sponsored links
TED2008

Peter Ward: A theory of Earth's mass extinctions

ピーター・ウォード が語る大量絶滅

February 27, 2008

大量絶滅の原因は隕石衝突説が有力視されますが、『メディア仮説』の著者、ピーター・ウォード博士は地球上の大量絶滅の多くは微生物が引き起したと唱えます。毒性の悪者である硫化水素には医学的に興味深い応用分野がある、と博士は言います。

Peter Ward - Paleontologist
Peter D. Ward studies life on Earth -- where it came from, how it might end, and how utterly rare it might be. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So, I want to start out with
最初に子供の頃見た
00:18
this beautiful picture from my childhood.
この美しい絵から始めましょう
00:20
I love the science fiction movies.
私はサイエンス・フィクションが大好きです
00:22
Here it is: "This Island Earth."
これは『宇宙水爆戦』 (原題:This Island Earth)
00:24
And leave it to Hollywood to get it just right.
ハリウッドは頼もしいですね
00:26
Two-and-a-half years in the making.
たった2年半で出来たという
00:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:30
I mean, even the creationists give us 6,000,
創造説論者でさえ6千年と言うのに
00:33
but Hollywood goes to the chase.
さすがハリウッドですね
00:36
And in this movie, we see what we think is out there:
この映画に登場するのは
想像上の存在です
00:38
flying saucers and aliens.
宇宙船や宇宙人です
00:42
Every world has an alien, and every alien world has a flying saucer,
どの世界にも宇宙人がいて
そこには宇宙船があります
00:45
and they move about with great speed. Aliens.
そして超高速で飛行します
宇宙人たち
00:48
Well, Don Brownlee, my friend, and I finally got to the point
私の友人ドン・ブラウンリーと私は
00:53
where we got tired of turning on the TV
毎晩テレビをつけると宇宙船が
00:56
and seeing the spaceships and seeing the aliens every night,
登場するのにうんざりして
00:59
and tried to write a counter-argument to it,
反論を書くことにしました
01:02
and put out what does it really take for an Earth to be habitable,
そして地球が居住可能な条件は何か
01:05
for a planet to be an Earth, to have a place
地球であるための条件は何か
01:09
where you could probably get not just life, but complexity,
単なる生命ではなく非常に長い進化を経て
01:11
which requires a huge amount of evolution,
高等な生命体を育む
01:14
and therefore constancy of conditions.
恒常性がある環境とは
何かを論述しました
01:16
So, in 2000 we wrote "Rare Earth." In 2003, we then asked,
2000年に私たちは『レアアース』
を執筆し 2003年には
01:19
let's not think about where Earths are in space, but how long has Earth been Earth?
他に地球を探すのではなく 今の地球が
どの位続いているのか問いかけました
01:22
If you go back two billion years,
20億年さかのぼると地球は
01:27
you're not on an Earth-like planet any more.
もはや地球らしくありません
01:29
What we call an Earth-like planet is actually a very short interval of time.
地球らしき惑星はごく短い
期間しか存在していないのです
01:31
Well, "Rare Earth" actually
『レアアース』のおかげで
01:35
taught me an awful lot about meeting the public.
多くの人々と会い たくさん学ぶことができました
01:37
Right after, I got an invitation to go to a science fiction convention,
出版直後サイエンス・フィクションの
集会に招かれました
01:40
and with all great earnestness walked in.
私は熱意を持って参加しました
01:43
David Brin was going to debate me on this,
デイヴィッド・ブリンと討論会を行う予定でした
01:46
and as I walked in, the crowd of a hundred started booing lustily.
到着すると百人程の聴衆から
思い切りブーイングを受けました
01:48
I had a girl who came up who said, "My dad says you're the devil."
少女が近づいてきて言うのです
“パパは あなたを悪魔って言うのよ”
01:52
You cannot take people's aliens away from them
宇宙人のイメージを壊してしまうと
01:55
and expect to be anybody's friends.
みんなに嫌われるんです
01:59
Well, the second part of that, soon after --
その後さらに事件が起きました
02:03
and I was talking to Paul Allen; I saw him in the audience,
聴衆に見かけたポール・アレンと話をしていて
02:05
and I handed him a copy of "Rare Earth."
『レアアース』を一冊渡した時です
02:08
And Jill Tarter was there, and she turned to me,
隣にいたジル・ターターが私の方に振り向いて
02:10
and she looked at me just like that girl in "The Exorcist."
まるで「エクソシスト」の少女のように言うのです
02:14
It was, "It burns! It burns!"
“やめて~!”
02:17
Because SETI doesn't want to hear this.
SETI(地球外知的生命体探査協会)
には迷惑なのです
02:19
SETI wants there to be stuff out there.
SETIは宇宙に様々なものが
存在すると思っています
02:21
I really applaud the SETI efforts, but we have not heard anything yet.
SETIの努力は称賛しますが
まだ何も傍受していません
02:24
And I really do think we have to start thinking
何が良い惑星で 何が悪い惑星か
02:27
about what's a good planet and what isn't.
