sponsored links
TED2004

Joseph Pine: What consumers want

ジョセフ・パインの「消費者の望むこと」

February 29, 2004

消費者は「本物」を求めている、が「マスカスタマイゼーション」の著者ジョセフ・パインは「本物」を売るのは非常に難しい、なぜならそんなものは存在しないからだ、と言います。かれは「作り物」だがそれでも莫大な収益を上げる体験について語ります。

Joseph Pine - Writer
A writer and veteran consultant to entrepreneurs and executives alike, Joseph Pine's books and workshops help businesses create what modern consumers really want: authentic experiences. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm going to talk about a very fundamental change that is going on
私はこれから、現代の経済の構造の
00:12
in the very fabric of the modern economy.
基本的な変化についてお話しします
00:15
And to talk about that, I'm going to go back to the beginning,
そのために、まず一番大元に戻ろうと思います
00:18
because in the beginning were commodities.
経済の始まりがコモディティ(未加工農産物)だからです
00:21
Commodities are things that you grow in the ground, raise on the ground or pull out of the ground:
コモディティは、あなたが土で育てあるいはそこから引き抜いてくるもので
00:25
basically, animal, mineral, vegetable.
基本的に動物、鉱物、野菜です
00:28
And then you extract them out of the ground,
地面からそれを取り出し
00:30
and sell them on the open marketplace.
オープンな市場でそれを売ります
00:32
Commodities were the basis of the agrarian economy
コモディティは農業経済の基本なわけです
00:34
that lasted for millennia.
それが1000年も続きました
00:36
But then along came the industrial revolution,
しかしその後に産業革命がやって来た
00:39
and then goods became the predominant economic offering,
そして「商品」が経済の主要な提供品になりました
00:42
where we used commodities as a raw material
そこではコモディティは生産の素材として
00:45
to be able to make or manufacture goods.
商品を作るために使われます
00:48
So, we moved from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy.
農業経済から産業経済へと移行したわけです
00:51
Well, what then happened over the last 50 or 60 years,
そして、最近の50か60年で起きたのは
00:54
is that goods have become commoditized.
商品の「コモディティ化」でした
00:57
Commoditized: where they're treated like a commodity,
商品はコモディティとして扱われます
00:59
where people don't care who makes them.
誰がそれを作ったかなんて気にしない
01:02
They just care about three things and three things only:
気になるのは三つのポイントだけです、つまり
01:04
price, price and price.
値段と値段と値段です
01:06
Now, there's an antidote to commoditization,
コモディティ化に対抗する手段があります
01:09
and that is customization.
それが「カスタマイズ」です
01:12
My first book was called "Mass Customization" --
私の最初の本は「Mass Customization」で―
01:14
it came up a couple of times yesterday --
昨日何回か名前が出ていましたが―
01:16
and how I discovered this progression of economic value
そして私がこの経済価値の進化を発見したのは
01:18
was realizing that customizing a good
商品をカスタマイズするのは
01:20
automatically turned it into a service,
それをサービス化することで
01:22
because it was done just for a particular person,
なぜならそれは特定の人に向けてなされることで
01:24
because it wasn't inventoried,
在庫化されておらず
01:26
it was delivered on demand to that individual person.
特定個人にオンデマンドで届けられると気づいたからです
01:28
So, we moved from an industrial economy to a service-based economy.
そこで我々は産業経済からサービス型の経済へと移動しました
01:31
But over the past 10 or 20 years, what's happened is that
しかし、この10から20年で起きたのは
01:35
services are being commoditized as well.
サービス自体もまたコモディティ化した、ということです
01:37
Long-distance telephone service sold on price, price, price;
長距離電話は値段と値段と値段で売られており
01:40
fast-food restaurants with all their value pricing;
ファーストフードレストランもすべて値段指向
01:42
and even the Internet is commoditizing not just goods,
インターネットでさえ、商品としてだけでなくサービスとして
01:45
but services as well.
コモディティ化されています
01:47
What that means is that it's time
それはなにかというと、つまり
01:52
to move to a new level of economic value.
新しいレベルの経済価値に移行する時期だ、といことです
01:54
Time to go beyond the goods and the services,
商品やサービスの範囲を超えて行くこと
01:57
and use, in that same heuristic, what happens when you customize a service?
