17:39
TEDGlobal 2005

Nick Bostrom: A philosophical quest for our biggest problems

ニック・ボストロム: 人類の三つの課題

Filmed:

オックスフォード大学の哲学者であり超人間主義者のニック・ボストロムが人類の未来を検証し、最も本質的な問題を解決するために人間の在り方を根幹から変えることを問う。

- Philosopher
Nick Bostrom asks big questions: What should we do, as individuals and as a species, to optimize our long-term prospects? Will humanity’s technological advancements ultimately destroy us? Full bio

I want to talk today about --
今日は
00:24
I've been asked to take the long view, and I'm going to tell you what
長期的な視点での話というリクエストを受けました
00:27
I think are the three biggest problems for humanity
人類にとって最大の3つの問題について
00:33
from this long point of view.
長期的な視点でお話します
00:37
Some of these have already been touched upon by other speakers,
ほかのスピーカーの話と重複するものもありますが
00:40
which is encouraging.
それはいいことだと思っています
00:43
It seems that there's not just one person
なぜなら 今日お話しする問題の重要性を
00:45
who thinks that these problems are important.
僕以外の人も感じているということだからです
00:47
The first is -- death is a big problem.
第一の問題は 死
これは大きな問題です
00:49
If you look at the statistics,
統計的には
00:53
the odds are not very favorable to us.
私達に勝ち目はなさそうです
00:56
So far, most people who have lived have also died.
今のところ 生まれた人はほぼ全員死んでいます
00:58
Roughly 90 percent of everybody who has been alive has died by now.
今までに生きた人の大体90%は死んでいます
01:02
So the annual death rate adds up to 150,000 --
つまり 年間の死亡者数は15万人
01:06
sorry, the daily death rate -- 150,000 people per day,
失礼 1日あたりの死亡者数は15万人です
01:12
which is a huge number by any standard.
これはどう見ても 大きな数字です
01:15
The annual death rate, then, becomes 56 million.
年間にすると5600万人が死ぬ計算です
01:18
If we just look at the single, biggest cause of death -- aging --
唯一最大の死因は 老化です
01:23
it accounts for roughly two-thirds of all human people who die.
死因の約3分の2は老化です
01:29
That adds up to an annual death toll
老化により毎年亡くなる人の数は
01:34
of greater than the population of Canada.
カナダの人口より多いのです
01:37
Sometimes, we don't see a problem
時として 私たちは問題に気付かないことがあります
01:39
because either it's too familiar or it's too big.
問題があまりに身近であるか
01:41
Can't see it because it's too big.
あまりに大きいために
01:45
I think death might be both too familiar and too big
死はほとんどの人にとって
あまりに身近であまりに大きく
01:47
for most people to see it as a problem.
問題として認識することが
できないのだと思います
01:50
Once you think about it, you see this is not statistical points;
考えてみれば 統計的なポイントではないと
分かるでしょう
01:53
these are -- let's see, how far have I talked?
これらのポイントは…
ところで どれくらいお話ししたでしょう
01:55
I've talked for three minutes.
3分くらいです
01:57
So that would be, roughly, 324 people have died since I've begun speaking.
つまり 私が話しはじめてから大体324人が亡くなりました
02:00
People like -- it's roughly the population in this room has just died.
大体この会場にいる人数くらいが 亡くなったのです
02:07
Now, the human cost of that is obvious,
さて これによる人的コストは明らかです
02:12
once you start to think about it -- the suffering, the loss --
哀しみや喪失感は言うまでもなく
02:14
it's also, economically, enormously wasteful.
大変不経済でもあります
02:17
I just look at the information, and knowledge, and experience
例えば 情報、知識、経験といったものが
02:20
that is lost due to natural causes of death in general,
自然死全般によって失われるのです
02:23
and aging, in particular.
特に 老化によって
02:26
Suppose we approximated one person with one book?
例えば1人の人を本1冊に例えてみましょう
02:28
Now, of course, this is an underestimation.
もちろん 1人が1冊というのは過小評価です
02:31
A person's lifetime of learning and experience
人間が一生かけて学んだことや経験は
02:33
is a lot more than you could put into a single book.
とても1冊の本にまとめられる量ではありません
02:39
But let's suppose we did this.
が ここでは例えとして1人1冊と仮定しましょう
02:41
52 million people die of natural causes each year
毎年5200万人が自然死します
02:44
corresponds, then, to 52 million volumes destroyed.
つまり 5200万冊の本が消失します
