23:13
TED2004

Steven Strogatz: The science of sync

スティーヴン・ストロガッツ: 驚くべきシンクロ現象

Filmed:

数学者スティーヴン・ストロガッツが、鳥、蛍、魚といった生物の群が誰の号令もなしにどうやって調和のとれた行動が出来るのかを説明します。無生物にも同調現象が発生します。

- Mathematician
In his work in applied mathematics, Steven Strogatz studies the way math and biology intersect. Full bio

シンクロすることが幸福にどう繋がるのか
00:19
I was trying to think, how is sync connected to happiness,
00:21
and it occurred to me that for some reason we take pleasure in synchronizing.
ずっと考えてきました
ダンスや合唱のように シンクロすることに
私たちは喜びを感じるようです
00:28
We like to dance together, we like singing together.
00:31
And so, if you'll put up with this, I would like to enlist your help
ですから まずは
みなさんの助けをかりて
実験で確認したいと思います
00:36
with a first experiment today. The experiment is --
ところで みなさんが先ほど拍手したとき
00:40
and I notice, by the way, that when you applauded,
アメリカ流に リズムを取らずに
00:43
that you did it in a typical North American way,
ガヤガヤと拍手していましたね
00:45
that is, you were raucous and incoherent.
そもそもリズムを取ること自体
00:49
You were not organized. It didn't even occur to you to clap in unison.
考えていなかったのでしょう
ではみなさんは リズムを揃えて拍手できるでしょうか
00:54
Do you think you could do it? I would like to see if this audience would --
練習したことはありませんよね
00:58
no, you haven't practiced, as far as I know --
シンクロした拍手ができるでしょうか?
01:00
can you get it together to clap in sync?
(拍手)
01:04
(Clapping)
(徐々にリズムが揃い 早くなってゆく)
これが我々が創発的行動と呼ぶものです
01:14
Whoa! Now, that's what we call emergent behavior.
01:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
これは予想外でした
01:18
So I didn't expect that, but -- I mean, I expected you could synchronize.
シンクロできるのは予想していましたが
01:22
It didn't occur to me you'd increase your frequency.
リズムが早まっていったのは予想外です
興味深いです
01:25
It's interesting.
(笑)
01:27
(Laughter)
これから何がわかるでしょうか?
01:30
So what do we make of that? First of all, we know that you're all brilliant.
ここにいるみなさんは賢いです
01:34
This is a room full of intelligent people, highly sensitive.
ここには知的で感受性の高い方々が集まっています
01:38
Some trained musicians out there.
それにプロの音楽家もいますね
それがシンクロできる理由でしょうか?
01:41
Is that what enabled you to synchronize?
そこで少し真面目な質問をしましょう
01:43
So to put the question a little more seriously,
みなさんが今やったような 自発的な同調をするのに
01:46
let's ask ourselves what are the minimum requirements for what you just did,
最低限必要なのは何でしょう?
01:50
for spontaneous synchronization.
みなさんぐらい賢くなければいけないのでしょうか?
01:53
Do you need, for instance, to be as smart as you are?
そもそもシンクロするのに頭脳は必要でしょうか?
01:57
Do you even need a brain at all just to synchronize?
02:04
Do you need to be alive? I mean, that's a spooky thought, right?
生物である必要は?
ただの物体が勝手にシンクロするというのは
02:09
Inanimate objects that might spontaneously synchronize themselves.
ちょっと気味が悪いですよね
でも今日は 実際そのようなシンクロが
自然界ではとてもありふれた現象だということを
02:14
It's real. In fact, I'll try to explain today that sync is maybe one of,
説明したいと思います
02:21
if not one of the most, perhaps the most pervasive drive in all of nature.
素粒子の世界から宇宙全体までの
あらゆるスケールで
02:25
It extends from the subatomic scale to the farthest reaches of the cosmos.
我々が教わったエントロピーの法則と反対に
02:31
It's a deep tendency toward order in nature
秩序へと向う傾向があります
02:35
that opposes what we've all been taught about entropy.
エントロピーの法則は間違いではありません
02:38
I mean, I'm not saying the law of entropy is wrong -- it's not.
しかし自然界にはこの法則に対抗して
自生的秩序を生み出す力があります
02:41
But there is a countervailing force in the universe --
しかし自然界にはこの法則に対抗して
自生的秩序を生み出す力があります
02:43
the tendency towards spontaneous order. And so that's our theme.
これが今日のテーマです
02:48
Now, to get into that, let me begin with what might have occurred to you immediately
自然界でのシンクロを語るときに
02:52
when you hear that we're talking about synchrony in nature,
みなさんが最初に思い浮べるのは
鳥や魚などが群になって
02:56
which is the glorious example of birds that flock together,
行動することではないでしょうか
03:02
or fish swimming in organized schools.