そして、同じ手法で考えると、サービスをカスタマイズ化したらどうなるか?
01:59
What happens when you design a service that is so appropriate for a particular person --
特定の人にぴったり合ったサービスが、ちょうど欲しい時に
02:02
that's exactly what they need at this moment in time?
手に入るようになったら、何が起こるのか?
02:06
Then you can't help but make them go "wow";
その人はもう「すごい!」と言わざるをえないのです
02:08
you can't help but turn it into a memorable event --
それは忘れられないイベントに変わるのです
02:10
you can't help but turn it into an experience.
それは体験に変わらざるをえないのです
02:12
So we're shifting to an experience economy,
つまり我々は「体験経済」へ移行しつつある
02:16
where experiences are becoming the predominant economic offering.
体験が経済的な提供品となる世界です
02:18
Now most places that I talk to,
私が講演するほとんどの場所で
02:22
when I talk about experience, I talk about Disney --
体験について語る時には、世界一の体験ステージ演出者、
02:24
the world's premier experience-stager.
ディスニーについて語ります
02:26
I talk about theme restaurants, and experiential retail,
私はテーマレストランや実験型店舗や
02:28
and boutique hotels, and Las Vegas --
ブティックホテルや、世界一の体験都市
02:30
the experience capital of the world.
ラスベガスについても語ります
02:33
But here, when you think about experiences,
しかし皆さんが体験について考える時には
02:36
think about Thomas Dolby and his group, playing music.
トーマス・ドルビーと彼のグループが演奏しているところを考えて下さい
02:38
Think about meaningful places.
意味のある場所について考えて下さい
02:41
Think about drinking wine,
ワインを飲む時のことを考え
02:43
about a journey to the Clock of the Long Now.
「ロング・ナウ時計」(1万年時計)への旅を考えて下さい
02:46
Those are all experiences. Think about TED itself.
これらは皆「体験」です TEDそのものもそうです
02:49
The experience capital in the world of conferences.
カンファレンスの世界での「体験の首都」でしょう
02:53
All of these are experiences.
これらは全て体験です
02:57
Now, over the last several years I spent a lot of time in Europe,
さて、ここ数年、私はヨーロッパの
02:59
and particularly in the Netherlands,
特にオランダで過ごすことが多く
03:01
and whenever I talk about the experience economy there,
そこで体験経済について語るといつも
03:03
I'm always greeted at the end with one particular question,
最後にある決まった質問を受けます
03:05
almost invariably.
ほとんどいつもです
03:08
And the question isn't really so much a question
それは質問といっても、実はどちらかというと
03:10
as an accusation.
非難なのですが
03:13
And the Dutch, when they usually put it,
オランダ人は、それに触れる場合は
03:15
it always starts with the same two words.
いつも決まった2語で始めます
03:17
You know the words I mean?
なんだかわかりますか?
03:19
You Americans.
「お前たち アメリカ人は」です
03:21
They say, you Americans.
彼らは言います 「お前たちアメリカ人は
03:24
You like your fantasy environments,
お前たちのあの幻の世界
03:26
your fake, your Disneyland experiences.
まやかしのディズニー体験が好きなのか」と
03:28
They say, we Dutch, we like real,
彼らは言います 「俺たちオランダ人はリアルで
03:31
natural, authentic experiences.
ナチュラルな『本物の』体験が好きなんだ」と
03:33
So much has that happened that I've developed a fairly praticed response,
あんまり何度も起きるので、私はかなり手慣れた反応を考えてあります
03:37
which is: I point out that first of all,
それは:まず最初に指摘しておくが
03:41
you have to understand that there is no such thing
そもそも「本物でない」体験などないんだ、と
03:43
as an inauthentic experience.
理解しなくてはいけない
03:45
Why? Because the experience happens inside of us.
なぜか? 体験は私たちの内部でおきるからだ
03:48
It's our reaction to the events that are staged in front of us.
それは私たちの目の前で演じられたことへの自分の反応だ
03:51
So, as long as we are in any sense authentic human beings,
つまり、私たちが何らかの意味で本物の人間である限り
03:54
then every experience we have is authentic.
全ての体験は本物なのだ、と
03:56
Now, there may be more or less natural or artificial
それで、体験にはいくらか自然でないとか人工的な
03:59
stimuli for the experience,
刺激もあるかもしれないが
04:01
but even that is a matter of degree, not kind.
