則を使うということです
18:20
So let me give you one very easy problem, a second very easy problem
これからとても易しい問題と 2番目に易しい問題
18:23
and then a third, hard, problem.
それから難しい問題を出します
18:27
Here's the first easy problem:
始めの易しい問題です
18:28
You can have 60 dollars now or 50 dollars now. Which would you prefer?
あなたは今 50ドルか60ドルかをもらえます どちらがいいですか?
18:31
This is what we call a one-item IQ test, OK?
これはとても簡単なIQテストです いいですか?
18:34
All of us, I hope, prefer more money, and the reason is,
私達全員 お金が多い方を選びます
18:37
we believe more is better than less.
少ないより多いほうがいいですからね
18:40
Here's the second problem:
2番目の問題です
18:43
You can have 60 dollars today or 60 dollars in a month. Which would you prefer?
あなたは今日60ドルか 1ヶ月後に60ドルもらえます どちらがいいですか?
18:44
Again, an easy decision,
これも簡単です
18:48
because we all know that now is better than later.
なぜなら私達は皆 後より今の方がいいと知っているからです
18:50
What's hard in our decision-making is when these two rules conflict.
意思決定をするのが難しいのは この2つのルールが衝突する時です
18:54
For example, when you're offered 50 dollars now or 60 dollars in a month.
例えば 今50ドルか 1ヶ月後に60ドルかという時
18:57
This typifies a lot of situations in life in which you will gain
これは待つことで多い利益を得られるが 忍耐が必要な
19:01
by waiting, but you have to be patient.
日常の多くの状況での典型的な例です
19:04
What do we know? What do people do in these kinds of situations?
何が分かりますか?このような状況で人はどうするでしょう?
19:07
Well, by and large people are enormously impatient.
概して人々はひどく気短です
19:10
That is, they require interest rates in the hundred
つまり 余分の10ドルをもらう楽しみを―
19:14
or thousands of percents in order to delay gratification
先延ばしして 1カ月待つためには
19:17
and wait until next month for the extra 10 dollars.
100パーセントから数千パーセントの利息が必要とされるのです
19:21
Maybe that isn't so remarkable, but what is remarkable is
これは恐らくそんなに驚くことではないと思いますが
19:25
how easy it is to make this impatience go away by simply changing
これらのお金の引き渡しの時期が変わるだけで
19:28
when the delivery of these monetary units will happen.
この短気さがいとも簡単に消えてしまうのには驚かされます
19:32
Imagine that you can have 50 dollars in a year -- that's 12 months --
1年後 つまり12ヶ月後に50ドルもしくは
19:36
or 60 dollars in 13 months.
13ヶ月後に60ドルもらえると想像して下さい
19:39
What do we find now?
さて どうなるでしょう?
19:42
People are gladly willing to wait: as long as they're waiting 12,
人々は喜んで待つでしょう 12か月待つなら
19:43
they might as well wait 13.
13か月待ってもいいと
19:46
What makes this dynamic inconsistency happen?
何がこの絶え間ない矛盾を引き起こすのでしょう?
19:48
Comparison. Troubling comparison. Let me show you.
比較です 厄介な比較 これを見て下さい
19:51
This is just a graph showing the results that I just suggested
時間をかけて答えてもらうと 先ほどお話ししたような結果―
19:55
you would show if I gave you time to respond, which is,
このようなグラフになります
19:58
people find that the subjective value of 50 is higher
つまり 今か 1ヶ月後―30日―の時間差では
20:00
than the subjective value of 60 when they'll be delivered in now
50ドルの主観的価値は60ドルの主観的価値よりも
20:03
or one month, respectively -- a 30-day delay --
高くなりますが 全ての決定を
20:07
but they show the reverse pattern when you push the entire decision
1年後に先延ばしすると
20:09
off into the future a year.
反対の結果となります
20:13
Now, why in the world do you get this pattern of results?
いったいなぜこのような結果になるのでしょうか?
20:16
These guys can tell us.
彼らが教えてくれます
20:20
What you see here are two lads,
ここに2人の青年がいます
20:21
one of them larger than the other: the fireman and the fiddler.