鳥や魚は特別に賢い生物ではありませんが
03:06
So these are not particularly intelligent creatures,
すばらしいバレエを披露してくれます
03:10
and yet, as we'll see, they exhibit beautiful ballets.
(音楽)
これはBBCの『捕食者』からの映像で
見ているのは防衛のための同調現象です
03:15
This is from a BBC show called "Predators,"
これはBBCの『捕食者』からの映像で
見ているのは防衛のための同調現象です
03:17
and what we're looking at here are examples of synchrony that have to do with defense.
小鳥や魚のように小さく無防備なものは
03:23
When you're small and vulnerable, like these starlings,
捕食者を避けたり困惑させるため 群になります
03:26
or like the fish, it helps to swarm to avoid predators, to confuse predators.
しばらく この素晴しい映像に集中しましょう
03:35
Let me be quiet for a second because this is so gorgeous.
(音楽)
生物学者は以前から
群れ行動のメカニズムについて悩んでいました
03:53
For a long time, biologists were puzzled by this behavior,
生物学者は以前から
群れ行動のメカニズムについて悩んでいました
03:56
wondering how it could be possible.
普通 シンクロするには統率者が必要です
03:59
We're so used to choreography giving rise to synchrony.
しかしこれらの生物には統率者はいません
04:03
These creatures are not choreographed.
自分たちだけでシンクロしているのです
04:05
They're choreographing themselves.
最近になってやっと
科学的メカニズムが分かってきました
04:09
And only today is science starting to figure out how it works.
オクスフォードの研究者イアン・クザンによる
コンピュータモデルを
04:13
I'll show you a computer model made by Iain Couzin, a researcher at Oxford,
ご覧いただきましょう
04:19
that shows how swarms work.
簡単なルールが三つあります
04:21
There are just three simple rules.
まず それぞれの個体は 一番近い仲間だけに注意しています
04:24
First, all the individuals are only aware of their nearest neighbors.
次に 全部の個体は隊列を組む傾向にあります
04:29
Second, all the individuals have a tendency to line up.
最後に 互いに近付こうとしますが
04:33
And third, they're all attracted to each other,
最低限の間隔を保とうとします
04:36
but they try to keep a small distance apart.
この3つのルールを組み込むと
04:39
And when you build those three rules in,
自動的に まるで魚や鳥のような
04:42
automatically you start to see swarms
04:44
that look very much like fish schools or bird flocks.
群の動作が発生するのです
なお 魚は 体長と同じくらいの距離を互いに保とうとします
04:48
Now, fish like to stay close together, about a body length apart.
鳥の場合は体長の3〜4倍くらいの距離です
04:52
Birds try to stay about three or four body lengths apart.
距離の違いを除けば ルールはまったく同じです
04:55
But except for that difference, the rules are the same for both.
(音楽)
ここで捕食者が現われると
動きが全く変わります
05:04
Now, all this changes when a predator enters the scene.
実は「捕食者が来たら逃げろ」という
4番目のルールがあります
05:09
There's a fourth rule: when a predator's coming, get out of the way.
(音楽)
このモデルでは 捕食者が攻撃をしています
05:23
Here on the model you see the predator attacking.
そしてたら 獲物はランダムな方向に逃げ
05:28
The prey move out in random directions,
そして お互いに近付くというルールのために また集まります
05:30
and then the rule of attraction brings them back together again,
別れては集まることが 繰り返されます
自然界で観察されていることですよね
05:33
so there's this constant splitting and reforming.
別れては集まることが 繰り返されます
自然界で観察されていることですよね
05:37
And you see that in nature.
(音楽)
互いに協調して行動してるように見えますが
05:47
Keep in mind that, although it looks as if each individual is acting to cooperate,
実はダーウィン的な 自己中心的の行動です
05:53
what's really going on is a kind of selfish Darwinian behavior.
05:57
Each is scattering away at random to try to save its scales or feathers.
それぞれが自分自身を守るために
ランダムに逃げています
この 自分自身を守りたいという願望から
それぞれがルールを守っており
06:03
That is, out of the desire to save itself,
この 自分自身を守りたいという願望から
それぞれがルールを守っており
06:06
each creature is following these rules,
それが結果的に群全体の安全に繋がっています
06:09
and that leads to something that's safe for all of them.
06:11
Even though it looks like they're thinking as a group, they're not.
群全体として考えているように見えますが
実際は違うのです
(音楽)
群れで行動することの利点はなんでしょうか?
06:32
You might wonder what exactly is the advantage to being in a swarm,
いくつかあります
06:35
so you can think of several.
