sponsored links
Serious Play 2008

John Maeda: My journey in design

ジョン・マエダ 彼のデザインの旅について語る

May 5, 2008

デザイナー ジョン・マエダがシアトルの豆腐屋から2008年にロードアイランドデザイン学校の校長に到るまでの道のりについて話します。飽くることのない実験者であり機知に富んだ観察者がデザインとコンピューターを探求する極めて重要な機会です。

John Maeda - Artist
John Maeda, the former president of the Rhode Island School of Design, is dedicated to linking design and technology. Through the software tools, web pages and books he creates, he spreads his philosophy of elegant simplicity. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm kind of tired of talking about simplicity, actually,
今日はシンプリシティでについてではなく
00:16
so I thought I'd make my life more complex, as a serious play.
人生を真剣勝負のように複雑に捉え
00:19
So, I'm going to, like, go through some slides
昔撮った写真をお見せしながら
00:22
from way back when,
人生を振り返り
00:24
and walk through them to give you a sense of how I end up here.
今ここに到るまでのお話ししたいと思います
00:26
So, basically it all began with
元をたどると全ては
00:29
this whole idea of a computer.
一台のコンピューターから始まりました
00:31
Who has a computer? Yeah.
コンピューターをお持ちの方はいますか
00:33
O.K., so, everyone has a computer.
どうやら皆さんお持ちですね
00:36
Even a mobile phone, it's a computer.
携帯電話もコンピューターと言えます
00:38
And -- anyone remember this workbook,
この学習帳を覚えている人はいますか
00:40
"Instant Activities for Your Apple" --
「すぐできる Apple」
00:43
free poster in each book?
本の折り込みチラシです
00:45
This was how computing began.
初期のコンピューターに
00:47
Don't forget: a computer came out; it had no software.
ソフトウェアは含まれていなかったので
00:49
You'd buy that thing, you'd bring it home, you'd plug it in,
買って来て家のコンセントをつないただけでは
00:53
and it would do absolutely nothing at all.
どうすることもできませんでした
00:56
So, you had to program it,
自分でプログラムを組む必要があり
00:58
and there were great programming, like, tutorials, like this.
よくできたチュートリアルがありました
01:00
I mean, this was great.
本当に良くできたものです
01:02
It's, like, you know, Herbie the Apple II.
これはApple IIのHerbieです
01:04
It's such a great way to --
よくできていました
01:06
I mean, they should make Java books like this,
Java本もこんなふうに作るべきだと思います
01:08
and we've have no problem learning a program.
そうすればプログラムを学ぶのに苦労はいりません
01:11
But this was a great, grand time of the computer,
当時はコンピューターの黎明期で
01:13
when it was just a raw, raw, what is it? kind of an era.
コンピューターの未開時代と言えます
01:15
And, you see,
そんな時代が
01:19
this era coincided with my own childhood.
私の幼少期でした
01:22
I grew up in a tofu factory in Seattle.
私はシアトルの豆腐屋で育ちました
01:24
Who of you grew up in a family business,
家業のある家で育った人はいますか
01:27
suffered the torture? Yes, yes.
生き地獄に苦しみながら いますね
01:30
The torture was good. Wasn't it good torture?
生き地獄はいいものです そう思いませんか
01:32
It was just life-changing, you know. And so, in my life, you know, I was in the tofu;
家業の豆腐屋が私の人生を
01:35
it was a family business.
変えました
01:38
And my mother was a kind of a designer, also.
母はある意味デザイナーで
01:40
She'd make this kind of, like, wall of tofu cooking,
店の壁いっぱいに豆腐料理の写真を貼って
01:43
and it would confuse the customers,
お客さんを混乱させました
01:46
because they all thought it was a restaurant.
豆腐レストランだと勘違いさせてしまったのです
01:48
A bad sort of branding thing, or whatever.
ブランディングの失敗例です
01:50
But, anyway, that's where I grew up,
そんな環境で私は育ちました
01:52
in this little tofu factory in Seattle,
シアトルの小さな豆腐屋です
01:54
and it was kind of like this:
この小さな部屋で育ったようなものです
01:56
a small room where I kind of grew up. I'm big there in that picture.
写真には成長した私が映ってます
01:59
That's my dad. My dad was kind of like MacGyver, really:
父は「冒険野郎マクガイバー」のような人で
02:02
he would invent, like, ways to make things heavy.