片方がもう一方より大きい 消防士とバイオリン弾きです
20:24
They are going to recede towards the vanishing point in the horizon,
彼らは地平線に消えるまで後ろに下がっていきます
20:27
and I want you to notice two things.
ここで2つの事に気をつけて下さい
20:30
At no point will the fireman look taller than the fiddler. No point.
どこで見ても消防士はバイオリン弾きより大きく見えます どこの位置でも
20:32
However, the difference between them seems to be getting smaller.
でも 彼らの差はだんだん小さくなるように見えます
20:38
First it's an inch in your view, then it's a quarter-inch,
始めは1インチ それから½インチ ¼ インチと
20:41
then a half-inch, and then finally they go off the edge of the earth.
そしてついに地球の端に消えてしまいます
20:44
Here are the results of what I just showed you.
これが先ほどお見せしたものの結果です
20:48
This is the subjective height --
これは主観的な高さ―
20:51
the height you saw of these guys at various points.
いろいろな位置から彼らを見た高さです
20:53
And I want you to see that two things are true.
そして2つの事実に注目して下さい
20:56
One, the farther away they are, the smaller they look;
1つ目は 遠くに行くほど彼らは小さく見えること
20:58
and two, the fireman is always bigger than the fiddler.
2つ目は 消防士はいつもバイオリン弾きより大きいということ
21:01
But watch what happens when we make some of them disappear. Right.
でも 彼らをいくつか消した時何が起こるか見て下さい そうです
21:03
At a very close distance, the fiddler looks taller than the fireman,
とても近い位置では バイオリン弾きの方が消防士より高くみえます
21:09
but at a far distance
でも遠く離れると
21:12
their normal, their true, relations are preserved.
彼らの実際の高さの関係が保たれます
21:14
As Plato said, what space is to size, time is to value.
プラトンが言ったように 距離と大きさの関係は 時間と価値の関係と同じです
21:17
These are the results of the hard problem I gave you:
これがあなた方にお尋ねした 今の50ドルか1ヶ月後の60ドルかという
21:22
60 now or 50 in a month?
難しい問題の結果です
21:27
And these are subjective values,
これらは主観的な価値で ここからわかるのは
21:29
and what you can see is, our two rules are preserved.
先ほどの2つのルールが守られているという事です
21:30
People always think more is better than less:
人々はいつも少ないより多い方が―
21:32
60 is always better than 50,
50より60の方が―
21:34
and they always think now is better than later:
そして後より今の方がよりいいと
21:36
the bars on this side are higher than the bars on this side.
つまりこちら側のバーは隣のバーより高いと思っています
21:38
Watch what happens when we drop some out.
いくつか条件を取り払ったらどうなるでしょう?
21:41
Suddenly we have the dynamic inconsistency that puzzled us.
突然私達は 頭が混乱するようなひどい矛盾に陥ります
21:44
We have the tendency for people to go for 50 dollars now
私たちは1カ月待つより今50ドルもらうほうがいいと思う傾向がありますが
21:47
over waiting a month, but not if that decision is far in the future.
これはそれらの行為がずっと先ではない時の話です
21:51
Notice something interesting that this implies -- namely, that
これが示すおもしろい事は―つまり
21:54
when people get to the future, they will change their minds.
時が経つと人は気が変わるという事です
21:58
That is, as that month 12 approaches, you will say,
あなたは 12か月目が近づいた時こう言うでしょう
22:02
what was I thinking, waiting an extra month for 60 dollars?
何を考えていたんだ 60ドルの為にもう1カ月待つなんて
22:05
I'll take the 50 dollars now.
今50ドルもらうよと
22:08
Well, the question with which I'd like to end is this:
さて 最後にこの質問で締めくくりたいと思います
22:11
If we're so damn stupid, how did we get to the moon?
私達がそんなにばかだったら どうやって月まで行けたのでしょう?
22:14
Because I could go on for about two hours with evidence
人間は 確率と価値の計算が下手だということの証明の材料は
22:17
of people's inability to estimate odds and inability to estimate value.
