sponsored links
Taste3 2008

Barry Schuler: Genomics 101

バリー・シュラー: ゲノム学基礎講座

June 30, 2008

ゲノム学とは何か?それは私たちの生活にどう影響するのか?起業家バリー・シュラーはゲノム革命の入門編として大変わかりやすく面白い話をします。彼はゲノム学のおかげで、少なくともより健康的でおいしい食物が手に入るようになると言います。一例としてピノノワール種のぶどうから、よりおいしいワインを作る事例を取り上げます。

Barry Schuler - Entrepreneur
Barry Schuler's multimedia firm Medior built key interactive technologies for AOL, helping millions connect to the Internet through a simple, accessible interface. Now, through venture capital (and wine appreciation), he wants to do the same for genomics. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What's happening in genomics,
ゲノム学で起きていること
00:16
and how this revolution is about to change everything we know
この革命は我々の全ての
知識を覆そうとしています
00:18
about the world, life, ourselves, and how we think about them.
世界 生命 我々自身
それらに対する我々の認識をです
00:23
If you saw 2001: A Space Odyssey,
「2001年宇宙の旅」を観た方は
00:30
and you heard the boom, boom, boom, boom, and you saw the monolith,
ブンブンといううなり声や
モノリスを覚えていることでしょう
00:33
you know, that was Arthur C. Clarke's representation
アーサー・C・クラークが表現したのは
00:37
that we were at a seminal moment in the evolution of our species.
我々が進化の重要な分岐点にあったことです
00:41
In this case, it was picking up bones and creating a tool,
ヒトザルが骨を拾って道具にすることを覚え
00:45
using it as a tool, which meant that apes just, sort of,
それを使うことによって それまで単に
00:49
running around and eating and doing each other
走り回り 食べ 生殖するだけだったサルが
00:53
figured out they can make things if they used a tool.
道具を使って物を作れることを知ったのです
00:55
And that moved us to the next level.
そこで我々は次の段階に進化しました
01:01
And, you know, we in the last 30 years in particular
ご存知の通り 特にこの30年位で
01:04
have seen this acceleration in knowledge and technology,
知識や技術が加速度的な発展を遂げました
01:08
and technology has bred more knowledge and given us tools.
技術がさらなる知識を生み
新しい道具を授けています
01:12
And we've seen many seminal moments.
我々は多くの重要な出来事に遭遇しました
01:15
We've seen the creation of small computers in the '70s and early '80s,
70年代や80年代初頭には
小型コンピュータができました
01:17
and who would have thought back then that every single person
一人一人が1台のみならず
20台ものコンピュータを
01:21
would not have just one computer but probably 20,
持つようになるなど
当時誰が考えたでしょう
01:24
in your home, and in not just your P.C. but in every device --
家の中ではパソコン以外にも
洗濯機や携帯電話など
01:27
in your washing machine, your cell phone.
あらゆる機器に入っていて
01:32
You're walking around; your car has 12 microprocessors.
外へ出れば車には12個の
マイコンが搭載されています
01:35
Then we go along and create the Internet
そうするうちにインターネットを創りだし
01:39
and connect the world together; we flatten the world.
世界中を結合して世界はフラット化しました
01:41
We've seen so much change, and we've given ourselves these tools now --
我々はとても多くの変化に遭遇し
現在のような道具を創りだしてきました
01:44
these high-powered tools --
高性能な道具は
01:49
that are allowing us to turn the lens inward
我々を内側に目を向けさせるようになり
01:51
into something that is common to all of us, and that is a genome.
我々に共通するもの
すなわちゲノムに注目が集まります
01:55
How's your genome today? Have you thought about it lately?
今日の皆さんのゲノムの調子はいかが?
最近そんなこと考えたことがありますか?
02:00
Heard about it, at least? You probably hear about genomes these days.
聞いたこと位はありますか?
最近ゲノムを耳にしたことはあるでしょう
02:05
I thought I'd take a moment to tell you what a genome is.
ゲノムとは何か 少しご説明しましょう
02:10
It's, sort of, like if you ask people,
それは人に こう聞くようなものです
02:13
Well, what is a megabyte or megabit? And what is broadband?
メガバイトとかメガビットって何?
ブロードバンドって何? と
02:15
People never want to say, I really don't understand.
よく解らないとは 誰も言いたがらないです
02:18
So, I will tell you right off of the bat.
そこで私の出番です
02:21
You've heard of DNA; you probably studied a little bit in biology.
DNAは聞いたことがあるでしょう
生物学で少し勉強したはずです
02:22
A genome is really a description for
all of the DNA that is in a living organism.