モノを重くする方法を発案したりしました
02:05
Like back here, there's like, concrete block technology here,
コンクリートブロック技術を駆使して
02:08
and he would need the concrete blocks to press the tofu,
豆腐は圧をかけるための重石を必要とします
02:11
because tofu is actually kind of a liquidy type of thing,
豆腐は元は液体のようなもので
02:14
and so you have to have heavy stuff
重い物で圧力をかけて
02:17
to push out the liquid and make it hard.
水分を抜いて固くする必要があるからです
02:19
Tofu comes out in these big batches,
豆腐は元はこんな大きな塊で
02:21
and my father would sort of cut them by hand.
父は手でこれを切り分けていました
02:24
I can't tell you -- family business story: you'd understand this --
家業については言葉では語り尽くせません
02:27
my father was the most sincere man possible.
父はとてもとても誠実な人でした
02:30
He walked into a Safeway once on a rainy day,
雨の日にスーパーマーケットSafewayに行き
02:33
slipped, broke his arm, rushed out:
滑って腕をケガしましたが急いで店を出ました
02:36
he didn't want to inconvenience Safeway.
店の名に泥を塗りたくなかったのです
02:38
So, instead, you know, my father's, like, arm's broken
父は腕をケガし
02:41
for two weeks in the store, and that week --
2週間働く事ができなかったので
02:43
now, those two weeks were when my older brother and I
私たち兄弟は父に代わって
02:46
had to do everything.
全ての事をする必要がありました
02:48
And that was torture, real torture.
まさに生き地獄とはこの事です
02:50
Because, you see, we'd seen my father
私たちは父が
02:53
taking the big block of tofu and cutting it,
豆腐に重石をのせ 切る姿を見ていました
02:55
like, knife in, zap, zap, zap. We thought, wow.
鮮やかな包丁裁きでスッスッスッと
02:57
So, the first time I did that, I went, like, whoa! Like this.
私が初めてやった時はこうなりました
03:00
Bad blocks. But anyways,
ひどい出来でした
03:03
the tofu to me was kind of my origin, basically.
この豆腐屋が私の原点です
03:06
And because working in a store was so hard,
お店で働くのはとてもきつかったので
03:10
I liked going to school; it was like heaven.
学校が好きでした まるで天国でした
03:13
And I was really good at school.
学校での成績は良く
03:16
So, when I got to MIT, you know,
MITに行くことになりました
03:18
as most of you who are creatives,
芸術的な人は 両親から
03:20
your parents all told you not to be creative, right?
芸術的であるなと言われたりしませんか
03:22
So, same way, you know,
同じように
03:25
I was good at art and good at math, and my father says, he's --
私は美術と数学が得意でしたでが父は
03:27
John's good at math.
「ジョンは数学が得意だ」と言っていました
03:29
I went to MIT, did my math,
MITでは数学を専攻していましたが
03:31
but I had this wonderful opportunity,
この素晴らしい機会が巡ってきました
03:33
because computers had just become visual.
コンピューターがちょうど視覚的になり始め
03:35
The Apple -- Macintosh just came out;
Appleのマッキントッシュが出た時期でした
03:38
I had a Mac in hand when I went to MIT.
MITに通っていた私は
03:40
And it was a time when a guy who, kind of,
Macを所有していて
03:42
could cross the two sides --
どちらに進むか悩む分岐点にいました
03:44
it was a good time.
良いタイミングでした
03:46
And so, I remember that my first major piece of software
初めて手がけたソフトウェアは
03:48
was on a direct copy of then-Aldus PageMaker.
Aldus PageMaker となりました
03:51
I made a desktop publishing system way back when,
その前には 出版システムを作っていました
03:54
and that was, kind of, my first step into figuring out how to --
これがきっかけとなり
03:57
oh, these two sides are kind of fun to mix.
2つのものを混ぜ合わせる楽しさに目覚めました
04:00
And the problem when you're younger --
若さ故の問題というのは
04:02
for all you students out there --
全ての学生に言える事ですが
04:04
is, your head gets kind of big really easy.
すぐ頭でっかちになってしまうということです
04:06
And when I was making icons, I was, like,
アイコンを作っているときは自分が
04:09
the icon master,
アイコンマスターになった気分でした
04:11
and I was, like, yeah, I'm really good at this, you know.