2時間ちょっと分は軽くあるのです
22:20
The answer to this question, I think, is an answer you've already heard
この質問の答えは他のTEDの話で既にお聞きですね
22:26
in some of the talks, and I dare say you will hear again:
これからも聞くことだと思います
22:28
namely, that our brains were evolved for a very different world
つまり私達の脳が 今生きている世界と全く違う世界にー
22:30
than the one in which we are living.
適合するように進化してきたためです
22:34
They were evolved for a world
私達の脳は人々が
22:36
in which people lived in very small groups,
小規模な集団で暮らし 自分達とひどく異なる人々に
22:38
rarely met anybody who was terribly different from themselves,
めったに会う事もなく 今より短命で
22:40
had rather short lives in which there were few choices
選択肢は少なく 優先は食べることと
22:43
and the highest priority was to eat and mate today.
子孫を残す事という世界で進化してきました
22:46
Bernoulli's gift, Bernoulli's little formula, allows us, it tells us
ベルヌーイの贈り物 ベルヌーイの方程式は 私達に
22:51
how we should think in a world for which nature never designed us.
自然が設計したわけではない世界で どの様に考えるべきか教えてくれます
22:56
That explains why we are so bad at using it, but it also explains
だからこそ 私達はその贈物を使うのが苦手で―
23:01
why it is so terribly important that we become good, fast.
早く使いこなせるようになることが重要なのです
23:05
We are the only species on this planet
自分の運命を自分で握れる種は
23:10
that has ever held its own fate in its hands.
この星には私達しかいません
23:12
We have no significant predators,
私達は捕食される心配もなく
23:16
we're the masters of our physical environment;
自分たちの環境を支配することができ
23:18
the things that normally cause species to become extinct
普通なら 種を絶滅させるようなでき事は
23:20
are no longer any threat to us.
私達にとってもはや脅威ではありません
23:23
The only thing -- the only thing -- that can destroy us and doom us
唯一のもの―私達を破壊させ滅びさせる唯一のものは
23:26
are our own decisions.
自分達自身の選択だけです
23:31
If we're not here in 10,000 years, it's going to be because
もし 1万年後人間が存在していないとすれば
23:33
we could not take advantage of the gift given to us
理由は 1738年にこのオランダ人の若者がくれた贈り物を
23:37
by a young Dutch fellow in 1738,
うまく使いこなせなかったからです
23:41
because we underestimated the odds of our future pains
未来の痛みの可能性を過小評価して
23:44
and overestimated the value of our present pleasures.
現在の快楽の価値を過大評価したためという事になるでしょう
23:48
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
23:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:53
Chris Anderson: That was remarkable.
クリス・アンダーソン:素晴らしいスピーチでした
24:03
We have time for some questions for Dan Gilbert. One and two.
ダン・ギルバートさんに質問する時間があります 1人目と2人目の方です
24:06
Bill Lyell: Would you say that this mechanism
ビル・ライル: このように考える癖が
24:11
is in part how terrorism actually works to frighten us,
実際にテロに脅威を感じる理由のひとつなのでしょうか
24:14
and is there some way that we could counteract that?
もしそうなら そうした考え方を抑える方法はありますか?
24:18
Dan Gilbert: I actually was consulting recently
ダン・ギルバート:実は最近―
24:22
with the Department of Homeland Security, which generally believes
安全保障予算を より国境警備の強化に費やすべきだと考える
24:23
that American security dollars should go to making borders safer.
アメリカ国土安全保障省の顧問をしていました
24:26
I tried to point out to them that terrorism was a name
私は「テロ(恐怖状況)」はある出来事に対しての
24:30
based on people's psychological reaction to a set of events,
人々の心理的な反応の名前であり テロを恐れるなら
24:33
and that if they were concerned about terrorism they might ask
私達皆が心配する残虐行為を
24:37
what causes terror and how can we stop people from being terrified,
防止することよりも―いえ それに加え 恐怖の原因と
24:39
rather than -- not rather than, but in addition to
人々の恐怖を抑える方法を
24:42
stopping the atrocities that we're all concerned about.
調べた方がいいと指摘しました
24:45
Surely the kinds of play that at least American media give to --
確かにテロ行為は少なくともアメリカのメディアでは注目されますが
24:48
and forgive me, but in raw numbers these are very tiny accidents.
