sponsored links
TED2005

Greg Lynn: Organic algorithms in architecture

グレッグ・リン: 建築に関する有機的なアルゴリズム

February 2, 2005

グレッグ・リンは建築における数学的なルーツについて、また微積分学やデジタルツールを使用し、どのようにして現代のデザイナーたちが伝統的な建築様式を越えた事を可能してきたかを語ります。クイーンズにある壮麗な教会(そして、チタン製の茶器)が彼の理論を説明してくれます

Greg Lynn - Designer
Greg Lynn is the head of Greg Lynn FORM, an architecture firm known for its boundary-breaking, biomorphic shapes and its embrace of digital tools for design and fabrication. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What I thought I would talk about today
今日私が
お話しをしたいのは
00:12
is the transition from one mode
自然に対する考えが
00:14
of thinking about nature
建築に幾度のも
変化を与えた
00:17
to another that's tracked by architecture.
軌跡についてです
00:19
What's interesting about architects is,
建築家の
興味深いところは
00:21
we always have tried to justify beauty
自然と向き合う事で
00:24
by looking to nature,
美しさを正当化しようと
してきたことで―
00:27
and arguably, beautiful architecture
美しい建物は紛れもなく
00:29
has always been looking at a model of nature.
いつも 自然を
モデルとしています
00:32
So, for roughly 300 years,
およそ300年間も―
00:34
the hot debate in architecture
「建築には5と7の比率の
00:37
was whether the number five
どちらが相応しいのか?」
00:39
or the number seven
といった熱い議論が
00:41
was a better proportion to think about architecture,
続いていましたが-
00:43
because the nose was one-fifth of your head,
これは 鼻は
頭の1/5であったり-
00:45
or because your head was one-seventh of your body.
頭は体の1/7である事
に由来しています
00:49
And the reason that that was the model
その理由は
00:52
of beauty and of nature
16世紀以前は-
00:54
was because the decimal point had not been invented yet --
小数点が発明
されておらず-
00:56
it wasn't the 16th century --
人々は分数を用いて
00:59
and everybody had to dimension a building
建築物の大きさを
01:02
in terms of fractions,
測量するしか
ありませんでした
01:05
so a room would be dimensioned
結果として
部屋は建物の正面の1/4に―
01:07
as one-fourth of a facade;
区切られるように
なったのです
01:09
the structural dais of that might be dimensioned as 10 units,
演壇の構造は 10組のユニットに
区切られたのかもしれません
01:11
and you would get down to the small elements
詳細部の要素も 分数の区分で-
01:15
by fractional subdivision:
細部へ細部へと-
01:18
finer and finer and finer.
区分されたのでしょう
01:20
In the 15th century, the decimal point was invented;
小数点は 15世紀に発明され-
01:22
architects stopped using fractions,
建築家は 分数の使用を止め
01:25
and they had a new model of nature.
新たな自然のモデルを使用
するようになりました
01:27
So, what's going on today
現在では 微積分学を基礎とする
01:29
is that there's a model of natural form
デジタルツールを用いた
01:32
which is calculus-based
自然なモデルを採用しています
01:35
and which is using digital tools,
そのモデルは美しさや―
01:37
and that has a lot of implications
形への私達のこだわりを
01:39
to the way we think about beauty and form,
豊富に含んだものとなっています
01:41
and it has a lot of implications in the way we think about nature.
自然へのこだわりも多くあり-
01:43
The best example of this would probably be the Gothic,
一番の良い例としては ゴシック様式です
01:47
and the Gothic was invented after the invention of calculus,
ゴシック様式は 微積分学発明後に
考え出されましたが-
01:50
although the Gothic architects
実は ゴシック様式の
建築家達は微積分を
01:54
weren't really using calculus to define their forms.
使用してデザイン
していませんでした
01:56
But what was important is,
重要な点は
ゴシック時代からの
01:59
the Gothic moment in architecture was the first time
建築で初めて
構造力学が-
02:01
that force and motion was thought of in terms of form.
建物の形を決める要素として
考えられた点です
02:03
So, examples like Christopher Wren's King's Cross:
クリストファー・レン設計の
キングス・クロスを例にすると-
02:07
you can see that the structural forces of the vaulting
アーチ天井の梁が
線の様に配置され-
02:10
get articulated as lines, so you're really actually seeing
強度な構造体の形が
表現されている事が
02:14
the expression of structural force and form.