02:49
Library of Congress holds 18 million volumes.
米国議会図書館には1800万冊の蔵書があります
02:53
We are upset about the burning of the Library of Alexandria.
アレクサンドリア図書館の焼失は
02:57
It's one of the great cultural tragedies
甚大な文化的損害であり
03:00
that we remember, even today.
今日でも語り継がれています
03:02
But this is the equivalent of three Libraries of Congress --
年間の死者数は 米国議会図書館3つ分の書籍が
03:06
burnt down, forever lost -- each year.
燃やされ 永遠に失われてしまうに等しい数です
03:08
So that's the first big problem.
ですので 死は第一の大問題なのです
03:11
And I wish Godspeed to Aubrey de Grey,
私は オーブレー・デグレイや
03:13
and other people like him,
彼のような人々の成功を祈っています
03:16
to try to do something about this as soon as possible.
できるだけ早く 死を食い止められるように
03:18
Existential risk -- the second big problem.
2つめの大問題は 人類絶滅の危機です
03:22
Existential risk is a threat to human survival, or to the long-term potential of our species.
これは長期的な種の保存という観点で脅威です
03:25
Now, why do I say that this is a big problem?
なぜ私がこれを問題視するかご説明しましょう
03:32
Well, let's first look at the probability --
まず始めに 確率を見てみましょう
03:34
and this is very, very difficult to estimate --
それを見積るのは非常に難しいのですが
03:38
but there have been only four studies on this in recent years,
近年この問題に関する研究は
03:41
which is surprising.
驚いたことに 4つしかなされていません
03:44
You would think that it would be of some interest
この 人類絶滅の危機は大変重大な問題なので
03:46
to try to find out more about this given that the stakes are so big,
興味深い研究対象だと思われるでしょう
03:49
but it's a very neglected area.
しかし この分野は全く注目されていないのです
03:53
But there have been four studies --
とは言え 4つの研究がなされました
03:55
one by John Lesley, wrote a book on this.
一つはジョン・レスリーによるもので
著書もあります
03:57
He estimated a probability that we will fail
レスリーは 人類が21世紀の終わりに生き残れない
03:59
to survive the current century: 50 percent.
確率を50%と見積りました
04:01
Similarly, the Astronomer Royal, whom we heard speak yesterday,
同様に 昨日スピーチをした英国王室天文官も
04:04
also has a 50 percent probability estimate.
50%と見積っています
04:09
Another author doesn't give any numerical estimate,
もう1人の著者は数字は示していませんが
04:12
but says the probability is significant that it will fail.
生き残れない可能性が非常に大きいとしています
04:15
I wrote a long paper on this.
私はこのテーマについて長い論文を書きました
04:18
I said assigning a less than 20 percent probability would be a mistake
論文中 私は20%未満と見積るのは低すぎるとしました
04:21
in light of the current evidence we have.
現状に照らして判断するに
04:25
Now, the exact figures here,
ここに実際に計算した結果を示していますが
04:28
we should take with a big grain of salt,
あまり真に受けないで下さい
04:30
but there seems to be a consensus that the risk is substantial.
とは言え 相当なリスクとの共通認識が
形成されているようです
04:32
Everybody who has looked at this and studied it agrees.
この計算を見て研究した人全員が納得しました
04:35
Now, if we think about what just reducing
ここで 人類絶滅の可能性を
04:38
the probability of human extinction by just one percentage point --
1%減らせるとしたら
1%というのはわずかなものですが
04:40
not very much -- so that's equivalent to 60 million lives saved,
6000万人の命が助かります
04:45
if we just count the currently living people, the current generation.
現在の世界人口を考えてみるに
04:50
Now one percent of six billion people is equivalent to 60 million.
60億人ですから その1%は6000万人です
04:54
So that's a large number.
そう考えると1%というのは大きな数字です
04:58
If we were to take into account future generations
もし私達の世代が失敗をすれば存在しえない
05:00
that will never come into existence if we blow ourselves up,
将来世代まで計算に含めると
05:03
then the figure becomes astronomical.
計算結果は天文学的な数字になります
05:08
If we could eventually colonize a chunk of the universe --
もし人類が宇宙のどこかに最終的に移住できるとしたら
05:11
the Virgo supercluster --
例えば乙女座超銀河団に移住するとしたら
05:14
maybe it will take us 100 million years to get there,
たどり着くのに1億年かかるでしょう
05:16
but if we go extinct we never will.
でも 生存していなければ決してたどり着けません
05:18