失礼ですが―数字だけを見ればとても小さい事故です
24:54
We already know, for example, in the United States,
既にご存じの通り 例えば アメリカでは
24:59
more people have died as a result of not taking airplanes --
飛行機に乗るのが怖いため 高速道路を利用して
25:01
because they were scared -- and driving on highways,
交通事故で死亡した人の数は 9月11日のテロ事件の
25:05
than were killed in 9/11. OK?
犠牲者の数より多いのです そうでしょう?
25:07
If I told you that there was a plague
来年疫病で1万5千人のアメリカ人が死ぬと言えば
25:09
that was going to kill 15,000 Americans next year,
それがインフルエンザだと分からない限り
25:11
you might be alarmed if you didn't find out it was the flu.
みなさん動揺されるでしょう
25:14
These are small-scale accidents, and we should be wondering
テロは比較的 小規模の事件であり
25:17
whether they should get the kind of play,
現在のメディアの扱い方が ふさわしいかどうか
25:20
the kind of coverage, that they do.
私達は考えるべきです
25:22
Surely that causes people to overestimate the likelihood
メディアの過剰な反応は 人々がこれらの事件に
25:24
that they'll be hurt in these various ways,
巻き込まれる確率を過大評価させ
25:27
and gives power to the very people who want to frighten us.
私達を脅えさせようとする人々に力を与えるのです
25:29
CA: Dan, I'd like to hear more on this. So, you're saying
クリス:その話についてもう少し聞きたいです ダンさんが仰るのは
25:31
that our response to terror is, I mean, it's a form of mental bug?
私達のテロへの反応はいわば心理的な欠陥ということですか?
25:33
Talk more about it.
もうちょっと説明してください
25:37
DG: It's out-sized. I mean, look.
ダン:私達の反応は大げさです
25:38
If Australia disappears tomorrow,
例えばもし 明日オーストラリアが突然消えるとしたら
25:41
terror is probably the right response.
恐怖はたぶんふさわしい反応です
25:43
That's an awful large lot of very nice people. On the other hand,
大勢の本当に優しい人が亡くなるからです
25:45
when a bus blows up and 30 people are killed,
一方もしバスが爆発して30人が犠牲になるとしても
25:50
more people than that were killed
より多くの人が同じ国でシートベルトを―
25:53
by not using their seatbelts in the same country.
しめない為に亡くなっているのです
25:55
Is terror the right response?
恐怖はふさわしい反応でしょうか?
25:58
CA: What causes the bug? Is it the drama of the event --
クリス:この心理的欠陥の原因は何ですか?その出来事の劇的さ?
25:59
that it's so spectacular?
人目を引くから?
26:03
Is it the fact that it's an intentional attack by, quote, outsiders?
「よそ者」「私達と違う人」によっての意図的な攻撃だからでしょうか?
26:04
What is it?
何ですか?
26:07
DG: Yes. It's a number of things, and you hit on several of them.
ダン:そうですね クリスさんが言った原因を含めて色々ありますよね
26:08
First, it's a human agent trying to kill us --
まずは 私達を殺そうとしているのが人間だからです
26:11
it's not a tree falling on us by accident.
木が偶然私達の上に落ちてくるようなことではありません
26:13
Second, these are enemies who may want to strike and hurt us again.
2番目に この敵はまた私達を攻撃して ダメージを与えるかもしれません
26:16
People are being killed for no reason instead of good reason --
理由があって死ぬ人がいる一方 理由なく殺される人々がいます
26:19
as if there's good reason, but sometimes people think there are.
もちろん 死ぬいい理由なんてありませんが あると思う時もあります
26:22
So there are a number of things that together
このように いろいろな原因が合わさって
26:25
make this seem like a fantastic event, but let's not play down
途方もない事件だと私達に思わせます
26:27
the fact that newspapers sell when people see something in it
でも購読者が読みたいことを掲載することで
26:30
they want to read. So there's a large role here played by the media,
新聞が売れるということを忘れてはいけません
26:34
who want these things to be
こうした出来事をできるだけ劇的な話に
26:37
as spectacular as they possibly can.