実際に見て
良く分かります
02:17
Much later, Robert Maillart's bridges,
そのかなり後の
ロバート・マイヤールの橋は-
02:20
which optimize structural form
計算された曲線で
合理的に構造化され
02:23
with a calculus curvature almost like a parabola.
ほぼパラボラの様な形です
02:26
The Hanging Chain models of Antonio Gaudi,
ハンギングチェーン
(宙吊の鎖)は
02:29
the Catalan architect.
カタロニアの建築家
アントニオ・ガウディの
02:33
The end of the 19th century, beginning of the 20th century,
手法ですが 19世紀末から
20世紀初頭にかけて
02:35
and how that Hanging Chain model
そのハンギングチェーンは―
02:40
translates into archways
アーチ門や ドーム天井に
02:42
and vaulting.
写しとられました
02:44
So, in all of these examples,
これらすべての例では
02:46
structure is the determining force.
構造力学が
形を決定しています
02:48
Frei Otto was starting to use foam bubble diagrams
フライ・オットーは シャボン玉の図式を
使用し始め―
02:52
and foam bubble models to generate his Mannheim Concert Hall.
気泡をモデルとして
マンハイム・コンサートホールを創出しました
02:55
Interestingly, in the last 10 years
興味深い事は
この10年間で―
03:00
Norman Foster used a similar heat thermal transfer model
熱伝導モデルとも
言える技術で―
03:03
to generate the roof of the National Gallery,
構造エンジニア
クリス・ウィリアムズと共に
03:07
with the structural engineer Chris Williams.
ナショナル・ギャラリーの
屋根を創出しました
03:11
In all these examples,
これらの例すべては
03:13
there's one ideal form,
ひとつの理想的な形-
03:15
because these are thought in terms of structure.
つまり 構造力学的
に考えたのです
03:17
And as an architect, I've always found these kinds of systems
私は 建築家として この類の構造には
限界があると感じています
03:20
very limiting, because I'm not interested in ideal forms
何故なら 私は理想の形に興味がなく-
03:23
and I'm not interested in optimizing to some perfect moment.
完全な能率に最適化する事にも
興味がありません
03:27
So, what I thought I would bring up is
私が取り上げたいのは
あなたが自然について―
03:32
another component that needs to be thought of,
考える時はいつでも
考える必要があり―
03:35
whenever you think about nature,
基本的には遺伝的進化の
03:37
and that's basically the invention of
過程で生まれた
一般的な形状の
03:39
generic form in genetic evolution.
もう一つの構成要素です
03:41
My hero is actually not Darwin;
私のヒーローは
ダーウィンなんかではありません
03:46
it's a guy named William Bateson,
その人は
グレゴリー・ベイトソンの父で
03:48
father of Greg Bateson, who was here for a long time in Monterey.
ウィリアム・ベイソンといい-
モントレーに永年住んでいました
03:50
And he was what you'd call a teratologist:
彼は「遺伝学者」と呼ばれ-
03:55
he looked at all of the monstrosities and mutations
標準的なものより
むしろ奇形や突然変異に目を向け
03:57
to find rules and laws, rather than looking at the norms.
規則や法則を
探し出そうとしました
04:02
So, instead of trying to find the ideal type
彼は 理想的なタイプや
理想の平均値を
04:05
or the ideal average,
探し出そうとするのではなく
04:08
he'd always look for the exception. So, in this example,
常に例外を探しました
その例として―
04:10
which is an example of what's called Bateson's Rule,
「ベイトソンのルール」
と呼ばれる例ですが―
04:13
he has two kinds of mutations of a human thumb.
この親指には
2つの突然変異が見られます
04:15
When I first saw this image, 10 years ago,
私が最初この写真を
見たのは10年前ですが
04:19
I actually found it very strange and beautiful at the same time.
美しさと
奇妙さの両方を感じました
04:21
Beautiful, because it has symmetry.
美しいのは
対象性を有するからです
04:25
So, what he found is that in all cases of thumb mutations,
彼は 親指の突然変異の
すべてのケースから見出したのは
04:27
instead of having a thumb,
普通の親指の変わりに-
04:31
you would either get another opposable thumb,
「対面するもう一つの親指があるか」
04:34
or you would get four fingers.
もしくは 「4本の指があるか」
というものでした
04:36
So, the mutations reverted to symmetry.