「オレはできるんだ」ってな感じで
04:13
And then luckily, you know,
そして幸運にも
04:15
I had the fortune of going to something called a library,
私は図書館へ行く機会に恵まれており
04:17
and in the library I came upon this very book.
この本と
04:20
I found this book. It's called,
出会いました
04:23
"Thoughts on Design," by a man named Paul Rand.
ポール・ランドの"Thoughts on Design"です
04:25
It's a little slim volume; I'm not sure if you've seen this.
ご覧になった事があるかもしれませんが
04:28
It's a very nice little book. It's about this guy, Paul Rand,
薄い本で 著者自身について書かれています
04:30
who was one of the greatest graphic designers,
彼は偉大なグラフィック・デザイナーで
04:33
and also a great writer as well.
作家としても有名です
04:35
And when I saw this man's work,
彼の作品を見た時
04:37
I realized how bad I was at design,
私のデザインがいかに酷いものか
04:39
or whatever I called it back then,
デザインと言ってもいいものか気づかされ
04:42
and I suddenly had a kind of career goal,
情熱と共に追い求める事ができる
04:44
kind of in hot pursuit.
キャリアゴールのようなものが浮かびました
04:46
So I kind of switched. I went to MIT, finished.
それから私はMITを卒業し
04:50
I got my masters,
and then went to art school after that.
修士を修め 美術学校に行きました
04:54
And just began to design stuff,
デザインを始め 箸の包装紙やナプキン
04:58
like chopstick wrappers, napkins, menus -- whatever I could get a handle on:
メニューなど 扱えるものはなんでもデザインしました
05:00
sort of wheel-and-deal, move up in the design world, whatever.
とにかく手を動かしました
05:02
And isn't it that strange moment when you publish your design?
デザインを世に出す瞬間はとても不思議な気分です
05:05
Remember that moment -- publishing your designs?
その時のことを今でも良く覚えています
05:08
Remember that moment? It felt so good, didn't it?
覚えていますか?とても壮快ですよね
05:10
So, I was published, you know,
自分のデザインが世に出て
05:13
so, wow, my design's in a book, you know?
本に取り上げられるのは快感です
05:14
After that, things kind of got strange,
その後 不思議な事に
05:16
and I got thinking about the computer,
コンピューターはいつも私の悩みの種で
05:18
because the computer to me always, kind of, bothered me.
そればかり考えていました
05:20
I didn't quite get it. And Paul Rand
理解できなかったのです
05:23
was a kind of crusty designer,
ポール・ランドは気難しいデザイナーでした
05:25
you know, a crusty designer, like a good -- kind of like a good French bread?
良いフランスパンのようなものでしょうか
05:28
You know, he wrote in one of his books:
彼の本にこう書いてあります
05:31
"A Yale student once said,
イェールの学生が こう言いました
05:33
'I came here to learn how to design, not how to use a computer.'
「私はコンピューターの使い方ではなくデザインを学びにきました 」
05:35
Design schools take heed."
デザイン学校は聞き入れました
05:38
This is in the '80s,
80年代のことです
05:40
in the great clash of computer/non-computer people.
コンピューター人間と非コンピューター人間の
05:42
A very difficult time, actually.
衝突です とても難しい時代でした
05:45
And this to me was an important message from Rand.
これはランドから私への重要なメッセージで
05:47
And so I began to sort of mess with the computer at the time.
当時コンピューターに手を出すきっかけになりました
05:51
This is the first sort of play thing I did, my own serious play.
これが私の最初の真剣勝負です
05:54
I built a working version of an Adobe Illustrator-ish thing.
Adobe Illustratorのようなものを作成しました
05:57
It looks like Illustrator; it can, like, draw.
Illustratorのように描く事ができます
06:01
It was very hard to make this, actually.
作成するのは結構難しく
06:03
It took a month to make this part.
1ヶ月を要しました
06:05
And then I thought, what if I added this feature,
それから 機能追加を検討しました
06:07
where I can say, this point,
ポイントは
06:09
you can fly like a bird. You're free, kind of thing.
鳥が飛ぶように 自由に動くということです
06:11
So I could, sort of, change the kind of stability
安定性に変更を加え
06:14
with a little control there on the dial,
小さなダイヤルでコントロールできるようにし
06:18
and I can sort of watch it flip around.
バタバタ動き続ける状態を作りました
06:20
And this is in 1993.
1993年のことです
06:22
And when my professors saw this, they were very upset at me.