本当に考え始めるべきだと私は思います
02:29
Now, I throw this slide up because it indicates to me that,
さて このスライドを出した理由は
02:32
even if SETI does hear something, can we figure out what they said?
仮にSETIが何か傍受したら
私たちに解読できるでしょうか?
02:35
Because this was a slide that was passed
というのも このスライドは
02:39
between the two major intelligences on Earth -- a Mac to a PC --
地球上の2つの知性の塊である
マックとPCの間を往復したのです
02:41
and it can't even get the letters right --
文字すら正しく表示されません
02:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:48
-- so how are we going to talk to the aliens?
これでどうやって宇宙人と会話するのでしょう?
02:50
And if they're 50 light years away, and we call them up,
もし宇宙人が50光年先にいるとして
私たちが呼びかけて
02:52
and you blah, blah, blah, blah, blah,
バババババ... と言ったとします
02:55
and then 50 years later it comes back and they say, Please repeat?
すると50年後に返信があって
相手曰く “繰返して下さい”
02:57
I mean, there we are.
...てな訳です
03:00
Our planet is a good planet because it can keep water.
私たちの惑星は水を保有できる
良い惑星です
03:02
Mars is a bad planet, but it's still good enough for us to go there
火星は悪い惑星ですが
私たちが行って地表に住むのは
03:05
and to live on its surface if we're protected.
保護する物があれば可能です
03:09
But Venus is a very bad -- the worst -- planet.
しかし金星は劣悪です 最悪の惑星です
03:11
Even though it's Earth-like, and even though early in its history
地球らしき惑星であり 太古には
03:14
it may very well have harbored Earth-like life,
地球らしき生命も存在したかも知れませんが
03:17
it soon succumbed to runaway greenhouse --
やがて充満する二酸化炭素の
03:20
that's an 800 degrees [Fahrenheit] surface --
温室効果で気温が上昇し続け
03:23
because of rampant carbon dioxide.
地表は 400℃を超えました
03:25
Well, we know from astrobiology that we can really now predict
天体生物学のおかげで今では
03:28
what's going to happen to our particular planet.
私たちの惑星が どうなるか予測できます
03:31
We are right now in the beautiful Oreo
私たちの地球惑星は生命の観点では
03:34
of existence -- of at least life on Planet Earth --
最初の過酷な微生物時代を終えて
03:37
following the first horrible microbial age.
現在オレオ・クッキーのクリームの中に
いるようなものです
03:40
In the Cambrian explosion, life emerged from the swamps,
カンブリア爆発で湿地帯で生命が生まれ
03:43
complexity arose,
より高等になりました
03:46
and from what we can tell, we're halfway through.
現在 私たちは中間地点にいます
03:48
We have as much time for animals to exist on this planet
この惑星上に存在する全ての動物は
03:51
as they have been here now,
今後もしばらくは存続するでしょうが
03:54
till we hit the second microbial age.
それは次の微生物時代までです
03:56
And that will happen, paradoxically --
地球温暖化とは逆説的に
03:58
everything you hear about global warming --
何が起きるかというと
04:00
when we hit CO2 down to 10 parts per million,
二酸化炭素濃度が 10ppm を下回ると
04:02
we are no longer going to have to have plants
光合成をする植物は
04:05
that are allowed to have any photosynthesis, and there go animals.
生存できなくなり それに伴って動物も消滅します
04:07
So, after that we probably have seven billion years.
その後地球は70億年存続しますが
04:11
The Sun increases in its intensity, in its brightness,
やがて太陽の輝きが増し 最終的には
04:13
and finally, at about 12 billion years after it first started,
始まりから120億年を経過した段階で
04:16
the Earth is consumed by a large Sun,
地球は巨大な太陽に吸収され
04:21
and this is what's left.
残るのは これだけになります
04:24
So, a planet like us is going to have an age and an old age,
従って 私たちの惑星にも寿命があり老化しますが
04:27
and we are in its golden summer age right now.
現在は その絶頂期なのです
04:31
But there's two fates to everything, isn't there?
しかし全てには2つの運命がありますよね
04:35
Now, a lot of you are going to die of old age,
皆さんの多くは寿命で死亡するでしょう
04:37
but some of you, horribly enough, are going to die in an accident.
しかし何人かは惨いことに事故死するのです
04:40
And that's the fate of a planet, too.
惑星の運命も同様です
04:43
Earth, if we're lucky enough -- if it doesn't get hit by a Hale-Bopp,
向こう70億年に渡り 幸運にも
04:45
or gets blasted by some supernova nearby
ヘール・ボップ彗星が衝突せず
近くでスーパーノバ爆発がない限り
04:49
in the next seven billion years -- we'll find under your feet.
地球は私たちの足元にあります
04:53
But what about accidental death?
しかし事故死はどうでしょう?
04:56
Well, paleontologists for the last 200 years
古生物学者は過去2百年に渡り
04:58
have been charting death. It's strange --
死を解析してきました 奇妙なことに
05:00
extinction as a concept wasn't even thought about
キュヴィエ男爵が初めてマストドンを
05:02
until Baron Cuvier in France found this first mastodon.