これで突然変異は
対称性を有する事になります
04:38
And Bateson invented
そして ベイトソンは-
04:41
the concept of symmetry breaking,
「対称性破壊」の
概念を打ち立てました
04:43
which is that
それは 「どのような場合でも
04:45
wherever you lose information in a system,
システムの情報を
失った場合-
04:47
you revert back to symmetry.
左右対称に回帰する」
というものです
04:50
So, symmetry wasn't the sign of order and organization --
対称性は指示や
構成の表れでは無く-
04:52
which is what I was always understanding, and as is an architect --
対称性は情報の欠落だと
04:56
symmetry was the absence of information.
一人の建築家として
いつも思っています
04:59
So, whenever you lost information, you'd move to symmetry;
情報が欠落した場合は
いつも 対称に陥り
05:02
whenever you added information to a system, you would break symmetry.
システムに情報を加えると
いつも対称性を破壊するのです
05:04
So, this whole idea of natural form shifted at that moment
その瞬間
自然な形状の思惑全体が―
05:08
from looking for ideal shapes
「理想的な形状」を探す事から
05:12
to looking for a combination of
「遺伝的な形状」
と「情報」の
05:15
information and generic form.
結合を探す事へと
移行したのです
05:17
You know, literally after seeing that image,
文字通り イメージをご覧になり―
05:21
and finding out what Bateson was working with,
ベイトソンの取り組みを理解すると
05:24
we started to use these rules for symmetry breaking and branching
私達は 建物の形状を考えるとき―
05:27
to start to think about architectural form.
「対称性破壊と分割論」
を使い始めたのです
05:31
To just talk for a minute about the
ここで少々
私達が現在使用している
05:33
digital mediums that we're using now
デジタルメディアが
どのようにして微分積分を―
05:36
and how they integrate calculus:
統合しているのか
お話ししますが-
05:38
the fact that they're calculus-based
ツールが微積分を
ベースにしているという事は-
05:41
means that we don't have to think about dimension
理想的なユニットでも
個々の要素でも
05:43
in terms of ideal units
その寸法に関しては-
05:46
or discreet elements.
考える必要が
無い事を意味しています
05:48
So, in architecture we deal with
建築では大規模な
構成部材の-
05:51
big assemblies of components,
複合体を扱うのですが
05:53
so there might be up to, say,
そうですね 例えば-
今 皆様が居る-
05:55
50,000 pieces of material
この室内では
05:58
in this room you're sitting in right now
50,000もの
個別部材があり-
06:00
that all need to get organized.
全てが 組織化されている
必要があります
06:02
Now, typically you'd think that they would all be the same:
典型的な考えとしては-
全てが同じと考えていませんか
06:05
like, the chairs you're sitting in would all be the same dimension.
今お座りの椅子が すべて
「同じ寸法だろう」という感じで
06:07
You know, I haven't verified this, but it's the norm
もちろん 確認したわけではありません
ですが すべての椅子が
06:09
that every chair would be a slightly different dimension,
少しずつ違った寸法
なのは 標準的な事です
06:12
because you'd want to space them all out for everybody's sight lines.
皆様の視線確保に
間隔が必要だからです
06:15
The elements that make up the ceiling grid and the lighting,
天井の格子や照明を
構成する部材は-
06:19
they're all losing their modular quality,
それらの個体寸法等の
質を失いながら-
06:23
and moving more and more to these infinitesimal dimensions.
ますます細分化された
寸法に移行します
06:26
That's because we're all using calculus tools
それは 製造過程や
設計過程で―
06:29
for manufacturing and for design.
私達が 微積分のツールを
使用するからです
06:31
Calculus is also a mathematics of curves.
微積分は 曲線の数学
であるともいえます
06:34
So, even a straight line, defined with calculus, is a curve.
直線でさえ 微積分で
定義すると 曲線です
06:38
It's just a curve without inflection.
屈曲の無い
曲線でしかありません
06:42
So, a new vocabulary of form
形状に対する
新しい知識は 今や-
06:44
is now pervading all design fields:
全ての分野に
広がっています
06:47
whether it's automobiles, architecture, products, etc.,
「自動車」 「建築」 「工業製品」や
その他 様々なところで
06:50
it's really being affected by this digital medium of curvature.
「曲線のデジタルツール」が
大きく影響しています
06:54
The intricacies of scale that come out of that --
はじき出されるスケールは複雑で-
06:57
you know, in the example of the nose to the face,
「顔の鼻」を例に挙げると―
07:00
there's a fractional part-to-whole idea.