したがるメディアも大きな原因の一つです
26:39
CA: I mean, what would it take to persuade our culture to downplay it?
クリス:それでは 私達はどうやってメディアに事件を控えめに扱わせたらいいのでしょう
26:43
DG: Well, go to Israel. You know,
イスラエルを見てみましょう
26:49
go to Israel. And a mall blows up,
イスラエルを考えましょう ショッピングセンターが爆発し
26:50
and then everybody's unhappy about it, and an hour-and-a-half later --
人々が悲しむ中―爆発の瞬間は私はそのイスラエルの
26:52
at least when I was there, and I was 150 feet from the mall
そのショッピングセンターから45メートルのところにいたのですが
26:55
when it blew up -- I went back to my hotel
その1時間半後―ホテルに戻ると
26:58
and the wedding that was planned was still going on.
予定されていた結婚式はまだ続いていました
27:00
And as the Israeli mother said,
イスラエル人の母親はこう言いました
27:03
she said, "We never let them win by stopping weddings."
「結婚式を中止して 彼らに屈するようなことはありません」
27:04
I mean, this is a society that has learned --
つまりこれが―他にも例はありますが―
27:08
and there are others too -- that has learned to live
ある程度のテロの中で日常生活をし
27:09
with a certain amount of terrorism and not be quite as upset by it,
それによって動揺しない事を学んだ社会
27:11
shall I say, as those of us who have not had many terror attacks.
私達のようにテロ事件が少ない国とは違う社会なのです
27:16
CA: But is there a rational fear that actually,
でも実際 理性的な恐怖
27:19
the reason we're frightened about this is because we think that
9月11日の様な決定的な攻撃を予期して
27:22
the Big One is to come?
恐れる事もあるのではないでしょうか?
27:25
DG: Yes, of course. So, if we knew that this was the worst attack
ダン:もちろんです でも もし後にも先にもこれが史上最悪の攻撃で
27:26
there would ever be, there might be more and more buses of 30 people --
これからは30人が死ぬバステロ事件がもっと頻繁に起こるとしたら―
27:30
we would probably not be nearly so frightened.
私達はこれほど恐れることはないでしょう
27:34
I don't want to say -- please, I'm going to get quoted somewhere
「テロは大丈夫だよ 心配することはない」と言っているのではありません
27:36
as saying, "Terrorism is fine and we shouldn't be so distressed."
お願いですから こんな引用は載せないで下さい
27:38
That's not my point at all.
それは私の言いたい事ではありません
27:42
What I'm saying is that, surely, rationally,
私が言っているのは 確かに理性的に
27:44
our distress about things that happen, about threats,
あるできごとと脅威に対しての私達の不安は
27:46
should be roughly proportional to the size of those threats
これらの脅威と今後訪れる脅威の大きさに
27:50
and threats to come.
おおよそ釣り合うべきだという事です
27:53
I think in the case of terrorism, it isn't.
テロの場合 私は釣り合っていないと思うのです
27:55
And many of the things we've heard about from our speakers today --
今日私達はたくさんの方の講演を聞きましたが―
27:58
how many people do you know got up and said,
何人もの人が力強く話した事は?
28:00
Poverty! I can't believe what poverty is doing to us.
「貧困」です 貧困が私達に及ぼす影響は信じられないほどです
28:02
People get up in the morning; they don't care about poverty.
でも日常生活の中 多くの人は貧困の問題を気にかけません
28:06
It's not making headlines, it's not making news, it's not flashy.
新聞の見出しにも載らないし ニュースにもなりません 人目も引きません
28:08
There are no guns going off.
銃が発射されることもありません
28:10
I mean, if you had to solve one of these problems, Chris,
つまり もしこの2つの問題の内 1つだけ解決できるとしたら クリスさん
28:12
which would you solve? Terrorism or poverty?
どちらを解決しますか?テロ それとも貧困?
28:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
28:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
28:20
That's a tough one.
難しいですね
28:22
CA: There's no question.
クリス:疑う余地もなく
28:24
Poverty, by an order of magnitude, a huge order of magnitude,
貧困はテロよりずっと大きな問題です
28:25
unless someone can show that there's, you know,
核兵器を持っているテロリストが
28:29
terrorists with a nuke are really likely to come.