たとえば 大きな群の中のほうが小さな集団よりも
06:37
As I say, if you're in a swarm, your odds of being the unlucky one
天敵に食べられる可能性は少ないでしょう
06:41
are reduced as compared to a small group.
危険を察知する目も 沢山あります
06:45
There are many eyes to spot danger.
また 小鳥の例でお見せするように
06:48
And you'll see in the example with the starlings, with the birds,
ハヤブサが小鳥の群に攻撃を仕掛けると
06:55
when this peregrine hawk is about to attack them,
パニックの波が危険信号として
06:57
that actually waves of panic can propagate,
非常に遠くまで伝わります
07:00
sending messages over great distances.
ごらんください
07:03
You'll see -- let's see, it's coming up possibly at the very end -- maybe not.
このすぐ後に見れるはずなんですが…
とりあえず このメカニズムにより
非常に短時間で
07:12
Information can be sent over half a kilometer away
500mもの距離を情報が伝わります
07:15
in a very short time through this mechanism.
あ ここで見れましたね
07:20
Yes, it's happening here.
07:22
See if you can see those waves propagating through the swarm.
群のなかを波が伝わってゆくのがわかりますね
コンピュータのおかげで 小鳥の群については
07:26
It's beautiful. The birds are, we sort of understand, we think,
少しは分かってきました
07:30
from that computer model, what's going on.
この単純な3つのルールと
07:32
As I say, it's just those three simple rules,
捕食者に注意するということだけです
07:34
plus the one about watch out for predators.
07:36
There doesn't seem to be anything mystical about this.
簡単なように思えます
しかし 実は 数学レベルでの解明は
できていません
07:39
We don't, however, really understand at a mathematical level.
私は数学者です もっと詳しく理解したい
07:42
I'm a mathematician. We would like to be able to understand better.
お見せしたコンピュータモデルは 現象を
07:46
I mean, I showed you a computer model, but a computer is not understanding.
理解せずに 実験を行ってるだけなのです
07:49
A computer is, in a way, just another experiment.
この現象がどうやって発生しているのか
07:52
We would really like to have a deeper insight into how this works
どうやって秩序が生れているのか
もっと深く知りたい
07:55
and to understand, you know, exactly where this organization comes from.
3つのルールから どうやって秩序が生れるのでしょうか?
08:00
How do the rules give rise to the patterns?
実は 蛍についてはもう少し詳しく
08:02
There is one case that we have begun to understand better,
解明されてきています
08:05
and it's the case of fireflies.
北米における蛍の発光は
08:08
If you see fireflies in North America,
他の北米の流儀に従って
08:10
like so many North American sorts of things,
互いのことは無視してバラバラに行動します
08:12
they tend to be independent operators. They ignore each other.
近くの仲間のことは無視して
08:16
They each do their own thing, flashing on and off,
それぞれが光を点滅させます
08:18
paying no attention to their neighbors.
しかし東南アジアでは 雄の蛍が
08:20
But in Southeast Asia -- places like Thailand or Malaysia or Borneo --
美しい協調的な行動をするのです
08:25
there's a beautiful cooperative behavior that occurs among male fireflies.
川縁で毎晩その様子を見れます
08:30
You can see it every night along the river banks.
マングローブの木々が
光で交信しあう蛍であふれるのです
08:33
The trees, mangrove trees, are filled with fireflies communicating with light.
特に 雄の蛍は完璧なタイミングでシンクロして
08:38
Specifically, it's male fireflies who are all flashing in perfect time together,
雌に強いメッセージを送るのです
08:43
in perfect synchrony, to reinforce a message to the females.
「ここだよ オレと交尾してくれ」
というメッセージです
08:47
And the message, as you can imagine, is "Come hither. Mate with me."
(音楽)
08:52
(Music)
これから 蛍一匹のスローモーションをお見せしましょう
08:59
In a second I'm going to show you a slow motion of a single firefly
これが動画1フレームです
09:03
so that you can get a sense. This is a single frame.
光って 消えて これで1/30秒です
09:06
Then on, and then off -- a 30th of a second, there.
では川縁全体の映像で
シンクロの正確さをご覧下さい
09:11
And then watch this whole river bank, and watch how precise the synchrony is.
(音楽)
光って さらに光って そして消えます
09:18
On, more on and then off.
(音楽)
小さな虫たちの光も 集まると非常に明るく
09:27
The combined light from these beetles -- these are actually tiny beetles --
海に出た漁師たちが自分の家に戻るために
09:30
is so bright that fishermen out at sea can use them
灯台として使うくらいです
すごいですよね
09:33
as navigating beacons to find their way back to their home rivers. It's stunning.