「断片部から全体へ」
との考え方がありますが-
07:03
With calculus, the whole idea
微積分では
細分化する考え方は
07:06
of subdivision is more complex,
より複雑になります
07:09
because the whole and the parts are one continuous series.
各パーツは 全体では
切れ目のない連続だからです
07:11
It's too early in the morning for a lecture on calculus,
微積分の講義をするには
朝も早すぎるので-
07:15
so I brought some images to just describe how that works.
どういう事なのか 説明する為に
画像を持ってきました
07:18
This is a Korean church that we did in Queens.
これは 私達が担当した
クイーンズにある韓国教会です
07:22
And in this example, you can see
この例では
この階段の構成部材に
07:25
that the components of this stair are repetitive,
繰り返しパターンが見えますが-
07:28
but they're repetitive without being modular.
基本構造のない繰り返しです
07:32
Each one of the elements in this structure
この構造の部材は
それぞれ独特の-
07:34
is a unique distance and dimension,
距離と寸法に
なっており 全ての接続部の―
07:36
and all of the connections are unique angles.
角度も異なっています
07:40
Now, the only way we could design that,
私達が これを設計し-
07:42
or possibly construct it,
建設する事を
可能にできたのは-
07:44
is by using a calculus-based definition
形状の微積分の
定義を-
07:47
of the form.
使ったからです
07:49
It also is much more dynamic,
この構造は大変ダイナミックで
07:51
so that you can see that the same form opens and closes
その中を通り抜けたときに同じ構造が
07:53
in a very dynamic way as you move across it,
閉じたようにも開いたようにも見えるのです
07:56
because it has this quality of vector in motion
これは 動きに伴うベクトル性が
07:59
built into it.
組み込まれているからです
08:02
So the same space that appears to be a kind of closed volume,
そこで同じ空間が
閉ざされたように見えたり
08:04
when seen from the other side becomes a kind of open vista.
反対側からは
開けた眺めになります
08:07
And you also get a sense of
また その空間では
視覚的な動きを―
08:11
visual movement in the space,
感じる事が出来ます
08:13
because every one of the elements is changing in a pattern,
すべての 部材のパターンが
変化していくからです
08:15
so that pattern leads your eye towards the altar.
そのパターンは あなたの視線を
祭壇へと導きます
08:19
I think that's one of the main changes,
私はそれが主な
変化のひとつであり―
08:23
also, in architecture:
建築では―
08:26
that we're starting to look now not for some ideal form,
教会のラテン
十字架の様な
08:28
like a Latin cross for a church,
「理想の形」ではなく―
08:31
but actually all the traits of a church:
実は教会の特徴である―
見えない背後から
08:34
so, light that comes from behind from an invisible source,
照射される光が
あなたを祭壇へ―
08:36
directionality that focuses you towards an altar.
向けさせるといった事に
注目し始めています
08:40
It turns out it's not rocket science
神聖な場所を
設計する事が―
08:44
to design a sacred space.
最新科学では
無いと解ります
08:46
You just need to incorporate a certain number of traits
ただ 特定化した
遺伝的な考えを-
08:48
in a very kind of genetic way.
組込む必要があります
08:51
So, these are the different perspectives of that interior,
それらの内部は
それぞれ違った展望になり-
08:54
which has a very complex
単純な構造が
とても複雑な
08:56
set of orientations all in a simple form.
組み合わせになっています
08:58
In terms of construction and manufacturing,
「建築」と「製造」の観点では-
09:02
this is a kilometer-long housing block
これは アムステルダムに
70年代に建設された-
09:05
that was built in the '70s in Amsterdam.
1kmほどの長さの
住宅施設ですが-
09:08
And here we've broken the 500 apartments
私達は500戸の
アパートを分離し-
09:11
up into small neighborhoods,
小さな近隣地区として
09:13
and differentiated those neighborhoods.
住区を区別できる
様にしました
09:16
I won't go into too much description of any of these projects,
これらのプロジェクトについて
多くは述べませんが-
09:18
but what you can see is that
建物の外部に沿って-
09:21
the escalators and elevators
エスカレーターと
エレベーターによる
09:23
that circulate people along the face of the building
人の動線が見えますが-
09:26
are all held up by
これは122組の―
09:29
122 structural trusses.
トラス構造で全て
支えられています
09:31
Because we're using escalators
エスカレーターで-
09:35
to move people,
人を運搬するときには
09:37
all of these trusses are picking up diagonal loads.
