sponsored links
TED2006

Rob Forbes: Ways of seeing

ロブ・フォーブス: ものの見方

February 2, 2006

Design Within Reachの創設者であるロブ・フォーブスがスナップ写真を交えて、彼のものの見方を紹介します。このスライドショーでは皆さんの周囲にあるかわいらしい配置、ファウンドアート、都市にみられるパターンなど今まで気づきもしなかった世界が見えてくるものの見方についてお話しします。

Rob Forbes - Designer
Rob Forbes founded Design Within Reach, the furniture company that brought high design to the general public. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I was listed on the online biography
オンライン上では私は
00:18
that said I was a design missionary.
デザイン伝道師と
紹介されているそうですが
00:21
That's a bit lofty; I'm really more
これは高尚すぎです
00:24
of something like a street walker.
私は放浪家みたいなものです
00:26
I spend a lot of time in urban areas
都市をいくつも
00:28
looking for design,
歩き回っては
00:30
and studying design in the public sector.
そこらへんのデザインを探しています
00:32
I take about 5,000 photographs a year,
一年間に写真は
5000枚ほど撮ります
00:34
and I thought that I would edit from these,
そこからおもしろそうなものを選び
00:37
and try to come up with some images
編集して
00:40
that might be appropriate and interesting to you.
お見せしようと思い立ったわけです
00:43
And I used three criteria:
選定には基準を3つ設けました
00:45
the first was, I thought I'd talk about
一つ目は 手の届く範囲にある
00:47
real design within reach,
洗練されたデザイン
00:49
design that's free, not design not quite within reach,
二つ目に ただのもの
デザイン業界では
00:51
as we're fondly known by our competition and competitors,
デザイン業界で知られるような
手の届かないものではなく
00:54
but stuff that you can find on the streets, stuff that was free,
路上で見つかるデザインはただで
00:57
stuff that was available to all people,
誰でもアクセスできます
01:01
and stuff that probably contains some other important messages.
三つ目は メッセージ性です
01:03
I'll use these sidewalks in Rio as an example.
こちらはリオで見つけた歩道です
01:06
A very common public design done in the '50s.
1950年代には
よく見られたデザインで
01:09
It's got a nice kind of flowing, organic form,
ブラジル文化に似合った
01:12
very consistent with the Brazilian culture --
流動的で有機的なパターンです
01:15
I think good design adds to culture.
よいデザインは文化を豊かにします
01:18
Wholly inconsistent with San Francisco or New York.
サンフランシスコや
ニューヨークには似合いません
01:20
But I think these are my sort of information highways:
これは私の好きな
情報交換ハイウェイです
01:23
I live in much more of an analog world,
私の暮らすアナログの世界では
01:26
where pedestrian traffic and
歩行者が行き交い
01:28
interaction and diversity exchange,
交流し 多様性が行き来します
01:30
and where I think the simple things under our feet
私は足元にある単純なものには
01:33
have a great amount of meaning to us.
大きな意味があると考えています
01:35
How did I get started in this business?
私がこの仕事を始めた理由ですが
01:38
I was a ceramic designer for about 10 years,
10年ほど陶器の
デザイナーをしていて
01:40
and just loved utilitarian form --
実用的なデザイン つまり日常的に
01:42
simple things that we use every day,
使われるありふれた作品中の
01:45
little compositions of color and surface on form.
ちょっとした質感や配色に
興味を持っていたんです
01:47
This led me to starting a company called Design Within Reach,
そこでDesign Within Reachという
企業を立ち上げました
01:50
a company dealing with simple forms,
シンプルなデザインの製品を扱い
01:54
making good designers available to us,
優れたデザイナーを広めるだけでなく
01:56
and also selling the personalities and character of the designers
彼らの特性・個性を売りとしています
01:58
as well, and it seems to have worked.
今のところは成功しているようです
02:01
A couple of years into the process,
仕事を始めて数年間
02:04
I spent a lot of time in Europe traveling around, looking for design.