09:37
For a long time it was not believed
フランシス・ドレイクのような
初期の探検家達がタイで見た
09:39
when the first Western travelers, like Sir Francis Drake,
この驚くべき光景のことを
09:42
went to Thailand and came back with tales of this unbelievable spectacle.
長いこと 誰も信じませんでした
09:46
No one believed them.
ヨーロッパではこのような光景は見れません
09:48
We don't see anything like this in Europe or in the West.
正式に記録された後でも長いこと
09:51
And for a long time, even after it was documented,
錯覚の一種だと考えられていました
09:54
it was thought to be some kind of optical illusion.
瞼の痙攣だ という論文が出版されたり
09:56
Scientific papers were published saying it was twitching eyelids
何もないところにパターンを見い出そうとする
人間の認識能力が
09:59
that explained it, or, you know, a human being's tendency
原因だと説明されました
10:03
to see patterns where there are none.
でも この夜景のビデオを見れば
本当にシンクロしてると
10:05
But I hope you've convinced yourself now, with this nighttime video,
みなさんも納得されたでしょう
10:08
that they really were very well synchronized.
このような自生的秩序を生み出すのは
10:11
Okay, well, the issue then is, do we need to be alive
何も生きているものばかりではない
10:14
to see this kind of spontaneous order,
ということを先程 ほのめかしました
10:16
and I've already hinted that the answer is no.
そう 完全な生命体ではなくても
10:21
Well, you don't have to be a whole creature.
たとえば あなたの心臓を鼓動させている
10:23
You can even be just a single cell.
心臓のペースメーカ細胞のように
独立した細胞でも十分なのです
10:25
Like, take, for instance, your pacemaker cells in your heart right now.
心臓のペースメーカ細胞のように
独立した細胞でも十分なのです
10:28
They're keeping you alive.
心臓の鼓動は 洞房結節により生み出されています
10:30
Every beat of your heart depends on this crucial region, the sinoatrial node,
この一万個の独立した細胞群は 電気的なリズム
10:35
which has about 10,000 independent cells that would each beep,
つまり電圧の上下によって信号を心室へと伝えています
10:39
have an electrical rhythm -- a voltage up and down --
つまり電圧の上下によって信号を心室へと伝えています
10:42
to send a signal to the ventricles to pump.
このペースメーカーは ひとつの細胞ではありません
10:45
Now, your pacemaker is not a single cell.
1万の細胞が協調して放電することによって
10:48
It's this democracy of 10,000 cells that all have to fire in unison
はじめて正しく動くのです
10:51
for the pacemaker to work correctly.
しかし シンクロするのは常に良いことではありません
10:54
I don't want to give you the idea that synchrony is always a good idea.
癲癇(てんかん)の発作では 10億もの細胞が
10:57
If you have epilepsy, there is an instance of billions of brain cells, or at least millions,
病的に協調して同時に放電します
11:02
discharging in pathological concert.
ですから 同調するということは
良いこととは限らないのです
11:06
So this tendency towards order is not always a good thing.
レーザ光線は 生物でも細胞でもない
シンクロ現象で 原子レベルでの
11:10
You don't have to be alive. You don't have to be even a single cell.
レーザ光線は 生物でも細胞でもない
シンクロ現象で 原子レベルでの
11:13
If you look, for instance, at how lasers work,
調和によって発生します
11:16
that would be a case of atomic synchrony.
この天井の照明とレーザとの決定的な違いは
11:19
In a laser, what makes laser light so different from the light above my head here
干渉性にあります
11:23
is that this light is incoherent --
天井の照明は みなさんの最初の拍手のように
11:25
many different colors and different frequencies,
さまざまな色 周波数が混じっています
11:28
sort of like the way you clapped initially --
しかしレーザ光は リズムの揃った拍手です
11:31
but if you were a laser, it would be rhythmic applause.
すべての原子が同じように振動して
11:34
It would be all atoms pulsating in unison,
ひとつの色 周波数を発しているのです
11:36
emitting light of one color, one frequency.
さて ここからが私のプレゼンの
一番むずかしいところです
11:40
Now comes the very risky part of my talk,
非生命体がシンクロする例をお見せしたいと思います
11:43
which is to demonstrate that inanimate things can synchronize.
息を飲んで見守って下さい
11:47
Hold your breath for me.
ここにあるのは空のペットボトルが2つ
11:49
What I have here are two empty water bottles.
手品を披露しようというわけではなくて
11:56
This is not Keith Barry doing a magic trick.
不器用な人間がペットボトルとたわむれてるだけです
11:58
This is a klutz just playing with some water bottles.
ここにメトロノームもあります
12:03
I have some metronomes here.
