sponsored links
TED2009

Barry Schwartz: Our loss of wisdom

バリー・シュワルツ「知恵の喪失」

February 7, 2009

バリー・シュワルツは官僚主義を突き詰め、破綻の道を進む社会の特効薬として「実践知」が必要だと提唱する。規則は役に立たず、よかれと思って与えるインセンティブは裏目となり、そして、実際的で日々の糧となるような知恵こそ世界を再建するのだとバリーは力強く説く。

Barry Schwartz - Psychologist
Barry Schwartz studies the link between economics and psychology, offering startling insights into modern life. Lately, working with Ken Sharpe, he's studying wisdom. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
In his inaugural address,
就任演説の中で
00:16
Barack Obama appealed to each of us to give our best
現在、直面している財政危機から抜け出そうと必死になっている我々に向かって
00:18
as we try to extricate ourselves from this current financial crisis.
オバマ大統領は1人1人がベストを尽くすよう訴えかけました
00:22
But what did he appeal to?
でも彼は一体何を私たちに訴えたのでしょうか
00:28
He did not, happily, follow in the footsteps of his predecessor,
幸いにも、彼は前大統領とは違い
00:30
and tell us to just go shopping.
買い物に行きましょうだとか
00:34
Nor did he tell us, "Trust us. Trust your country.
「我々と我が国を信頼してほしい」
00:38
Invest, invest, invest."
「そして投資し続けよう!」とは言いませんでした
00:42
Instead, what he told us was to put aside childish things.
オバマ大統領はそんな子供じみたことはやめようと
00:46
And he appealed to virtue.
人間の美徳に訴えかけました
00:51
Virtue is an old-fashioned word.
美徳とは古めかしい言葉です
00:55
It seems a little out of place in a cutting-edge environment like this one.
TEDのような最先端の環境においては場違いな言葉かもしれません
00:59
And besides, some of you might be wondering,
それに皆さんの中には美徳って一体どんな
01:04
what the hell does it mean?
意味があるんだ?と思う方がいるかもしれない
01:07
Let me begin with an example.
1つ例を挙げてみましょう
01:10
This is the job description of a hospital janitor
いまスクリーンに流れているのは
01:13
that is scrolling up on the screen.
病院の清掃員の職務明細書です
01:16
And all of the items on it are unremarkable.
ここに書いてある項目はどれも珍しいものではありません
01:19
They're the things you would expect:
誰もが予想する内容です
01:24
mop the floors, sweep them, empty the trash, restock the cabinets.
床をモップで拭く、掃く、ゴミ捨て、棚の整理
01:27
It may be a little surprising how many things there are,
数の多さに多少驚くかもしれませんが
01:32
but it's not surprising what they are.
内容自体は至って普通です
01:35
But the one thing I want you to notice about them is this:
この中で1つだけ気付いていただきたいことは
01:37
even though this is a very long list,
このとても長い職務リストの中に
01:40
there isn't a single thing on it that involves other human beings.
他者と関わる仕事が1つもないということです
01:43
Not one.
1つもです
01:48
The janitor's job could just as well be done in a mortuary as in a hospital.
病院内の清掃と霊安室の掃除はさほど変わりないかもしれません
01:51
And yet, when some psychologists interviewed hospital janitors
しかし、病院の清掃員が自分たちの仕事をどう思っているか調査するため
01:56
to get a sense of what they thought their jobs were like,
心理学者が清掃員にインタビューしたところ
02:01
they encountered Mike,
マイクに出会いました
02:04
who told them about how he stopped mopping the floor
マイクはジョーンズさんが体力作りのため少し運動したり
02:07
because Mr. Jones was out of his bed getting a little exercise,
ホールの中で軽いウォーキングをするために
02:10
trying to build up his strength, walking slowly up and down the hall.
床のモップがけをやめたと心理学者に語りました
02:13
And Charlene told them about how she ignored her supervisor's admonition