デザインを求めて
ヨーロッパを旅しました
02:06
And I had a bit of a wake-up call in Amsterdam:
アムステルダムで
驚いたことがあります
02:09
I was there going into the design stores,
デザインストアで
02:11
and mixing with our crowd of designers,
何人ものデザイナーと話をしていると
02:13
and I recognized that a whole lot of stuff
そこのものは大抵似通っており
02:15
pretty much looked the same, and the effect of globalization
デザイン業界に押し寄せる
02:17
has had that in our community also.
グローバル化の波に気づかされました
02:19
We know a lot about what's going on with design around the world,
皆さんも世界の
デザイン事情はご存じでしょう
02:21
and it's getting increasingly more difficult
独自の文化を反映するデザインは
02:24
to find design that reflects a unique culture.
なかなか見つからなくなってきました
02:26
I was walking around on the streets of Amsterdam
アムステルダムを歩いていて
02:29
and I recognized, you know, the big story
目にとまったのは
02:31
from Amsterdam isn't what's in the design stores,
デザインストア内の商品ではなく
02:33
it's what's out on the streets,
外 つまり路上のものでした
02:35
and maybe it's self-explanatory,
当たり前のことでしょうが
02:37
but a city that hasn't been taken over by modernism,
現代主義に冒されていない都市には
02:39
that's preserved its kind of architecture and character,
独特の建築や雰囲気が残っています
02:42
and where the bicycle plays an important part of the way
自転車が重要な交通手段である所では
02:45
in which people get around and where pedestrian rights
歩行者の権利が
02:48
are protected.
守られています
02:50
And I write a newsletter that goes out every week,
さて 私は毎週ニュースレターを
発刊していますが
02:52
and I wrote an article about this, and it got such enormous response
このことを記事にすると
大きな反響を呼びました
02:54
that I realized that design, that common design,
公共の場にある
ありふれたデザインは
02:57
that's in the public area means a lot to people,
地域にとって
大切な基盤であり 対話の
02:59
and establishes kind of a groundwork and a dialog.
一形態でもあるのです
03:02
I then kind of thought about the other cities
そこでヴィトラのある
バーゼルやイタリア北部など
03:04
in Europe where I spend a lot of time looking for design,
デザインを探して
多くの時間を過ごした―
03:07
like Basel, where Vitra is located, or in northern Italy --
ヨーロッパの都市を思い返してみると
必ず大量の自転車と
03:10
all cities where there are a whole lot of bicycles,
歩行者専用道路があります
03:14
and where pedestrian areas -- and I came to the conclusion that perhaps
これらの都市には自転車や
歩行者の交通に関連する
03:16
there was something about these important design centers
何か重要なデザインの
要素があるはずだ
03:20
that dealt with bicycles and foot traffic,
と考えるようになりました
03:23
and I'm sure the skeptic eye would say, no, the correlation there
懐疑的な人はこう言うでしょう
03:25
is that there are universities and schools
「いや 共通項は大学や
学校ということであり
03:27
where people can't afford cars,
住人に車を買う余裕がないだけだ」
03:29
but it did seem that in many of these areas
しかし これらの多くの地域では
03:31
pedestrian traffic was protected.
歩行者交通も確保されています
03:33
You wouldn't look at this and call this a designer bike:
この二輪車をデザイナーバイクと
呼ぶ人はいないでしょう
03:37
a designer bike is made of titanium or molybdenum.
デザイナーバイクはチタニウムとか
モリブデンでできています
03:40
But I began looking at design in a place like Amsterdam
しかし アムステルダムのような場所の
デザインはどこか目新しく
03:42
and recognized, you know, the first job of design
そして デザインの本質とは
03:45
is to serve a social purpose.
有用性であると考えました
03:47
And so I look at this bike as not being a designer bike,
そこでこれを
デザイナーバイクではなく
03:49
but being a very good example of design.