それでも単に程度の問題であって、種類のではない、と
04:03
And there's no such thing as a 100 percent natural experience.
それに100%自然な体験などは存在しない、と
04:07
Even if you go for a walk in the proverbial woods,
古代の森を散歩しているとしても
04:09
there is a company that manufactured the car
その森の縁まで運転して来た自動車を
04:12
that delivered you to the edge of the woods;
製造した会社はある:
04:14
there's a company that manufactured the shoes that you have
森を歩くのに足を守っている
04:16
to protect yourself from the ground of the woods.
靴を作った会社もある
04:18
There's a company that provides a cell phone service you have
森で迷子になったときのために用意してある
04:20
in case you get lost in the woods.
携帯電話の会社もあるのだ、と
04:22
Right? All of those are man-made,
わかる? これらはみんな人工物で
04:25
artificiality brought into the woods by you,
あなたが森に持ち込んだ人工物であり
04:27
and by the very nature of being there.
だからこそそこにあるのだ、と
04:30
And then I always finish off
そしていつもこう言って終わる
04:34
by talking about -- the thing that amazes me the most about this question,
―これがこの話の一番面白いところなんだが―
04:37
particularly coming from the Dutch,
特にオランダ人からの質問の場合は
04:40
is that the Netherlands
つまり、オランダそのものが
04:42
is every bit as manufactured as Disneyland.
まるでディズニーランドのように人工物だ、ということです
04:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:47
And the Dutch, they always go ...
そしてオランダ人は、いつも通り
04:49
and they realize, I'm right!
私が正しいことに気づくのです
04:51
There isn't a square meter of ground in the entire country
そこの土地には、海から干拓した以外の土地は
04:53
that hasn't been reclaimed from the sea,
1エーカーもなく
04:55
or otherwise moved, modified and manicured
そうでなければ元からずっとそこにあったように
04:57
to look as if it had always been there.
とこからか移して来たか手入れをした土地だけしかないのです
05:00
It's the only place you ever go for a walk in the woods and all the trees are lined up in rows.
そこは、森に行くと全ての木がきれいに整列している唯一の場所です
05:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:05
But nonetheless, not just the Dutch,
しかしにもかかわらず、オランダ人だけでなく
05:09
but everyone has this desire for the authentic.
全ての人は「本物」への欲求があるのです
05:11
And authenticity is therefore
そこで「本物」は
05:13
becoming the new consumer sensibility --
消費者の新しい感性となりつつあり
05:15
the buying criteria by which consumers
彼らが、何を、誰から
05:18
are choosing who are they going to buy from,
買うかという基準に
05:20
and what they're going to buy.
なりつつあるのです
05:22
Becoming the basis of the economy.
経済の基盤になろうとしています
05:24
In fact, you can look at how each of these economies developed,
事実、それぞれの経済がどうやって成長したかを調べると
05:26
that each one has their own business imperative,
消費者の感性とマッチした必要性が
05:29
matched with a consumer sensibility.
それぞれのビジネスにあったことがわかります
05:32
We're the agrarian economy, and we're supplying commodities.
農耕経済の時代には、コモディティを供給していました
05:34
It's about supply and availability.
それは供給と可用性のことです
05:36
Getting the commodities to market.
コモディティを市場に出していました
05:38
With the industrial economy, it is about controlling costs --
産業経済の時代になり、重要なのはコストを管理することになり
05:41
getting the costs down as low as possible
コストを出来るだけ下げることで
05:44
so we can offer them to the masses.
大衆に商品を提供できるようになりました
05:46
With the service economy, it is about
サービス経済えは、重要なのは
05:48
improving quality.
品質を上げることでした
05:51
That has -- the whole quality movement has risen
それは―サービス向上は、ここ20か30年間の
05:53
with the service economy over the past 20 or 30 years.
サービス経済の勃興とともに始まったのです
05:55
And now, with the experience economy,
そして今、体験経済とともに
05:58
it's about rendering authenticity.
重要なのは「本物」を演じることになりました
06:00
Rendering authenticity -- and the keyword is "rendering."