ゲノムは生命体の持つDNAの全てを指します
02:26
And one thing that is common to all of life is DNA.
すべての生命に共通するもの それがDNAです
02:33
It doesn't matter whether you're a yeast;
イースト菌だろうが
02:39
it doesn't matter whether you're a mouse;
マウスだろうが
02:41
doesn't matter whether you're a fly; we all have DNA.
ハエだろうが全ての生命が
DNAを持っています
02:43
The DNA is organized in words, call them: genes and chromosomes.
DNAは単語のように構成され
遺伝子と染色体の基をなしています
02:47
And when Watson and Crick in the '50s
ワトソンとクリックが50年代に
02:54
first decoded this beautiful double helix that we know as the DNA molecule --
DNA分子として知られる美しい
二重らせん構造を初めて解読した時
02:58
very long, complicated molecule --
とても長く複雑な分子ですが
03:04
we then started on this journey to understand that
その時からDNAの中に我々の性格や特徴
03:06
inside of that DNA is a language that determines the characteristics, our traits,
遺伝的に受け継ぐ性質や
発病の恐れを決定する
03:10
what we inherit, what diseases we may get.
言語があることを知り始めたのです
03:16
We've also along the way discovered that this is a very old molecule,
同時に これがとても古い
分子であることも分かりました
03:19
that all of the DNA in your body has been around forever,
体内の全てのDNAは
太古の昔からずっと永遠に
03:25
since the beginning of us, of us as creatures.
我々の生物としての始まりから
存在していたのです
03:31
There is a historical archive.
DNAには歴史が保管されています
03:35
Living in your genome is the history of our species,
ゲノムの中には我々の種の
歴史が息づいており
03:37
and you as an individual human being, where you're from,
ひとりの人間として
あなたがどこの出身か
03:42
going back thousands and thousands and thousands of years,
何千年も何万年も昔にさかのぼって
03:48
and that's now starting to be understood.
その歴史が明らかになろうとしています
03:51
But also, the genome is really the instruction manual.
しかし実はゲノムは操作手順書でもあります
03:54
It is the program. It is the code of life.
それはプログラムであり生命の暗号なのです
03:59
It is what makes you function;
それはあなたを機能させるもの
04:02
it is what makes every organism function.
あらゆる生命体を機能させるものです
04:04
DNA is a very elegant molecule.
DNAはとても格調高い分子です
04:08
It's long and it's complicated.
長くて複雑な形をしています
04:11
Really all you have to know about it is that there's four letters:
皆さんが抑えるべきことは たった4つの文字
04:13
A, T, C, G; they represent the name of a chemical.
A T C G です
各々の文字はある化学物質を表します
04:18
And with these four letters, you can create a language:
その4つの文字から言語を作ることができます
04:22
a language that can describe anything, and very complicated things.
どんな複雑なことでも表現可能な言語です
04:27
You know, they are generally put together in pairs,
これらの文字は通常 対になっており
04:32
creating a word or what we call base pairs.
塩基対と呼ばれる単語を作ります
04:35
And you would, you know, when you think about it,
考えてみると つまりは
04:38
four letters, or the representation of four things, makes us work.
その4つの文字が表現するものが
我々を動かしているわけです
04:41
And that may not sound very intuitive,
解りにくいでしょうから
04:47
but let me flip over to something else you know about, and that's computers.
身近なコンピュータを
例にとって説明しましょう
04:50
Look at this screen here and, you know, you see pictures
このスクリーンをご覧ください
そこには画像が
04:54
and you see words, but really all there are are ones and zeros.
そして単語が見えていますが
実は1と0が並んでいるだけです
04:58
The language of technology is binary;
コンピュータの言語は二進法なのです
05:02
you've probably heard that at some point in time.
どこかで聞いたことがあるでしょう
05:06
Everything that happens in digital is converted,
デジタルの世界は1と0の列が変換されて
05:08
or a representation, of a one and a zero.
表現するものから成り立っているのです
05:12
So, when you're listening to iTunes and your favorite music,
ですから iTunes や好きな
音楽を聴いている時も
05:15
that's really just a bunch of ones and zeros playing very quickly.
実は1と0の列が高速で
再生されているに過ぎないのです
05:20
When you're seeing these pictures, it's all ones and zeros,
これらの画像も1と0からできていますし
05:23
and when you're talking on your telephone, your cell phone,
電話や携帯で話している時も
05:26
and it's going over the network,
ネットワーク越しに
05:29
your voice is all being turned into ones and zeros and magically whizzed around.