発見するまで絶滅の概念はありませんでした
05:05
He couldn't match it up to any bones on the planet,
同様な骨が他に存在せず
05:08
and he said, Aha! It's extinct.
彼は絶滅を唱えたのです
05:10
And very soon after, the fossil record started yielding
その後すぐに高等な生命体が残した
05:12
a very good idea of how many plants and animals there have been
興味深い化石を調査をすることで
05:15
since complex life really began to leave
化石に残る植物や動物が
05:18
a very interesting fossil record.
何種類存在したか 分かるようになりました
05:20
In that complex record of fossils,
化石の複雑な記録の中には
05:23
there were times when lots of stuff
とても多くの生命体が突然死滅したと
05:26
seemed to be dying out very quickly,
思える時期がありました
05:28
and the father/mother geologists
それを見た先代の地質学者は
05:30
called these "mass extinctions."
“大量絶滅”と呼びました
05:32
All along it was thought to be either an act of God
長い間その原因は 神の仕業か
05:34
or perhaps long, slow climate change,
長期間に渡る気象変動と考えられました
05:36
and that really changed in 1980,
1980年 その考えが大きく変わりました
05:38
in this rocky outcrop near Gubbio,
ウォルター・アルバレスが グッビオ近くの岩層を
05:40
where Walter Alvarez, trying to figure out
調査し 白亜紀の生物を含んだ白い岩石と
05:43
what was the time difference between these white rocks,
その上層の第三紀の化石を含んだ
05:46
which held creatures of the Cretaceous period,
ピンク色の岩石の年代差を
05:49
and the pink rocks above, which held Tertiary fossils.
解明しようとしました
05:51
How long did it take to go from one system to the next?
そして 一つの地質時代から次へ移行するのに
どれ程の時間を要したかを
05:53
And what they found was something unexpected.
彼らが発見したのは予想外のことでした
05:57
They found in this gap, in between, a very thin clay layer,
彼らは地層の境目に とても薄い粘土層を発見しました
05:59
and that clay layer -- this very thin red layer here --
その粘土層は ―このとても薄い赤い層ですが―
06:02
is filled with iridium.
イリジウムを含んでいます
06:05
And not just iridium; it's filled with glassy spherules,
そしてイリジウムだけでなく
ガラス状の小球体もあります
06:07
and it's filled with quartz grains
さらに石英粒子も含んでいます
06:10
that have been subjected to enormous pressure: shock quartz.
石英粒子は強烈な圧力が
掛かかった 衝撃石英です
06:12
Now, in this slide the white is chalk,
このスライドにある白い部分は白亜です
06:16
and this chalk was deposited in a warm ocean.
白亜は温暖な海で堆積しました
06:18
The chalk itself's composed by plankton
白亜自体はプランクトンが
06:21
which has fallen down from the sea surface onto the sea floor,
海面から海底に沈んで堆積して
できたので ここに見える
06:23
so that 90 percent of the sediment here is skeleton of living stuff,
沈殿物の90%は生命体の残骸です
06:27
and then you have that millimeter-thick red layer,
そしてミリ単位幅の赤い層と
06:30
and then you have black rock.
それに黒い岩石があります
06:32
And the black rock is the sediment on the sea bottom
黒い岩石は海底にプランクトンが
06:34
in the absence of plankton.
なかった時の堆積物です
06:37
And that's what happens in an asteroid catastrophe,
隕石が衝突した結果こうなります
06:39
because that's what this was, of course. This is the famous K-T.
これが証拠です 有名なK-T隕石は
06:43
A 10-kilometer body hit the planet.
長さ10Kmあり 地球に衝突しました
06:46
The effects of it spread this very thin impact layer all over the planet,
その痕跡が地球全体に
この大変薄い層として拡がり
06:48
and we had very quickly the death of the dinosaurs,
恐竜が突然に死滅し
06:52
the death of these beautiful ammonites,
これら美しいアンモナイトも死滅しました
06:55
Leconteiceras here, and Celaeceras over here,
これはリトセラス
これはセラセラスです
06:57
and so much else.
そして その他の生物も
06:59
I mean, it must be true,
これは真実に間違いないです
07:01
because we've had two Hollywood blockbusters since that time,
2つのハリウッド映画がヒットしたし
07:03
and this paradigm, from 1980 to about 2000,
1980年~2000年の間に唱えられた理論は
07:06
totally changed how we geologists thought about catastrophes.
私たち地質学者の大変動に関する
考え方を根本から変えました
07:09
Prior to that, uniformitarianism was the dominant paradigm:
それ以前は斉一説が主流な理論でした
07:14
the fact that if anything happens on the planet in the past,
つまり 地球で過去に起きた事象は
07:17
there are present-day processes that will explain it.
それを説明できる作用が
今日も存在するという説です
07:20
But we haven't witnessed a big asteroid impact,
しかし私たちは隕石衝突を目撃していないので
07:24
so this is a type of neo-catastrophism,
これは いわば新しい絶滅論です
07:27
and it took about 20 years for the scientific establishment
そして科学界が隕石衝突説-
07:29
to finally come to grips: yes, we were hit;
大量絶滅の原因が隕石衝突だったことを
07:32
and yes, the effects of that hit caused a major mass extinction.
