sponsored links
TED2003

Sherwin Nuland: The extraordinary power of ordinary people

シャーウィン・ヌーランド: 普通の人々の素晴らしい力

February 2, 2003

外科医であり作家でもあるシャーウィン・ヌーランドは、希望 ― つまり、自己と世界をより良くしたいという願望について思考を巡らせます。これからについて考えさせられる、思考に富んだ12分間です。

Sherwin Nuland - Doctor
A practicing surgeon for three decades, Sherwin Nuland witnessed life and death in every variety. Then he turned to writing, exploring what there is to people beyond just anatomy. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
You know, I am so bad at tech
私はテクノロジーに疎いので
00:12
that my daughter -- who is now 41 --
今では41歳の 私の娘が
00:17
when she was five, was overheard by me
5歳のとき 友達に
00:19
to say to a friend of hers,
こう言っているのを
ふと耳にしました
00:22
If it doesn't bleed when you cut it,
「切っても 血が出ないものは
00:24
my daddy doesn't understand it.
パパにはわからないのよ」
00:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:28
So, the assignment I've been given
ですから 私に与えられた課題は
00:29
may be an insuperable obstacle for me,
克服できないものかもしれません
00:31
but I'm certainly going to try.
挑戦しようと思います
00:33
What have I heard
私が この4日間で
耳にしたのは
00:36
during these last four days?
一体何だったでしょうか?
00:38
This is my third visit to TED.
TEDに参加するのは
これが3回目で
00:41
One was to TEDMED, and one, as you've heard,
1つはTEDMED
そしてもう1つは ご存じの通り
00:43
was a regular TED two years ago.
2年前の 通常のTEDでした
00:45
I've heard what I consider an extraordinary thing
私が今回耳にしたのは
素晴らしいことでした―
00:47
that I've only heard a little bit in the two previous TEDs,
先の2回のTEDでは 少ししか
取り上げられていなかったことです
00:50
and what that is is an interweaving
社会的責任とでも
言うべき感覚が
00:54
and an interlarding, an intermixing,
実に多くのトークに
00:57
of a sense of social responsibility
入り交じり 織り込まれ
01:00
in so many of the talks --
混ざり合っていたのです―
01:03
global responsibility, in fact,
国際的な責任とも言える それは
01:06
appealing to enlightened self-interest,
啓発された利己心に
訴えるものでありながら
01:09
but it goes far beyond enlightened self-interest.
それ以上のものでした
01:13
One of the most impressive things
おそらく10人位の
01:17
about what some, perhaps 10,
講演者が話してきたことで
01:19
of the speakers have been talking about
最も印象的だったことの1つは
01:22
is the realization, as you listen to them carefully, that they're not saying:
ある気付きです
注意して耳を傾ければ 彼らは
01:25
Well, this is what we should do; this is what I would like you to do.
これをすべきだ これをしてほしい
と言っているのではなく―
01:28
It's: This is what I have done
彼らは 自分がこれを
成し遂げたのは
01:31
because I'm excited by it,
それが わくわくさせられる
01:33
because it's a wonderful thing, and it's done something for me
素晴らしいことであり 何かを
得られるからだと言っているのです
01:35
and, of course, it's accomplished a great deal.
もちろん素晴らしいことを
成し遂げたからでもあります
01:38
It's the old concept, the real Greek concept,
これは昔からある
実にギリシャ的な
01:41
of philanthropy in its original sense:
本来の意味での
「博愛」という考えです
01:44
phil-anthropy, the love of humankind.
「博愛」 つまり人類愛です
01:48
And the only explanation I can have
この4日間 耳にしていること
について
01:51
for some of what you've been hearing in the last four days
私にできる唯一の説明は
01:53
is that it arises, in fact, out of a form of love.
それが一種の愛情に
起因しているということです
01:56
And this gives me enormous hope.
このことは 私に
大きな希望を与えてくれます
02:00
And hope, of course, is the topic
もちろん 希望というのが
02:03
that I'm supposed to be speaking about,
私が話すべき話題なのですが
02:05
which I'd completely forgotten about until I arrived.
ここに到着するまで
完全に忘れていました
02:07
And when I did, I thought,
到着したとき
02:11
well, I'd better look this word up in the dictionary.
この言葉を辞書で調べた方が
いいかもしれないと思いました
02:13
So, Sarah and I -- my wife -- walked over to the public library,
そこで私は妻のサラと
