sponsored links
TED2003

David Carson: Design and discovery

デイビッド・カーソン「デザイン + 発見」

February 2, 2003

いいデザインとは永遠に終わりのない旅のようなものだ。少しくらいの笑いのセンスがあってちょうどいい。社会学者であり、サーファーからデザイナーへと転身したデイビッド・カーソンが、自身のデザインや身近な所で発見したイメージについて、ユーモアたっぷり話します。

David Carson - Type designer
David Carson is the "grunge typographer" whose magazine Ray Gun helped explode the possibilities of text on a page. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I had requested slides,
今回スライド・プロジェクターを使いたいと
00:18
kind of adamantly,
がんばって
00:21
up till the -- pretty much, last few days,
最後の最後までお願いしていたのですが
00:23
but was denied access to a slide projector.
結局プロジェクターの使用はダメでした
00:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:29
I actually find them a lot more emotional --
私が思うに スライドはとても感情的で
00:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:37
-- and personal,
親しみが持てるから いいなって思うんです
00:39
and the neat thing about a slide projector
その上 スライド・プロジェクターは
00:42
is you can actually focus the work,
PowerPointや他のソフトと違って
00:44
unlike PowerPoint and some other programs.
ピントを合わせられます
00:47
Now, I agree that
そのかわりに
00:52
you have to -- yeah, there are certain concessions
妥協しないといけない部分がある
というのは否めませんが
00:55
and, you know, if you use a slide projector,
たとえば
00:58
you're not able to have the bad type
格好悪い文字を
01:00
swing in from the back or the side, or up or down,
縦 横 斜めから
飛び込ませたりすることはできません
01:03
but maybe that's an O.K. trade-off,
それはピントを合わせられるんなら
01:07
to trade that off for a focus.
仕方ないかなって思えますけどね
01:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:12
It's a thought. Just a thought.
ただの考えですが
01:15
And there's something nice about slides getting stuck.
スライドがひっかかったりするのも
どこか素敵で
01:18
And the thing you really hope for
そういうときに 本当は心の中では
01:22
is occasionally they burn up,
たまに燃えたりしたらいいな、なんて
01:24
which we won't see tonight. So.
今晩はそんなことは起こりませんが
01:26
With that, let's get the first slide up here.
前置きはよしとして
最初のスライドをお見せしましょう
01:30
This, as many of you have probably guessed,
これは、誰が見ても当然ですが
01:33
is a
これは、誰が見ても当然ですが
01:36
recently emptied beer can in Portugal.
ポルトガルで撮った
飲み干したばかりのビール缶です
01:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:41
This -- I had just arrived in Barcelona for the first time,
これはバルセロナに初めて到着したとき
01:44
and I thought --
印象的だったんです
01:48
you know, fly all night, I looked up,
夜通しのフライトの後 これを見て
01:50
and I thought, wow, how clean.
なんて無駄のないデザインなんだって
01:52
You come into this major airport, and they simply have a B.
こんなメジャーな空港で、
バルセロナ(Barcelona)の「B」だけなんて
01:54
I mean, how nice is that?
なんて素晴らしい
01:59
Everything's gotten simpler in design,
近年は何でもシンプルになってきたけれど
02:01
and here's this mega airport,
こんな大規模な空港で
02:03
and God, I just -- I took a picture.
まさか!と思って撮った訳です
02:05
I thought, God, that is the coolest thing I've ever seen at an airport.
空港でこんなカッコいいもの見た事がない
02:07
Till a couple months later,
でも数ヶ月後
02:11
I went back to the same airport --
また同じ空港に、確か同じ便で
02:13
same plane, I think -- and looked up,
行く機会があって以前と同様に見上げたら
02:15
and it said C.
今度は「C」が見えて
02:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:19
It was only then that I realized
そのときようやく
02:25
it was simply a gate that I was coming into.
それがゲート番号だと分かったんです
02:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:30
I'm a big believer in the emotion of design,
僕は、デザインには感情が伴うと信じています
02:33
and the message that's sent
デザインには
02:37
before somebody begins to read,
文章を読んで、残りの情報を知る前に
02:39
before they get the rest of the information;
既に送られているメッセージがある
02:41
what is the emotional response they get to the product,
製品、物語、絵画など それがなんであれ
02:43
to the story, to the painting -- whatever it is.
そこに現れる感情的な反応は何なのか
02:46
That area of design interests me the most,
私が一番興味を惹かれる分野です
02:50
and I think this for me is a real clear,
このスライドは
02:52
very simplified version
これを説明するのに
02:54
of what I'm talking about.
一番シンプルな例だと思います
02:56
These are a couple of garage doors painted identical,
お互い隣同士の
02:58
situated next to each other.
全く同様の車庫ふたつ
03:01
So, here's the first door. You know, you get the message.
一つ目はこれ
何が言いたいのかお分かりですね
03:03
You know, it's pretty clear.
明確でしょう
03:07
Take a look at the second door and see
ではふたつ目を見てみましょう
03:09
if there's any different message.