受け入れるには 20年を要しました
07:34
Well, there are five major mass extinctions
過去5億年の間には5つの主要な
07:39
over the last 500 million years, called the Big Five.
大量絶滅が発生しビッグファイブと呼ばれます
07:41
They range from 450 million years ago
五大絶滅の最初は 4.5億年前で
07:44
to the last, the K-T, number four,
最後は4で示す K-Tです
07:47
but the biggest of all was the P, or the Permian extinction,
最大だったのは P で示すペルム紀絶滅で
07:49
sometimes called the mother of all mass extinctions.
時々全ての大量絶滅の祖と呼ばれます
07:53
And every one of these has been subsequently blamed
そして各々の絶滅は大型の隕石衝突に
07:55
on large-body impact.
起因すると考えられました
07:58
But is this true?
しかし本当でしょうか?
08:00
The most recent, the Permian, was thought to have been an impact
ペルム紀絶滅の原因が
隕石衝突とする理由は
08:03
because of this beautiful structure on the right.
右側にある美しい構造物です
08:06
This is a Buckminsterfullerene, a carbon-60.
バックミンスターフラーレン C60構造です
08:08
Because it looks like those terrible geodesic domes
60年代に有名だった今は悪名高き
08:11
of my late beloved '60s,
ジオデシック・ドームに似ているので
08:14
they're called "buckyballs."
バッキーボールと呼ばれます
08:16
This evidence was used to suggest
2.5億年前ペルム紀末に
08:18
that at the end of the Permian, 250 million years ago, a comet hit us.
隕石が地上に落下した際に
その圧力によって
08:20
And when the comet hits, the pressure produces the buckyballs,
バッキーボールが形成され
その成分に地上では希少だが
08:24
and it captures bits of the comet.
宇宙には豊富にある
08:27
Helium-3: very rare on the surface of the Earth, very common in space.
ヘリウム3が含まれることから
隕石衝突説の根拠となりました
08:29
But is this true?
しかし本当でしょうか?
08:34
In 1990, working on the K-T extinction for 10 years,
1990年 K-T絶滅を既に10年研究していた私は
08:36
I moved to South Africa to begin work twice a year
南アフリカに移り住んで
08:40
in the great Karoo desert.
年に2度カルー砂漠で調査を続けました
08:43
I was so lucky to watch the change of that South Africa
あの南アフリカが 新生南アフリカになる様子を
08:45
into the new South Africa as I went year by year.
毎年体験できたことは幸運でした
08:48
And I worked on this Permian extinction,
そしてボーア人墓地近くでキャンプをして
08:51
camping by this Boer graveyard for months at a time.
一回に何か月も滞在し
ペルム紀絶滅を研究しました
08:53
And the fossils are extraordinary.
化石は類い稀なものでした
08:56
You know, you're gazing upon your very distant ancestors.
遠い祖先を見ているのです
08:59
These are mammal-like reptiles.
化石は哺乳類に似た爬虫類です
09:01
They are culturally invisible. We do not make movies about these.
一般には知られない動物で
映画にも登場しません
09:03
This is a Gorgonopsian, or a Gorgon.
これは ゴルゴノプスや
ゴルゴンと呼ばれます
09:06
That's an 18-inch long skull of an animal
この動物の頭蓋骨は45cm あります
09:08
that was probably seven or eight feet, sprawled like a lizard,
体長はおそらく 2~2.5m
体つきはトカゲで
09:12
probably had a head like a lion.
頭部はおそらくライオンのようでした
09:16
This is the top carnivore, the T-Rex of its time.
最強の食肉種 ティラノサウルス級です
09:18
But there's lots of stuff.
さらに多くの物があります
09:20
This is my poor son, Patrick.
私のかわいそうな息子のパトリック
09:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:24
This is called paleontological child abuse.
古生物学的子供のいじめです
09:25
Hold still, you're the scale.
じっとして 寸法代わりだから
09:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:30
There was big stuff back then.
当時 巨大な生物が存在しました
09:36
Fifty-five species of mammal-like reptiles.
哺乳類に似た爬虫類が 55種確認されました
09:39
The age of mammals had well and truly started
哺乳類の時代が 2.5億年前に
09:42
250 million years ago ...
始まったのも束の間
09:45
... and then a catastrophe happened.
大変動が起きたのです
09:47
And what happens next is the age of dinosaurs.
次に来たのは恐竜の時代です
09:50
It was all a mistake; it should have never happened. But it did.
全ては間違いでした
起きてはならない事が起きたのです
09:52
Now, luckily,
しかし幸いにも―
09:56
this Thrinaxodon, the size of a robin egg here:
これはトリナクソドン
コマドリの卵位の大きさです
09:58
this is a skull I've discovered just before taking this picture --
この写真を撮る直前に私が発見しました
10:01
there's a pen for scale; it's really tiny --
ペンと比べると とても小さいです
10:04
this is in the Lower Triassic, after the mass extinction has finished.
三畳紀前期は大量絶滅が終わった後です
10:06
You can see the eye socket and you can see the little teeth in the front.