音声が1と0に変換されて
魔法のように飛んでいくわけです
05:31
And look at all the complex things and wonderful things
我々が1と0だけで創り出してきた
05:35
we've been able to create with just a one and a zero.
複雑ですばらしい物は
とてもたくさんあります
05:38
Well, now you ramp that up to four, and you have a lot of complexity,
ここで4文字にまで拡張してみましょう
すると複雑性が増し
05:41
a lot of ways to describe mechanisms.
より複雑なメカニズムも
表現できるようになります
05:47
So, let's talk about what that means.
それが何を意味するか お話しましょう
05:51
So, if you look at a human genome,
ヒトゲノムを紐解いてみると
05:53
they consist of 3.2 billion of these base pairs. That's a lot.
32億の塩基対になります
とてもたくさんです
05:55
And they mix up in all different fashions,
それらが様々に組み合わさって
06:01
and that makes you a human being.
ヒトができているのです
06:03
If you convert that to binary, just to give you a little bit of sizing,
ちなみに 二進法に変換して
プログラムの大きさを比較してみると
06:06
we're actually smaller than the program Microsoft Office.
実はヒトのゲノムはマイクロソフト
オフィスより小さいのです
06:11
It's not really all that much data.
意外と大したデータ量ではないんです
06:15
I will also tell you we're at least as buggy.
ついでにお伝えします
我々もオフィスと同程度にバグがあります
06:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:22
This here is a bug in my genome
この出っ張った腹は私のゲノムのバグです
06:25
that I have struggled with for a long, long time.
そのせいで長年悩まされてきました
06:29
When you get sick, it is a bug in your genome.
病気になるのはゲノムのバグです
06:34
In fact, many, many diseases we have struggled with for a long time,
現在のところ がんのように
我々が長い間悩まされてきた
06:39
like cancer, we haven't been able to cure
多くの病気は 治療法が
まだ見つかっていません
06:44
because we just don't understand how it works at the genomic level.
その疾患がゲノムレベルでどう作用するか
解明されていないからです
06:47
We are starting to understand that.
今その謎が解明され始めています
06:51
So, up to this point we tried to fix it
これまでの我々の治療法は
06:53
by using what I call shit-against-the-wall pharmacology,
“下手な鉄砲も数打ちゃ当たる”方法でした
06:55
which means, well, let's just throw chemicals at it,
つまり この化学物質を投与してみよう
06:59
and maybe it's going to make it work.
そうすれば何とかなるだろうという感じです
07:02
But if you really understand why does a cell go from normal cell to cancer?
しかし なぜ正常な細胞がガン細胞になるのか
07:04
What is the code?
どんなプログラムがガンを誘発するのか
07:11
What are the exact instructions that are making it do that?
どんな命令によりガンが発生するのか分かれば
07:13
then you can go about the process of trying to fix it and figure it out.
治療法を検討し確立することができます
07:17
So, for your next dinner over a great bottle of wine, here's a few factoids for you.
そこで おいしいワインを片手に
ディナーを楽しむ際の豆知識です
07:21
We actually have about 24,000 genes that do things.
我々の遺伝子のうち
2万4千は実際機能しています
07:26
We have about a hundred, 120,000 others
そのほかに12万の遺伝子が
07:30
that don't appear to function every day,
普段は機能こそしていないものの
07:34
but represent this archival history of how we used to work as a species
種としての我々の歴史を
保存しているのです
07:37
going back tens of thousands of years.
何万年もさかのぼって
07:42
You might also be interested in knowing
興味深いことに
07:45
that a mouse has about the same amount of genes.
マウスが持つ遺伝子もほぼ同数です
07:47
They recently sequenced Pinot Noir, and it also has about 30,000 genes,
ピノ・ノワールのゲノム配列を調べてみると
3万個の遺伝子があったそうです
07:49
so the number of genes you have may not necessarily represent the complexity
従って遺伝子の数は 必ずしも特定の種の複雑さや
07:56
or the evolutionary order of any particular species.
その進化の過程を
表しているわけではないようです
08:00
Now, look around: just look next to your neighbor,
ちょっと周りをみてください 隣や前後の方を
08:05
look forward, look backward. We all look pretty different.
皆外見が全く違うでしょう
08:08
A lot of very handsome and pretty people here, skinny, chubby,
ハンサムな人 かわいい人
ほっそりした人 ぽっちゃりした人
08:10
different races, cultures. We are all 99.9% genetically equal.
人種や文化が違う人などたくさんいますね
しかしその遺伝子は99.9%共通なのです
08:14
It is one one-hundredth of one percent of genetic material
0.1%の遺伝子の差が
08:22
that makes the difference between any one of us.