違いがあるか考えてみてください
03:12
O.K., which one would you park in front of?
さて、どちらの前に駐車しますか?
03:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:16
Same color, same message, same words.
同じ色、同じ内容、同じ言葉
03:18
The only thing that's different
ひとつだけ違うのは
03:20
is the expression that the individual door-owner here put into the piece --
車庫主の”No Parking"(駐車禁止)の表現
03:22
and, again,
じゃあ
03:26
which is the psycho-killer here?
どちらが殺人鬼でしょう?
03:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:30
Yet it doesn't say that; it doesn't need to say that.
言わなくても伝わるんです
03:34
I would probably park in front of the other one.
私ならひとつめの車庫の前に駐車するでしょう
03:36
I'm sure a lot of you are aware
お気づきだと思いますが
03:41
that graphic design has gotten a lot simpler in the last
グラフィックデザインはこの5年ほどで
03:43
five years or so.
ずいぶんシンプルになりました
03:45
It's gotten so simple that it's already starting to kind of
シンプルになりすぎたせいか
03:47
come back the other way again and get a little more expressive.
すでに逆をいくものも出てきました
03:49
But I was in Milan and saw this street sign,
ミランにいたときこの標識を見つけて
03:52
and was very happy to
嬉しかったんです
03:54
see that apparently this idea of minimalism
ミニマリズムが
03:56
has even been translated by the graffiti artist.
まさか
落書きアートにまで応用されるとは
03:58
(Laughter)
(笑)だって
04:02
And this graffiti artist has come along,
このアーティストは
04:05
made this sign a little bit better, and then moved on.
標識をちょっといじって
さっさと立ち去って行っちゃったんですよ
04:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:10
He didn't overpower it like they have a tendency to do.
よくやる「やり過ぎ」をしなかったんです
04:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:15
This is for a book by "Metropolis."
メトロポリスによる本のために
04:17
I took some photos, and this is
写真を何枚か撮ったのですが
04:21
a billboard in Florida,
これはフロリダにあった看板です
04:24
and either they hadn't paid their rent,
広告主が料金を払わなかったのか
04:26
or they didn't want to pay their rent again on the sign,
もう払わないと決めたのか、それとも
04:28
and the billboard people were too cheap to tear the whole sign down,
看板屋が広告をすべて剥がす費用をケチったのか
04:30
so they just teared out sections of it.
広告がつぎはぎになっていました
04:33
And I would argue that it's possibly more effective
僕はこれがオリジナルより
04:35
than the original billboard in terms of getting your attention,
注目を集めるという点で
04:37
getting you to look over that way.
効果的だと思います
04:40
And hopefully you don't stop and buy those awful pecan things -- Stuckey's.
製品自体はひどい製品ですけれども
04:42
This is from my second book.
私の2冊目の本からです
04:47
The first book is called, "The End of Print,"
1冊目は『印刷の終焉』と言います
04:50
and it was done along with a film,
ウィリアム・バロウズ氏と
04:53
working with William Burroughs.
同名の短編映画も制作しました
04:55
And "The End of Print" is now in its fifth printing.
その『印刷の終焉』なんですが
第5版目が印刷されました
04:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:00
When I first contacted William Burroughs about being part of it,
バロウズ氏に初めて連絡したとき
05:05
he said no; he said he didn't believe it was the end of print.
「印刷に終わりはない」と断られてしまいました
05:08
And I said, well, that's fine;
私はそれでも結構ですから
05:12
I just would love to have your input on this film and this book,
アドバイスを是非とお願いしました
05:14
and he finally agreed to it.
そうしてようやく協力を得た訳です
05:17
And at the end of the film, he says in this great voice
映画の最後、彼は素晴らしい声で
05:19
that I can't mimic but I'll kind of try, but not really, he says,
真似できないのが残念ですが
05:23
"I remember attending an exhibition called,
「私は『写真−絵画の終焉』と名付けられた
05:26
'Photography: The End of Painting.'"
美術展に行ったことがある」
05:29
And then he says, "And, of course, it wasn't at all."
そして言うんです
「もちろん終わりなんか来なかった」って
05:33
So, apparently when photography was perfected,
写真が確立されたとき
05:36
there were people going around saying,
絵画は終わったものと
05:39
that's it: you've just ruined painting.
考えた人もいました
05:42
People are just going to take pictures now.
これからはみんな写真を撮るだろうと
05:44
And of course, that wasn't the case.
それはもちろん間違いでした
05:47
So, this is from "2nd Sight,"
これは『セカンド・サイト』という
05:49
a book I did on intuition.
直感についての本です
05:51
I think it's not the only ingredient in design,
僕は、直感はデザインの構成要素で
05:53
but possibly the most important.
もっとも重要だと思います
05:55
It's something everybody has.