12:08
Can you hear that?
聞こえますか?
12:12
All right, so, I've got a metronome,
それから これは世界最小のメトロノームです
12:14
and it's the world's smallest metronome, the -- well, I shouldn't advertise.
... おっと 宣伝はダメでしたね
12:18
Anyway, so this is the world's smallest metronome.
とにかく 最小のメトロノームです
これを一番早い設定にしてみます
12:21
I've set it on the fastest setting, and I'm going to now take
もうひとつも同じにします
12:24
another one set to the same setting.
まずはテーブルに置いて試してみましょう
12:28
We can try this first. If I just put them on the table together,
この2つがシンクロする理由はありませんし
多分しないでしょう
12:33
there's no reason for them to synchronize, and they probably won't.
(メトロノームの音)
ここに立ったほうが良く聞こえますね
12:42
Maybe you'd better listen to them. I'll stand here.
(さっきより少し大きくなったメトロノームの音)
周期が完全に同じではないので
12:49
What I'm hoping is that they might just drift apart
徐々にズレてゆくはずです
12:51
because their frequencies aren't perfectly the same.
(徐々にずれるメトロノームの音)
ほら ズレました
13:01
Right? They did.
互いにコミュニケーションできないからです
13:03
They were in sync for a while, but then they drifted apart.
13:07
And the reason is that they're not able to communicate.
メトロノームがコミュニケーションだなんて
13:09
Now, you might think that's a bizarre idea.
おかしな考え方だと思いますよね?
13:11
How can metronomes communicate?
でも 実は 機械的な作用で出来るのです
13:14
Well, they can communicate through mechanical forces.
そのためのチャンスを用意しましょう
13:17
So I'm going to give them a chance to do that.
13:19
I also want to wind this one up a bit. How can they communicate?
この2つを 動く台に乗せます
13:22
I'm going to put them on a movable platform,
「コーネル大学院ガイド」という台です
13:24
which is the "Guide to Graduate Study at Cornell." Okay? So here it is.
(笑)
さて どうなるでしょうか
13:33
Let's see if we can get this to work.
嫁さんには 全体がひっくり返ってしまわないように
13:37
My wife pointed out to me that it will work better if I put both on at the same time
同時に載せろと言われたのですが…
13:41
because otherwise the whole thing will tip over.
13:43
All right. So there we go. Let's see. OK, I'm not trying to cheat --
できましたね さてと…
さらにズルをしないため
ズレた状態から始めたいのですが
13:50
let me start them out of sync. No, hard to even do that.
それもまた難しいんです
(メトロノームの音 ずれていたのが徐々に同じリズムになる)
14:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
よし ではまたズレてしまう前に下ろしましょう
14:12
All right. So before any one goes out of sync, I'll just put those right there.
(笑)
14:17
(Laughter)
ちょっと奇妙に思えるでしょうが
14:18
Now, that might seem a bit whimsical,
このように ありふれている 自生的秩序の発生が
14:20
but this pervasiveness of this tendency towards spontaneous order
思いもしない結果につながることがあります
14:25
sometimes has unexpected consequences.
良い例として
2000年のロンドンで起きた事件があります
14:29
And a clear case of that,
良い例として
2000年のロンドンで起きた事件があります
14:31
was something that happened in London in the year 2000.
テムズ川の美しい ミレニアム・ブリッジは
14:34
The Millennium Bridge was supposed to be the pride of London --
100年にわたるロンドンの歴史の中で
テムズ川を渡す
14:37
a beautiful new footbridge erected across the Thames,
最初の歩行者橋になる 誇るべき事業でした
14:41
first river crossing in over 100 years in London.
橋のデザインは 大きなコンテストで選ばれ
14:45
There was a big competition for the design of this bridge,
勝利したのは 卓越したチームでした
14:48
and the winning proposal was submitted by an unusual team --
メンバーのノーマン・フォスター卿はおそらく
14:52
in the TED spirit, actually -- of an architect --
TED精神を体現した イギリスの最も偉大な建築家でしょう
14:55
perhaps the greatest architect in the United Kingdom, Lord Norman Foster --
14:59
working with an artist, a sculptor, Sir Anthony Caro,
共に働くのは彫刻家のアンソニー・カロ
そして設計事務所オヴ・アラップ
15:04
and an engineering firm, Ove Arup.
フォスター卿が子供の時に読んだ
15:08
And together they submitted a design based on Lord Foster's vision,
漫画をもとにしたデザインで優勝しました
15:13
which was -- he remembered as a kid reading Flash Gordon comic books,
その漫画では 主人公のフラッシュ・ゴードンが
15:17
and he said that when Flash Gordon would come to an abyss,
断崖でライトセイバーのようなものを投げます
15:20
he would shoot what today would be a kind of a light saber.