眼窩と鼻先にある小さな歯が見えます
10:10
If that does not survive, I'm not the thing giving this talk.
もしこいつが存続しなかったら
私はここで講演していません
10:13
Something else is, because if that doesn't survive, we are not here;
つまりこいつが存続しなかったら
私たち人類は存在しないのです
10:18
there are no mammals. It's that close; one species ekes through.
哺乳類は存在しません 実に際どい
存続は この種のおかげです
10:22
Well, can we say anything about the pattern of who survives and who doesn't?
では誰が存続して 誰がしなかったか
何かパターンはあるのでしょうか?
10:26
Here's sort of the end of that 10 years of work.
それが私の10年間に及ぶ研究の成果です
10:29
The ranges of stuff -- the red line is the mass extinction.
様々なことがあります
赤い線が大量絶滅ですが
10:31
But we've got survivors and things that get through,
生存して乗り越えた者もいます
10:34
and it turns out the things that get through preferentially are cold bloods.
分かったのは乗り越えた者は
どちらかというと冷血動物です
10:36
Warm-blooded animals take a huge hit at this time.
温血動物はこの時期ほぼ淘汰されました
10:40
The survivors that do get through
乗り越えた生存者たちは
10:45
produce this world of crocodile-like creatures.
ワニのような生物が取り囲む世界を形成しました
10:47
There's no dinosaurs yet; just this slow, saurian, scaly, nasty,
恐竜は まだ出現せず ただゆっくり動く
トカゲのように鱗を持った醜い動物たちが
10:50
swampy place with a couple of tiny mammals hiding in the fringes.
湿地帯を取り囲み周辺に わずかだけ
哺乳類が隠れ棲んでいました
10:54
And there they would hide for 160 million years,
そこで哺乳類は 1.6億年間隠れ続けるのです
10:59
until liberated by that K-T asteroid.
そしてK-T隕石により解放されました
11:02
So, if not impact, what?
衝突説以外に説明はないでしょうか?
あります
11:05
And the what, I think, is that we returned, over and over again,
地球は先カンブリア時代 のような
微生物時代に戻るたびに
11:07
to the Pre-Cambrian world, that first microbial age,
大量絶滅が起きたのではないかと
11:11
and the microbes are still out there.
そしてその微生物は依然存在します
11:14
They hate we animals.
微生物は動物が嫌いです
11:16
They really want their world back.
微生物の世界を復活させたいのです
11:18
And they've tried over and over and over again.
復活しようと何度も試みたのです
11:20
This suggests to me that life causing these mass extinctions
つまり大量絶滅は生命が原因で
11:24
because it did is inherently anti-Gaian.
起きたことは本質的に反ガイア的です
11:27
This whole Gaia idea, that life makes the world better for itself --
生命体が働きかけて世界を
良くするというガイア的な考え―
11:30
anybody been on a freeway on a Friday afternoon in Los Angeles
金曜午後にロスアンジェルスの
高速道路を走行した人で
11:35
believing in the Gaia theory? No.
ガイア理論を信じる人います? いません
11:39
So, I really suspect there's an alternative,
そこで私は代替案があると思うのです
11:41
and that life does actually try to do itself in --
生命体は実は自滅しあうことがあります
11:44
not consciously, but just because it does.
無意識的にそうするのです
11:46
And here's the weapon, it seems, that it did so over the last 500 million years.
これが5億年間使用してきた
武器と思われるものです
11:48
There are microbes which, through their metabolism,
微生物の中には代謝により
硫化水素を
11:52
produce hydrogen sulfide,
発生するものがいます
11:55
and they do so in large amounts.
しかも大量に発生します
11:57
Hydrogen sulfide is very fatal to we humans.
硫化水素は私たち人間にとっては致死性が高いです
12:00
As small as 200 parts per million will kill you.
わずか200ppmでも死亡に至ります
12:03
You only have to go to the Black Sea and a few other places -- some lakes --
黒海やその他 数か所の湖に行くと
12:09
and get down, and you'll find that the water itself turns purple.
水面が紫色に染まるのを見られます
12:13
It turns purple from the presence of numerous microbes
紫色になるのは 日光と硫化水素を栄養源とする
12:17
which have to have sunlight and have to have hydrogen sulfide,
多くの微生物が存在するからです
12:20
and we can detect their presence today -- we can see them --
今日その存在が確認できます 実際に見えます
12:23
but we can also detect their presence in the past.
しかも過去に それらの微生物が
12:27
And the last three years have seen
存在したことが確認できます
過去3年の間に
12:29
an enormous breakthrough in a brand-new field.
全く新しい分野で革新的進歩がありました
12:31
I am almost extinct --
私は絶滅危惧種です
12:34
I'm a paleontologist who collects fossils.
私は化石を収集する古生物学者です
12:36
But the new wave of paleontologists -- my graduate students --
しかし私の学院生など新種の古生物学者は
12:38
collect biomarkers.