デザインの模範例として
再定義しました
03:53
And since that time in Amsterdam, I spent an increasing amount of time
このアムステルダムの経験以来
03:56
in the cities, looking at design
街中でデザイナーの署名のない
03:59
for common evidence of design
デザインの中の共通項を探すことに
04:01
that really isn't under so much of a designer's signature.
時間を費やすようになりました
04:03
I was in Buenos Aires very recently,
ついこないだ
サンティアゴ・カラトラバの
04:06
and I went to see this bridge by Santiago Calatrava.
この橋を見るために
ブエノス・アイレスを訪ねました
04:08
He's a Spanish architect and designer.
彼はスペインの
建築家兼デザイナーです
04:12
And the tourist brochures pointed me in the direction of this bridge --
観光ガイドを見ながら
この橋へと向かいました
04:15
I love bridges, metaphorically and symbolically and structurally --
わたしは橋の比喩的 象徴的
構造的要素が好きです
04:18
and it was a bit of a disappointment,
しかし 川の泥が堆積して
04:21
because of the sludge from the river was encrusted on it; it really wasn't in use.
橋はほとんど
使用されておらず残念でした
04:23
And I recognized that oftentimes design,
そこで気づいたことは
04:26
when you're set up to see design,
デザインというものはしばしば
04:28
it can be a bit of a letdown.
見るものの期待を
裏切るということです
04:30
But there were lots of other things going on in this area:
しかし この地域には
他にも面白いものがありました
04:32
it was a kind of construction zone;
ここはいわゆる開発地区で
04:35
a lot of buildings were going up.
建設中の建物が多くありました
04:37
And, approaching a building from a distance, you don't see too much;
遠くからでは何の変哲もありませんが
04:39
you get a little closer, and you arrive at a nice little composition
近くで見てみると
モンドリアンやディーベンコーンを
04:41
that might remind you of a Mondrian or a Diebenkorn or something.
思い起こさせる美しい
パターンが目に飛び込んできます
04:44
But to me it was an example of
しかしこれは産業資材ですら
04:48
industrial materials with a little bit of colors and animation
少し 色や活気を
加えてやると 意図せずして
04:50
and a nice little still life -- kind of unintended piece of design.
ちょっとした静物画に
なるという一例です
04:53
And going a little closer, you get a different perspective.
更に近づけば
違った様相が見えてきます
04:56
I find these little vignettes,
こういった偶然が作り出す
04:59
these little accidental pieces of design,
小さなデザインというのは
05:01
to be refreshing.
新鮮に感じられます
05:03
They give me, I don't know,
こういった作品はどこか
05:05
a sense of correctness in the world
建物が完成しても
05:07
and some visual delight in the knowledge
このシンプルな足場ほどの
05:09
that the building will probably never look as good
美しさを放つことはないという
05:12
as this simple industrial scaffolding
どこかこの世の道理のようなものを
05:14
that is there to serve.
教えてくれます
05:16
Down the road, there was another building, a nice visual structure:
もう少し先に 目に楽しい
構造物を見つけました
05:18
horizontal, vertical elements, little decorative lines
縦横の線と斜めの
ちょっとした装飾のラインに
05:21
going across, these magenta squiggles,
赤紫の曲がったライン
05:24
the workmen being reduced to decorative elements,
そこに作業員という装飾が加わり
05:26
just a nice, kind of, breakup
まるで都会の中に
05:29
of the urban place.
絵画が現れたようでした
05:31
And, you know, that no longer exists.
この光景はもうお目にかかれませんよ
05:33
You've captured it for a moment, and finding this little still life's
この一瞬を撮る 静物画を
探すという作業は
05:35
like listening to little songs or something:
音楽かなにかに耳を
傾けるようなものなんです
05:37
it gives me an enormous amount of pleasure.
そこが私はとても
気に入っているんですけどね
05:39
Antoine Predock designed
アントワーヌ・プリドックは
05:42
a wonderful ball stadium in San Diego
サンディエゴのペトコパークという
05:44
called Petco Park.
素晴らしい野球場の
デザインをしました
05:46
A terrific use of local materials,
現地の資材を
ふんだんに利用していますが
05:48
but inside you could find some interior compositions.