誰もが持っているものです
05:57
It's not a matter of teaching it;
教えればいいというものでもありません
06:00
in fact, most of the schools tend to discount intuition
実際に「直感」という要素を
06:02
as an ingredient of your working process
具体的に数字にできないがために
06:04
because they can't quantify it:
学校では直感を軽視しがちです
06:07
it's very hard to teach people the four steps to intuitive design,
直感的デザインを教えるのは難しいけれど
06:09
but we can teach you the four steps to a nice business card
名刺や会報の上手いデザインの仕方を
06:14
or a newsletter.
教えるのは簡単なことです
06:16
So it tends to get discounted.
だから軽視されがちになる
06:18
This is a quote from Albert Einstein, who says,
これはアインシュタインの言葉です
06:20
"The intellect has little to do on the road to discovery.
「発見に知性はほとんど必要ない
06:24
There comes a leap in consciousness --
一瞬の意識の跳躍 ー
06:28
call it intuition or what you will --
それを直感と呼んでもいいが
06:30
and the solution just comes to you, and you don't know from where or why."
答えはただやってくるものだ」
06:33
So, it's kind of like when somebody says, Who did that song?
例えば、誰の曲だったっけ?と
06:37
And the more you try to think about it,
考えれば考えるほど
06:39
the further the answer gets from you,
分からなくなり
06:41
and the minute you stop thinking about it,
考えるのをやめた途端
06:43
your intuition gives you that answer, in a sense.
直感が閃いて答えが分かるのと同じです
06:45
I like this for a couple of reasons.
これが好きな理由はいくつかあります
06:51
If you've had any design courses, they would teach you you can't read this.
デザイン教育では、これは読めないと教わりますが
06:53
I think you eventually can and, more importantly, I think it's true.
よく見れば読めるだけでなく
正にその通りなのです
06:56
"Don't mistake legibility for communication."
"Don't mistake legibility for communication."
(訳:「読みやすさと意思疎通を混同するな」)
06:59
Just because something's legible doesn't means it communicates.
読みやすいからといって通じるわけではない
07:03
More importantly, it doesn't mean it communicates the right thing.
正しく通じるかどうかは別のことです
07:06
So, what is the message sent before
では実際に中身を理解する前に
07:09
somebody actually gets into the material?
受け取るメッセージとは何か
07:11
And I think that's sometimes an overlooked area.
見落としがちな分野だと思います
07:15
This is working with Marshall McLuhan.
マーシャル・マクルーハン氏をテーマにした本
07:19
I stayed and worked with his wife and son, Eric,
奥さんと息子エリック君と共に
07:21
and we came up with close to 600 quotes from Marshall
600ほどのマクルーハン氏の名言を見つけました
07:25
that are just amazing in terms of being ahead of the times,
それらは時代の先を行っているものばかりで
07:30
predicting so much of what has happened
実際に広告や、テレビ、メディア業界で
07:33
in the advertising, television, media world.
起こった出来事を予測しているんです
07:35
And so this book is called "Probes." It's another word for quotes.
だから本のタイトルを『格言』と名付けました
07:39
And it's -- a lot of them are never -- have never been published before,
ほとんどのものが未発表のものばかりで
07:43
and basically, I've interpreted the different quotes.
僕なりに解釈してみました
07:47
So, this was the contents page originally.
これはもともと目次でした
07:50
When I got done it was 540 pages,
最初540ページあったのですが
07:53
and then the publisher, Gingko Press,
そのあと出版社が
07:55
ended up cutting it down considerably:
かなりページを削って
07:57
it's just under 400 pages now.
400ページ程になりました
08:00
But I decided I liked this contents page --
でもこの目次のページが気に入っていたので
08:02
I liked the way it looks -- so I kept it.
キープした訳です
08:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:07
It now has no relevance to the book whatsoever,
全然実際の中身とは無関係ですが
08:10
but it's a nice spread, I think, in there.
いい見開きでしょう
08:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:16
So, a couple spreads from the book:
本の中からいくつか見開きを紹介します
08:18
here McLuhan says,
マクルーハン氏はこう言います
08:20
"The new media are not bridges between Man and Nature; they are Nature."
「ニューメディアは人間と自然の架け橋ではなく
自然の一部だ」
08:22
"The invention of printing did away with anonymity,
「印刷の発明は匿名性を廃止し
08:29
fostering ideas of literary fame
文学で名声を得ることや
08:31
and the habit of considering intellectual effort as private property,"
私有財産として
知的労力を扱う習慣を育成した」
08:34
which had never been done before printing.
印刷が存在しなければ
考えられなかったことです
08:38
"When new technologies impose themselves
「新技術が古いものに慣れきった
08:43
on societies long habituated to older technologies,
社会に登場するとき
08:45
anxieties of all kinds result."
様々な不安が浮き彫りになる」
08:48
"While people are engaged in creating a totally different world,
「人間は 今とは全く違った世界を
造り出そうと試みるが
08:52
they always form vivid images of the preceding world."
結局は 過去の鮮明な画像を
形作っているだけだ」
08:55
I hate this stuff. It's hard to read.