教授達はこれを見て 激怒しました
06:25
They were saying, Why's it moving?
教授:「なぜ動くのだ?」
06:29
They were saying, Make it stop now.
教授:「止めなさい」と
06:32
Now, I was saying, Well, that's the whole point: it's moving.
私は「動いているという事がポイントなんです」と言い
06:35
And he says, Well, when's it going to stop?
彼は「いつ止まるんだ」と言いました
06:37
And I said, Never.
私が「止まる事はありません」と言うと
06:39
And he said, Even worse. Stop it now.
彼はさらに不機嫌になり「今すぐ止めなさい」と言いました
06:40
I started studying this whole idea,
私はこのアイディアについてさらに研究を進めました
06:43
of like, what is this computer? It's a strange medium.
このコンピューターという不思議なメディアは何ものだろう
06:45
It's not like print. It's not like video.
印刷物でないし ビデオでもない
06:48
It lasts forever. It's a very strange medium.
永遠に続く とても不思議なメディア
06:51
So, I went off with this,
私はこれを
06:54
and began to look for things even more.
もっと探求し始めました
06:56
And so in Japan, I began to experiment with people.
日本では人による実験をしました
06:58
This is actually bad: human experiments.
この実験は良い例ではないですが
07:01
I would do these things where I'd have students become pens:
学生にはペンを渡します
07:04
there's blue pen, red pen, green pen, black pen.
青 赤 緑 黒のペンがあり
07:07
And someone sits down and draws a picture.
ひとりが座り絵の描き方を指示します
07:10
They're laughing because he said,
彼の言った事に対して笑っています
07:18
draw from the middle-right to the middle, and he kind of messed up.
絵はめちゃくちゃになりました
07:20
See, humans don't know how to take orders;
人間は注文を受ける方法がわからないのです
07:23
the computer's so good at it.
その点 コンピューターはとても上手です
07:25
This guy figured out how to get the computer to draw with two pens at once:
彼は1度に2本で描く方法を突き止めました
07:27
you know, you, pen, do this, and you, pen, do this.
あなたはこれ きみはこれを描いてと
07:30
And so began to have multiple pens on the page --
複数のペンで一度に描けます
07:33
again, hard to do with our hands.
我々の手で行なうには困難な事です
07:36
And then someone discovered this "a-ha moment"
誰かがここからひらめきを得て
07:39
where you could use coordinate systems.
座標系を導入しました
07:41
We thought, ah, this is when it's going to happen.
このように物事は起こるのです
07:44
In the end, he drew a house. It was the most boring thing.
最終的に家を描きましたが 単純なものです
07:46
It became computerish; we began to think computerish --
これがコンピューターで言うところの
07:49
the X, Y system -- and so that was kind of a revelation.
X, Yシステムです 驚きですね
07:52
And after this I wanted to build a computer out of people,
この後 人で構成されるコンピューターを作りました
07:55
called a human-powered computer.
名付けて「人力コンピューター」です
07:58
So, this happened in 1993.
1993年のことです
08:00
Sound down, please.
音を下げてください
08:04
It's a computer where the people are the parts.
このコンピューターの部品は人です
08:05
I have behind this wall a disk drive, a CPU,
壁の後ろにはディスクドライブ CPU
08:09
a graphics card, a memory system.
グラフィックカード メモリーシステムがあります
08:13
They're picking up a giant floppy disk made of cardboard.
彼らは巨大なフロッピーディスクを取り上げ
08:15
It's put inside the computer.
コンピューターに挿入しています
08:18
And that little program's on that cardboard disk.
フロッピーにはプログラムが保存されています
08:21
So, she wears the disk,
彼女がフロッピーを装着し
08:24
and reads the data off the sectors of the disk,
それをディスク部門に引き渡し
08:27
and the computer starts up; it sort of boots up, really.
コンピューターが起動し始めます
08:31
And it's a sort of a working computer. And when I built this computer,
コンピューターの仕組みはこうなっています
08:34
I had a moment of -- what is it called? --
この人力コンピューターを作成したときに
08:37
the epiphany where I realized that the computer's just so fast.
コンピューターがいかに高速であるかという事に気づかされました
08:39
This computer appears to be fast - she's working pretty hard,
人力でも彼女と周囲の人々がとても頑張って動けば
08:43
and people are running around, and we think, wow, this is happening at a fast rate.