全てのトラスには
対角方向に荷重が掛かります
09:39
So, every one of them is a little bit different-shaped
その一つ一つは 建物の全体が
下に行くにつれて
09:44
as you move down the length of the building.
ほんの少しずつ違った形で
構成されています
09:47
So, working with
ベントレー社と共同で
09:49
Bentley and MicroStation,
マイクロステーションを利用し-
09:51
we've written a custom piece of software
全ての部材をネットワーク化し-
09:54
that networks all of the components together
情報をグループ化する
09:56
into these chunks of information,
ソフトを作成しました
09:59
so that if we change any element
これにより
建物のいずれかの―
10:02
along the length of the building,
部材を変える事は-
10:04
not only does that change distribute
その変化は各トラスに
10:06
through each one of the trusses,
影響を及ぼすだけでなく
10:09
but each one of the trusses then distributes that information
全てのトラス構造に
行きわたり-
10:11
down the length of the entire facade of the building.
その結果建物全体
に及びます
10:14
So it's a single calculation
私達が設計する
10:17
for every single component of the building
建物全ての
構成部材に対しての
10:19
that we're adding onto.
計算であり―
10:22
So, it's tens of millions of calculations
鋼材と鋼材との
接合部と―
10:24
just to design one connection between a piece of structural steel
他の鋼材の計算で-
10:28
and another piece of structural steel.
何千万回にも及びます
10:31
But what it gives us is a harmonic
その計算が全ての
部材間の-
10:33
and synthesized
部材から 次の部材
へとの統合された
10:35
relationship of all these components, one to another.
調和を与えてくれます
10:39
This idea has, kind of, brought me into doing
この考えは
私が製品の設計を行う事に
10:43
some product design,
繋がりました
10:46
and it's because design firms
建築家と関わりを持つ
10:48
that have connections to architects,
デザイン会社の
10:51
like, I'm working with Vitra, which is a furniture company,
家具会社のヴィトラや
家庭雑貨のアレッシィで
10:53
and Alessi, which is a houseware company.
仕事をしています
10:56
They saw this actually solving a problem:
この手法が課題解決に
役立つのです
10:59
this ability to differentiate components
部材を変えても
11:01
but keep them synthetic.
全体を統合出来るのです
11:03
So, not to pick on BMW,
BMWを批判するつもりも
11:06
or to celebrate them,
褒め称える
つもりもないですが-
11:08
but take BMW as an example.
でも BMWを例にしましょう
11:10
They have to, in 2005,
彼らは 2005年に-
11:12
have a distinct identity
全ての彼らの
自動車のモデルに
11:15
for all their models of cars.
明瞭な独自性を
出す必要がありました
11:17
So, the 300 series, or whatever their newest car is,
300シリーズも
最新のモデル―
11:19
the 100 series that's coming out,
ちょうどデビューした100シリーズも
11:22
has to look like the 700 series,
700シリーズと同じように
見える必要がありました
11:24
at the other end of their product line,
ラインナップとしては両極端でも
11:27
so they need a distinct, coherent identity,
彼らにはBMWという
一貫した独自性が
11:30
which is BMW.
必要でした
11:32
At the same time, there's a person paying 30,000 dollars
同時に 300シリーズの車に-
11:34
for a 300-series car,
3万ドル支払う人々がいて-
11:37
and a person paying 70,000 dollars
700シリーズに7万ドル
11:39
for a 700 series,
支払う人がいますが-
11:41
and that person paying more than double
2倍以上支払っている人は-
11:43
doesn't want their car to look too much like
自分の車が
ローエンドの車とそっくりなのは
11:45
the bottom-of-the-market car.
いやなのです
11:47
So they have to also discriminate between these products.
ですので 彼らは製品の間で
差別化を図る事も必要となりました
11:49
So, as manufacturing
そこで 製造において
11:52
starts to allow more
より多くのデザインのオプションを
11:54
design options,
許容しようとすると
11:57
this problem gets exacerbated,
この全体と部品との問題は
11:59
of the whole and the parts.
悪化していったのです
12:01
Now, as an architect, part-to-whole relationships
部分から
全体への関係性が-
12:03
is all I think about,
建築家としての
私の考えですが―
12:05
but in terms of product design
製品デザインにおいては
12:07
it's becoming more and more of an issue for companies.