これは読みづらくて最悪ですね
09:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:13
"People in the electronic age have no possible environment except the globe,
「電子時代に生きる人間は 地球以外の環境を持たず
09:16
and no possible occupation except information gathering."
情報収集以外の仕事を持たない」
09:23
That was it. That's all he saw as the options. And not too far off.
これが彼の言葉です。そう外れてはいません
09:27
So, this is a project for Nine Inch Nails.
これはNine Inch Nailsのためにした仕事
09:31
And I only show it because it seemed like it got all this relevancy all of a sudden,
突然 関連性が見えてきたので、お見せすることにしました
09:34
and it was done right after 9/11.
9・11テロ直後にした仕事です
09:37
And I had recently discovered a bomb shelter
最近LAに買った家に
09:40
in the backyard of a house I had bought in LA
防空壕があることが分かりました
09:44
that the real estate person hadn't pointed out.
不動産屋は何も言わなかったんですけどね
09:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:50
There was some bomb shelter built, apparently in the '60s Cuban missile crisis.
60年代、キューバ危機の頃に
建てられたものがあるそうなんですが
09:54
And I asked the real estate guy what it was as we were walking by,
不動産屋にこれは何かと聞いたところ
09:58
and he goes, "It's something to do with the sewage system."
「下水関係の何かだ」って言うんで
気にせずにいたんです
10:01
I was, O.K.; that's fine.
「下水関係の何かだ」って言うんで
気にせずにいたんです
10:03
I finally went down there, and it was this old rusted circular thing,
ついに入ってみたら
中は錆びた円形をしていて
10:04
and two beds, and very kind of creepy and weird.
ベッドが2つあって、非常に不気味でした
10:08
And also, surprisingly, it was done in kind of a cheap metal,
驚いたことに防空壕は安い金属製で
10:11
and it had completely rusted through, and water everywhere, and spiders.
完全に錆びついて水浸し、蜘蛛もたくさん
10:14
And I thought, you know, what were they thinking?
何を考えてたんでしょう
10:19
You'd think maybe cement, possibly, or something.
セメントか何かにすれば良かったんじゃないか
10:21
But anyway, I used this for a cover for the Nine Inch Nails DVD,
とにかく、その防空壕を
Nine Inch NailsのDVDのカバーに使いました
10:23
and I've also now fixed the bomb shelter with duct tape,
防空壕は その後 きちんと直しておきました ガムテープで
10:28
and it's ready. I think I'm ready. So.
もう何があっても大丈夫なはず
10:34
This is an experiment, really, for a client, Quicksilver,
Quicksilverと行った実験です
10:43
where we were taking what was a six-shot sequence
6枚の写真を連続に並べて
10:46
and trying to use print as a medium to get people to the Web.
印刷物を見た人を
インターネットに誘導する試みでした
10:49
So, this is a six-shot sequence.
これが6枚の連続写真
10:52
I've taken one shot; I cropped it a few different ways.
1枚の写真を 違った方法でトリミングしました
10:54
And then the tiny line of copy says,
短い文章も添えました
10:58
If you want to see this entire sequence --
「この波乗りの全てを見たいのなら
11:00
how this whole ride was -- go to the website.
ウェブサイトへアクセス」
11:02
And my guess is that a lot of the surf kids did go to the site
これを見て、多くのサーファーがサイトを
11:05
to get this entire picture.
訪れたはずです
11:09
Got no way of tracking it, so I could be totally wrong.
確かめていないので、間違ってるかもしれませんが
11:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:15
I don't have the site. It's just the piece itself.
サイトはなくて、この印刷物だけですが
11:18
This is a group in New York called the Coalition for a Smoke-free Environment --
これはNYの禁煙推進グループから
11:21
asked me to do these posters.
依頼されたポスターです
11:24
They were wild-posted around New York City.
NYCのいたるところに出廻りました
11:26
You can't really -- well, you can't see it at all --
見えますか(訳:タバコはチンコを縮める)
11:29
but the second line is really the more kind of payoff, in a sense.
2行目がキモなんです
11:31
It says, "If the cigarette companies can lie, then so can we." But --
「タバコ会社が嘘をつけるなら、私達も」
11:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:41
-- but I did.
でも僕がやったんですけど
11:44
These were literally wild-posted all over New York one night,
これがNYのいたる所に一晩で張り出され
11:46
and there were definitely some heads turning,
かなりの人が振り返りました
11:50
you know, people smoking and, "Huh!"
タバコを吸っている人たちが「えっ?」て
11:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:54
And it was purposely done to look fairly serious.
真面目に見えるよう作ってありましたし
12:00
It wasn't some, you know, weird grunge type or something;
ヘンテコな嘘っぽいものじゃなかった
12:03
it looked like they might be real. Anyway.
本物みたいに見えたんです
12:06
Poster for Atlantic Center for the Arts, a school in Florida.
これはフロリダにあるアトランティック芸術センターのポスター
12:09
This amazes me. This is a product I just found out.