生体指標を収集します
12:41
They take the sediment itself, they extract the oil from it,
彼らは堆積岩を収集しそれから直接
油性物質を抽出します
12:43
and from that they can produce compounds
それから特定の微生物群の
12:47
which turn out to be very specific to particular microbial groups.
特徴を持つ化合物を生成できるのです
12:49
It's because lipids are so tough, they can get preserved in sediment
脂質はとても強いため堆積岩の中で
12:53
and last the hundreds of millions of years necessary,
何百万年もの間保存されます
12:57
and be extracted and tell us who was there.
抽出後そこに誰がいたか分かります
13:00
And we know who was there. At the end of the Permian,
そうして特定できました ペルム紀の終わり
13:02
at many of these mass extinction boundaries,
大量絶滅境界の多くで
13:05
this is what we find: isorenieratene. It's very specific.
我々が発見したのはイソレニエラテン
とても特有です
13:07
It can only occur if the surface of the ocean has no oxygen,
海面に酸素がなくて硫化水素が
13:11
and is totally saturated with hydrogen sulfide --
溶液から気化する位 充満する
13:15
enough, for instance, to come out of solution.
条件でのみ発見できるのです
13:18
This led Lee Kump, and others from Penn State and my group,
これに基づきペンシルバニア州立大学の
リー・カンプはじめ私のグループは
13:21
to propose what I call the Kump Hypothesis:
カンプ仮説と呼ぶ 次の提言をしました
13:25
many of the mass extinctions were caused by lowering oxygen,
大量絶滅の多くは高濃度二酸化炭素により
13:28
by high CO2. And the worst effect of global warming, it turns out:
酸素が減り地球温暖化の最悪の結果として
13:31
hydrogen sulfide being produced out of the oceans.
海洋から硫化水素が発生したことである
13:35
Well, what's the source of this?
この証拠は どこにあるのか?
13:38
In this particular case, the source over and over has been flood basalts.
この特定の事例についての
手掛りは常に洪水玄武岩です
13:40
This is a view of the Earth now, if we extract a lot of it.
これは地球の現在の姿です
大部分を取り除くと
13:44
And each of these looks like a hydrogen bomb;
水素爆弾のような形になります
13:47
actually, the effects are even worse.
実は影響はもっとひどいのです
13:49
This is when deep-Earth material comes to the surface,
こうなるのは地球内部深くにある物質が
13:51
spreads out over the surface of the planet.
地上に達し地上に広がった時です
13:54
Well, it's not the lava that kills anything,
溶岩流が直接の死因ではありません
13:56
it's the carbon dioxide that comes out with it.
一緒に放出される二酸化炭素のせいです
13:59
This isn't Volvos; this is volcanoes.
これはボルボでなくて火山です
14:01
But carbon dioxide is carbon dioxide.
でも二酸化炭素は二酸化炭素です
14:04
So, these are new data Rob Berner and I -- from Yale -- put together,
そしてエール大学のロブ・バーナーと
14:07
and what we try to do now is
私が収集したデータがあり
14:10
track the amount of carbon dioxide in the entire rock record --
それに基づき 色々な方法を駆使して
14:12
and we can do this from a variety of means --
岩石全体の記録から二酸化炭素の量を把握し
14:15
and put all the red lines here,
私が温暖化大量絶滅と呼ぶ
14:18
when these -- what I call greenhouse mass extinctions -- took place.
絶滅が起きた赤い線の状況を分析しました
14:20
And there's two things that are really evident here to me,
極めて明確な事実を2つ発見しました
14:23
is that these extinctions take place when CO2 is going up.
これらの絶滅は二酸化炭素が
上昇している時期に起きたこと
14:25
But the second thing that's not shown on here:
そして二つ目は ここにはありませんが
14:28
the Earth has never had any ice on it
二酸化炭素が 1,000ppmを
14:31
when we've had 1,000 parts per million CO2.
超した時期は地球には
氷が存在しなかったことです
14:34
We are at 380 and climbing.
現在 380ppmで上昇中です
14:38
We should be up to a thousand in three centuries at the most,
今後3世紀もすれば 1,000ppmに達するでしょう
14:40
but my friend David Battisti in Seattle says he thinks a 100 years.
しかしシアトルの友人デイビッド・
バッティスティの意見は 100年です
14:43
So, there goes the ice caps,
やがて氷がすべて解けます
14:47
and there comes 240 feet of sea level rise.
すると海面が70メートル上昇します
14:49
I live in a view house now;
私の家は高台にありますが
14:53
I'm going to have waterfront.
やがて海岸沿いになるでしょう
14:55
All right, what's the consequence? The oceans probably turn purple.
さて結末は何でしょう?
海洋は恐らく紫色になるでしょう
14:57
And we think this is the reason that complexity took so long
私たちは これが高等な生命が発展するのに
15:01
to take place on planet Earth.
長期間要した理由と考えます
15:04
We had these hydrogen sulfide oceans for a very great long period.
極めて長期間 海洋は硫化水素に満ちていました
15:06
They stop complex life from existing.
そのために高度な生命が存在しなかったのです
15:09
We know hydrogen sulfide is erupting presently a few places on the planet.