実際来そうだ と証明されないのであれば
28:32
The latest I've read, seen, thought
私が最近読んだのは
28:36
is that it's incredibly hard for them to do that.
核兵器の攻撃を実行するのはテロリストにとって非常に難しいという事です
28:38
If that turns out to be wrong, we all look silly,
でももしそれが間違いだとしたら 私達は馬鹿を見ます
28:42
but with poverty it's a bit --
でも貧困はまた少しー
28:44
DG: Even if that were true, still more people die from poverty.
ダン:核兵器の攻撃があるとしても 貧困による死者数の方がまだ多いのです
28:46
CA: We've evolved to get all excited
クリス:私達はそういうドラマチックな攻撃に
28:53
about these dramatic attacks. Is that because in the past,
興奮するように進化しました それは過去
28:54
in the ancient past, we just didn't understand things like disease
それもずっと昔は 病気や貧困を引き起こすしくみなどが分からず
28:57
and systems that cause poverty and so forth,
そのため それらについて思い煩うエネルギーを
29:00
and so it made no sense for us as a species to put any energy
使うことが私たち人類にとって
29:02
into worrying about those things?
意味がなかったためですか?
29:06
People died; so be it.
人々は死に それは仕方のない事とされました
29:08
But if you got attacked, that was something you could do something about.
でも攻撃をされた場合 それに対しては何かすることができ
29:10
And so we evolved these responses.
このような反応を進化させてきた
29:12
Is that what happened?
そういうことですか?
29:14
DG: Well, you know, the people who are most skeptical
ダン:全ての現象に進化論上の説明を付ける事に
29:15
about leaping to evolutionary explanations for everything
最も懐疑的なのが
29:18
are the evolutionary psychologists themselves.
進化心理学者自身です
29:20
My guess is that there's nothing quite that specific
私達の進化の過去において 特別な事は
29:22
in our evolutionary past. But rather, if you're looking for
何もなかったと私は思います ただ―
29:25
an evolutionary explanation, you might say
進化論上の説明を探せば
29:27
that most organisms are neo-phobic -- that is, they're a little scared
ほとんどの生物は新規性恐怖症―つまり新しく 異質なものをちょっと怖がる
29:29
of stuff that's new and different.
という事が言えるかもしれません
29:33
And there's a good reason to be,
それには理由があります
29:34
because old stuff didn't eat you. Right?
前からずっとあるものはあなたを食べたりしないから そうでしょう?
29:36
Any animal you see that you've seen before is less likely
見たことのある動物は見たことのない動物より
29:37
to be a predator than one that you've never seen before.
捕食動物である確率は低い
29:40
So, you know, when a school bus is blown up and we've never seen this before,
ですからスクールバスが爆発したとき
29:43
our general tendency is to orient towards
このような光景を見たことがないため 目新しく奇抜なものに
29:46
that which is new and novel is activated.
目を向けやすいという一般的な傾向が働くのです
29:48
I don't think it's quite as specific a mechanism
クリスさんが仰った特定な仕組みと言うのではなく
29:53
as the one you alluded to, but maybe a more fundamental one underlying it.
もっと根本的な基礎的な仕組みだと私は思います
29:55
Jay Walker: You know, economists love to talk about
ジェイ・ウォーカー:経済学者は宝くじを買う人の
30:01
the stupidity of people who buy lottery tickets. But I suspect
愚かさを話すのが大好きです でもダンさんも
30:06
you're making the exact same error you're accusing those people of,
その人々を責めるというまさしく同じ誤り つまり価値の誤りを
30:10
which is the error of value.
犯していると思います
30:13
I know, because I've interviewed
私は何年も 宝くじを買う人
30:14
about 1,000 lottery buyers over the years.
1000人位のインタビューをしてきているのでわかります
30:15
It turns out that the value of buying a lottery ticket is not winning.
ダンさんがお考えのように宝くじを買う価値は
30:17
That's what you think it is. All right?
それに当たることではありませんでした おわかりでしょうか?