内側では インテリアのような
造りが見られます
05:50
Some people go to baseball stadiums to look at games;
野球を見にくる方もいますが
05:53
I go and see design relationships.
私はこのデザインを見に行きます
05:55
Just a wonderful kind of breakup of architecture,
垂直に立つ木々が
05:57
and the way that the trees form vertical elements.
建築学的な中断をもたらしています
05:59
Red is a color in the landscape
赤色は大抵の場合
06:02
that is often on stop signs.
”止まれ”と暗示しています
06:04
It takes your attention; it has a great amount of emotion;
感情を包含する赤は注意を引きます
06:06
it stares back at you the way that a figure might.
彼女のように
にらみ返してくる感じがします
06:08
Just a piece of barrier tape construction stuff in Italy.
これはイタリアの
立ち入り禁止のテープです
06:11
Construction site in New York:
こちらはニューヨークの工事現場です
06:14
red having this kind of emotional power
赤色にはこの子犬の
06:16
that's almost an equivalent with the way in which --
かわいさなどに匹敵する
06:18
cuteness of puppies and such.
訴えかける力が備わっています
06:20
Side street in Italy.
こちらはイタリアの横道です
06:22
Red drew me into this little composition,
こちらも赤色に惹かれました
06:24
optimistic to me in the sense that maybe
メールボックス
ドアサービス 配管―
06:26
the public service's mailbox,
まるで異なる公共事業が
06:29
door service, plumbing.
楽観的にも
06:31
It looks as if these different public services
一つのデザインを
06:33
work together to create some nice little compositions.
作り上げているようですね
06:35
In Italy, you know, almost everything, kind of, looks good.
なぜかイタリアのものは
よく見えますよ
06:38
Simple menus put on a board,
壁にかかったメニューですら
06:40
achieving, kind of, the sort of balance.
バランスがとれて見えます
06:41
But I'm convinced that it's because
これは裏路地などを
06:43
you're walking around the streets and seeing things.
見歩いているからだと思います
06:45
Red can be comical: it can draw your attention
赤は滑稽でもあり
このかわいそうにも
06:47
to the poor little personality of the little fire hydrant
設計ミスのために
埋もれたハバナの消火栓も
06:49
suffering from bad civic planning in Havana.
十分な注意を惹きます
06:52
Color can animate simple blocks,
単純なブロックや素材も
06:55
simple materials:
色があれば活気づきます
06:57
walking in New York, I'll stop.
ニューヨークではよく訳もなく
06:59
I don't always know why I take photographs of things.
立ち止って写真を撮ってしまいます
07:01
A nice visual composition of symmetry.
左右対称の美
07:04
Curves against sharp things.
直線 対 曲線
07:06
It's a comment on the way in which we deal with
これがニューヨーク市内の
ベンチに対する
07:08
public seating in the city of New York.
私の印象です
07:11
I've come across some other just,
他には なんと言いますか
07:13
kind of, curious relationships
興味深い解釈のできる
07:15
of bollards on the street that have different interpretations,
保護柱に遭遇したこともあります
07:17
but -- these things amuse me.
いやいや おもしろいですね
07:20
Sometimes a trash can -- this is just in the street in San Francisco --
こちらは
サンフランシスコの路地ですが
07:23
a trash can that's been left there for 18 months
この18ヶ月間放置された
ゴミ箱がいい具合に
07:26
creates a nice 45-degree angle
45度の角度を保ちながら
07:29
against these other relationships,
周囲と調和することで
07:31
and turns a common parking spot into a nice little piece of sculpture.
なんでもない駐車場を
作品にしています
07:33
So, there's this sort of silent hand of design at work
この様に 行く先々には
自然にできた
07:36
that I see in places that I go.
作品たちが転がっているのです
07:39
Havana is a wonderful area.