硫化水素は今でも地球上の
数か所で噴出し続けています
15:13
And I throw this slide in -- this is me, actually, two months ago --
これは2カ月前に撮った私の写真です
15:18
and I throw this slide in because here is my favorite animal, chambered nautilus.
お気に入りの動物 オウムガイと
一緒なのでお見せしました
15:22
It's been on this planet since the animals first started -- 500 million years.
この動物は5億年の太古から生存しています
15:26
This is a tracking experiment, and any of you scuba divers,
追跡調査をしている所です
スキューバ・ダイバーにとって
15:30
if you want to get involved in one of the coolest projects ever,
最高のプロジェクトに参加したいなら これです
15:33
this is off the Great Barrier Reef.
ここはグレート・バリア・リーフの近くです
15:36
And as we speak now,
そしてこの瞬間にも
15:38
these nautilus are tracking out their behaviors to us.
オウムガイは彼らの軌跡を私たちに伝えてくれるのです
15:39
But the thing about this is that every once in a while
ただし時折ダイバーには
15:42
we divers can run into trouble,
危険が待ち受けています
15:46
so I'm going to do a little thought experiment here.
少し考えてみましょう
15:48
This is a Great White Shark that ate some of my traps.
仕掛けを食いちぎったホウジロザメです
15:50
We pulled it up; up it comes. So, it's out there with me at night.
釣り上げたところです
夜になってもサメがいます
15:53
So, I'm swimming along, and it takes off my leg.
泳いでいた私は脚を
食いちぎられたとします
15:56
I'm 80 miles from shore, what's going to happen to me?
海岸から 120キロ離れています
私はどうなるのでしょう?
15:59
Well now, I die.
死ぬでしょう
16:02
Five years from now, this is what I hope happens to me:
今から5年後 こうなると期待します
16:04
I'm taken back to the boat, I'm given a gas mask:
船に引き上げられ ガスマスクが被せられます
16:06
80 parts per million hydrogen sulfide.
80ppmの硫化水素を吸入します
16:09
I'm then thrown in an ice pond, I'm cooled 15 degrees lower
そして氷水につけられます
体温が15度低下した状態で
16:12
and I could be taken to a critical care hospital.
救命救急病院に搬送されます
16:16
And the reason I could do that is because we mammals
これが可能な理由は私たち哺乳類は
16:20
have gone through a series of these hydrogen sulfide events,
これまで幾多の硫化水素放出を経験してきたので
16:22
and our bodies have adapted.
身体が適応しているからです
16:25
And we can now use this as what I think will be a major medical breakthrough.
実現すれば大きな医療革新になるでしょう
16:27
This is Mark Roth. He was funded by DARPA.
マーク・ロスです 国防総省国防高等研究事業局
(DARPA)の
16:31
Tried to figure out how to save Americans after battlefield injuries.
依頼を受け戦場で負傷した
米兵を救う研究をしています
16:33
He bleeds out pigs.
豚を失血させます
16:37
He puts in 80 parts per million hydrogen sulfide --
80ppmの硫化水素を投与します
16:39
the same stuff that survived these past mass extinctions --
過去の大量絶滅を生き延びたのと同じ条件です
16:42
and he turns a mammal into a reptile.
哺乳類が爬虫類に変身します
16:45
"I believe we are seeing in this response the result of mammals and reptiles
“この反応こそ哺乳類と爬虫類が何度となく
16:47
having undergone a series of exposures to H2S."
硫化水素に触れてきた結果だと確信します”
16:51
I got this email from him two years ago;
このEメールは2年前に受け取ったものです 彼曰く
16:54
he said, "I think I've got an answer to some of your questions."
“いくつかの質問に答えが出たと思う”
16:56
So, he now has taken mice down
彼は今ではネズミで実験をしています
16:59
for as many as four hours, sometimes six hours,
実験は4時間から時には6時間に及びます
17:01
and these are brand-new data he sent me on the way over here.
ここに移動中に もらった最新のデータです
17:05
On the top, now, that is a temperature record of a mouse who has gone through --
一番上の線は実験中の普通のネズミの体温です
17:07
the dotted line, the temperatures.
点線は実験中の室温を示します
17:12
So, the temperature starts at 25 centigrade,
室温は 25℃から段々と低下し始めます
17:14
and down it goes, down it goes.
室温は 25℃から段々と低下し始めます
17:16
Six hours later, up goes the temperature.
そして6時間後上昇し元に戻ります
17:17
Now, the same mouse is given 80 parts per million hydrogen sulfide
さて同じネズミに 80ppm の硫化水素を投与します
17:19
in this solid graph,
そのグラフが実線です
17:24
and look what happens to its temperature.
体温がどうなるか見てください
17:26
Its temperature drops.
体温が低下します
17:28
It goes down to 15 degrees centigrade from 35,
35℃から 15℃まで下がります
17:30
and comes out of this perfectly fine.
そして 異常なく回復するのです
17:34
Here is a way we can get people to critical care.
これが人を救命救急施設に搬送する方法です
17:37
Here's how we can bring people cold enough to last till we get critical care.
こうすれば低い体温を維持しながら
救命救急施設に搬送できるのです
17:40
Now, you're all thinking, yeah, what about the brain tissue?