速い結果を出す事ができますが
08:47
And this computer's programmed to do only one thing, which is,
一度に一つの事しか処理できません
08:51
if you move your mouse, the mouse changes on the screen.
マウスを動かすとスクリーンが変わります
08:54
On the computer, when you move your mouse, that arrow moves around.
通常マウスを動かすと同時にカーソルが動きますが
08:57
On this computer, if you move the mouse, it takes half an hour
この人力コンピューターではマウスを動かすと
09:01
for the mouse cursor to change.
カーソルが動くのに1時間半かかります
09:03
To give you a sense of the speed, the scale:
この差です コンピューターの驚くべきスピードを
09:05
the computer is just so amazingly fast, O.K.?
感じていただけたかと思います
09:07
And so, after this I began to do experiments for different companies.
これはその後 他の会社と開発したものです
09:10
This is something I did for Sony in 1996.
1996年にSonyと開発したもので
09:13
It was three Sony "H" devices
このSony3Hデバイスは
09:16
that responded to sound.
音に反応します
09:18
So, if you talk into the mike,
マイクに向かって話すと
09:20
you'll hear some music in your headphones;
ヘッドフォンを通して音楽が流れ
09:22
if you talk in the phone, then video would happen.
電話を通じて話すとビデオが起動します
09:24
So, I began to experiment with industry in different ways
この技術の入り交じった製品を
09:26
with this kind of mixture of skills.
他の方法で実験してみました
09:28
I did this ad. I don't believe in this kind of alcohol, but I do drink sometimes.
この広告を手がけました 酒は信用していないのですが時々飲みます
09:31
And Chanel. So, getting to do different projects.
これはシャネル また別のプロジェクトです
09:35
And also, one thing I realized is that
そして一つ気づいたことは
09:37
I like to make things.
私は作るのが好きだという事です
09:39
We like to make things. It's fun to make things.
人は皆作るのが好きで 楽しいものです
09:41
And so I never developed the ability to have a staff.
私はスタッフを抱えた事はありません
09:44
I have no staff; it's all kind of made by hand --
すべて自分の手で作っています
09:46
these sort of broken hands.
このボロボロの手で
09:48
And these hands were influenced
私のこの手はイナミ・ナオミ氏に
09:50
by this man, Mr. Inami Naomi.
影響を受けました
09:53
This guy was my kind of like mentor.
私の師匠のような人です
09:56
He was the first digital media producer in Tokyo.
東京のデジタルメディアプロデューサー第一人者で
09:58
He's the guy that kind of discovered me,
彼が私を見つけ
10:01
and kind of got me going in digital media.
デジタルメディアの世界へ引き込みました
10:03
He was such an inspirational guy.
彼はとても刺激的な人物で
10:05
I remember, like, we'd be in his studio, like, at 2 a.m.,
ある時 午前2時に彼のスタジオを訪ねると
10:08
and then he'd show up from some client meeting.
彼は複数のクライアントと会議中でした
10:11
He'd come in and say, you know,
彼は私のところに来て
10:14
If I am here, everything is okay.
「私がいれば 全て上手くいく」と言い
10:16
And you'd feel so much better, you know.
とても気が楽になりました
10:19
And I'll never forget how, like, but -- I'll never forget how, like,
忘れられないのは
10:21
he had a sudden situation with his -- he had an aneurysm.
彼が突然 動脈瘤で倒れ
10:25
He went into a coma.
意識不明になったことです
10:28
And so, for three years he was out, and he could only blink,
3年間 まばたきしかできませんでした
10:30
and so I realized at this moment, I thought, wow --
そのとき気づかされました
10:33
how fragile is this thing we're wearing,
私たちが身にまとっている
10:35
this body and mind we're wearing,
この身体と心はなんて儚いんだと
10:37
and so I thought, How do you go for it more?
そして もっと何ができるのか
10:39
How do you take that time you have left and go after it?
今後の人生の過ごし方について考えました
10:41
So, Naomi was pivotal in that.
彼が気づかせてくれました
10:44
And so, I began to think more carefully about the computer.
より注意深くコンピューターについて考えるようになり
10:46
This was a moment where I was thinking about,
こんな事を考えていました
10:49
so, you have a computer program,
コンピューターにはプログラムがあり
10:51
it responds to motion -- X and Y --
縦横といった動きに反応します
10:53
and I realized that each computer program
各々のコンピュータープログラムが
10:57
has all these images inside the program.