30:21
The average lottery buyer buys about 150 tickets a year,
宝くじの購入者は1年に平均して
30:23
so the buyer knows full well that he or she is going to lose,
150枚ほどの宝くじを買いますが はずれることは事は十分承知しています
30:26
and yet she buys 150 tickets a year. Why is that?
それでも1年に150枚買うのです なぜでしょう
30:30
It's not because she is stupid or he is stupid.
それはその人がばかだからではありません
30:33
It's because the anticipation of possibly winning
当たるかもしれないという期待が脳内のセロトニンを分泌させ
30:37
releases serotonin in the brain, and actually provides a good feeling
外れたと分かるまで
30:40
until the drawing indicates you've lost.
実際いい気持ちにさせるのです
30:44
Or, to put it another way, for the dollar investment,
言い換えれば 1ドルの投資で
30:46
you can have a much better feeling than flushing the money
トイレにお金を流す事―これはいい気持ちになりません―より
30:49
down the toilet, which you cannot have a good feeling from.
ずっといい気持ちを感じることができるからです
30:52
Now, economists tend to --
経済学者は―
30:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
30:57
-- economists tend to view the world
経済学者は自分の視点から
31:00
through their own lenses, which is:
世の中を見る傾向があり
31:01
this is just a bunch of stupid people.
見えるのは大ばかの群衆だけです
31:03
And as a result, many people look at economists as stupid people.
その結果 多くの人は経済学者をばかな人達だと思っています
31:05
And so fundamentally, the reason we got to the moon is,
ですから そもそも私達が月に行くことができたのは
31:09
we didn't listen to the economists. Thank you very much.
経済学者の言う事を聞かなかったからです
31:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
31:15
DG: Well, no, it's a great point. It remains to be seen
ダン:それはいいポイントですね
31:20
whether the joy of anticipation is exactly equaled
ただ抽選前の期待の喜びと 抽選後の失望が
31:23
by the amount of disappointment after the lottery. Because remember,
正確に同量かはまだ立証されていません なぜならいいですか
31:27
people who didn't buy tickets don't feel awful the next day either,
宝くじを買わなかった人は 抽選の間喜ぶ事はありませんが
31:30
even though they don't feel great during the drawing.
次の日に気分が悪くなることもありません
31:33
I would disagree that people know they're not going to win.
当たらないと十分承知しているという点は同意しかねます
31:35
I think they think it's unlikely, but it could happen,
当たる確率は低いけれど可能性が残っているから
31:37
which is why they prefer that to the flushing.
トイレに流すのでなく宝くじを買うのだと私は思います
31:40
But certainly I see your point: that there can be
でも 確かにジェイさんにも一理あります
31:43
some utility to buying a lottery ticket other than winning.
宝くじを買うことには当たる以外にも有益性があるという点です
31:46
Now, I think there's many good reasons not to listen to economists.
ええ 経済学者の言う事を聞かない方がいい理由はたくさんあります
31:50
That isn't one of them, for me, but there's many others.
私からすればこの話は別ですが 他にはたくさんありますからね
31:53
CA: Last question.
クリス:最後の質問です
31:56
Aubrey de Grey: My name's Aubrey de Grey, from Cambridge.
オーブリ・ダ・グレーです ケンブリッジから来ました
31:58
I work on the thing that kills more people than anything else kills --
私はどんな死因より多くの人を死に至らせるもの つまり老化について
32:01
I work on aging -- and I'm interested in doing something about it,
研究しています そして老化対策について関心があります
32:05
as we'll all hear tomorrow.
明日の講演にもありますね
32:07
I very much resonate with what you're saying,
私はダンさんが言っている事にとても共鳴します
32:08
because it seems to me that the problem
なぜなら私にとって 人々に老化対策について
32:11
with getting people interested in doing anything about aging
興味を持たせる事が難しいのは 人は老化で死ぬというより
32:13
is that by the time aging is about to kill you it looks like cancer
ガンや心臓病などで 死んでしまうと考えるためだと―
32:16
or heart disease or whatever. Do you have any advice?
思うのです 何かアドバイスはありますか?
32:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
32:22
DG: For you or for them?
ダン:オーブリさんに それとも皆さんに?
32:25
AdG: In persuading them.
オーブリ:私が皆さんを説得できるように
32:26
DG: Ah, for you in persuading them.