Then, even a one percentage point reduction
人類絶滅のリスクをたった1%低減するだけでも
05:21
in the extinction risk could be equivalent
それはこの天文学的な数字
05:24
to this astronomical number -- 10 to the power of 32.
10の32乗という数になるのです
05:28
So if you take into account future generations as much as our own,
ですので 将来世代も含めて考えれば
05:31
every other moral imperative of philanthropic cost just becomes irrelevant.
慈善にかかる費用についての道徳上の要請などは
取るに足らない問題です
05:35
The only thing you should focus on
私達が注目すべきは
05:40
would be to reduce existential risk
人類絶滅のリスクをいかに低減するかです
05:42
because even the tiniest decrease in existential risk
なぜなら ほんのわずかでも人類絶滅のリスクを減らせれば
05:44
would just overwhelm any other benefit you could hope to achieve.
他のいかなる方法でも達成しえない
大きな利益につながるからです
05:48
And even if you just look at the current people,
仮に 今の世代のことだけを考えて
05:52
and ignore the potential that would be lost if we went extinct,
今の世代が絶滅すれば失われてしまう
将来世代の可能性を考慮に入れなくても
05:54
it should still have a high priority.
人類絶滅のリスクを低減することは優先課題なのです
05:59
Now, let me spend the rest of my time on the third big problem,
では 残り時間は全部 3つ目の問題の説明に使いましょう
06:01
because it's more subtle and perhaps difficult to grasp.
この問題はより曖昧で 理解が難しいと思います
06:06
Think about some time in your life --
みなさん ご自身の人生を振り返ってみて下さい
06:12
some people might never have experienced it -- but some people,
まだ一度も経験したことがない方もいれば
06:16
there are just those moments that you have experienced
経験済みの方もいるでしょう
06:19
where life was fantastic.
人生が素晴らしくバラ色だったときを
06:22
It might have been at the moment of some great, creative inspiration
それは 素晴らしくクリエイティブなインスピレーションを
感じた瞬間かもしれません
06:24
you might have had when you just entered this flow stage.
この会場に足を踏み入れたときに
06:31
Or when you understood something you had never done before.
それは 今まで分からなかったことが理解できた
瞬間かもしれません
06:33
Or perhaps in the ecstasy of romantic love.
それは ロマンチックな恋に夢中になった
ときかもしれません
06:35
Or an aesthetic experience -- a sunset or a great piece of art.
それは 美しいものに触れたときかもしれません
夕日や芸術作品など
06:39
Every once in a while we have these moments,
ときどき私達はこのような瞬間を味わいます
06:44
and we realize just how good life can be when it's at its best.
そして 人生が上手くいっているとき
人生はいいものだと思えるのです
06:46
And you wonder, why can't it be like that all the time?
一方 なぜ人生はいいときばかりではないのだろう?
という疑問もわいてきます
06:50
You just want to cling onto this.
人はこのことに執着しがちです
06:55
And then, of course, it drifts back into ordinary life and the memory fades.
そして 当然のごとく ありふれた日常に引き戻され
思い出は色あせていきます
06:57
And it's really difficult to recall, in a normal frame of mind,
また 普通の心理状態では なかなか思い出せないのです
07:01
just how good life can be at its best.
上手くいっているとき 人生がいかにすばらしいかを
07:05
Or how bad it can be at its worst.
また反対に 上手くいかないとき人生がいかに困難かを
07:08
The third big problem is that life isn't usually
3つ目の問題は 人生いいことばかりではない
07:11
as wonderful as it could be.
ということです
07:14
I think that's a big, big problem.
私は これは大問題だと思っています
07:16
It's easy to say what we don't want.
いやなことを挙げるのは簡単なことです
07:20
Here are a number of things that we don't want --
沢山の例を挙げることができます
07:23
illness, involuntary death, unnecessary suffering, cruelty,
病気、不本意な死、余計な苦しみ、虐待
07:26
stunted growth, memory loss, ignorance, absence of creativity.
発育不良、物忘れ、無知、創造力の欠如
07:29
Suppose we fixed these things -- we did something about all of these.
仮に 私達がこれら全てのことを解決できたとしましょう
07:35
We were very successful.
大成功して
07:38
We got rid of all of these things.
いやなこと全部を取り除くことができました
07:40
We might end up with something like this,
その結果は このスライドのようなものでしょうか
07:42
which is -- I mean, it's a heck of a lot better than that.
いや これよりずっともっと良くなるでしょう
07:45
But is this really the best we can dream of?
私達が望むのは本当にこの程度のことでしょうか?
07:49
Is this the best we can do?
この程度しかできないのでしょうか?
07:54