最近クリスマスにカリブ海に行ったとき
12:12
I was in the Caribbean at Christmas,
見つけた製品なんですが
12:15
and I'm just blown away that in this day and age they will still sell --
いまどきこのご時世で、こんなにも
12:17
not that they will sell --
肌の色を白くさせたい人の
12:20
that there is felt a need for people to lighten the color of their skin.
需要があるのかって
12:23
This was either an old product with new packaging,
ただの新パッケージで売られていたのか
12:26
or a brand-new package, and I just thought,
新製品なのかわかりませんが
12:28
Yikes! How's that still happening?
びっくりしました
12:31
I do a lot of workshops all over the world, really,
世界中でワークショップを開いています
12:34
and this particular assignment was
この課題はトイレのサインを
12:36
to come up with new symbols for the restroom doors.
新しくデザインするというものでした
12:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:41
I felt this was one of the more successful solutions.
これが良かったもののひとつ
12:57
The students actually cut them up
学生達はこれを実際にバーや
13:01
and put them up around bars and restaurants that night,
レストランのトイレに貼り出しました
13:03
and I just always have this vision of this elderly couple going to use the restroom ...
お年寄りのカップルが
混乱する様が目に浮かびます
13:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:10
I did some work for Microsoft a few years back.
数年前、マイクロソフトの仕事を担当しました
13:13
It was a worldwide branding campaign.
世界規模のブランド・キャンペーンです
13:16
And it was interesting to me --
興味深かったのは
13:18
my background is in sociology; I had no design training,
私は社会学畑の人間で
デザインを勉強したことはなく
13:20
and sometimes people say, well, that explains it --
それで、たまに
「だからか」と言われたりするんですが
13:23
but it was a very interesting experiment
商品を売るためでないという点で
13:25
because there's no product that I had to sell;
これは興味深い実験でした
13:28
it was simply the image of Microsoft they were trying to improve.
単にマイクロソフトのイメージ向上が目的でした
13:30
They thought some people didn't like them.
彼らはアンチの存在に気付いたんですね
13:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:36
I found out that's very true,
この世界規模のキャンペーンをしてみて
13:40
working on this campaign worldwide.
それは本当だと分かりました
13:42
And our goal was to try to humanize them a bit,
目標はブランドに人間味を出すこと
13:45
and what I did was add type and people to the ad,
過去のキャンペーンにはなかった試みとして
13:48
which the previous campaign had not had,
誰も覚えず話にものぼらなかった広告に
13:52
and nobody remembered them, and nobody referenced them.
文章と人を入れこみました
13:54
And we were trying to say that,
マイクロソフトには
良い人間もいるんですよって伝えたかったんです
13:56
hey, some of these guys that work there are actually OK;
マイクロソフトには
良い人間もいるんですよって伝えたかったんです
13:57
some of them actually have friends and family,
友達や家族もいるし
14:00
and they're not all awful people.
ひどい人ばかりではないと
14:02
And the umbrella campaign was "Thank God it's Monday."
「月曜日でよかった」キャンペーンの一環でした
14:05
So, we tried to take this --
マイナスに思われる部分
14:09
what was perceived as a negative:
たとえば過当な競争力や
14:11
their over-competitiveness, their,
長い労働時間だとかを
14:13
you know, long working hours --
プラスに変えて
14:15
and turn it into a positive and not run from it.
しっかり見つめてみようとしました
14:17
You know: Thank God it's Monday --
月曜日でよかった
14:20
I get to go back to that little cubicle, those fake gray walls,
灰色の壁で隔たれた、狭い仕事机に戻って
14:21
and hear everybody else's conversations f
みんなの会話を10時間も聞いて
14:24
or 10 hours and then go home.
家に帰る生活に戻れるんだ
14:26
But anyway, this is one of the ads I was most pleased with,
これが僕が一番気に入った広告のひとつ
14:28
because they were all elaborately art-directed,
精巧に演出されていたし、実際に
14:32
and this one I thought actually felt like the girl was looking at the computer.
女の子がコンピューターを見ている感じがしたんです
14:35
It says, "Wonder Around." And then it's a piece of the software.
「冒険しよう」という言葉
そしてソフトのイメージです
14:38
And this is how the ad ran around the world.
この形式で世界中で広告が展開されました
14:41
In Germany, they made one small change without checking with me --
ところが、ドイツでは僕の許可なしに
一箇所変更されていました
14:43
nor did they have to, because it was done through agencies --
広告代理店を通してだから、僕の許可は
14:47
but see if you can tell the difference.
必要ないんですけど、違いがわかりますか
14:49
This is how the ad ran throughout the world;
世界中で廻った広告はこれ
14:51
Germany made one slight change in the ad.
ドイツ版では一箇所違った部分がある
14:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:57
Now, there's kind of two issues here.
問題点はふたつあります
15:01
If you're going to put a kid in the ad, pick one that looks alive.
せっかく広告に使うんなら
もうちょっと生き生きとした子供にしてほしかった
15:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:07
I just have a feeling this kid's been there for a week, you know.
この子がコンピューターの前で
15:13
He's just really hoping that boots up and, you know ...