ますます 企業の重要課題と
なっています
12:09
So, the first kind of test product we did
最初に私達が行った
製品テストは-
12:12
was with Alessi,
アレッシィでですが-
12:14
which was for a coffee and tea set.
珈琲とお茶のセットでした
12:16
It's an incredibly expensive coffee and tea set;
初めから 信じられない程
高価な珈琲と―
12:18
we knew that at the beginning. So, I actually went to some people I knew
お茶のセットだと知っていましたので
ずっと南のサンディエゴに
12:21
down south in San Diego,
知人達を実際に訪ね-
12:24
and we used an exploded
航空宇宙産業で
使用されている
12:27
titanium forming method
チタンの爆発成形法を
12:29
that's used in the aerospace industry.
使用しました
12:31
Basically what we can do,
基本的に私達が出来る事は-
12:34
is just cut a graphite mold,
黒鉛の型を切断して
12:36
put it in an oven, heat it to 1,000 degrees,
オーブンに入れ
1,000度まで熱し-
12:38
gently inflate titanium that's soft,
柔らかくなったチタンを
静かに膨らませ-
12:42
and then explode it at the last minute into this form.
最後に爆発させて
成形することです
12:44
But what's great about it is,
この方法の
素晴らしい事は-
12:47
the forms are only a few hundred dollars.
成形はたった数百ドル
だという事です
12:49
The titanium's several thousand dollars, but the forms are very cheap.
チタンは数千ドルですが
成形はとても安価です
12:51
So, we designed a system here
ですので 私達は8個の-
12:54
of eight curves that could be swapped,
入れ替え可能な曲線-
12:57
very similar to that housing project I showed you,
先程の住宅の設計によく似た物を
デザインしました
13:00
and we could recombine those together,
それらは 再結合できるので-
13:03
so that we always had ergonomic shapes
常に人間工学に基づいた-
13:05
that always had the same volume
形でありながら-
13:08
and could always be produced in the same way.
同容量でありながら同じ方法で
製造できるのです
13:11
That way, each one of these tools we could pay for with
その様に それぞれのツールに
13:13
a few hundred dollars,
数百ドルを投じて-
13:15
and get incredible variation in the components.
驚くほどのコンポーネントの
種類を得ました
13:17
And this is one of those examples of the sets.
これは そのセットの
例の一つです
13:20
So, for me, what was important is that
私にとって
重要だったのは-
13:23
this coffee set --
この珈琲セット
13:25
which is just a coffee pot, a teapot,
ただの 珈琲ポットと
ティーポットです
13:27
and those are the pots sitting on a tray --
トレーの上にセット
されていますが-
13:29
that they would have a coherence --
それらには
一貫性があります
13:31
so, they would be Greg Lynn Alessi coffee pots --
グレッグ・リン・アレッシィの
コーヒーポットですが-
13:33
but that everyone who bought one
それを購入した人は-
13:36
would have a one-of-a-kind object that was unique in some way.
ある意味で 唯一無二の
商品を手にした事になります
13:38
To go back to architecture,
建築に戻りますが
13:43
what's organic about architecture as a field,
建築にとって有機的である事は
分野としては-
13:45
unlike product design,
製品デザインと違い-
13:48
is this whole issue of holism
全体論と剛性の-
13:50
and of monumentality is really our realm.
問題の全てであり
まさに 我々の領域のものです
13:52
Like, we have to design things which are coherent as a single object,
一つの作品として一貫した
設計が必要ですが-
13:56
but also break down into small rooms
小さい部屋への
細分化も必要です
14:00
and have an identity of both the big scale
そして 大スケールと
小スケールの
14:03
and the small scale.
両方の特徴が必要です
14:05
Architects tend to work with signature,
建築家は特性で
動く傾向があり
14:07
so that an architect needs a signature
建築家には
特性が必要となり-
14:11
and that signature has to work across the scale of houses
その特性は
建物全体にまたがります
14:13
up to, say, skyscrapers,
超高層ビルまでも-
14:16
and that problem of signatures is a thing we're very good at maintaining
特性を維持する事は
我々が長けている事で-
14:19
and working with; and intricacy,
色々な事柄の輻輳-
14:22
which is the relationship of, say,
云わば 「形」「構造」「窓」
14:24
the shape of a building, its structure, its windows,
「色」「パターン」等の関係性で-
14:26
its color, its pattern. These are real architectural problems.
それらが本当の
建築の問題なのです
14:29
So, my kind of hero for this in the natural world
私の自然界での
お気に入りは-
14:34
are these tropical frogs.