こうした違いを作りだしているのです
08:26
That's a tiny amount of material,
些細な差ですが
08:29
but the way that ultimately expresses itself
それが最終的には
08:31
is what makes changes in humans and in all species.
ヒトや他の種の変化を生み出すのです
08:35
So, we are now able to read genomes.
現在 既にゲノムを解読することができます
08:40
The first human genome took 10 years, three billion dollars.
最初のヒトゲノムの解読に10年
金額にして30億ドルかかりました
08:43
It was done by Dr. Craig Venter.
クレイグ・ヴェンター博士の研究成果です
08:48
And then James Watson's -- one of the co-founders of DNA --
その後 DNAの共同発見者の
ジェームス・ワトソンが
08:51
genome was done for two million dollars, and in just two months.
2百万ドルかけて たった2ヶ月で
ゲノム解読に成功しました
08:55
And if you think about the computer industry
コンピュータ産業に目を向けると
08:59
and how we've gone from big computers to little ones
巨大だったコンピュータは小さくなり
09:01
and how they get more powerful and faster all the time,
そしてより高速で高性能になりました
09:04
the same thing is happening with gene sequencing now:
遺伝子配列解読も同様です
09:08
we are on the cusp of being able to sequence human genomes
5千ドルと1時間以内の時間でヒトゲノム配列を
09:10
for about 5,000 dollars in about an hour or a half-hour;
読めるようになるのも時間の問題です
09:14
you will see that happen in the next five years.
5年以内には実現するでしょう
09:19
And what that means is, you are going to walk around
そうなれば あなたも電子カードに
自分のゲノム情報を入れて
09:21
with your own personal genome on a smart card. It will be here.
持ち歩くようになります
こんな感じです
09:23
And when you buy medicine,
薬を買うときには
09:29
you won't be buying a drug that's used for everybody.
汎用の薬ではなく
09:31
You will give your genome to the pharmacist,
薬剤師に自分のゲノム情報を渡して
09:34
and your drug will be made for you
自分に合った薬を処方してもらいます
09:37
and it will work much better than the ones that were --
従来の薬よりはるかによく効くでしょう
09:39
you won't have side effects.
副作用もありません
09:41
All those side effects, you know, oily residue and, you know,
コマーシャルでいうような ベトベト感とか
09:43
whatever they say in those commercials: forget about that.
変な副作用も関係ありません
09:46
They're going to make all that stuff go away.
そんなものも全部なくなる日がくるでしょう
09:50
What does a genome look like?
ゲノムはどんな形をしているのでしょう
09:52
Well, there it is. It is a long, long series of these base pairs.
これです とても長い塩基対の鎖で
09:55
If you saw the genome for a mouse or for a human it would look no different than this,
マウスのゲノムもヒトゲノムも
ほぼ変わりありません
10:01
but what scientists are doing now is
しかし科学者は現在
10:05
they're understanding what these do and what they mean.
これらの機能と意味を調べています
10:07
Because what Nature is doing is double-clicking all the time.
ゲノムは特定の動作を意味づけています
10:11
In other words, the first couple of sentences here,
例えばブドウの木では
10:15
assuming this is a grape plant:
最初の数文字が
10:19
make a root, make a branch, create a blossom.
根を作り 枝をはって 花を咲かせよ
10:21
In a human being, down in here it could be:
ヒトではこの辺で例えば
10:25
make blood cells, start cancer.
血液細胞を作ったり がん化させよ
10:29
For me it may be: every calorie you consume, you conserve,
私の場合は取り入れた
全てのカロリーを貯め込め
10:33
because I come from a very cold climate.
寒い地域の出身なのでね
10:40
For my wife: eat three times as much and you never put on any weight.
私の妻にとっては 1日3回好きなだけ
食べても全然太らないとか
10:43
It's all hidden in this code,
全てはこの暗号に書いてあり
10:47
and it's starting to be understood at breakneck pace.
すばらしい早さで解明されつつあります
10:49
So, what can we do with genomes now that we can read them,
では解読可能になったゲノムで
一体何ができるのでしょうか
10:54
now that we're starting to have the book of life?
我々は生命の本を手にしようと
しているわけですが
10:57
Well, there's many things. Some are exciting.
できることは多くあります
わくわくすることも
10:59
Some people will find very scary. I will tell you a couple of things
怖いと感じることもあります
いくつかお話ししましょう
11:02
that will probably make you want to projectile puke on me, but that's okay.
不愉快な話かもしれません お許しを
11:06
So, you know, we now can learn the history of organisms.
まずは生物の歴史を知ることができます
11:10
You can do a very simple test: scrape your cheek; send it off.