延々といつ起動するのか
待っているような気がして
15:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:18
And then as the agency explained to me, they said,
広告代理店が言うには
15:22
"Look, we don't have little green people in our country;
「ドイツには黒人はいないのに
15:26
why would we put little green people in our ads, for instance?"
なんで黒人を広告に入れなくてはいけないのか?」
15:29
So, I understand their logic. I totally disagree with it;
言いたいことは解りますが、そうは思いませんでした
15:32
I think it's a very small-minded approach,
視野が狭いアプローチだと思います
15:36
the world is certainly much more global,
世界がグローバルに繋がっている今
15:38
and I certainly think the people of Germany
ドイツ国民も黒人の女の子の存在に
15:40
could have handled a little black girl sitting in front of a computer,
問題なかったんじゃないかと思うんです
15:42
though we'll never know.
永久にわかりませんが
15:44
This is some work from Ray Gun.
雑誌レイ・ガンのためにした仕事
15:46
And the point of this magazine was to read the articles,
この雑誌の意義は、記事を読んで
15:48
listen to the music, and try to interpret it.
音楽を聴き、それを解釈するというもの
15:51
There's no grid, there's no system, there's nothing set up in advance.
決まったことはひとつもありません
15:53
This is an opener for Brian Eno,
ブライアン・イーノの記事です
15:57
and it's just kind of my personal interpretation of the music.
私の個人的な解釈でデザインしました
15:59
This is rockstars talking about teachers they had lusted after in school.
ロックスターが語る、彼らが好きになった教師について (笑)
16:03
There's a lot of great writing in "Ray Gun."
レイ・ガン誌には秀逸な記事がたくさんあります
16:09
And I was fortunate to find a photograph of a teacher sitting on some books.
教師が本の上に座っている写真を見つけられたのはラッキーでした
16:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:15
Article on Bryan Ferry -- just really boring article --
ブライアン・フェリーに関する記事
16:19
so I set the whole article in Dingbat.
あまりにもつまらなかったので
記事すべてを絵文字にしました
16:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:24
You could -- you could highlight it; you could make it Helvetica or something:
重要な部分に線を引くこともできるし、
別の書体に変換することだってできる
16:31
it is the actual article.
れっきとした記事そのままです
16:35
I suppose you could eventually decode it,
読みたければ解読できるはずです
16:37
but it's really not very well written; it really wouldn't be worthwhile.
ひどい記事なので、時間の無駄でしょうが
16:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:43
Having done a lot of magazines,
雑誌の仕事をたくさんこなしてきて、
有名誌のメジャーな出来事の扱い方に興味がわき
16:45
I'm very curious how big magazines handle big stories,
雑誌の仕事をたくさんこなしてきて、
有名誌のメジャーな出来事の扱い方に興味がわき
16:46
and I was very curious to see how Time and Newsweek would handle 9/11.
タイム誌とニューズウィーク誌が
どう9・11テロを扱うのか気になりました
16:50
And I was basically pretty disappointed
非常に残念だったのは
16:54
to see that they had
両誌ともすでに
16:56
chosen to show the photo we'd already seen a million times,
読者が何百回も見てきた
衝突の瞬間の
16:58
which was basically the moment of impact.
写真を選んだことでした
17:01
And People magazine, I thought,
個人的には、ピープル誌が
17:03
got probably the best shot.
ベストな写真を選んだと思います
17:05
It's kind of horsey type, but the texture --
うまく言えないのですが
17:07
the second plane not quite hitting:
2機目の飛行機がまだ衝突していない
17:11
there was something more enticing,
何か惹きつけられもものがあった瞬間
17:13
if that's the right -- it's not the right word --
言い方は間違っていますけれども
17:15
but in this cover than Time or Newsweek.
他誌とは違った捉え方をしていました
17:17
But when I got into this magazine,
でも雑誌を開けると
17:20
there's something kind of disturbing, and this continued.
なんとも殺伐としていたんです
17:22
On the left we see people dying; we see people running for their lives.
左側には死んでいる人たち、ひたすら逃げ惑う人たちの写真
17:26
And on the right we learn that there's a new way to support your breast.
その横には新型のサポートブラの広告
17:29
The coveted right-hand page was not given up to the whole issue.
広告用の右ページを
除去することはしなかったんですね
17:33
Look at the image of this lady --
左手のこの女性を見てください
17:37
who knows what she's going through? --
どんなにつらかったか想像がつきません
17:39
and the copy says: "He knows just how to give me goosebumps."
その隣のキャッチコピーには
「あのひとは私をどっきりさせる方法を知っている」
17:41
Yeah, he jumps out of buildings. It's --
誰かがビルから飛び降りれば、当然です
17:44
unfortunately, this one works, kind of, as a spread.
残念なのは、この見開き自体の構成はいいこと
17:46
And this continued through the entire magazine.
こんなことがこの特別号全てにおいて
17:50
It did not let up.
起こっていて本当に残念でした
17:52
This says: "One clean fits all." .