ダン:あぁ あなたが皆さんを説得できるように
32:27
Well, it's notoriously difficult to get people to be farsighted.
人々に先見の明を持たせる事は ご存じのように途方もなく大変な事です
32:29
But one thing that psychologists have tried that seems to work
でもひとつ心理学者が発見した有効と思える方法は
32:32
is to get people to imagine the future more vividly.
人々に未来をもっと生き生きと想像させる事です
32:36
One of the problems with making decisions about the far future
私達が遠い将来と近い将来について
32:39
and the near future is that we imagine the near future
決断をする際の問題のひとつは 遠い将来よりも
32:42
much more vividly than the far future.
近い将来の方がずっと生き生きと想像できるという事です
32:45
To the extent that you can equalize the amount of detail
人々に頭の中で遠い未来と近い未来の描写を同じように―
32:47
that people put into the mental representations
詳細に想像させればさせるほど
32:51
of near and far future, people begin to make decisions
その2つの未来についての
32:53
about the two in the same way.
それぞれの決定は同じになります
32:55
So, would you like to have an extra 100,000 dollars when you're 65
あなたが65歳になった時もう10万ドル余計に欲しいかという質問は
32:57
is a question that's very different than,
65歳のあなたはどんな人か
33:02
imagine who you'll be when you're 65: will you be living,
想像してくださいという質問とは別の問題です その時まだ生きているか
33:03
what will you look like, how much hair will you have,
どういう風貌をしているか 髪がどのくらい残っているか
33:07
who will you be living with.
誰と暮らしているか
33:09
Once we have all the details of that imaginary scenario,
その想像上のシナリオが全部揃った時
33:10
suddenly we feel like it might be important to save
私達は突然 お金を蓄えて退職後に備える事が
33:13
so that that guy has a little retirement money.
重要に思えてきます
33:15
But these are tricks around the margins.
でもこれらの人々を説得する方法は あまり効果はありません
33:18
I think in general you're battling a very fundamental human tendency,
私はオーブリ―さん 一般的にあなたは「私は今日ここにいるのだから
33:20
which is to say, "I'm here today,
現在の方が先の事よりも大事だ」と唱える
33:23
and so now is more important than later."
人間のとても基礎的な傾向と戦っているのだと思います
33:25
CA: Dan, thank you. Members of the audience,
クリス:ダンさん ありがとうございました 観客の皆さん
33:28
that was a fantastic session. Thank you.
素晴らしい会合でした ありがとうございます
33:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
33:31

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Dan Gilbert - Psychologist; happiness expert
Harvard psychologist Dan Gilbert says our beliefs about what will make us happy are often wrong -- a premise he supports with intriguing research, and explains in his accessible and unexpectedly funny book, Stumbling on Happiness.

Why you should listen

Dan Gilbert believes that, in our ardent, lifelong pursuit of happiness, most of us have the wrong map. In the same way that optical illusions fool our eyes -- and fool everyone's eyes in the same way -- Gilbert argues that our brains systematically misjudge what will make us happy. And these quirks in our cognition make humans very poor predictors of our own bliss.

The premise of his current research -- that our assumptions about what will make us happy are often wrong -- is supported with clinical research drawn from psychology and neuroscience. But his delivery is what sets him apart. His engaging -- and often hilarious -- style pokes fun at typical human behavior and invokes pop-culture references everyone can relate to. This winning style translates also to Gilbert's writing, which is lucid, approachable and laugh-out-loud funny. The immensely readable Stumbling on Happiness, published in 2006, became a New York Times bestseller and has been translated into 20 languages.

In fact, the title of his book could be drawn from his own life. At 19, he was a high school dropout with dreams of writing science fiction. When a creative writing class at his community college was full, he enrolled in the only available course: psychology. He found his passion there, earned a doctorate in social psychology in 1985 at Princeton, and has since won a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Phi Beta Kappa teaching prize for his work at Harvard. He has written essays and articles for The New York Times, Time and even Starbucks, while continuing his research into happiness at his Hedonic Psychology Laboratory.

More profile about the speaker
Dan Gilbert | Speaker | TED.com