これら全てのイメージを持っています
10:59
So, if you can see here, you know,
この角にあるプログラムに
11:02
that program you're seeing in the corner,
見れるように
11:04
if you spread it out, it's all these things all at once.
一度に拡げることができます
11:06
It's real simultaneity. It's nothing we're used to working with.
真の同時性で 我々の動きとは異なります
11:09
We're so used to working in one vector.
我々はベクトルにそって動くことに慣れています
11:13
This is all at the same time.
このプログラムはすべて同時です
11:15
The computer lives in so many dimensions.
コンピューターは非常に多くの次元に在ります
11:17
And also, at the same time I was frustrated,
同時に私に挫折感を抱かせます
11:19
because I would go to all these art and design schools everywhere,
私がどんなデザイン美術学校に行こうとも
11:21
and there were these, like, "the computer lab," you know,
かつて「コンピューター・ラボ」がありました
11:23
and this is, like, in the late 1990s,
1990年代後半のことです
11:26
and this is in Basel,
バーゼルにある
11:29
a great graphic design school.
素晴らしいグラフィックデザイン学校です
11:31
And here's this, like, dirty, kind of, shoddy,
これは荒れ放題でボロボロの
11:33
kind of, dark computer room.
陰鬱なコンピュータールームです
11:35
And I began to wonder, Is this the goal?
これが私の求めていたゴールだろうか
11:38
Is this what we want, you know?
我々が求めているものだろうかと考え始め
11:40
And also, I began to be fascinated by machines --
また マシンに魅了され始めました
11:43
you know, like copy machines -- and so this is actually in Basel.
バーゼルにあったコピー機から気づかされたのは
11:46
I noticed how we spent so much time on making it interactive --
我々が相互作用にいかに時間を費やしてきたかという事です
11:49
this is, like, a touch screen --
これはタッチスクリーンのようなもので
11:52
and I noticed how you can only touch five places,
なぜ 5カ所しかタッチしないのかに注目し
11:54
and so, "why are we wasting so much interactivity everywhere?"
なぜ あらゆる場所で相互作用を無駄にしているのかと
11:56
became a question. And also, the sound:
疑問がわきました それから この音
11:59
I discovered I can make my ThinkPad pretend it's a telephone.
ThinkPadに電話の真似をさせる事ができると発見しました
12:02
You get it? No? O.K.
似てませんか? 似てない?
12:07
And also, I discovered in Logan airport,
ローガン空港ではこんな発見をしました
12:09
this was, like, calling out to me.
呼びかけてくるような音です
12:12
Do you hear that? It's like cows. This is at 4 a.m. at Logan.
まるで牛の鳴き声 朝4時のことです
12:20
So, I was wondering, like,
不思議に思いました
12:23
what is this thing in front of me, this computer thing?
目の前にある このコンピューターという物は何なのか
12:25
It didn't make any sense.
さっぱり分かりませんでした
12:28
So, I began to make things again. This is another series of objects
これは別のシリーズものです
12:30
made of old computers from my basement.
地下室にあった古いコンピュータで作りました
12:32
I made -- I took my old Macintoshes
古いマッキントッシュを集め
12:34
and made different objects out of them from Tokyo.
部品を使い異なる作品を東京で作りました
12:36
I began to be very disinterested in computers themselves,
私はコンピューターそのものに興味がなくなり
12:39
so I began to make paintings out of PalmPilots.
PalmPilotを使って絵画を制作しました
12:42
I made this series of works.
このシリーズです
12:44
They're paintings I made and put a PalmPilot in the middle
PalmPilotを絵の中央にもってきて
12:46
as a kind of display that's sort of thinking,
ディスプレイのようにしています
12:49
I'm abstract art. What am I? I'm abstract.
私は何者でしょうか 抽象的な人です
12:51
And so it keeps thinking out loud of its own abstraction.
そのもの自体の抽象とは何なのか考え続けました
12:54
I began to be fascinated by plastic,
それからプラスチックに魅了され
12:58
so I spent four months making eight plastic blocks
4ヶ月をかけて8つのブロックを作りました
13:01
perfectly optically transparent,
完全な光学透過です
13:04
as a kind of release of stress.
一種のストレス発散です
13:06
Because of that, I became interested in blue tape,
それから青テープに興味が湧き
13:09
so in San Francisco, at C.C., I had a whole exhibition on blue tape.