ハバナは素晴らしい場所ですよ
07:42
It's quite free of commercial clutter:
商業化の侵略をうけておらず
07:44
you don't see our logos and brands and names,
ブランドの名前やロゴは見当たらず
07:46
and therefore you're alert to things physically.
物理的に周囲がよく見えるんです
07:48
And this is a great protection of a pedestrian zone,
こちらは歩行者天国の防護柱ですが
07:50
and the repurposing of some colonial cannons to do that.
植民地時代の大砲を
再利用したものです
07:55
And Cuba needs to be far more resourceful,
キューバには輸入規制があるため
07:59
because of the blockades and things,
代替品利用が必要ですが
08:02
but a really wonderful playground.
しかし素晴らしい遊び場でもあります
08:03
I've often wondered why Italy is really a leader in modern design.
何故イタリアがモダンデザインの
リーダーなのか考えてみたことがあります
08:05
In our area, in furnishings,
私の専門 家具という分野においては
08:09
they're sort of way at the top.
完全なるトップです
08:11
The Dutch are good also, but the Italians are good.
オランダも悪くないですが
イタリアは素晴らしい
08:13
And I came across this little street in Venice,
この小さな通りを
見つけたのはベネチアでした
08:15
where the communist headquarters
共産主義団体の本部が
08:18
were sharing a wall with this Catholic shrine.
カソリックの寺と壁を共有しています
08:20
And I realized that, you know, Italy is a place
そこで気づいたのですが
イタリアという場所では
08:23
where they can accept these different ideologies
異なるイデオロギーや
多様性を認め合い
08:26
and deal with diversity and not have the problem,
これを問題視しないのです
08:30
or they can choose to ignore them,
それどころか無視する場合もあります
08:33
but these -- you don't have warring factions,
しかし 互いに
ぶつかり合うこともなく
08:35
and I think that maybe the tolerance of the absurdity
このような突飛なことにも
寛容であるため
08:38
which has made Italy so innovative
イタリアのデザインは革新的であり
08:41
and so tolerant.
寛容なのではと思います
08:44
The past and the present work quite well together in Italy also,
この写真に見るようにイタリアでは
08:46
and I think that it's recognizable there,
過去と現在が調和しています
08:50
and has an important effect on culture,
このことは文化に大きく影響します
08:52
because their public spaces are protected,
公共のスペースや
歩道は保護されており
08:54
their sidewalks are protected,
こういったオブジェを直に
08:56
and you're actually able to confront these things
鑑賞することができます
08:58
physically,
イタリア人はこのようにして
09:00
and I think this helps people get over
現代化を初めとする
09:02
their fear of modernism and other such things.
諸々の恐怖を乗り越えることが
出来るのです
09:03
A change might be a typical street corner in San Francisco.
所変ってこちらは
サンフランシスコの通りです
09:06
And I use this -- this is, sort of,
この風景は私に言わせれば
09:09
what I consider to be urban spam.
都会特有のおしつけです
09:11
I notice this stuff because I walk a lot,
私はよく歩くので気がつきましたが
09:13
but here, private industry is really kind of
ここでは企業が
09:16
making a mess of the public sector.
公共のスペースを
損ねてしまっています
09:18
And as I look at it, I sort of say, you know,
これを目にして思いました
09:20
the publications that report on problems in the urban area
「都市の問題を扱う出版物が
09:21
also contribute to it,
問題の原因となることがあるのです」
09:24
and it's just my call to say to all of us,
皆さん 考えてみてください
09:26
public policy won't change this at all;
社会政策ではこれらを変えられません
09:28
private industry has to work to take things like this seriously.
企業側が真剣に取り組むべきなんです
09:30
The extreme might be in Italy where, again,
それが顕著に見られるのが
またイタリアです
09:33
there's kind of some type of control
雑誌などを売っているだけでも
09:36
over what's happening in the environment is very evident,
とても明確に周囲環境への
09:38
even in the way that they sell and distribute periodicals.
管理がされていることが覗えます
09:41
I walk to work every day or ride my scooter,
私は歩くか スクーターに
乗り通勤しています
09:44
and I come down and park in this little spot.