ごく簡単なテストです
頬の内側をかきとって試験に出せば
11:14
You can find out where your relatives come from;
親戚のルーツが分かります
11:17
you can do your genealogy going back thousands of years.
家系を何千年もさかのぼることができます
11:20
We can understand functionality. This is really important.
機能が分かるようになります
これはとても大切です
11:23
We can understand, for example, why we create plaque in our arteries,
例えば動脈で血小板ができる理由や
11:26
what creates the starchiness inside of a grain,
穀物の中でデンプンを作るものの正体
11:31
why does yeast metabolize sugar and produce carbon dioxide.
イーストが糖質を代謝し二酸化炭素を
作る理由を知ることができます
11:35
We can also look at, at a grander scale, what creates problems,
より大きく言うと 問題を引き起こす物質
11:43
what creates disease, and how we may be able to fix them.
病気の原因を調べ治療法を探すことができます
11:46
Because we can understand this,
これが分かると
11:50
we can fix them, make better organisms.
改良してより良い生物を作ることができます
11:52
Most importantly, what we're learning
さらに大事なことは 自然は壮大な道具箱を
11:55
is that Nature has provided us a spectacular toolbox.
我々に与えてくれたと分かってきたのです
11:57
The toolbox exists.
道具箱は実在します
12:02
An architect far better and smarter than us has given us that toolbox,
我々よりはるかにすばらしく賢い設計者が
我々に道具箱をお与えになったのです
12:04
and we now have the ability to use it.
そしていま我々はそれを
使いこなそうとしています
12:09
We are now not just reading genomes; we are writing them.
ゲノムを解読するだけでなく
設計しようとしているのです
12:12
This company, Synthetic Genomics, I'm involved with,
私のシンセティック・ゲノミクス社では
12:16
created the first full synthetic genome for a little bug,
ある小さな虫の完全な
合成ゲノムを初めて作りだしました
12:18
a very primitive creature called Mycoplasma genitalium.
マイコプラズマ・ジェ二タリウムという
非常に原始的な生物です
12:22
If you have a UTI, you've probably -- or ever had a UTI --
尿路感染症に罹ったことがあれば
12:25
you've come in contact with this little bug.
この小さな虫のせいです
12:29
Very simple -- only has about 246 genes --
遺伝子は246個だけの単純な構造ですが
12:32
but we were able to completely synthesize that genome.
ゲノムの完全合成に成功したのです
12:35
Now, you have the genome and you say to yourself,
ゲノムがあれば もしや
12:42
So, if I plug this synthetic genome -- if I pull the old one out and plug it in --
古いゲノムの代わりに この合成ゲノムを注入して
12:45
does it just boot up and live?
スイッチ入れると生命が起動するのか?
12:50
Well, guess what. It does.
その通りなのです
12:52
Not only does it do that; if you took the genome -- that synthetic genome --
それだけでなくその合成ゲノムを取り出して
12:56
and you plugged it into a different critter, like yeast,
イーストなど別の生物に注入すれば
13:02
you now turn that yeast into Mycoplasma.
イーストがマイコプラズマに大変身
13:05
It's, sort of, like booting up a PC with a Mac O.S. software.
マックのソフトを使って
PCを立ち上げるようなものです
13:09
Well, actually, you could do it the other way.
反対もできます
13:14
So, you know, by being able to write a genome
ゲノムを設計して
13:16
and plug it into an organism,
それを生物に注入すれば
13:20
the software, if you will, changes the hardware.
いわばソフトウェアが
ハードウェアを変えるのです
13:23
And this is extremely profound.
これは大変重大なことです
13:28
So, last year the French and Italians announced
昨年フランスとイタリアが協力して
13:30
they got together and they went ahead and they sequenced Pinot Noir.
ピノ・ノワールの配列解読に
成功したと発表しました
13:33
The genomic sequence now exists for the entire Pinot Noir organism,
ピノ・ノワール全体のゲノム配列を解明し
13:37
and they identified, once again, about 29,000 genes.
2万9千の遺伝子を特定できたとしています
13:43
They have discovered pathways that create flavors,
風味を作りだす代謝経路も発見されました
13:47
although it's very important to understand
ただし
13:50
that those compounds that it's cranking out
こういった合成物質は
13:52
have to match a receptor in our genome, in our tongue,
我々のゲノムにある舌の
受容子と結合しなければ
13:55
for us to understand and interpret those flavors.
風味は感じとれません
13:58
They've also discovered that
また香りを作りだすにも
14:01
there's a heck of a lot of activity going on producing aroma as well.
実に多くの仕組みが
あることも分かりました
14:03
They've identified areas of vulnerability to disease.