「だれにでもフィットする洗剤」という広告
17:54
There were a lot of orphans made this day,
この日、多くの子が孤児になりました
17:56
and here's a dead body being brought out.
ここには死体が運び出されている写真
17:59
It just seems to me possibly even a blank page
僕は、ここに白紙を代わりに入れていたら
18:01
would have been more appropriate.
よっぽど適切だったと思うんです
18:04
And this one I think is possibly the worst:
これは一番最悪な例
18:07
two ladies, both facing the same way, both wearing jeans.
ジーンズを履いた女性ふたり
同じ方向を向いている
18:09
One -- who knows what she's going through;
ひとりは想像のつかない苦しみの中にいるのに対し
18:13
the other one is worried about model behavior and milk.
対の女性はうまくポーズできてるかとか、
牛乳のことに気を取られている
18:15
And --
この数ヶ月後に
18:20
I gave a talk in New York a couple months after this,
NYで講演をする機会があって
18:22
and afterwards somebody came up to me and they said that --
観客だったひとりが僕にこう言ったんです
18:26
they actually emailed me -- and they said that they appreciated the talk,
実際にはメールだったんですが、講演に感謝していると
18:29
and when they got back to their car,
そのひとは、講演のあと車に戻ったときに
18:33
they found a note on their car that made them think
車にとある貼り紙を見つけて
18:35
maybe New York was getting back to being New York again after this event --
悲惨事のあと、ようやくNYが
だんだんいつものNYに戻って来たのかもしれないと
18:37
it had been a few months.
思ったそうなんです
18:41
This was what they found on their car.
これがその貼り紙です
18:43
(Laughter)
(訳:わざわざ接近駐車ご苦労様。
次は缶切りでも用意してくれないと
俺様の車が出られないから、
お前みたいなくそったれはバスに乗れ)
18:45
There's very few times you'd be happy to find this on your car,
こういう貼り紙を見つけて
喜ぶ機会はそう滅多にないですが
19:03
but it did seem to indicate that we were coming back.
普通に戻ってきた証しのようで嬉しかった
19:06
This is my desktop.
これは僕のデスクトップ
19:08
Somebody told me today there was this thing called folders,
今日、フォルダーというものがあることを
教えてもらったんですが
19:10
but I don't know what they are.
それが何なのかよくわかりません
19:13
These are my notes for the talk -- there might be a correlation here.
これは僕の講演のノート
ちょっと関係しているかな
19:15
We are wrapping up.
あとちょっとです
19:19
This I saw on the plane, flying in, for hot new products.
これは飛行機のカタログで見つけた新製品
19:21
I'm not sure this is an improvement, or a good idea,
どこがいいのかわかりません
19:24
because, like, if you don't spend quite enough time in front of your computer,
もしコンピュータの前で
今まで以上に時間をつぶしたいのなら
19:28
you can now get a plate in the keyboard,
お皿付きのキーボードが買えるんです
19:31
so there's no more faking it --
もうごまかす必要はありません
一日中机から離れず
19:33
that you don't really sit at your desk all day and eat and work anyway.
仕事をしながら食べるのを堂々とできるわけです
19:37
Now there's a plate, and it would be really, really convenient
便利でしょう
19:41
to get a piece of pizza, then type a little bit, then ...
ピザを一口食べて、タイプして・・・
19:43
I'm just not sure this is improvement.
でもこれがいいものなのかわかりません
19:46
If you ever doubt the power of graphic design,
グラフィックデザインが、どれほど影響力があるか疑うのなら
19:49
this is a very generic sign that literally says, "Vote for Hitler." It says nothing else.
このポスターは強力です
「ヒットラーに一票を」以外なにも意味しない
19:52
And this to me is an extreme case
にもかかわらず、これは非常に
19:57
of the power of emotion, of graphic design,
強い感情を与えるデザインの例になります
19:59
even though, in fact, was a very generic poster at the time.
当時、ありふれた
平凡なポスターだったのにも関わらずです
20:02
What's next? What's next is going to be people.
次は人間について
20:07
As we get more technically driven,
人間が技術的に進歩するにつれて
20:09
the importance of people becomes more than it's ever been before.
人間性が今までになく重要になってきた
20:11
You have to utilize who you are in your work.
仕事に個性を引き出さないといけない
20:15
Nobody else can do that: nobody else can pull from your background,
自分自身でしか自分を引き出せません
誰も、あなたの経歴だとか
20:18
from your parents, your upbringing, your whole life experience.
両親や、生い立ち、人生経験すべてを
引き出すことはできません
20:21
If you allow that to happen, it's really the only way you can do some unique work,
もしそれができるのなら、
それが唯一自分だけができる仕事をする方法であって
20:24
and you're going to enjoy the work a lot more as well.
なによりも楽しむことができるでしょう
20:28
This is -- I like found art; hand lettering's coming back in a big way,
僕はファウンド・アートが好きです
手書きは最近ブームになっていますね
20:31
and I thought this was a great example of both.