駐車はこの小さな路地にします
09:47
And I came down one day,
先日 いつも通り出勤すると
09:51
and all the bikes were red.
とまっているバイクが全て赤色でした
09:53
Now, this is not going to impress you guys who Photoshop, and can do stuff,
Photoshopなどをいじる方は
驚かないでしょうが
09:55
but this was an actual moment
このときは スクーターを降りた瞬間
09:58
when I got off my bike,
バイク乗りたちが
10:00
and I looked and I thought, it's as if
一致団結して
10:02
all of my biker brethren
なにか共謀でもしているかのような
10:04
had kind of gotten together and conspired
印象を受けて
10:07
to make a little statement.
本当に驚きました
10:09
And it reminded me that --
こういったものとの遭遇には
10:11
to keep in the present,
いつも備えておくべきということを
10:13
to look out for these kinds of things.
思いださせてくれました
10:15
It gave me possibilities for wonder --
そこで私は考えました
10:17
if maybe it's a yellow day in San Francisco, and we could all agree,
イエローデイなら
サンフランシスコで 皆さん合意のもと
10:19
and create some installations.
何かインスタレーションを作れるなと
10:22
But it also reminded me of the power
しかし それ以外にも
10:24
of pattern and repetition
パターンや反復のもつ
10:26
to make an effect in our mind.
心動かす力を思い出させてくれます
10:28
And I don't know if there's a stronger kind of effect
異なる構成要素を繋ぐパターンよりも
10:31
than pattern and the way it unites
強力な手法は他には
10:34
kind of disparate elements.
ないのではないでしょうか
10:36
I was at the art show in Miami in December,
12月にはマイアミの
アートショーを訪ねました
10:38
and spent a couple of hours looking at fine art,
数時間美術作品を眺めていましたが
10:41
and amazed at the prices of art
その価格には驚きましたね
10:43
and how expensive it is, but having a great time looking at it.
まぁ 鑑賞自体は楽しめましたけど
10:45
And I came outside, and the valets for this car service
外にでるとパーキングサービスの壁が
10:47
had created, you know, quite a nice little collage
車の鍵で埋め尽くされ 小さな素敵な
10:52
of these car keys,
コラージュになっていました
10:55
and my closest equivalent were a group of prayer tags
そこで頭に浮かんだのが
ところ狭しと吊される
10:57
that I had seen in Tokyo.
東京の絵馬でした
11:01
And I thought that if
パターンに異なる要素を
11:03
pattern can unite these disparate elements,
つなぐ力があるなら 応用範囲は
11:05
it can do just about anything.
無限ではないでしょうか
11:08
I don't have very many shots of people,
人物の写真をあまり撮らない理由は
11:10
because they kind of
get in the way of studying pure form.
自然なデザインの
邪魔になってしまうからです
11:12
I was in a small restaurant in Spain,
さて スペインのレストランで
11:15
having lunch --
ある天気の良い日に
11:18
one of those nice days where
たまたま自分たちしか客がない
11:20
you had the place kind of to yourself,
昼食をとっていました
11:22
and you have a glass of wine, and enjoying the local area
ワインを飲み 地元文化や
11:24
and the culture and the food
食事を楽しんでいたんですが
11:26
and the quiet, and feeling very lucky,
とても静かでラッキーと
思っていた矢先
11:28
and a bus load of tourists arrived,
バスから団体の観光客が降りてきて
11:31
emptied out,
レストランに一斉に
11:34
filled up the restaurant.
なだれ込んできました
11:36
In a very short period of time,
瞬く間に
11:38
completely changed the atmosphere
大男が大声を出したりと
11:40
and character with loud voices and large bodies and such,
雰囲気は一変してしまいました
11:43
and we had to get up and leave;
大変居心地が悪くなり
11:46
it was just that uncomfortable.