またシャーリーンは、毎日病院を訪れては1日中患者につきっきりの家族が
02:17
and didn't vacuum the visitor's lounge
待合室でたまたま仮眠を取っていたので
02:23
because there were some family members who were there all day, every day
上司の言いつけを無視して
02:26
who, at this moment, happened to be taking a nap.
待合室に掃除機をかけませんでした
02:29
And then there was Luke,
ルークは昏睡状態にある若者の
02:32
who washed the floor in a comatose young man's room twice
病室を2度掃除した話をしたそうです
02:34
because the man's father, who had been keeping a vigil for six months,
というのは、6ヶ月間寝ずの看病をしていた青年の父親は
02:38
didn't see Luke do it the first time,
ルークが最初に掃除をした時に気付かず
02:43
and his father was angry.
サボっているのではと怒ったのです
02:46
And behavior like this from janitors, from technicians, from nurses
このような清掃員や技師、看護師の行動は
02:48
and, if we're lucky now and then, from doctors,
運が良ければたまにこんな医者もいるでしょうが
02:54
doesn't just make people feel a little better,
周囲の人々の気持ちを少し和らげてくれるだけでなく
02:57
it actually improves the quality of patient care
実際に患者へのケアの質を上げ
03:00
and enables hospitals to run well.
病院の運営も向上させます
03:03
Now, not all janitors are like this, of course.
もちろん清掃員の誰もがこうではありません
03:06
But the ones who are think that these sorts of human interactions
ですが、彼らのような清掃員は人と触れ合いながら優しく気遣い
03:09
involving kindness, care and empathy
思いやることが仕事において必要不可欠な
03:15
are an essential part of the job.
部分だと考えているのです
03:18
And yet their job description contains not one word about other human beings.
にもかかわらず職務明細書には他者を示唆する言葉は1つとして出てこない
03:20
These janitors have the moral will to do right by other people.
この清掃員たちは他者に対して正しい行いをするという倫理的な意志を持っている
03:25
And beyond this, they have the moral skill to figure out what "doing right" means.
それ以上に、彼らは正しい行いとは何かを判断するための倫理的技術を持っている
03:31
"Practical wisdom," Aristotle told us,
アリストテレスは「実践知とは」
03:38
"is the combination of moral will and moral skill."
「倫理的な意志と技術の組み合わせである」と説いています
03:43
A wise person knows when and how to make the exception to every rule,
清掃員が他の目的を果たすために任務を無視する術を知っていたように
03:46
as the janitors knew when to ignore the job duties in the service of other objectives.
賢い者は規則に例外が必要な場合をわきまえ、そして例外の設け方を知っています
03:53
A wise person knows how to improvise,
ルークが2度床を掃除したように
03:59
as Luke did when he re-washed the floor.
賢い者は即興で演じることができるのです
04:03
Real-world problems are often ambiguous and ill-defined
現実世界の問題の多くは曖昧模糊としており
04:06
and the context is always changing.
文脈は常に変わっていっています
04:09
A wise person is like a jazz musician --
賢い人はジャズミュージシャンのように
04:12
using the notes on the page, but dancing around them,
譜面の音符を読むだけでなく、音符の周りで踊ります
04:15
inventing combinations that are appropriate for the situation and the people at hand.
その場の状況やそこにいる人に適した組み合わせを生み出します
04:18
A wise person knows how to use these moral skills
賢い人は正しい目的のために
04:25
in the service of the right aims.
倫理的な技術を使う方法を知っています
04:28
To serve other people, not to manipulate other people.
他者を操るためではなく、他者に仕えるためにです
04:31
And finally, perhaps most important,
最後に、最も重要な点ですが
04:35
a wise person is made, not born.
生まれながらに賢い人はいない。成長と共に作られるのです
04:38
Wisdom depends on experience,
知恵は経験から生み出されます
04:41