これは素晴らしい例だと思ったんです
20:34
This lady's advertising for her lost pit bull.
迷い犬のピットブルを探す広告に
20:36
It's friendly -- she's underlined friendly --
この犬はフレンドリーだと
下線を引いて強調してある
20:38
that's probably why she calls it Hercules or Hercles. She can't spell.
だからヘラクレスなのかハークルスなのか
スペルできないんでしょうね
20:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:45
But more importantly,
なによりも
20:48
she's willing to give you 20 bucks to go find this lost pit bull.
$20の賞金を出して、この犬を探そうとしている
20:50
And I'm thinking, yeah, right,
冗談ですよね
20:53
I'll go look for a lost pit bill for 20 bucks.
この迷い犬を$20のために探しにいくなんて
20:55
I have visions of people going down alleyways yelling out for Hercles,
細道を人々がハークルスと叫びながら
行き交う場面が目に浮かびます
20:58
and you get charged by this thing and you go,
するとこの猛犬がとびかかってきて
ハークルスであることを願うわけです
21:01
oh, please be Hercles; please be the friendly one.
あのフレンドリーな犬であることを
21:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:07
I'm sure she never found the dog, because I took the sign.
犬は見つからなかったでしょうね
ポスターを取っちゃったんで
21:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:14
But I was asked to give a talk at a conference in Sacramento a few years back.
数年前に、サクラメントでの会議での
講演を頼まれました
21:15
And the theme was courage, and they asked me to talk
勇気がテーマで
21:19
about how courageous it is to be a graphic designer.
グラフィックデザイナーになるための
勇気について話をしてくれと
21:21
And I remembered seeing this photograph of my father,
それでこのテスト操縦者だった父の写真のことを
21:24
who was a test pilot, and he told me that
思い出したんです。父が言ったんです
21:27
when you signed up to become a test pilot,
テスト操縦者になると決めたら
21:29
they told you that there was a 40 to 50 percent chance
4割が5割の確率で
21:31
of death on the job.
死ぬことになる、と宣告される、と
21:33
That's pretty high for most occupations.
普通の仕事よりもよっぽど危険ですね
21:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:38
But, you know, the government would make a plane;
国が飛行機を作って
「ちょっと試しに乗ってくれないか?」ってくるわけです
21:40
they'd say, go see if that one flies, would you?
国が飛行機を作って
「ちょっと試しに乗ってくれないか?」ってくるわけです
21:42
Some of them did; some of them didn't.
中には生き延びた人もいましたし
そうじゃない人もいました
21:44
And I started thinking about some of these decisions I have to make
僕も自分の下した決断について考えてみました
21:47
between, like, serif versus san-serif.
例えば書体を
明朝体にするかゴシック体にするか
21:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:53
And for the most part, they're not real life-threatening.
大抵は生死には関わらないことばかりです
21:56
Why not experiment? Why not have some fun?
なら実験してみればいい、
楽しんでやればいいじゃないか
22:00
Why not put some of yourself into the work?
自分らしさを仕事に生かして何が悪い?
22:03
And when I was teaching, I used to always ask the students,
教師だったころ 生徒によく質問しました
22:06
What's the definition of a good job?
いい仕事の定義とは何であるか?
22:08
And as teachers, after you get all the answers,
教師としては、生徒の回答を聞いたあと
22:10
you like to give them the correct answer.
正しい回答を与えてあげたいものです
22:12
And the best one I've heard -- I'm sure some of you have heard this --
聞いたこともあるかと思いますが
僕がベストだと思った
22:14
the definition of a good job is:
いい仕事の定義とは
22:17
If you could afford to -- if money wasn't an issue --
もしお金に不自由しないなら、タダでも
22:19
would you be doing that same work?
今と同じ仕事を続けるかどうか?
22:23
And if you would, you've got a great job.
もしそうなら、素晴らしい
22:25
And if you wouldn't, what the heck are you doing?
そうでなかったら、一体きみは今何をしているのか?
22:28
You're going to be dead a really long time.
そんなの生きているとは言えません
22:31
Thank you very much.
ご静聴ありがとうございました
22:33
Translator:Yasuyo Takeo
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

David Carson - Type designer
David Carson is the "grunge typographer" whose magazine Ray Gun helped explode the possibilities of text on a page.

Why you should listen

David Carson's boundary-breaking typography in the 1990s, in Ray Gun magazine and other pop-cult books, ushered in a new vision of type and page design -- quite simply, breaking the traditional mold of type on a page and demanding fresh eyes from the reader. Squishing, smashing, slanting and enchanting the words on a layout, Carson made the point, over and over, that letters on a page are art. You can see the repercussions of his work to this day, on a million Flash intro pages (and probably just as many skateboards and T-shirts).

His first book, with Lewis Blackwell and a foreword by David Byrne, is The End of Print, and he's written or collaborated on several others, including the magisterial Book of Probes, an exploration of the thinking of Marshall McLuhan. His latest book is Trek, a collection of his recent work.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.