公共図書館へと向かいました
02:16
which is four blocks away, on Pacific Street, and we got the OED,
4ブロック先のパシフィック通りにあります
02:19
and we looked in there, and there are 14 definitions of hope,
オックスフォード英語辞典で調べると
「希望」には14の定義がありましたが
02:23
none of which really hits you
どれも しっくりきません
02:27
between the eyes as being the appropriate one.
適切と思えるものがないのです
02:30
And, of course, that makes sense,
それも そのはずで
02:33
because hope is an abstract phenomenon; it's an abstract idea,
というのも 「希望」は
抽象的な現象・概念であり
02:35
it's not a concrete word.
具体的な単語ではないからです
02:38
Well, it reminds me a little bit of surgery.
これによって 少し手術のことを
思い出します
02:41
If there's one operation for a disease, you know it works.
1つの病気に対して
1つの手術であれば 効くとわかりますが
02:44
If there are 15 operations, you know that none of them work.
15も手術があれば
どれもうまくいかないのだと思うでしょう
02:48
And that's the way it is with definitions of words.
これが言葉の定義にも当てはまります
02:50
If you have appendicitis, they take your appendix out, and you're cured.
虫垂炎ならば
虫垂を摘出すれば治ります
02:53
If you've got reflux oesophagitis, there are 15 procedures,
逆流性食道炎ならば
15もの治療法があり
02:57
and Joe Schmo does it one way
ジョー・シュモーが
ある方法で治療する一方
03:00
and Will Blow does it another way,
ウィル・ブロウは別の方法で
治療を行うものの
03:02
and none of them work, and that's the way it is with this word, hope.
全部うまくいかない
「希望」という言葉もそうなのです
03:04
They all come down to the idea of an expectation
何かいいことがあるはずだという
03:07
of something good that is due to happen.
期待に終始してしまうのです
03:10
And you know what I found out?
私の発見をお教えしましょう
03:13
The Indo-European root of the word hope
インド・ヨーロッパ語の
「希望」という言葉の語源は
03:15
is a stem, K-E-U --
「K-E-U」という語幹にあるのです
03:18
we would spell it K-E-U; it's pronounced koy --
「K-E-U」とつづり
「コイ」と発音するのですが―
03:20
and it is the same root from which the word curve comes from.
これは「カーブ」と同じ語源です
03:25
But what it means in the original Indo-European
ですが もとの
インド・ヨーロッパ語では
03:29
is a change in direction, going in a different way.
方向を変えること 違う道を行くこと
という意味です
03:33
And I find that very interesting and very provocative,
これは 実に興味深く
また挑発的だと思いました
03:37
because what you've been hearing in the last couple of days
というのも この数日で
耳にしたのは
03:40
is the sense of going in different directions:
異なる方向へ行くという
感覚だったからです
03:43
directions that are specific and unique to problems.
各問題に特有であり
独特の方向です
03:47
There are different paradigms.
異なるパラダイムもあるでしょう
03:50
You've heard that word several times in the last four days,
この4日間で何度か
耳にしたことと思いますし
03:52
and everyone's familiar with Kuhnian paradigms.
皆さん クーンによるパラダイムという
考え方をご存知だと思います
03:54
So, when we think of hope now,
ですから 希望について
考えるとき
03:57
we have to think of looking in other directions
私たちは これまでとは
違う方向を
03:59
than we have been looking.
見なければならないのです
04:02
There's another -- not definition, but description, of hope
定義ではありませんが
印象的な
04:05
that has always appealed to me, and it was one by Václav Havel
希望についての説明があります
ヴァーツラフ・ハヴェルのもので―
04:08
in his perfectly spectacular book "Breaking the Peace,"
素晴らしい著作
『平和を乱すということ』において
04:12
in which he says that hope
彼は こう述べています
04:16
does not consist of the expectation that things will
希望とは 物事が
思い通りに進むという
04:18
come out exactly right,
期待ではなく
04:21
but the expectation that they will make sense
いかなる結果であろうとも
何らかの意味をなすはずだという
04:23
regardless of how they come out.
期待のことであると
04:26
I can't tell you how reassured I was
数日前に
ディーン・カメン氏が行った
04:29
by the very last sentence
素晴らしいプレゼンテーションの
04:32
in that glorious presentation by Dean Kamen a few days ago.
最後のひと言で 私は
大変な安堵感を覚えました
04:35
I wasn't sure I heard it right,