投げられたライトセイバーは断崖をまたぐ
一筋の光となり
15:23
He would shoot his light saber across the abyss, making a blade of light,
その光の上を駆け抜けるのです
15:27
and then scamper across on this blade of light.
「テムズを渡す光が私のビジョンだ」
15:29
He said, "That's the vision I want to give to London.
とフォスター卿は語りました
15:31
I want a blade of light across the Thames."
そうしてできあがった一筋の光が
15:35
So they built the blade of light,
うすい鋼鉄のリボンでできた
15:37
and it's a very thin ribbon of steel, the world's --
ケーブルが橋の側面に設置された
15:43
probably the flattest and thinnest suspension bridge there is,
世界で最も薄く平らな吊り橋でした
15:46
with cables that are out on the side.
普通 吊り橋は上からケーブルで吊っていますが
15:49
You're used to suspension bridges with big droopy cables on the top.
この橋のケーブルは橋の横にあって
15:52
These cables were on the side of the bridge,
まるで輪ゴムをテムズ側にピンと張ったように
15:55
like if you took a rubber band and stretched it taut across the Thames --
橋を支えているのです
15:59
that's what's holding up this bridge.
みんなが橋を渡りたいと思っていたので
開通日は 何千もの人が駆けつけました
16:01
Now, everyone was very excited to try it out.
16:03
On opening day, thousands of Londoners came out, and something happened.
みんなが橋を渡りたいと思っていたので
開通日は 何千もの人が駆けつけました
そこで事件が起きました
そして 開通後二日で橋は閉鎖されたのです
16:08
And within two days the bridge was closed to the public.
開通の日に橋の上にいた人々の
16:12
So I want to first show you some interviews with people
インタビューを聞いてみましょう
16:17
who were on the bridge on opening day, who will describe what happened.
男性: 横揺れがおきて 上下にはあまり揺れませんでした
16:20
Man: It really started moving sideways and slightly up and down,
ボートに乗ったみたいでした
16:25
rather like being on the boat.
女性: 不安定な感じでした 風も強かったです
16:28
Woman: Yeah, it felt unstable, and it was very windy,
旗が上下にはためいていたのを覚えてます
16:31
and I remember it had lots of flags up and down the sides, so you could definitely --
横向きに 何か起きてたようです
16:35
there was something going on sideways, it felt, maybe.
取材者: 上下には?
16:38
Interviewer: Not up and down? Boy: No.
少年: 動いてなかったよ
取材者: 前後にも?
16:40
Interviewer: And not forwards and backwards? Boy: No.
少年: うん
取材者: 横揺れだけだね どれくらい動いていたと思う?
16:42
Interviewer: Just sideways. About how much was it moving, do you think?
少年: ええと
16:45
Boy: It was about --
取材者: これくらい? それともこれくらい?
16:47
Interviewer: I mean, that much, or this much?
少年: 二番目のほう
16:49
Boy: About the second one.
取材者: これくらいだね?
16:51
Interviewer: This much? Boy: Yeah.
男性: だいたい15cm から 20cm くらいだったと思います
16:53
Man: It was at least six, six to eight inches, I would have thought.
取材者: つまり 最低でもこれくらい?
16:56
Interviewer: Right, so, at least this much? Man: Oh, yes.
男性: そうです
女性: 橋を降りなきゃ と思いました
16:58
Woman: I remember wanting to get off.
取材者: そんなに?
17:00
Interviewer: Oh, did you? Woman: Yeah. It felt odd.
女性: はい
取材者: そんな怖かったですか?
17:02
Interviewer: So it was enough to be scary? Woman: Yeah, but I thought that was just me.
女性: はい 自分だけかと思いましたが
取材者: なんでそんな歩き方を?
17:08
Interviewer: Ah! Now, tell me why you had to do this?
少年: こうしないとバランスを崩しそうだったの
17:11
Boy: We had to do this because, to keep in balance
バランスを取らないと
17:13
because if you didn't keep your balance,
左右に45度くらい傾いてしまいそうだったから
17:15
then you would just fall over about, like, to the left or right, about 45 degrees.
取材者: 普通に歩いてみて下さい
17:21
Interviewer: So just show me how you walk normally. Right.
そして橋が揺れはじめた時の歩き方は?
17:26
And then show me what it was like when the bridge started to go. Right.
すると 意識して足を左右に押し出すように
17:31
So you had to deliberately push your feet out sideways and --
短い歩幅で?
17:35
oh, and short steps?
男性: その通りです
17:37
Man: That's right. And it seemed obvious to me
たくさんの人がそうやっていました
17:40
that it was probably the number of people on it.