熱帯のカエルです
14:37
I got interested in them because they're the most
私が彼らに興味を抱いたのは-
14:39
extreme example
極端な質感のある
14:41
of a surface where
例からですが―
14:43
the texture and the -- let's call it the decoration --
そうですね-
装飾と呼びましょう
14:46
I know the frog doesn't think of it as decoration, but that's how it works --
カエルは装飾とは
考えてないでしょうが そう機能して-
14:50
are all intricately connected to one another.
すべてが複雑な
関係性にあります
14:53
So a change in the form
形状の変化は
14:56
indicates a change in the color pattern.
カラーパターンの
変化となります
14:58
So, the pattern and the form aren't the same thing,
パターンと形状は
同じではないですが
15:00
but they really work together and are fused
それらは 一緒に働いて
15:03
in some way.
ある意味で融合されます
15:05
So, when doing a center
コスタリカにある国立公園の
15:07
for the national parks in Costa Rica,
センターに携った時ですが-
15:10
we tried to use that idea of a gradient color
私達は ビルの表面を
構造体が横切るかのような-
15:13
and a change in texture
色のグラデーションと質感を-
15:15
as the structure moves across the surface of the building.
使用しようとしました
15:18
We also used a continuity of change
私達はまた メイン展示ホールから-
15:22
from a main exhibition hall to a natural history museum,
自然科学館まで変化の
連続性を出そうとしたので-
15:25
so it's all one continuous change
ひと塊の連続した
15:29
in the massing,
変化となり-
15:31
but within that massing are very different kinds of spaces and forms.
しかし その塊の中は
異なった空間と形状になっています
15:33
In a housing project in Valencia, Spain, we're doing,
私達が携わっている
スペインのバレンシアの住宅では-
15:37
the different towers of housing fused together
異なる住宅のタワーが 共有された
カーブで
15:40
in shared curves so you get a single mass,
融合して一つの大きな塊になり
15:44
like a kind of monolith,
まるで 一枚岩のように見えますが-
15:47
but it breaks down into individual elements.
それぞれ 個別の部材
にも分解できます
15:49
And you can see that that change in massing
そして 塊の中での
変化を見る事ができ-
15:54
also gives all 48 of the apartments
また 48戸のアパートが
15:57
a unique shape and size,
独自の形とサイズに
なっていてますが-
16:00
but always within a, kind of, controlled limit,
常に制御された 制限の中で
一種の-
16:02
an envelope of change.
囲いの中での変化です
16:05
I work with a group of other architects.
私達は他の建築家のグループと
働いています
16:09
We have a company called United Architects.
ユナイテッド・アーキテックという
会社ですが-
16:11
We were one of the finalists for the World Trade Center site design.
ワールドトレードセンターの
デザインの決勝進出者でした
16:13
And I think this just shows how
我々が いかに
大規模な建設の
16:17
we were approaching
問題に挑戦しているか
16:20
the problem of incredibly large-scale construction.
お解り頂けるかと思います
16:22
We wanted to make a kind of Gothic cathedral
我々は
ワールドトレードセンター跡地に
16:25
around the footprints of the World Trade Center site.
一種のゴシック様式の大聖堂の
建設を考えていました
16:28
And to do that, we tried to connect up
その為には 5つのタワーを
16:32
the five towers into a single system.
ひとつの システムに
する事を試みました
16:35
And we looked at, from the 1950s on,
そして 我々は1950年代から―
16:39
there were numerous examples of other architects
他の建築家が
同様の事を―
16:43
trying to do the same thing.
試みた多くの
例を見てきました
16:45
We really approached it at the level
我々は まさに
建物の類型学レベルで
16:47
of the typology of the building,
アプローチし
16:49
where we could build these five separate towers,
これら 5つの
個別タワーを建設し―
16:51
but they would all join at the 60th floor
60階でその
すべてを連結しー
16:53
and make a kind of single monolithic mass.
一枚岩の様な塊にしました
16:56
With United Architects, also,
ユナイテッド・アーキテックでは
17:00
we made a proposal for the European Central Bank headquarters
同様のシステムで
ヨーロッパ中央銀行本部の―
17:02
that used the same system,
提案をしましたが―
17:05
but this time in a much more monolithic mass,
この時は 球体の様に
17:07
like a sphere.