Or is it possible to find something a little bit more inspiring to work towards?
もっと実現する価値のあるものはないでしょうか?
07:56
And if we think about this,
そう考えてみると
08:02
I think it's very clear that there are ways
色々な方法があることは明白だと思うのです
08:04
in which we could change things, not just by eliminating negatives,
単にいやなことを取り除くだけではなく
08:08
but adding positives.
前向きなことを加えることにより
物事は変えられるのです
08:11
On my wish list, at least, would be:
少なくとも私の欲しいものリストに並ぶのは
08:13
much longer, healthier lives, greater subjective well-being,
より健康にもっと長生きすること
より充実した人生
08:15
enhanced cognitive capacities, more knowledge and understanding,
認知能力の向上
更なる知識と理解
08:20
unlimited opportunity for personal growth
今の生物学上の限界を越えて
08:25
beyond our current biological limits, better relationships,
無限に成長する機会、より良い人間関係
08:27
an unbounded potential for spiritual, moral
精神的、道徳的、知的に
08:31
and intellectual development.
限りなく成長できる可能性
08:33
If we want to achieve this, what, in the world, would have to change?
私達がこれらを実現するには
何を変えなくてはならないでしょうか?
08:35
And this is the answer -- we would have to change.
答えを言います
私達自身が変わらなくてはならないのです
08:43
Not just the world around us, but we, ourselves.
私達を取り囲む世界だけではなく
私達自身もです
08:48
Not just the way we think about the world, but the way we are -- our very biology.
私達が世界をどう思うかだけではなく
私達自身の生物的在り方もです
08:51
Human nature would have to change.
人の在り方を変えなくてはならないのです
08:55
Now, when we think about changing human nature,
さて 人類の在り方を変えようとするときに
08:57
the first thing that comes to mind
まず思い浮かぶのは
08:59
are these human modification technologies --
次のような人間改造技術です
09:01
growth hormone therapy, cosmetic surgery,
成長ホルモン療法、美容整形
09:05
stimulants like Ritalin, Adderall, anti-depressants,
リタリンやアデラルのような精神刺激薬、抗うつ剤
09:07
anabolic steroids, artificial hearts.
筋肉増強剤、人工心臓
09:10
It's a pretty pathetic list.
実にみじめなリストです
09:12
They do great things for a few people
これらは ごく一部の人々にとっては
大変役立つものです
09:15
who suffer from some specific condition,
ある特定の症状に苦しむ人々にとって
09:17
but for most people, they don't really transform
しかし 大半の人々にとっては
09:19
what it is to be human.
人間らしく生きていくための役には立ちません
09:24
And they also all seem a little bit --
そして これら全てに対して
09:26
most people have this instinct that, well, sure,
ほとんどの人は直感的に違和感を覚えるでしょう
09:28
there needs to be anti-depressants for the really depressed people.
確かに 重いうつ病の治療には抗うつ剤が必要なのですが
09:31
But there's a kind of queasiness
何かが間違っているような
09:33
that these are unnatural in some way.
不自然な感じがします
09:35
It's worth recalling that there are a lot of other
そんなものに頼らなくても 私達は既に多くの
09:38
modification technologies and enhancement technologies that we use.
改造や改良の技術を使っています
09:40
We have skin enhancements, clothing.
例えば 皮膚を機能拡張したものは
衣服です
09:43
As far as I can see, all of you are users of this
私が見る限り この会場にいらっしゃる全員が
09:47
enhancement technology in this room, so that's a great thing.
この改良技術のユーザーですね
すばらしいことです
09:51
Mood modifiers have been used from time immemorial --
気分を変えるものは
太古の昔から使われてきました
09:56
caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, immune system enhancement,
カフェイン、アルコール、ニコチン、免疫力の向上
09:59
vision enhancement, anesthetics --
視力の向上、麻酔など
10:04
we take that very much for granted,
私達はこれらを当たり前のことと思っていますが
10:06
but just think about how great progress that is --
実に素晴らしい進化なのです
10:08
like, having an operation before anesthetics was not fun.
例えば 麻酔がなかった時代の手術を考えてみて下さい
10:12
Contraceptives, cosmetics and brain reprogramming techniques --
避妊薬、化粧品、思考回路を書き換えるテクニック
10:16
that sounds ominous,
と言うと不気味な感じがするかもしれませんが
10:22
but the distinction between what is a technology --
技術 ―典型的には道具などです― と
10:24
a gadget would be the archetype --
人間の在り方を変える他の方法との違いは
10:28
and other ways of changing and rewriting human nature is quite subtle.