サンフランシスコのコミュニティカレッジで
13:12
I made a whole installation out of blue tape -- blue painters' tape.
ブルーな画家の青テープ展を行ないました
13:15
And at this point my wife kind of got worried about me,
そんな私を見て妻が心配し始めたので
13:17
so I stopped doing blue tape and began to think,
青テープでの創作は辞め
13:20
Well, what else is there in life?
他のことを考え始めました
13:22
And so computers, as you know,
もちろんコンピューターについても
13:24
these big computers, there are now tiny computers.
今はとても小さくなっています
13:27
They're littler computers, so the one-chip computers,
ワンチップコンピューターです
13:29
I began to program one-chip computers
このチップにプログラムを組込み
13:31
and make objects out of P.C. boards, LEDs.
PCボードから取り外したLEDで
13:33
I began to make LED sculptures
LED像を作り始めました
13:37
that would live inside little boxes out of MDF.
主端子盤から取り外したものです
13:39
This is a series of light boxes I made for a show in Italy.
イタリア展覧会用のlight boxシリーズです
13:42
Very simple boxes: you just press one button and some LED interaction occurs.
とてもシンプルな箱で ボタンを一つ押すとLEDの光が舞います
13:46
This is a series of lamps I made. This is a Bento box lamp:
これはランプシリーズの弁当箱ランプです
13:49
it's sort of a plastic rice lamp;
これは食玩の米ランプです
13:52
it's very friendly.
とても和みます
13:55
I did a show in London last year made out of iPods --
昨年ロンドンで行なったiPodの作品展は
13:57
I used iPods as a material.
iPodを素材として使いました
14:00
So I took 16 iPod Nanos
16個のiPod nanoで
14:02
and made a kind of a Nano fish, basically.
nano魚を作りました
14:04
Recently, this is for Reebok.
これは最近
14:06
I've done shoes for Reebok as well,
Reebokシューズの作品
14:08
as a kind of a hobby for apparel.
これは趣味です
14:10
So anyways, there are all these things you can do,
これら全てはあなたにもできる事です
14:12
but the thing I love the most is to
私が一番好きなのは
14:15
experience, taste the world.
世界を体験し 味わうことです
14:17
The world is just so tasty.
世界はとても美味です
14:19
We think we'll go to a museum; that's where all the tastes are.
我々は美術館に行き 全てを味わったと思っていますが
14:21
No, they're all out there.
それは違います 全ては外の世界にあります
14:23
So, this is, like, in front of the Eiffel Tower, really,
エッフェル塔の手前や
14:25
actually, around the Louvre area.
ルーブル美術館の周囲だったり
14:27
This I found, where nature had made a picture for me.
これは自然の力が私に写真を撮らせたもので
14:29
This is a perfect 90-degree angle by nature.
自然にぴったり90度になっています
14:31
In this strange moment where, like, these things kind of appeared.
このような不思議な瞬間がいたるところにあり
14:33
We all are creative people.
私たちは皆 芸術家なのです
14:36
We have this gene defect in our mind.
この遺伝子を心に抱えているのです
14:38
We can't help but stop, right? This feeling's a wonderful thing.
この素晴らしい感じ どうにも止める事ができません
14:41
It's the forever-always-on museum.
これぞ いつでもどこでも美術館です
14:44
This is from the Cape last year.
これは昨年 岬で拾ったものです
14:47
I discovered that I had to find the equation of art and design,
アートとデザインの方程式を見つけました
14:49
which we know as circle-triangle-square.
丸 四角 三角に見えます
14:52
It's everywhere on the beach, I discovered.
ビーチのいたるところにあり
14:55
I began to collect every instance of circle-triangle-square.
集めて並べてみました
14:57
I put these all back, by the way.
元の場所に戻しましたけど
15:00
And I also discovered how .
それから
15:02
some rocks are twins separated at birth.
双子の生き別れの石も見つけました
15:04
This is also out there, you know.
これも同じように
15:07
I'm, like, how did this happen, kind of thing?
いったい何があったの?と
15:10
I brought you guys together again.
一緒にして戻しておきました
15:12
So, three years ago I discovered, the letters M-I-T
3年前にM-I-T の綴りを発見しました
15:14
occurring in simplicity and complexity.