取材者: みんな わざわざそうやって歩いたんですか?
17:44
Interviewer: Were they deliberately walking in step, or anything like that?
男性: いや 橋の動きで自然にそうなってしまうんです
17:48
Man: No, they just had to conform to the movement of the bridge.
スティーブン: 何が起きていたのか
十分なヒントがありましたね
17:52
Steven Strogatz: All right, so that already gives you a hint of what happened.
ミレニアム・ブリッジを この台だと考えれば
17:55
Think of the bridge as being like this platform.
歩行者はメトロノームだと言えます
17:59
Think of the people as being like metronomes.
わたしたちが歩く動作をすると
18:02
Now, you might not be used to thinking of yourself as a metronome,
実際 メトロノームのように揺れ動くわけです
18:05
but after all, we do walk like -- I mean, we oscillate back and forth as we walk.
橋の上の人々のような歩き方なら なおさらです
18:09
And especially if we start to walk like those people did, right?
18:12
They all showed this strange sort of skating gait
橋が動き始めるとみんな
スケートするような歩き方になってしまいました
18:16
that they adopted once the bridge started to move.
これから橋の上での映像をお見せしましょう
18:19
And so let me show you now the footage of the bridge.
開通の日の橋の映像のあとには
橋が揺れる原因を解明した
18:22
But also, after you see the bridge on opening day, you'll see an interesting clip
ケンブリッジの橋梁技術者
アラン・マクロビィの研究に関する
18:26
of work done by a bridge engineer at Cambridge named Allan McRobie,
興味深い映像をご覧頂きます
18:31
who figured out what happened on the bridge,
彼は 説明のために橋のシミュレータを作りました
18:33
and who built a bridge simulator to explain exactly what the problem was.
そして 原因は 技術者が知らなかった
18:37
It was a kind of unintended positive feedback loop
橋の揺れかたと人々の歩き方によって引き起された
18:41
between the way the people walked and the way the bridge began to move,
意図しない正のフィードバックでした
18:44
that engineers knew nothing about.
確か この映像に最初に登場する人物は
18:46
Actually, I think the first person you'll see
18:48
is the young engineer who was put in charge of this project. Okay.
このプロジェクトを担当した若い技術者です
取材者: 怪我人は?
18:53
(Video) Interviewer: Did anyone get hurt? Engineer: No.
技術者: いません
取材者: 揺れは小さかった?
18:55
Interviewer: Right. So it was quite small -- Engineer: Yes. Interviewer: -- but real?
技術者: ええ
取材者: でも揺れてた?
18:58
Engineer: Absolutely. Interviewer: You thought, "Oh, bother."
技術者: そうです
取材者: どう思いましたか?
技術者: がっかりしました
19:01
Engineer: I felt I was disappointed about it.
長い時間をかけて設計し 分析して
19:04
We'd spent a lot of time designing this bridge, and we'd analyzed it,
設計より重い荷重にも耐えられるか確認して
19:08
we'd checked it to codes -- to heavier loads than the codes --
そして まったく知らなかったことが起きたんです
19:11
and here it was doing something that we didn't know about.
取材者: 予想してなかったんですね
19:14
Interviewer: You didn't expect. Engineer: Exactly.
ナレータ: この衝撃的な映像を見ると
19:16
Narrator: The most dramatic and shocking footage
何百人もの群集が一体となり
19:19
shows whole sections of the crowd -- hundreds of people --
橋と一緒に 左右にリズムを合せて
19:22
apparently rocking from side to side in unison,
シンクロして動いています
19:24
not only with each other, but with the bridge.
このシンクロした動きが橋を動かしているようです
19:27
This synchronized movement seemed to be driving the bridge.
どうやって群集がシンクロしたのでしょうか?
19:31
But how could the crowd become synchronized?
ミレニアム・ブリッジ特有の何かが
この現象を引き起したのでしょうか?
19:34
Was there something special about the Millennium Bridge that caused this effect?
この点が調査の主眼となりました
19:38
This was to be the focus of the investigation.
取材者: ついにシミュレータが完成しました
こいつは揺らすことが出来ます
19:42
Interviewer: Well, at last the simulated bridge is finished, and I can make it wobble.
アランさん あなたが責任者ですね
アラン:はい
19:49
Now, Allan, this is all your fault, isn't it? Allan McRobie: Yes.
取材者: あなたが 作ったこのシミュレータで
19:53
Interviewer: You designed this, yes, this simulated bridge,
実際の橋の動きを再現できるんですね?
19:55
and this, you reckon, mimics the action of the real bridge?
アラン: はい 実際の挙動を良く再現しています
19:58
AM: It captures a lot of the physics, yes.