病気の耐性が解明されました
14:07
They now are understanding, and the work is going on,
研究は継続しており
14:10
exactly how this plant works, and we have the capability to know,
この植物の特性がさらに
解明されつつあります
14:14
to read that entire code and understand how it ticks.
ゲノムを完全に解読しその機能の
全容が明らかになります
14:18
So, then what do you do?
そこで どうしましょう
14:22
Knowing that we can read it, knowing that we can write it, change it,
ゲノムを解読 設計 変更でき
14:24
maybe write its genome from scratch. So, what do you do?
一から設計し直せます さてどうしましょう
14:28
Well, one thing you could do is what some people might call Franken-Noir.
フランケン・ノワールと呼ぶ新種を作りますか
14:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:36
We can build a better vine.
ブドウの品種改良に役立ちます
14:39
By the way, just so you know:
ところで
14:41
you get stressed out about genetically modified organisms;
遺伝子組換え生物に不安を感じる皆さん
14:43
there is not one single vine in this valley or anywhere
この場所でも他のどこでも あらゆるブドウは
14:47
that is not genetically modified.
既に遺伝子改良されています
14:50
They're not grown from seeds; they're grafted into root stock;
種からではなく接ぎ木して成長したブドウは
14:52
they would not exist in nature on their own.
自然には存在していないのです
14:55
So, don't worry about, don't stress about that stuff. We've been doing this forever.
心配ご無用です
ずっとやってきていることです
14:57
So, we could, you know, focus on disease resistance;
病気の耐性向上に注目してみましょう
15:01
we can go for higher yields without necessarily having
収穫量を上げるには必ずしも劇的な
15:04
dramatic farming techniques to do it, or costs.
農業技術やコストをかける必要はありません
15:08
We could conceivably expand the climate window:
生育の気候条件を広げることも考えられます
15:11
we could make Pinot Noir grow maybe in Long Island, God forbid.
ロング・アイランドでもピノ・ノワールが
育つかもしれません なんてことだ
15:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:19
We could produce better flavors and aromas.
味と香りも改良できるかもしれません
15:23
You want a little more raspberry, a little more chocolate here or there?
もう少しラズベリーや
チョコレート風味を加えたりして
15:26
All of these things could conceivably be done,
これらを全て実現することは可能ですし
15:29
and I will tell you I'd pretty much bet that it will be done.
きっと実現されると思います
15:32
But there's an ecosystem here.
しかしここには生態系があります
15:35
In other words, we're not, sort of, unique little organisms running around;
つまり我々は勝手に生きる
唯一の生物種ではありません
15:37
we are part of a big ecosystem.
我々は巨大な生態系の一部なのです
15:42
In fact -- I'm sorry to inform you --
お伝えするのは気が引けますが 実際に
15:44
that inside of your digestive tract is about 10 pounds of microbes
消化器系には約5キロもの微生物が
15:47
which you're circulating through your body quite a bit.
存在し体内を循環しているのです
15:51
Our ocean's teaming with microbes;
海も微生物に満ちています
15:54
in fact, when Craig Venter went and sequenced the microbes in the ocean,
事実 クレイグ・ヴェンターが海洋中の
微生物の配列解読をした際
15:57
in the first three months tripled the known species on the planet
3ヶ月で地球上で既知の
生物種は3倍に膨れ上がりました
16:02
by discovering all-new microbes in the first 20 feet of water.
水深6mまででもそれだけの
新種が見つかったのです
16:06
We now understand that those microbes have more impact on our climate
そのような微生物は気候に
対して大きな影響を持っており
16:09
and regulating CO2 and oxygen than plants do,
二酸化炭素と酸素を制御している
ことが分かってきました
16:13
which we always thought oxygenate the atmosphere.
植物が大気中に酸素を
供給する以上にです
16:17
We find microbial life in every part of the planet:
微生物は地球上のあらゆる場所にいます
16:19
in ice, in coal, in rocks, in volcanic vents; it's an amazing thing.
氷 石炭 岩 火山の噴火口
驚異的です
16:23
But we've also discovered, when it comes to plants, in plants,
しかも植物について分かってきたのは
16:31
as much as we understand and are starting to understand their genomes,
ゲノムの理解が進むと同様に
16:36
it is the ecosystem around them,
植物を取り囲む生態系
16:40
it is the microbes that live in their root systems,
つまり 根に生きる微生物には
16:43
that have just as much impact on the character of those plants
植物自身と同じ位
植物の特性を決定すべき
16:46
as the metabolic pathways of the plants themselves.