"simplicity and complexity" にありました
15:17
My alma mater, MIT, and I had this moment --
私の母校MITです
15:19
a kind of M. Night Shayamalan moment --
M・ナイト・シャマランの映画のようですね
15:21
where I thought, Whoa! I have to do this.
「ぉお これは私がやらねば」と思い
15:22
And I went after it with passion.
情熱をもって取り組みました
15:25
However, recently this RISD opportunity kind of arose --
しかし最近 このロードアイランドデザイン大学(RISD)の話があり
15:28
going to RISD -- and I couldn't reconcile this real easy,
なかなか心を決められずにいました
15:32
because the letters had told me, MIT forever.
MITのことがずっと頭から離れませんでした
15:35
But I discovered in the French word raison d'être.
しかし「存在理由」という意味のフランス語
15:39
I was, like, aha, wait a second.
"raison d'être"をよく見てみると
15:42
And there RISD appeared.
RISDが現れました
15:44
And so I realized it was O.K. to go.
これはいけると確信し
15:47
So, I'm going to RISD, actually.
RISDに行くことにしました
15:49
Who's a RISD alum out there?
RISD卒業生いますか
15:53
RISD alums? Yeah, RISD. There we go, RISD. Woo, RISD.
いますね 素晴らしい!
15:55
I'm sorry, I'm sorry, Art Center -- Art Center is good, too.
もちろんアートセンターも素晴らしい所です
15:58
RISD is kind of my new kind of passion,
私は今RISDに熱中しているところです
16:00
and I'll tell you a little bit about that.
そのお話をします
16:04
So, RISD is --
「RISDとは...」
16:07
I was outside RISD,
これは学校の外で
16:09
and some student wrote this on some block, and I thought,
だれか学生が壁に書いたもので
16:11
Wow, RISD wants to know what itself is.
RISDは何なのか知りたがっています
16:13
And I have no idea what RISD should be, actually,
RISDのあるべき姿はさっぱり見えていません
16:16
or what it wants to be, but one thing I have to tell you is that
この先どうなりたいのかも 実は私は
16:18
although I'm a technologist, I don't like technology very much.
技術者ですが技術があまり好きではありません
16:21
It's a, kind of, the qi thing, or whatever.
「気」のようなものでしょうか
16:24
People say,
人々は
16:26
Are you going to bring RISD into the future?
RISDに未来はあるかと訪ねますが
16:28
And I say, well, I'm going to bring the future back to RISD.
私は「未来がRISDに追いつくのです」と答えます
16:30
There's my perspective. Because in reality,
私が考えている課題は
16:33
the problem isn't how to make the world more technological.
どうやって世界を技術的にするかではなく
16:36
It's about how to make it more humane again.
もっと人に優しくするかということです
16:40
And if anything, I think RISD has a strange DNA.
RISDは不思議なDNAを持っていて
16:42
It's a strange exuberance
不思議な活力
16:46
about materials, about the world:
神秘的な世界で溢れています
16:48
a fascination that I think the world needs
世界は今それに魅力を感じ
16:50
quite very much right now.
とても必要としているのです
16:52
So, thank you everyone.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
16:54
Translator:Mina Kiyuna
Reviewer:Takafusa Kitazume

sponsored links

John Maeda - Artist
John Maeda, the former president of the Rhode Island School of Design, is dedicated to linking design and technology. Through the software tools, web pages and books he creates, he spreads his philosophy of elegant simplicity.

Why you should listen

When John Maeda became president of the legendary Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in 2008, he told the Wall Street Journal, "Everyone asks me, 'Are you bringing technology to RISD?' I tell them, no, I'm bringing RISD to technology."

In his fascinating career as a programmer and an artist, he's always been committed to blurring the lines between the two disciplines. As a student at MIT, studying computer programming, the legendary Muriel Cooper persuaded him to follow his parallel passion for fine art and design. And when computer-aided design began to explode in the mid-1990s, Maeda was in a perfect position at the MIT Media Lab to influence and shape the form, helping typographers and page designers explore the freedom of the web.

Maeda is leading the "STEAM" movement--adding an "A" for Art to the education acronym STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)--and experiencing firsthand the transformation brought by social media. After leaving his post as RISD's president, Maeda is turning his attention to Silicon Valley, where is is working as a Design Partner for Kleiner, Perkins, Caulfield and Byers. He is also consulting for eBay, where he is the chair of the Design Advisory Board.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.