正確に聞き取ったのか
04:40
so I found him in one of the inter-sessions.
定かでなかったので
インターセッションで彼を探しました
04:42
He was talking to a very large man, but I didn't care.
彼は体格のよい男性と
話していましたが 割って入り
04:46
I interrupted, and I said, "Did you say this?"
「こうおっしゃいましたか?」
と尋ねると
04:49
He said, "I think so."
「そうです」という答えでした
04:51
So, here's what it is: I'll repeat it.
それを今 ここで繰り返します
04:53
"The world will not be saved by the Internet."
「インターネットには
この世界を救えない」
04:55
It's wonderful. Do you know what the world will be saved by?
素晴らしいですね
何が世界を救うと思いますか?
04:59
I'll tell you. It'll be saved by the human spirit.
それは 人間の精神です
05:03
And by the human spirit, I don't mean anything divine,
しかし 人間の精神と言っても
神がかったものや
05:05
I don't mean anything supernatural --
超自然的なものではありません
05:08
certainly not coming from this skeptic.
私のような懐疑主義者が
そんなことは言いません
05:10
What I mean is this ability
私が言いたいのは
05:14
that each of us has
私たち皆が持っている
05:16
to be something greater than herself or himself;
自分自身よりも
優れたものになろうとする―
05:18
to arise out of our ordinary selves and achieve something
普段の自分から立ち上がり
当初はとても無理だと
05:24
that at the beginning we thought perhaps we were not capable of.
考えていたことを
やってのける能力のことです
05:28
On an elemental level, we have all felt
基本的なレベルでは
私たちは皆 その精神を
05:32
that spirituality at the time of childbirth.
子供が誕生したときに
感じたことがあるでしょう
05:35
Some of you have felt it in laboratories;
ラボの中や
05:38
some of you have felt it at the workbench.
作業台で感じたことが
ある人もいるでしょう
05:40
We feel it at concerts.
コンサートでも感じますね
05:42
I've felt it in the operating room, at the bedside.
私は手術室やベッドのそばで
感じました
05:44
It is an elevation of us beyond ourselves.
私たち自身を超越して
高められるような感覚です
05:47
And I think that it's going to be, in time,
私はそれが そのうちに
05:50
the elements of the human spirit that we've been hearing about
この数日間で 多くの講演者から
少しずつ 耳にしたような
05:54
bit by bit by bit from so many of the speakers in the last few days.
人間の精神の要素に
なるのだと思います
05:58
And if there's anything that has permeated this room,
この会場に 何か
行き渡っているものがあるとすれば
06:03
it is precisely that.
まさしくそれです
06:07
I'm intrigued by
私は 19世紀初めに
06:10
a concept that was brought to life
生まれたある概念に
06:13
in the early part of the 19th century --
興味があります―
06:16
actually, in the second decade of the 19th century --
実際には
1810年代のことですが―
06:18
by a 27-year-old poet
27歳の詩人
06:22
whose name was Percy Shelley.
パーシー・シェリーに
よるものです
06:25
Now, we all think that Shelley
現代では シェリーは
06:27
obviously is the great romantic poet that he was;
偉大なロマン派の詩人
として知られていますが
06:29
many of us tend to forget that he wrote
私たちの多くが 彼は
06:32
some perfectly wonderful essays, too,
素晴らしい散文も
書いたことを忘れがちです
06:37
and the most well-remembered essay
最もよく知られている散文は
06:40
is one called "A Defence of Poetry."
「詩の擁護」という詩論です
06:43
Now, it's about five, six, seven, eight pages long,
これは 5、6、7
いや8ページほどあるもので
06:47
and it gets kind of deep and difficult after about the third page,
3ページ目以降は何やら
深遠で難解になるのですが
06:50
but somewhere on the second page
2ページ目の ある箇所で
06:53
he begins talking about the notion
彼は「道徳的な想像力」と呼ぶ
概念について語り始めます
06:57
that he calls "moral imagination."
彼は「道徳的な想像力」と呼ぶ
概念について語り始めます
07:01
And here's what he says, roughly translated:
大体の解釈ですが
これがその内容です
07:06
A man -- generic man --
人間は―
一般的な人ということですが
07:11
a man, to be greatly good,
人間は
非常に善くあるためには
07:15
must imagine clearly.
明確に想像しなければならない
07:18
He must see himself and the world
自分自身と世界を
07:21
through the eyes of another,
別の誰か そして多くの他者の
07:26
and of many others.
視点から見なければならない
07:29
See himself and the world -- not just the world, but see himself.