本物を演じるーキーワードは「演じる」です
06:03
Right? Rendering, because you have to get your consumers --
でしょ? 「演じる」 なぜならあなたはお客さんに―
06:07
as business people --
商売相手でも同じですが―
06:09
to percieve your offerings as authentic.
あなたの提案が本物だ、と分からせるのですから
06:11
Because there is a basic paradox:
なぜならそこには基本的な矛盾があるのです:
06:14
no one can have an inauthentic experience,
「本物でない体験」というものはあり得ない
06:16
but no business can supply one.
しかしどんなビジネスも本物は提供できない
06:19
Because all businesses are man-made objects; all business is involved with money;
なぜなら全てのビジネスは人が作ったモノであり;お金が関与しており
06:22
all business is a matter of using machinery,
全てのビジネスは機械を使うことで
06:26
and all those things make something inauthentic.
その機会が作るのは「まがいもの」でだからです
06:29
So, how do you render authenticity,
では、どうやって本物を演出するのかが
06:34
is the question.
問題です
06:37
Are you rendering authenticity?
あなたは本物を演出していますか?
06:39
When you think about that, let me go back to
それを考えるときは、
06:42
what Lionel Trilling, in his seminal book on authenticity,
ライオネル・トリリングが1960年が書いた「真性性」ついての
06:44
"Sincerity and Authenticity" -- came out in 1960 --
名著「真摯さと信憑性」で、彼が
06:47
points to as the seminal point
真性性が古典として認知される
06:50
at which authenticity entered the lexicon,
重要なポイントについて語っているところに
06:52
if you will.
戻ってみましょう
06:54
And that is, to no surprise, in Shakespeare,
それは、当たり前ですが、シェイクスピアの
06:56
and in his play, Hamlet.
演劇においては、「ハムレット」です
06:59
And there is one part in this play, Hamlet,
その劇「ハムレット」のなかに次の節があります
07:01
where the most fake of all the characters in Hamlet, Polonius,
そこでは、劇の中で一番嘘くさい役どおろのポローニアスが
07:03
says something profoundly real.
非常に深い真実を語るのです
07:06
At the end of a laundry list of advice
ずらっと並んだ忠告のリストの最後で
07:08
he's giving to his son, Laertes,
息子レアティーズに向かって
07:10
he says this:
こう言うのです:
07:12
And this above all: to thine own self be true.
最後に、最も大切なる訓 己に対して忠実なれ
07:15
And it doth follow, as night the day,
さすれば夜の昼に継ぐが如く、
07:19
that thou canst not then be false to any man.
他人に対しても忠実ならん(坪内逍遥訳)
07:21
And those three verses are the core of authenticity.
この3行の詩が「本物」の本質です
07:25
There are two dimensions to authenticity:
「本物」には二つの側面があります
07:29
one, being true to yourself, which is very self-directed.
一つ、自分自身に真実であること、非常に自己指向です
07:32
Two, is other-directed:
もう一つは他人指向で:
07:36
being what you say you are to others.
あなたが他人に「自分はこうだ」と言ったものであること、です
07:38
And I don't know about you, but whenever I encounter two dimensions,
そして、あなたがどうか知りませんが、二つの側面を見るといつも
07:41
I immediately go, ahh, two-by-two!
私は「ああ、2x2図ね!」と考えます
07:43
All right? Anybody else like that, no?
でしょ? 誰か他にそうなひとは? いない?
07:45
Well, if you think about that, you do, in fact, get
ふむ、もしそう思うなら、やってみましょうよ
07:47
a two-by-two.
2x2図です
07:50
Where, on one dimension it's a matter of being true to yourself.
一方の軸は、あなたが自分に対して真実であること
07:52
As businesses, are the economic offerings you are providing --
ビジネス的には、あなたが経済的に提供しているものは―
07:56
are they true to themselves?
そのものは本物か?ということです
07:58
And the other dimension is:
もう一方の軸は:
08:01
are they what they say they are to others?
それは他人に「これはこうだ」と言っているものか?、です
08:03
If not, you have,
否定形のほうは
08:07
"is not true to itself," and "is not what it says it is,"
「それ自身としては本物ではない」と「そうだと他人に言っているものではない」です
08:09
yielding a two-by-two matrix.
これで2x2図が出来ますね
08:13
And of course, if you are both true to yourself,
そしてもちろん、このうち自分に対しても正しく
08:15
and are what you say you are, then you're real real!