さらに一枚岩的な塊にしました
17:09
But again, you can see this, kind of,
ここでも
多数の建物要素が―
17:11
organic fusion
有機的な融合で
17:13
of multiple building elements
全体を形成しながら
より小さな部分へ
17:15
to make a thing which is whole, but breaks down into smaller parts,
分離されていて 極めて有機的な
方法である事が
17:17
but in an incredibly organic way.
お解り頂けると思います
17:21
Finally, I'd like to just show you
最後に デジタル
成形を使用した
17:24
some of the effects of using digital fabrication.
いくつかの効果を
お見せ致します
17:26
About six years ago, I bought one of these CNC mills,
約6年前 CNC加工機
を購入しましたが―
17:30
to just replace, kind of,
若手が模型を
作る際 頻繁に―
17:33
young people cutting their fingers off all the time building models.
指を切っているのを
避ける為でした
17:35
And I also bought a laser cutter
そして
レーザーカッターも購入し―
17:39
and started to fabricate within my own shop,
工房で 大規模な
建築部材やモデルの
17:41
kind of, large-scale building elements and models,
加工を始めました
17:44
where we could go directly to the tooling.
ここでは ただちに工作機械を使えます
17:47
What I found out is that the tooling,
工作機械という物は―
17:50
if you intervened in the software,
もし ソフトウェアに手を入れれば
17:53
actually produced decorative effects.
実際に装飾的な効果を生む事が
解ったのです
17:55
So, for these interiors, like this shop in Stockholm, Sweden,
ですので スウェーデンの
ストックホルムの店や
17:57
or this installation wall in the Netherlands
オランダ建設協会の
施設の壁の様な
18:01
at the Netherlands Architecture Institute,
内装の為に
18:04
we could use the texture that the tool would leave
この装置で作製した
多彩な空間演出をもたらす
18:07
to produce a lot of the spatial effects,
テクスチャーを使用し
18:10
and we could integrate the texture of the wall
壁の部材の
テクスチャーと形を
18:13
with the form of the wall with the material.
統合しました
18:15
So, in vacuum-formed plastic, in fiberglass,
真空成型した プラスチックや
ファイバーグラス
18:18
and then even at the level of structural steel,
そして 扁平的でモジュール的と
考えられる
18:22
which you think of as being linear and modular.
構造用鉄骨のレベルでさえもです
18:24
The steel industry is so far
鉄骨関連はこれまで
18:26
ahead of the design industry
デザイン産業よりも
優先的でした
18:28
that if you take advantage of it
もし これを利用できれば
18:30
you can even start to think of beams and columns
「梁や柱を一つのシステムとして
取り入れる」と
18:32
all rolled together into a single system
考える事が出来ます
18:35
which is highly efficient,
かなり効率がよくなり-
18:38
but also produces decorative effects
それでいて
非常に美しい有機的な-
18:40
and formal effects
装飾的で形式的な
18:42
that are very beautiful and organic.
効果を創り出すことが出来ます
18:44
Thanks very much.
ありがとうございました
18:46
Translator:Keisuke Oki
Reviewer:Takeshi Maeda

sponsored links

Greg Lynn - Designer
Greg Lynn is the head of Greg Lynn FORM, an architecture firm known for its boundary-breaking, biomorphic shapes and its embrace of digital tools for design and fabrication.

Why you should listen

Who says great architecture must be proportional and symmetrical? Not Greg Lynn. He and his firm, Greg Lynn FORM, have been pushing the edges of building design, by stripping away the traditional dictates of line and proportion and looking into the heart of what a building needs to be.

A series of revelations about building practice -- "Vertical structure is overrated"; "Symmetry is bankrupt" -- helped Lynn and his studio conceptualize a new approach, which uses calculus, sophisticated modeling tools, and an embrace of new manufacturing techniques to make buildings that, at their core, enclose space in the best possible way. The New York Presbyterian church that Lynn designed with Douglas Garofalo and Michael McInturf, collaborating remotely, is a glorious example of this -- as a quiet industrial building is transformed into a space for worship and contemplation with soaring, uniquely shaped and tuned elements.

In a sort of midcareer retrospective, the book Greg Lynn Form (watch the video) was released in October 2008; recently, Lynn has collaborated with the video team Imaginary Forces on the New City installation as part of the MOMA exhibit "Design and the Elastic Mind." In November 2008, FORM won a Golden Lion at the Venice Bienniale for its exhibition Recycled Toy Furniture.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.