20:00
Interviewer: Right. So if we get on it, we should be able to wobble it, yes?
取材者: それでは乗って 橋が揺れるか見てみましょう
ケンブリッジの橋梁技術者 アラン・マクロビィから
20:06
Allan McRobie is a bridge engineer from Cambridge who wrote to me,
正しい長さの振り子にシミュレータを吊せば
実際の橋と同じように揺らすことが出来るという
20:09
suggesting that a bridge simulator ought to wobble
正しい長さの振り子にシミュレータを吊せば
実際の橋と同じように揺らすことが出来るという
20:12
in the same way as the real bridge --
手紙を受け取りました
20:14
provided we hung it on pendulums of exactly the right length.
アラン: これは たった数トンなので 歩けば簡単に揺れます
20:16
AM: This one's only a couple of tons, so it's fairly easy to get going.
取材者: 揺れ始めましたね
20:19
Just by walking. Interviewer: Well, it's certainly going now.
アラン: わざと揺らさなくても ただ歩くだけで揺れます
20:22
AM: It doesn't have to be a real dangle. Just walk. It starts to go.
取材者: とても歩くのが難しいですね
20:25
Interviewer: It's actually quite difficult to walk.
次にどうを踏みだすか注意しないと
20:28
You have to be careful where you put your feet down, don't you,
ひっくり返ってしまいそうです
20:31
because if you get it wrong, it just throws you off your feet.
アラン: 足をとられて普通に歩くことができません
20:34
AM: It certainly affects the way you walk, yes. You can't walk normally on it.
取材者: 足を前に踏みだしたくても正面からそれますね
アラン: その通りです
20:39
Interviewer: No. If you try and put one foot in front of another,
取材者: 足を前に踏みだしたくても正面からそれますね
アラン: その通りです
20:41
it's moving your feet away from under you. AM: Yes.
取材者: 足を横に出すことになってしまいます
20:44
Interviewer: So you've got to put your feet out sideways.
このシミュレータの上で歩くと
20:47
So already, the simulator is making me walk in exactly the same way
実際の橋にいた人の証言と同じようになります
20:50
as our witnesses walked on the real bridge.
アラン: アイススケートのような歩き方です
20:52
AM: ... ice-skating gait. There isn't all this sort of snake way of walking.
取材者: さらに実験で確認するために
20:55
Interviewer: For a more convincing experiment,
橋の群集を再現して確認しました
20:57
I wanted my own opening-day crowd, the sound check team.
ただ「普通に歩いて下さい」と言いました
21:00
Their instructions: just walk normally.
(足音と笑い声)
興味深ことに 誰もわざと揺らそうとしてないのです
21:12
It's really intriguing because none of these people is trying to drive it.
みんな歩くのがむずかしいので
21:16
They're all having some difficulty walking.
自然と このような歩き方になってしまい
21:19
And the only way you can walk comfortably is by getting in step.
結局 みんなで橋を揺らすことになってしまいます
21:22
But then, of course, everyone is driving the bridge.
橋の揺れで仕方なく この歩き方をしてるのですが
21:27
You can't help it. You're actually forced by the movement of the bridge to get into step,
それが橋を余計に揺らしてしまうのです
21:32
and therefore to drive it to move further.
(笑)
スティーブン: このおかしな歩き方事件で
21:38
SS: All right, well, with that from the Ministry of Silly Walks,
私の話は終わりです
21:42
maybe I'd better end. I see I've gone over.
あなたの身の回りの驚異的なシンクロ現象に
21:45
But I hope that you'll go outside and see the world in a new way,
興味を持って頂ければ嬉しいです
21:48
to see all the amazing synchrony around us. Thank you.
(拍手)
21:51
(Applause)
Translated by Ryoichi KATO
Reviewed by Makoto Ikeo

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Steven Strogatz - Mathematician
In his work in applied mathematics, Steven Strogatz studies the way math and biology intersect.

Why you should listen

Steven Strogatz studies some of the most interesting problems in applied mathematics -- such as the intersection of math and biology, looking for patterns in the human sleep-wake cycle or in swarms of blinking fireflies.

He's been looking at nonlinear dynamics and chaos applied to physics, engineering and biology, and branching out into new areas, such as explorating of the small-world phenomenon in social networks (popularly known as "six degrees of separation"), and its generalization to other complex networks in nature and technology.

Strogatz' work has been in the news as British engineers released the definitive paper on the Millenium Bridge wobble,  and its roots in how people walk on an unpredictable surface.

In 2012, he re-examined the "birthday problem" >>

More profile about the speaker
Steven Strogatz | Speaker | TED.com