他人に対してそういっているものでもあるなら、あなたはreal realです!
08:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:19
The opposite, of course, is -- fake fake.
反対はもちろんfake fakeです
08:22
All right, now, there is value for fake.
オーケー ところで偽物(fake)にも価値があります
08:26
There will always be companies around to supply the fake,
常に偽物を供給する会社があります
08:28
because there will always be desire for the fake.
なぜならそれを求める人がいるからです
08:30
Fact is, there's a general rule: if you don't like it, it's fake;
実は大原則がああります:「あなたがそれを嫌いなら、それは偽物、
08:32
if you do like it, it's faux.
それが好きなら、それはつくりもの」です
08:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:37
Now, the other two sides of the coin are:
それで、他の組み合わせは
08:43
being a real fake --
real fakeは
08:46
is what it says it is,
それは言われてるものではあるが
08:48
but is not true to itself,
本物ではない
08:50
or being a fake real:
fake realは
08:52
is true to itself, but not what it says it is.
本物だが、言われているものではない
08:54
You can think about those two -- you know, both of these
これら二つについて考えてみることができます
08:57
better than being fake fake -- not quite as good as being real real.
fake fakeよりはよいが、real realほどではない
08:59
You can contrast them by thinking about
これらふたつを比べるには
09:02
Universal City Walk versus
ユニバーサルシティウォークと
09:05
Disney World, or Disneyland.
ディズニーワールド、ディズニーランドを想像して下さい
09:07
Universal City Walk is a real fake --
ユニバーサルシティウォークは「本物のフェイク」です
09:09
in fact, we got this very term
そもそも、この言葉は
09:11
from Ada Louise Huxtable's book, "The Unreal America."
エイダ・ルイーズ・ハクスタブルの本「アンリアルなアメリカ」からとっています
09:13
A wonderful book, where she talks about Universal City Walk as --
素晴らしい本で、そこで彼女はユニバーサルシティウォークについて
09:16
you know, she decries the fake, but she says, at least that's a real fake,
それはフェイクだが、本物のフェイクだ、と書いています
09:19
right, because you can see behind the facade, right?
なぜなら舞台裏を見ることができるからです。でしょう?
09:22
It is what it says it is: It's Universal Studio;
それは、それが言われているものなのです:ユニバーサルスタジオという;
09:25
it's in the city of Los Angeles; you're going to walk a lot.
それはロサンゼルスにあり;たくさん歩くことになります
09:27
Right? You don't tend to walk a lot in Los Angeles,
でしょう?ロサンゼルスで歩くことってあまりないですよね
09:30
well, here's a place where you are going to walk a lot,
でもここにはとても歩く場所があるのです
09:32
outside in this city.
しかも野外で、この街で
09:34
But is it really true to itself?
でもそれはこの街にとって本当に本物なのか?
09:36
Right? Is it really in the city?
それは本当に街の中にあるのでしょうか?
09:39
Is it --
それは
09:41
you can see behind all of it,
あなたは裏側を全部見ることができます
09:44
and see what is going on in the facades of it.
内側で行われていること全てです
09:46
So she calls it a real fake.
それで彼女はそれを本物のフェイクと読んだのです
09:48
Disney World, on the other hand, is a fake real,
いっぽうディズニーランドはfake realです
09:50
or a fake reality.
フェイクのリアリティです
09:52
Right? It's not what it says it is. It's not really the magic kingdom.
でしょう? それは言われているものではない 「魔法の王国」ではない
09:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:58
But it is -- oh, I'm sorry, I didn't mean to --
しかしそれは―おお、ごめん、そういう意味じゃない―
10:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:04
-- sorry.
―ごめんなさい
10:05
We won't talk about Santa Claus then.
サンタクロースの話はしないからね
10:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:09
But Disney World is wonderfully true to itself.
しかし、ディズニーワールドは、それ自身素晴らしく本物です
10:10
Right? Just wonderfully true to itself.
でしょう? ただそれ自身として素晴らしく本物だ
10:13
When you are there you are just immersed
いけばそれだけですばらしい環境に
10:15
in this wonderful environment.
ひたってしまう
10:17
So, it's a fake real.