皆さん思っていることでしょう
脳組織は大丈夫なのかと
17:46
And so this is one of the great challenges that is going to happen.
克服すべき大きな問題になるでしょう
17:50
You're in an accident. You've got two choices:
事故に遭ったとします 選択肢は二つです
17:53
you're going to die, or you're going to take the hydrogen sulfide
死ぬか 硫化水素を吸引して
例えば75%の確率で
17:55
and, say, 75 percent of you is saved, mentally.
精神上は生き残るか
17:58
What are you going to do?
あなただったら どうしますか?
18:01
Do we all have to have a little button saying, Let me die?
死ぬ意思を示す小さな
バッジを持ち歩くのでしょうか?
18:03
This is coming towards us,
やがて この時代がやってくるのです
18:06
and I think this is going to be a revolution.
まさに革命的になるでしょう
18:08
We're going to save lives, but there's going to be a cost to it.
生命を救えますが コストもあります
18:10
The new view of mass extinctions is, yes, we were hit,
大量絶滅の新発見は 確かに衝突があり
18:13
and, yes, we have to think about the long term,
そして長期的観点も必要なことです
18:15
because we will get hit again.
将来また衝突があるでしょう
18:17
But there's a far worse danger confronting us.
しかし私たちは もっと重大な危険に瀕しています
18:19
We can easily go back to the hydrogen sulfide world.
硫化水素の世界に 簡単に逆戻りし兼ねません
18:21
Give us a few millennia --
何千年もすれば―
18:24
and we humans should last those few millennia --
今後何千間人類は存続するでしょうが―
18:26
will it happen again? If we continue, it'll happen again.
それが再び繰返すのでしょうか
私たちがこのまま進めば繰返します
18:28
How many of us flew here?
ここに来るのに何人が飛行機を使いましたか?
18:32
How many of us have gone through
私たち何人が今年飛行機を
18:34
our entire Kyoto quota
利用しただけで京都議定書の排出枠を
18:36
just for flying this year?
使い切りましたか?
18:39
How many of you have exceeded it? Yeah, I've certainly exceeded it.
何人が超えましたか?
私は間違いなく超えました
18:41
We have a huge problem facing us as a species.
私たちは種として巨大な問題に直面しています
18:44
We have to beat this.
それに勝たねばなりません
18:47
I want to be able to go back to this reef. Thank you.
私はこのサンゴ礁に戻りたいです
ありがとうございます
18:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:53
Chris Anderson: I've just got one question for you, Peter.
ひとつだけ質問があります
18:59
Am I understanding you right, that what you're saying here
あなたが言っていることは
19:01
is that we have in our own bodies
私たちの体内に硫化水素への
19:03
a biochemical response to hydrogen sulfide
生化学的な反応が埋め込まれており
19:05
that in your mind proves that there have been past mass extinctions
それが過去の大量絶滅は気象変動が
19:09
due to climate change?
原因とする証拠だというのですか?
19:12
Peter Ward: Yeah, every single cell in us
はい 私たちの細胞には危機的状況に
19:14
can produce minute quantities of hydrogen sulfide in great crises.
直面すると微量の硫化水素を
放出する能力が備わっています
19:16
This is what Roth has found out.
ロスが発見しました
19:20
So, what we're looking at now: does it leave a signal?
そこで今研究しているのは
その形跡を発見できるか?
19:21
Does it leave a signal in bone or in plant?
骨や植物の中にその形跡があるか?
19:23
And we go back to the fossil record and we could try to detect
化石をさらに調査して
過去に そのような出来事が
19:25
how many of these have happened in the past.
何回あったか研究しています
19:28
CA: It's simultaneously
信じられない医療技術です
19:30
an incredible medical technique, but also a terrifying ...
しかし同時に恐ろしい...
19:32
PW: Blessing and curse.
福音であり 呪縛です
19:35
Translator:Akira Kan
Reviewer:Jarred Tucker

sponsored links

Peter Ward - Paleontologist
Peter D. Ward studies life on Earth -- where it came from, how it might end, and how utterly rare it might be.

Why you should listen

Paleontologist and astrobiologist Peter D. Ward studies the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event (the one that killed the dinosaurs) and other mass extinctions. He is a leader in the intriguing new field of astrobiology, the study of the origin, distribution and evolution of life in the universe.

In his book Rare Earth he theorizes that complex life itself is so rare, it's quite possible that Earth is the only planet that has any. But, he theorizes, simple life may exist elsewhere -- and possibly be more common than we think.

His upcoming book, The Medea Hypothesis, makes a bold argument that even here on Earth, life has come close to being wiped out several times. Contrary to the "Gaia hypothesis" of a self-balancing, self-perpetuating circle of life, Ward's Medea hypothesis details the scary number of times that life has come close to flatlining, whether due to comet strikes or an overabundance of bacteria.

In March 2009, Ward's 8-hour television series, Animal Armageddon, premieres on Animal Planet Network.

In April 2013, Ward published a surprisingly moving essay about his life's obsession: the chambered nautilus >>

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.