大きな影響力があるのです
16:50
If you take a closer look at a root system,
根をよく見てみると
16:54
you will find there are many, many, many diverse microbial colonies.
実に多種多様な微生物が
生息しているのに気付きます
16:57
This is not big news to viticulturists;
これはブドウ栽培者はよく知っています
17:01
they have been, you know, concerned with water and fertilization.
彼らは水と肥料に注意を払います
17:03
And, again, this is, sort of, my notion of shit-against-the-wall pharmacology:
これが私の言う “下手な鉄砲も
数打ちゃ当たる” 薬学です
17:07
you know certain fertilizers make the plant more healthy so you put more in.
ある肥料が植物に良いと思うと
それをたくさん与えます
17:13
You don't necessarily know with granularity
詳細に どの有機物が
17:17
exactly what organisms are providing what flavors and what characteristics.
どんな風味や性質を産むか
知っているわけではありません
17:21
We can start to figure that out.
それが理解でき始めているのです
17:27
We all talk about terroir; we worship terroir;
我々は葡萄園を語り 葡萄園を崇めます
17:30
we say, Wow, is my terroir great! It's so special.
“私の葡萄園はすごい
実に素晴らしい” とか言います
17:33
I've got this piece of land and it creates terroir like you wouldn't believe.
“この土地を手に入れ 信じられない
葡萄園を作り出した” とも
17:36
Well, you know, we really, we argue and debate about it --
そう 我々は葡萄園に関して
本当に多くの議論を重ねます
17:40
we say it's climate, it's soil, it's this. Well, guess what?
やれ気候だ やれ土だと何だと
しかし聞いてください
17:44
We can figure out what the heck terroir is.
そもそも葡萄園が何なのかを
解明できるのです
17:47
It's in there, waiting to be sequenced.
配列解読されれば分かります
17:50
There are thousands of microbes there.
そこには何千種もの微生物がいます
17:53
They're easy to sequence: unlike a human,
人間と違って微生物の配列解読は容易です
17:55
they, you know, have a thousand, two thousand genes;
1~2千程度の遺伝子なので
17:57
we can figure out what they are.
微生物は何かが分かります
17:59
All we have to do is go around and sample, dig into the ground, find those bugs,
畑に行き 土を掘って それらの虫を見つけ
18:01
sequence them, correlate them to the kinds of characteristics we like and don't like --
配列を解読し 好ましい特性と
好ましくない特性に関連づけるのです
18:08
that's just a big database -- and then fertilize.
すると巨大なデータベースとなり
それを基に肥料やりができます
18:13
And then we understand what is terroir.
これで葡萄園は何かが分かります
18:16
So, some people will say, Oh, my God, are we playing God?
人は問います
“我々は神の真似をしているのか?”
18:20
Are we now, if we engineer organisms, are we playing God?
我々が有機体を操作するのは
神の模倣でしょうか?
18:22
And, you know, people would always ask James Watson --
ジェームス・ワトソンに尋ねたい質問です
18:27
he's not always the most politically correct guy ...
彼の答えは政治的に物議をかもしますが
18:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:32
... and they would say, "Are, you know, are you playing God?"
“あなたは神を真似しているのか?” と尋ねてみると
18:33
And he had the best answer I ever heard to this question:
ワトソンはとても的を得た答えをしました
18:38
"Well, somebody has to."
“誰かは真似しないとね”
18:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:43
I consider myself a very spiritual person,
私は自分がとても精神的な
人間だと思っていますが
18:46
and without, you know, the organized religion part,
既成宗教を抜きに語ると
18:50
and I will tell you: I don't believe there's anything unnatural.
自然に反するものなど無いと思っています
18:53
I don't believe that chemicals are unnatural.
化学物質も自然に反するとは思いません
18:57
I told you I'm going to make some of you puke.
不愉快な話をすると先に言いました
19:01
It's very simple: we don't invent molecules, compounds.
単純なことです 分子や化合物は
発明するものではありません
19:03
They're here. They're in the universe.
はじめから宇宙に存在しているのです
19:07
We reorganize things, we change them around,
我々は物質を再構成し 変更するでしょうが
19:09
but we don't make anything unnatural.
自然の摂理に反するものを
作りはしません
19:12
Now, we can create bad impacts --
悪影響を及ぼす事態はあり得ます
19:15
we can poison ourselves; we can poison the Earth --
我々自身を汚染したり
地球を汚染してしまいます
19:17
but that's just a natural outcome of a mistake we made.
しかしそれは失敗の自然な代償なのです
19:19
So, what's happening today is, Nature is presenting us with a toolbox,
今日起きていることは
自然界が我々に贈った道具箱が
19:23
and we find that this toolbox is very extensive.