自分自身と世界を見るのです―
世界だけでなく 自分をも
07:34
What is it that is expected of us
私たちが 何億人もの人々から
07:40
by the billions of people
期待されていること―
07:43
who live in what Laurie Garrett the other day
ローリー・ギャレットが 先日
非常に的確に「絶望と不平等」と
07:46
so appropriately called
述べたもののうちに
生きる人々から
07:49
despair and disparity?
一体何を期待されているのでしょう?
07:51
What is it that they have every right
彼らが私たちに
求めることのできるものとは
07:53
to ask of us?
一体何でしょうか?
07:57
What is it that we have every right to ask of ourselves,
私たちが人間性と
人間の精神に基づき
07:59
out of our shared humanity and out of the human spirit?
自らに求めることの
できるものとは何でしょうか?
08:03
Well, you know precisely what it is.
皆さんはご存じですね
08:08
There's a great deal of argument
アメリカが
08:11
about whether we, as the great nation that we are,
大国として
世界の警察―
08:13
should be the policeman of the world,
世界の保安隊となるべきか
08:17
the world's constabulary,
という議論がよくなされますが
08:20
but there should be virtually no argument
私たちが世界を
癒やすべきかについて
08:23
about whether we should be the world's healer.
議論などすべきではないのです
08:27
There has certainly been no argument about that
この4日間 この会場で
08:32
in this room in the past four days.
そんな議論は
全くなされませんでした
08:35
So, if we are to be the world's healer,
私たちが 世界を
癒やすものにならんとするなら
08:39
every disadvantaged person in this world --
世界のすべての恵まれない人々は
08:42
including in the United States -- becomes our patient.
アメリカの人々も含めて
私たちの患者ということになります
08:45
Every disadvantaged nation, and perhaps our own nation,
もしかすると この国も含めて
すべての恵まれない国家が
08:50
becomes our patient.
私たちの患者になります
08:54
So, it's fun to think about the etymology of the word "patient."
「患者」という言葉の語源を
考えるのも面白いでしょう
08:57
It comes initially from the Latin patior, to endure, or to suffer.
ラテン語の“patior” に由来し
「耐え忍ぶ」あるいは「苦しむ」の意味です
09:02
So, you go back to the old Indo-European root again,
古いインド・ヨーロッパ語の
語源に戻ると
09:11
and what do you find? The Indo-European stem is pronounced payen --
何がわかるでしょう?
語幹は「ペイェン」と発音され
09:14
we would spell it P-A-E-N -- and, lo and behold, mirabile dictu,
“P-A-E-N” と綴るのですが―
驚いたことに
09:18
it is the same root as the word compassion comes from, P-A-E-N.
これは「思いやり」という言葉の
語源と同じなのです
09:23
So, the lesson is very clear. The lesson is that our patient --
教訓は明らかですね
私たちの患者―
09:29
the world, and the disadvantaged of the world --
世界 そして
世界の恵まれない人々は
09:34
that patient deserves our compassion.
私たちの思いやりを
受けるにふさわしいということです
09:38
But beyond our compassion, and far greater than compassion,
しかし 思いやり以上に
はるかに大きなことは
09:43
is our moral imagination
道徳的想像力と
09:46
and our identification with each individual
この世界に住む
1人1人を
09:48
who lives in that world,
大きな1つの森だと
09:52
not to think of them as a huge forest,
捉えるのでなく
09:55
but as individual trees.
個々の木である
と捉えることです
09:59
Of course, in this day and age, the trick is not to let each tree
もちろん こんな時代に
個々の木を
10:02
be obscured by that Bush in Washington that can get --
ワシントンのブッシュ(茂み)に
覆われないようにするのは
10:06
can get in the way.
大変ですが
10:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:12
So, here we are.
さて 私たちは
10:14
We are, should be,
道徳的に
10:16
morally committed to
世界を癒やすものに
10:19
being the healer of the world.
ならんと努力せねばなりません
10:22
And we have had examples over and over and over again --
私たちは いくつもの例を
何度も目にしてきました
10:26
you've just heard one in the last 15 minutes --
たった今 この15分間で
聞いているのもそうです
10:30
of people who have not only had that commitment,
努力せんと決意を
固めただけでなく
10:34
but had the charisma, the brilliance --
カリスマ性 才能を
持っている人々―
10:38
and I think in this room it's easy to use the word brilliant, my God --