退去を余儀なくされました
11:48
And at that moment, the sun came out,
その時 太陽が出始めたんです
11:50
and through this perforated screen,
穴の開いた日よけを通じて
11:52
a pattern was cast over these bodies
観光客に光のパターンが映し出され
11:55
and they kind of faded into the rear,
人々は背景となりました
11:57
and we left the restaurant kind of
それを見てどこか満足感を得て
12:00
feeling O.K. about stuff.
レストランをあとにしました
12:02
And I do think pattern
さて 私の考えでは
12:04
has the capability of eradicating
パターンは
12:06
some of the most evil
悪趣味なレストランといった
12:08
forces of society,
社会の悪の根源を
12:10
such as bad form in restaurants,
根絶する力があると思います
12:12
but quite seriously, it was a statement to me
しかし まじめな話
12:14
that one thing that you do, sort of, see
この光景には
12:17
is the aggressive nature
産業界が
12:19
of the industrial world has produced --
多かれ少なかれ
12:21
kind of,
生み出してしまっている
12:23
large masses of things,
支配的側面を垣間見ました
12:26
and when you -- in monoculture,
更に単一文化の中では
12:30
and I think the preservation of diversity in culture
文化的多様性の保全というのは
12:32
is something that's important to us.
大事になってくると思います
12:34
The last shots that I have deal with --
最後にお見せする写真は
12:36
coming back to this theme of sidewalks,
また 歩道に関するものですが
12:39
and I wanted to
少し補足しましょう
12:41
say something here about -- I'm, kind of, optimistic, you know.
私はどこか楽観的なところがあります
12:43
Post-Second World War,
第二次大戦後
12:46
the influence of the automobile
自動車の普及により
12:48
has really been devastating in a lot of our cities.
多くの都市部は荒廃してきました
12:50
A lot of urban areas have been converted into parking lots
都市部では無作為に作られた
12:52
in a sort of indiscriminate use.
駐車場ばかりが目につきます
12:55
A lot of the planning departments became subordinated
都市デザインは運輸省によって
12:57
to the transportation department. It's as easy to rag on cars
支配されました
12:59
as it is on Wal-Mart;
車のせいにするのは簡単ですが
13:01
I'm not going to do that.
私はこれには反対です
13:03
But they're real examples in urbanization
しかし ここ数年間で
こういった変化が
13:05
and the change that's occurred in the last number of years,
見られるようになり
文化の中心としての
13:08
and the heightened sensitivity to the importance
都市環境の重要性が
13:11
of our urban environments as cultural centers.
再認識されるようになりました
13:13
I think that they are, that the statements that we make
公共部門における
13:15
in this public sector
私たちの意思表明は
13:18
are our contributions
より大きな全体に対する
13:20
to a larger whole.
貢献なのだと思います
13:23
Cities are the place where we're most likely
都市部というのは常に
13:25
to encounter diversity
外界と交流し 変化が起こる場所です
13:27
and to mix with other people.
そうして芸術や
インスピレーションが生まれ
13:29
We go there for stimulation in art and all those other things.
皆が足を運ぶのです
13:31
But I think people have recognized
しかし 同時に都市部の
13:33
the sanctity of our urban areas.
尊厳も認知されているようです
13:35
A place like Chicago
シカゴのような場所は
13:37
has really reached kind of a level of international stature.
国際的な発展を遂げてきました
13:39
The U.S. is actually becoming a bit of a leader in kind of
米国は都市計画・都市再生における
13:41
enlightened urban planning and renewal,
リーダーになりつつあります
13:43
and I want to single out a place like Chicago,
そこでシカゴの例を挙げます
13:46
where I look at some guy like Mayor Daley as a bit of a design hero
シカゴ市長のデイリーは
デザイン界のヒーローです
13:48
for being able to work through the
政治的プロセスを経て
13:51
political processes and all that to improve an area.
地域発展に尽力しています
13:53
You would expect a city like this to have
こんな街のショッピング通り―
13:56
upgraded flower boxes
ミシガン通りのフラワーボックスには
13:58
on Michigan Avenue where wealthy people shop,
お金がかかっていると思いますよね?