とても奥が深いことを我々が認識したことです
19:27
There are microbes out there that actually make gasoline, believe it or not.
驚くべきことに ガソリンを作る微生物がいます
19:31
There are microbes, you know -- go back to yeast.
微生物です 酵母を思い出して下さい
19:35
These are chemical factories;
微生物は化学工場です
19:37
the most sophisticated chemical factories are provided by Nature,
最も洗練した化学工場は自然界にあります
19:39
and we now can use those.
そして今や我々はそれらを使うことができます
19:43
There also is a set of rules.
ただしいくつか掟もあります
19:46
Nature will not allow you to --
自然界ではその掟を破ることは許されません
19:48
we could engineer a grape plant, but guess what.
我々はブドウの木を作れますが
19:51
We can't make the grape plant produce babies.
ブドウの木に赤ん坊を
産ませることは不可能です
19:53
Nature has put a set of rules out there.
自然界には掟があります
19:55
We can work within the rules; we can't break the rules;
我々はその掟の範囲内で動けますが
掟を破ることはできません
19:58
we're just learning what the rules are.
我々はその掟を学んでいる最中です
20:01
I just ask the question, if you could cure all disease --
それでは質問です
もし全ての病気を治すことができ
20:03
if you could make disease go away,
もし病気の動きを理解した上で
20:07
because we understand how it actually works,
病気を駆逐することができ
20:09
if we could end hunger by being able to create nutritious, healthy plants
もし生育困難な環境下でも育つ
栄養価が高い健康な植物を作って
20:11
that grow in very hard-to-grow environments,
飢餓を無くすことができ
20:16
if we could create clean and plentiful energy --
もしクリーンなエネルギーを
豊富に作ることができ―
20:19
we, right in the labs at Synthetic Genomics,
シンセティック・ゲノミクス社の実験室では
20:22
have single-celled organisms that are taking carbon dioxide
二酸化炭素を吸収しガソリンに
極めて似通った分子を生み出す
20:25
and producing a molecule very similar to gasoline.
単細胞生物の合成に成功しました
20:29
So, carbon dioxide -- the stuff we want to get rid of -- not sugar, not anything.
二酸化炭素です 糖よりも他の何物よりも
我々が除去したいものです
20:33
Carbon dioxide, a little bit of sunlight,
二酸化炭素とわずかな日光だけで
20:38
you end up with a lipid that is highly refined.
極めて純粋な脂質を得ることができます
20:41
We could solve our energy problems; we can reduce CO2,;
エネルギー問題を解決する糸口です
二酸化炭素を減らせるのです
20:46
we could clean up our oceans; we could make better wine.
海もきれいにでき
ワインも改良できるでしょう
20:50
If we could, would we?
もし可能だったら 我々はどうしますか?
20:53
Well, you know, I think the answer is very simple:
答えは単純だと思います
20:56
working with Nature, working with this tool set that we now understand,
自然に働きかけ 十分に解明した道具箱を活かすことが
20:59
is the next step in humankind's evolution.
人類の進化における次のステップです
21:04
And all I can tell you is, stay healthy for 20 years.
最後に私が言いたいことは
今後20年を健康に過ごして下さい
21:07
If you can stay healthy for 20 years, you'll see 150, maybe 300.
そして この講座の中級編
あるいは応用編を受けられるでしょう
21:11
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
21:14
Translator:Tomoshige Ohno
Reviewer:Akira Kan

sponsored links

Barry Schuler - Entrepreneur
Barry Schuler's multimedia firm Medior built key interactive technologies for AOL, helping millions connect to the Internet through a simple, accessible interface. Now, through venture capital (and wine appreciation), he wants to do the same for genomics.

Why you should listen

If in the mid-'90s tech revolution you found yourself intimidated by command lines (or computers in general), chances are you had your first encounter with email through America Online. Above those first-month-free CDs, the main appeal was its easy-as-a-microwave interface, which Barry Schuler and his team at Medior designed. While the other techies were complaining of eternal September, Schuler remained a populist, passionate about spreading accessibility to the next generation of services that he foresaw changing the world. (Earlier, he had developed and marketed color desktop apps for Apple.)

Schuler later served as AOL's CEO when it acquired Time Warner. But now, as high-tech democratization continues, Schuler wants to direct the momentum toward genomics. As managing director of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, he's funding next-thing projects in tech, and he also serves on the board of Synthetic Genomics. A lover of wine (and a proponent of using genetics to enhance wine grapes), he owns Meteor Vineyard in Napa Valley. He's currently CEO of Raydiance, which is developing laser technology for healthcare use.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.