実に曖昧なものです
10:30
So if you think about what it means to learn arithmetic or to learn to read,
例えば 算数や読み書きを学ぶということは
10:34
you're actually, literally rewriting your own brain.
実に 文字通り 脳を改造するということなのです
10:38
You're changing the microstructure of your brain as you go along.
学ぶにつれ 脳の微細な構造が変化していきます
10:41
So in a broad sense, we don't need to think about technology
つまり大きな意味では 技術というのは何も
10:45
as only little gadgets, like these things here,
こんな機器だけをさすのではないのです
10:48
but even institutions and techniques,
習慣、テクニック、心理的手法
10:50
psychological methods and so forth.
なども含めて 技術と呼べるのです
10:54
Forms of organization can have a profound impact on human nature.
組織の在り方も
人間性に大きな影響力を持っています
10:56
Looking ahead, there is a range of technologies
将来を見通すと 遅かれ早かれ
11:01
that are almost certain to be developed sooner or later.
これらの技術が開発されることは ほぼ確実です
11:03
We are very ignorant about what the time scale for these things are,
私達は様々な技術が開発される時間軸に無頓着ですが
11:06
but they all are consistent with everything we know
全ての技術は既存の知識
11:10
about physical laws, laws of chemistry, etc.
物理や化学の法則に基づいています
11:12
It's possible to assume,
人類絶滅の可能性を別にすれば
11:16
setting aside a possibility of catastrophe,
遅かれ早かれ これら全てを開発できると
11:18
that sooner or later we will develop all of these.
想定できます
11:21
And even just a couple of these would be enough
これらの技術のうち ごく一部でも実現されれば
11:24
to transform the human condition.
人間の在り方は変わってしまうでしょう
11:27
So let's look at some of the dimensions of human nature
では 人間の在り方として改善する余地のある
11:29
that seem to leave room for improvement.
部分に着目してみましょう
11:34
Health span is a big and urgent thing,
健康寿命は重要かつ喫緊の課題です
11:37
because if you're not alive,
生きていなければ
11:39
then all the other things will be to little avail.
他のあらゆることは無用になります
11:41
Intellectual capacity -- let's take that box,
知的な能力の囲みを見てみましょう
11:44
which falls into a lot of different sub-categories:
その中には多くの項目が並びます
11:46
memory, concentration, mental energy, intelligence, empathy.
記憶力、集中力、精神力、理解力、共感力
11:51
These are really great things.
これらは素晴らしいものです
11:54
Part of the reason why we value these traits
私達がこれらに重きを置く理由は ひとつには
11:56
is that they make us better at competing with other people --
他者との競争力につながるからです
11:58
they're positional goods.
これらは他者との相対的な位置関係に影響します
12:02
But part of the reason --
他の理由は
12:04
and that's the reason why we have ethical ground for pursuing these --
私達がこれらを倫理的に追求する理由なのですが
12:06
is that they're also intrinsically valuable.
これらが本質的に価値あるものだということです
12:10
It's just better to be able to understand more of the world around you
世の中のことや自分と関わりを持つ人々のことを
12:13
and the people that you are communicating with,
より深く理解したり
12:17
and to remember what you have learned.
学んだことを忘れないように
できた方が良いでしょう
12:19
Modalities and special faculties.
感覚や特定の能力についてお話しましょう
12:23
Now, the human mind is not a single unitary information processor,
さて 人間の脳は単一にまとまった情報処理装置
ではありません
12:25
but it has a lot of different, special, evolved modules
ある役割に特化および進化した多くのモジュールで
12:30
that do specific things for us.
構成され 機能しています
12:34
If you think about what we normally take as giving life a lot of its meaning --
私達が人生に多くの意味をもたらすと思っているものを
考えてみて下さい
12:36
music, humor, eroticism, spirituality, aesthetics,
音楽、ユーモア、エロティシズム、信仰、美学
12:40
nurturing and caring, gossip, chatting with people --
養育、思いやり、うわさ話、おしゃべり
12:44
all of these, very likely, are enabled by a special circuitry
これら全ては
人間の脳に備わっている
12:49
that we humans have,
特定の回路によるものと考えられます
12:53
but that you could have another intelligent life form that lacks these.
一方で これらの欠落した知的生活を営むこともできます
12:55
We're just lucky that we have the requisite neural machinery
とても幸運なことに 私達の脳には音楽を鑑賞し
12:58
to process music and to appreciate it and enjoy it.