14:00
but if you actually go along the street you find
しかし実際 行くと分かりますが
14:02
the flower boxes change from street to street:
フラワーボックスは
通りごとに別々のもので
14:04
there's actual diversity in the plants.
植物も多種多様なんです
14:07
And the idea that a city group can maintain
市の団体が何種類もの
14:09
different types of foliage
植物育てるなんて
14:11
is really quite exceptional.
素晴らしいと思います
14:13
There are common elements of this that you'll see throughout Chicago,
同じようにシカゴ中に
見られる要素ですが
14:16
and then there are your big-D design statements:
こちらはBig D Designと
呼ばれるものです
14:19
the Pritzker Pavilion done by Frank Gehry.
フランク・ゲーリの
フリッツカーパビリオンです
14:21
My measure of this as being an important bit of design
このデザインを重要と思う理由は
14:24
is not so much the way that it looks,
その外観のためではなく
14:27
but the fact that it performs a very important social function.
社会的に大切な役割を
果たしているからです
14:30
There are a lot of free concerts, for example,
例えば この地域では
14:32
that go on in this area;
無料のコンサートが
よく開かれています
14:34
it has a phenomenal acoustic system.
音響システムは素晴らしいですよ
14:36
But the commitment that the city has made to the public area
しかし市が行った公共への働きかけは
14:38
is significant, and almost an international model.
とても重要で
国際的規範といってもいい程です
14:40
I work on the mayor's council in San Francisco,
私はサンフランシスコ市長委員会にて
14:43
on the International Design Council for Mayors,
国際デザインコンサルタントを
していますが
14:45
and Chicago is looked at as the pinnacle,
シカゴはトップであると
みなされており
14:48
and I really would like to salute Mayor Daley and the folks there.
この点市長デイリー氏らに
敬意を表したいと思います
14:50
I thought that I should include at least one
テクノロジー関連のものも
14:53
shot of technology for you guys.
一つは入れようとこちらの
14:55
This is also in Millennium Park in Chicago,
シカゴの
ミレニアム・パークを選びました
14:57
where the Spanish artist-designer Plensa
スペインのデザイナーのプレンサが
15:00
has created, kind of,
作ったものですが
15:02
a digital readout in this park
この地域の人々の
15:04
that reflects back
個性や性格を
15:06
the characters and personalities
映し出すような
15:08
of the people in this area.
デジタルディスプレーです
15:10
And it's a welcoming area, I think, inclusive of diversity,
多様性を包括しながら
15:13
reflective of diversity, and I think
それをよく表現していると思います
15:16
this marriage of both technology and art
この公共部門での
テクノロジーとアートの
15:19
in the public sector is an area where the U.S.
融合というのは米国が
15:22
can really take a leadership role,
リーダーシップを発揮できる分野です
15:24
and Chicago is one example.
シカゴはほんの一例に過ぎません
15:26
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
15:28
Translator:Takahiro Shimpo
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Rob Forbes - Designer
Rob Forbes founded Design Within Reach, the furniture company that brought high design to the general public.

Why you should listen

A decade ago, if you wanted to buy a piece of classic modern furniture for your house -- say, a classic Eames chaise longue -- you had basically two options: make friends with a commercial office designer who could order you a piece from the supplier, or wait until your neighborhood psychiatrist redecorated his office and put all the 1960s-vintage Eames chairs out on the curb. Rob Forbes, a potter with a background in retail, saw a market for clean, modern design made available to regular people, and turned this idea into the brilliant nationwide chain and catalog Design Within Reach.

Along with new and classic home goods, DWR became a platform for Forbes' way of seeing. The early-2000-vintage DWR newsletters were packed with colorful images from Forbes' travels and news about designers he loved. And this is not to forget each holiday's annual champagne chair contest -- in which DWR fans were challenged to create a miniature modern masterpiece from the foil, wire and cork of a bottle of bubbly.

In July 2007, Forbes left DWR to focus on a new project, PUBLIC, which designs and sells urban bikes.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.