さからそれは本物でない真実なのです
10:20
Now the easiest way
さて、この状態に落ち込み
10:23
to fall down in this,
real realでなくなる
10:25
and not be real real,
一番簡単な方法は
10:27
right, the easiest way not to be true to yourself
つまりあなた自身でなくなる簡単な方法は
10:29
is not to understand your heritage,
自分の出自を理解しないこと
10:31
and thereby repudiate that heritage.
伝統を拒否することです
10:34
Right, the key of being true to yourself is knowing who you are as a business.
自分自身である鍵は、ビジネス上自分が何者かを知ることです
10:36
Knowing where your heritage is: what you have done in the past.
自分の伝統を知るとは:過去に何をして来たかを知ることです
10:40
And what you have done in the past limits what you can do,
そして過去の行跡が、これから出来ることを決め、
10:43
what you can get away with, essentially, in the future.
将来、なにとかかわらないで済むかを決めるのです
10:46
So, you have to understand that past.
だからあなたを過去を知らなくてはなりません
10:49
Think about Disney again.
ディズニーをもう一度考えてみましょう
10:52
Disney,
ディズニー
10:54
10 or 15 years ago, right,
10か15年前,
10:56
the Disney -- the company that is probably
おそらく高い家族の価値で知られる
10:58
best-known for family values out there,
ディズニーは、
11:00
Disney bought the ABC network.
ABCネットワークを買収しました
11:03
The ABC network, affectionately known in the trade
ABCネットワークは、業界では愛情を込めて
11:06
as the T&A network, right --
T&Aネットワークと呼ばれていて、OK?
11:08
that's not too much jargon, is it?
分からないような業界用語じゃないですよね?
11:10
Right, the T&A network. Then it bought Miramax,
オーケー、T&Aネットワーク それがMiramaxを買収し
11:12
known for its NC-17 fare,
その会社はNC-17視聴制限で知られていて
11:14
and all of a sudden, families everywhere
突然、どこの家族も
11:16
couldn't really trust what they were getting from Disney.
その会社がディズニーからなにを得ているのか信じられなくなりました
11:18
It was no longer true to its heritage;
自らの伝統に正直でなくなったからです
11:20
no longer true to Walt Disney.
もはやウォルト・ディズニーにたいして正直でない
11:22
That's one of the reasons why they're having such trouble today,
これこそが、彼らが近年やっかいなトラブルを抱えている理由であり
11:24
and why Roy Disney is out to get Michael Eisner.
ロイ・ディズニーがマイケル・アイズナーを得ようとしている理由です
11:26
Because it is no longer true to itself.
自分自身に正直でなくなったから
11:30
So, understand what -- your past limits what you can do in the future.
これで、自らの過去が自らの将来を規定する、というのがおわかりでしょう
11:33
When it comes to being what you say you are, the easiest mistake that companies make
「自分はこうだ」と言ったものであるかどうかについて、会社が間違えやすいのは
11:38
is that they advertise
自分たちがそうでないものを
11:41
things that they are not.
広告で打つことです
11:43
That's when you're perceived as fake, as a phony company --
それが、つまり自分でないものを宣伝するときに
11:47
advertizing things that you're not.
あなたはその会社をうそつきだ、と認識します
11:49
Think about any hotel, any airline,
あらゆるホテル、あらゆる航空会社
11:51
any hospital.
あらゆる病院などを考えてみて下さい
11:53
Right, if you could check into the ads, you'd have a great experience.
広告を詳しく見れば、素晴らしい体験が得られるでしょう
11:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:58
But unfortunately, you have to experience the actual hotel,
しかし不幸にも、あなたは実際のホテル、
12:00
airline and hospital, and then you have that disconnect.
航空会社、病院を体験してようやく「これは違う」とわかるのです
12:03
Then you have that perception that you are phony.
そこまできてようやく「これはウソだ」とわかるのです
12:06
So, the number one thing to do when it comes to being what you say you are,
したがって、あなたが言われている通りのものであるために最初にやるべきことは
12:09
is to provide places for people to experience
あなたが何であるのかを体験できる場所を
12:13
who you are.
提供することです
12:16
For people to experience who you are.
あなたが誰なのか、人々が体験することです
12:18
Right, it's not advertising does it.
広告を通じてではありません
12:20
That's why you have companies like Starbucks,
だからこそスターバックスのような会社があるのです
12:22
right, that doesn't advertise at all.