楽しめるよう処理してくれる機能が備わっています
13:01
All of these would enable, in principle -- be amenable to enhancement.
音楽に関する能力は
原則として向上できるものです
13:05
Some people have a better musical ability
より優れた音楽的才能を持つ人々は
13:08
and ability to appreciate music than others have.
他の人より音楽を楽しむことができます
13:10
It's also interesting to think about what other things are --
他のことも考えてみると面白いものです
13:12
so if these all enabled great values,
これらが全て
素晴らしい価値に結びつくものだとしたら
13:15
why should we think that evolution has happened to provide us
人類の進化の過程で
他にも存在しうる価値を
13:19
with all the modalities we would need to engage
私達が認識できるよう知覚が備わったのは
13:22
with other values that there might be?
なぜなのでしょうか
13:25
Imagine a species
音楽を処理する機能が脳に備わっていない
13:27
that just didn't have this neural machinery for processing music.
種が存在すると過程してみましょう
13:29
And they would just stare at us with bafflement
彼らは私達を見て困惑するでしょうね
13:33
when we spend time listening to a beautiful performance,
私達が つい先ほどの演奏のような
美しい音楽に耳を傾ける姿を見て
13:36
like the one we just heard -- because of people making stupid movements,
奇妙な動きをするものだと 困惑するでしょう
13:40
and they would be really irritated and wouldn't see what we were up to.
そして 私達が何をしているのか理解できず
とてもいらいらするでしょう
13:42
But maybe they have another faculty, something else
一方で 彼らには別の能力が備わっているかもしれません
13:45
that would seem equally irrational to us,
それは 彼らが音楽を解さないのと同様に
私達には不可解に思える能力なのでしょう
13:48
but they actually tap into some great possible value there.
それは 彼らにとっては大変に有意義な価値を
味わう能力なのです
13:51
But we are just literally deaf to that kind of value.
しかし 私達はそのような 自分の理解できない価値を
まったく認識できません
13:54
So we could think of adding on different,
そこで 私達は異なった
13:58
new sensory capacities and mental faculties.
新しい知覚や思考力を加えることが考えられます
14:00
Bodily functionality and morphology and affective self-control.
身体機能や形態、感情の自己制御
14:04
Greater subjective well-being.
より主観的な満足感
14:09
Be able to switch between relaxation and activity --
リラックス状態と活発な状態の切り替えができること
14:11
being able to go slow when you need to do that, and to speed up.
必要に応じて減速したり加速したりできること
14:14
Able to switch back and forth more easily
より簡単に前後の切り替えができること
14:18
would be a neat thing to be able to do --
そうできたらいいですね
14:20
easier to achieve the flow state,
何かに没頭しているときに
14:22
when you're totally immersed in something you are doing.
それをスムーズに出来る状態に早く入れること
14:24
Conscientiousness and sympathy.
誠実さと思いやり
14:28
The ability to -- it's another interesting application
これもまた興味深い応用で
14:30
that would have large social ramification, perhaps.
おそらく大きな社会的影響があるでしょう
14:33
If you could actually choose to preserve your romantic attachments to one person,
もし ある人に対する恋愛感情を自らの意志で
14:36
undiminished through time,
ずっと消えてしまわないよう選択できるとしたら
14:42
so that wouldn't have to -- love would never have to fade if you didn't want it to.
自分で終わりにしようと思わない限り
愛情が色あせることはありません
14:44
That's probably not all that difficult.
それは特別難しいことでもないように思います
14:49
It might just be a simple hormone or something that could do this.
簡単なホルモンか何かで実現できそうなことです
14:52
It's been done in voles.
ハタネズミの実験で既に成功しています
14:57
You can engineer a prairie vole to become monogamous
元来 一夫多妻のプレイリーハタネズミを
15:01
when it's naturally polygamous.
一夫一妻にすることも可能です
15:04
It's just a single gene.
ある1つの遺伝子をいじるだけでいいのです
15:06
Might be more complicated in humans, but perhaps not that much.
人間では多少複雑かもしれませんが
おそらく さほど大きな違いはないでしょう
15:08
This is the last picture that I want to --
こちらが最後にお見せしたいスライドです
15:10
now we've got to use the laser pointer.
レーザーポインターを使いましょう
15:13
A possible mode of being here would be a way of life --
存在の仕方の可能性をここに示しています
15:16
a way of being, experiencing, thinking, seeing,
生き方、在り方、経験すること、考えること、見ること、
15:19
interacting with the world.
世界との関わり