この会場では「才能」という言葉
を使うのは実に簡単ですね
10:40
the brilliance to succeed at least at the beginning
自らの探求の
少なくとも最初は
10:44
of their quest,
成功する才能
10:48
and who no doubt will continue to succeed,
そして 自らの動機に
賛同する人が 増えていく限り
10:50
as long as more and more of us enlist ourselves in their cause.
その成功を信じて疑わない
人々の例です
10:53
Now, if we're talking
さて 今私たちは
10:58
about medicine,
医療について―
11:01
and we're talking about healing,
癒やすことについて
話していますので
11:03
I'd like to quote someone who hasn't been quoted.
ぜひ引用したい人がいます
11:06
It seems to me everybody in the world's been quoted here:
世界中の全員が
引用されたような感じですね
11:10
Pogo's been quoted;
ポゴが引用され
11:12
Shakespeare's been quoted backwards, forwards, inside out.
シェイクスピアもあらゆる角度から
すべて引用されています
11:14
I would like to quote one of my own household gods.
私の分野で よく知られた
偉人の1人を引用したいと思います
11:18
I suspect he never really said this,
本当にそう言ったのかは
疑問ですが
11:21
because we don't know what Hippocrates really said,
ヒポクラテスでさえ
実際のところはわかりませんから
11:24
but we do know for sure that one of the great Greek physicians
ですが ギリシャの偉大な医者の
1人が次のように述べたことは
11:27
said the following,
確かです
11:30
and it has been recorded in one of the books attributed to Hippocrates,
ヒッポクラテスの著作とされる本
にも記録されています
11:33
and the book is called "Precepts."
『指針』という本です
11:36
And I'll read you what it is.
ここで 読みたいと思います
11:38
Remember, I have been talking about,
私は 本来 博愛について
11:41
essentially philanthropy:
話していることを
心に留めていただきたい
11:44
the love of humankind, the individual humankind
人間同士の愛―
一個人としての人間です
11:46
and the individual humankind
そして 1人の人間は
11:51
that can bring that kind of love
そういった愛情を
11:53
translated into action,
行動に変えることができ
11:55
translated, in some cases, into enlightened self-interest.
啓発された利己心へと
変えることもあるのです
11:58
And here he is, 2,400 years ago:
その人物の2,400年前の言葉です
12:01
"Where there is love of humankind,
「人類の愛がある所には
12:06
there is love of healing."
愛という癒やしが存在する」
12:10
We have seen that here today
今日 私たちはそれを
12:13
with the sense,
認識し
12:16
with the sensitivity --
感じました―
12:18
and in the last three days,
そして この3日間
12:21
and with the power of the indomitable human spirit.
不屈の人間の精神力で
それを目の当たりにしたのです
12:23
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございます
12:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:29
Translator:Natsuno Kamiya
Reviewer:Moe Shoji

sponsored links

Sherwin Nuland - Doctor
A practicing surgeon for three decades, Sherwin Nuland witnessed life and death in every variety. Then he turned to writing, exploring what there is to people beyond just anatomy.

Why you should listen

Sherwin Nuland was a practicing surgeon for 30 years and treated more than 10,000 patients -- then became an author and speaker on topics no smaller than life and death, our minds, our morality, aging and the human spirit.

His 1994 book How We Die: Reflections of Life's Final Chapter demythologizes the process of dying. Through stories of real patients and his own family, he examines the seven most common causes of death: old age, cancer, AIDS, Alzheimer's, accidents, heart disease and stroke, and their effects. The book, one of more than a dozen he wrote, won the National Book Award, was a finalist for the Pultizer Prize, and spent 34 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list. Other books include How We Live, The Art of Aging: A Doctor's Prescription for Well-Being; and The Soul of Medicine: Tales from the Bedside.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.