でしょう? 彼らは何も広告しない
12:26
They said, you want to know who we are, you have to come experience us.
彼らは言います「知りたかったら、ここにきて体験して下さい」と
12:29
And think about the economic value they have provided
そして、体験を通じて彼らが築いた経済的価値を
12:33
by that experience.
考えてみて下さい
12:35
Right? Coffee, at its core, is what?
でしょう? コーヒーって、本質は何ですか?
12:38
Right? It's beans; right? It's coffee beans.
豆ですよね コーヒー豆
12:41
You know how much coffee is worth, when treated as a commodity as a bean?
コーヒーが、コモディティの豆として扱われる場合、いくらかご存知ですか?
12:44
Two or three cents per cup -- that's what coffee is worth.
コップ一杯辺り2から3セントです それがコーヒーの価値です
12:48
But grind it, roast it, package it, put it on a grocery store shelf,
しかし、それを挽いて、パッケージして、スーパーの棚に置く
12:51
and now it'll cost five, 10, 15 cents,
するとうまく扱えば
12:54
when you treat it as a good.
それは10から15セントになります
12:56
Take that same good,
同じ商品を使って
12:59
and perform the service of actually brewing it for a customer,
お客にコーヒーをいれる
13:01
in a corner diner, in a bodega, a kiosk somewhere,
角のレストランや、酒場や、キオスクなどで
13:04
you get 50 cents, maybe a buck
すると一杯で50セントか
13:06
per cup of coffee.
1ドルになる
13:08
But surround the brewing of that coffee
しかしそのコーヒーをいれる場所を
13:10
with the ambiance of a Starbucks,
シダー材の内装などの
13:12
with the authentic cedar that goes inside of there,
スターバックスの雰囲気で囲むと
13:14
and now, because of that authentic experience,
その本物の体験だけで
13:17
you can charge two, three, four, five dollars
2,3,4,5ドルの値づけが出来るのです
13:19
for a cup of coffee.
一杯のコーヒーに
13:22
So, authenticity is becoming
「本物」が
13:26
the new consumer sensibility.
顧客の感性になっているのです
13:28
Let me summarize it, for the business people in the audience,
まとめましょう 聴衆の中のビジネスパーソンの方々に
13:31
with three rules, three basic rules.
3つの基本的な法則で
13:34
One, don't say you're authentic
一つ 自分が本物でない限り
13:37
unless you really are authentic.
自分を本物だ、といわないこと
13:40
Two, it's easier to be authentic
二つ 自分が本物だ、と言わない方が
13:44
if you don't say you're authentic.
本物でいやすい
13:46
And three, if you say you're authentic,
そして三つ目 自分が本物だ、と言ったのなら
13:50
you better be authentic.
本物であった方がいい
13:53
And then for the consumers, for everyone else in the audience,
そして、聴衆のそれ以外の消費者の方々に
13:56
let me simply summarize it by saying, increasingly,
一言で簡単にまとめますと、これからはだんだん
13:59
what we -- what will make us happy,
「本物指向」の欲求を満たすものに
14:01
is spending our time and our money
時間とお金を使うと
14:05
satisfying the desire for authenticity.
より幸せになるでしょう
14:09
Thank you.
ありがとう
14:12
Translator:Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewer:Shen David

sponsored links

Joseph Pine - Writer
A writer and veteran consultant to entrepreneurs and executives alike, Joseph Pine's books and workshops help businesses create what modern consumers really want: authentic experiences.

Why you should listen

Joseph Pine's career as a business coach began at IBM when he did something truly unorthodox: he brought business partners and customers into the development process of a new computer. Taking from this the lesson that every customer is unique, he wrote a book called Mass Customization on businesses that serve customers' unique needs. Later he discovered what he would coin the "Experience Economy" -- consumers buying experiences rather than goods or commodities -- and wrote a book of the same name.

Pine and his friend Jim Gilmore have since turned their focus to authenticity, which they argue is the main criterion people use when deciding what to buy. (The idea was featured in TIME's "10 Ideas That Are Changing the World," and also became a book.) They joke that their company, Strategic Horizons, ought to be called "Frameworks 'R' Us," after their specialty in helping others see business differently.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.