15:23
Down here in this little corner, here, we have the little sub-space
この右下角の小さな領域が
15:25
of this larger space that is accessible to human beings --
この大きな領域の中で 私達人間の生物学的な
15:30
beings with our biological capacities.
能力をもって手の届く範囲です
15:34
It's a part of the space that's accessible to animals;
その領域は 動物の領域に含まれます
15:37
since we are animals, we are a subset of that.
人間も動物ですので 人間の領域は
動物の領域の範囲内なのです
15:40
And then you can imagine some enhancements of human capacities.
ここで 人間の能力が向上したらどうなるか
考えてみましょう
15:43
There would be different modes of being you could experience
もし 例えば後200年生きられるとしたら
15:47
if you were able to stay alive for, say, 200 years.
今とは違った生き方
在り方を体験することができるでしょう
15:50
Then you could live sorts of lives and accumulate wisdoms
そうすれば
現在の人類にとって不可能な
15:53
that are just not possible for humans as we currently are.
生き方をして 知識を蓄積することができるでしょう
15:57
So then, you move off to this larger sphere of "human +,"
そうなれば この図で「人類プラス」と現している
より大きな領域に進出できます
16:00
and you could continue that process and eventually
そして そのプロセスを繰り返しながら最終的に
16:04
explore a lot of this larger space of possible modes of being.
この大きな あらゆる存在の仕方の可能性を
探求できるでしょう
16:07
Now, why is that a good thing to do?
さて なぜこうすることが良いのでしょうか
16:11
Well, we know already that in this little human circle there,
私達は既に この小さな人間の領域において
16:13
there are these enormously wonderful and worthwhile modes of being --
大変素晴らしい 価値ある生き方があることを
16:17
human life at its best is wonderful.
上手くいっているとき人生は素晴らしいことを
知っています
16:21
We have no reason to believe that within this much, much larger space
ここに示した 人間の領域よりももっと大きな領域には
16:24
there would not also be extremely worthwhile modes of being,
きっと非常に価値ある生き方があるでしょう
16:29
perhaps ones that would be way beyond our wildest ability
おそらくそれは 私達の想像や夢を
16:33
even to imagine or dream about.
はるかに越えるものでしょう
16:39
And so, to fix this third problem,
結論として
この第3の問題を解決するには
16:41
I think we need -- slowly, carefully, with ethical wisdom and constraint --
時間をかけて 注意深く 倫理を重んじ 制御しながら
16:43
develop the means that enable us to go out in this larger space and explore it
この大きな領域に進出探索する方法を開発し
16:49
and find the great values that might hide there.
そこに眠る素晴らしい価値を見出すことだと思います
16:54
Thanks.
ありがとうございました
16:56
Translated by Fumiko Kamada
Reviewed by Misaki Sato

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Nick Bostrom - Philosopher
Nick Bostrom asks big questions: What should we do, as individuals and as a species, to optimize our long-term prospects? Will humanity’s technological advancements ultimately destroy us?

Why you should listen

Philosopher Nick Bostrom envisioned a future full of human enhancement, nanotechnology and machine intelligence long before they became mainstream concerns. From his famous simulation argument -- which identified some striking implications of rejecting the Matrix-like idea that humans are living in a computer simulation -- to his work on existential risk, Bostrom approaches both the inevitable and the speculative using the tools of philosophy, probability theory, and scientific analysis.

Since 2005, Bostrom has led the Future of Humanity Institute, a research group of mathematicians, philosophers and scientists at Oxford University tasked with investigating the big picture for the human condition and its future. He has been referred to as one of the most important thinkers of our age.

Nick was honored as one of Foreign Policy's 2015 Global Thinkers .

His recent book Superintelligence advances the ominous idea that “the first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man need ever make.”

More profile about the speaker
Nick Bostrom | Speaker | TED.com