and not just any experience.
でもどんな経験も知恵となるわけではありません
04:44
You need the time to get to know the people that you're serving.
仕えている人について学ぶ時間が必要になります
04:47
You need permission to be allowed to improvise,
相手と即興で演じ、新しいことを試み、時には間違え
04:51
try new things, occasionally to fail and to learn from your failures.
失敗から共に学ぶことを許されなくてはいけません
04:54
And you need to be mentored by wise teachers.
そして賢い先人から教えを乞う必要もあります
04:59
When you ask the janitors who behaved like the ones I described
もし私がお話したような行動を取る清掃員に
05:02
how hard it is to learn to do their job,
仕事を習得するのがどれくらい大変か訊いたら
05:07
they tell you that it takes lots of experience.
多くの経験を要すると答えるでしょう
05:10
And they don't mean it takes lots of experience to learn how to mop floors and empty trash cans.
モップがけやゴミ捨てを覚えるのに多くの経験がいるわけではありません
05:13
It takes lots of experience to learn how to care for people.
他人への思いやりを学ぶのに多くの経験が必要なのです
05:17
At TED, brilliance is rampant.
TEDには類い稀なる才能が溢れています
05:23
It's scary.
恐ろしいほどです
05:27
The good news is you don't need to be brilliant to be wise.
ありがたいのは賢くあるために有能さは必要ではないことです
05:29
The bad news is that without wisdom,
ですが残念なことに、知恵のない
05:34
brilliance isn't enough.
有能さでは不十分です
05:38
It's as likely to get you and other people into trouble as anything else.
頭がよくても知恵がなければ、あなた自身や他人にも迷惑をかけるでしょう
05:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:47
Now, I hope that we all know this.
皆さんにとっては自明のことだと信じています
05:50
There's a sense in which it's obvious,
あまりにも当然だと思っているでしょうが
05:53
and yet, let me tell you a little story.
こんな話をご存知ですか
05:56
It's a story about lemonade.
レモネードについてのお話です
05:59
A dad and his seven-year-old son were watching a Detroit Tigers game at the ballpark.
父親と11歳になる息子が球場でデトロイト・タイガースの試合を見ていました
06:02
His son asked him for some lemonade
息子は父親にレモネードをねだりました
06:08
and Dad went to the concession stand to buy it.
そこで父親は売店へ買いに行きました
06:10
All they had was Mike's Hard Lemonade,
売店にあったのは5%のアルコールが入っている
06:13
which was five percent alcohol.
「マイクのハードレモネード」だけでした
06:16
Dad, being an academic, had no idea that Mike's Hard Lemonade contained alcohol.
学者であった父親は「マイクのハードレモネード」がお酒だとは知らず
06:19
So he brought it back.
それを買って息子のもとに戻りました
06:25
And the kid was drinking it, and a security guard spotted it,
息子がそれを飲んでいると警備員がそれに気付いて
06:28
and called the police, who called an ambulance
警察を呼び、救急車も来て
06:31
that rushed to the ballpark, whisked the kid to the hospital.
息子を病院へ連れて行きました
06:34
The emergency room ascertained that the kid had no alcohol in his blood.
救急治療室でその子の血中からアルコールは検出されないことが確認され
06:37
And they were ready to let the kid go.
病院はその子を退院させようとしましたが
06:41
But not so fast.
ことはそんなにスムーズには運びませんでした
06:44
The Wayne County Child Welfare Protection Agency said no.
ウェイン地区児童福祉保護局がノーと言ったのです
06:47
And the child was sent to a foster home for three days.
子供は児童養護施設に3日間送られてしまいました
06:51
At that point, can the child go home?
この時点で、子供は家へ帰れるのでしょうか?
06:55
Well, a judge said yes, but only if the dad leaves the house and checks into a motel.
裁判官は父親が外泊するならば子供を帰してもよいとしました
06:58
After two weeks, I'm happy to report,
2週間後やっとのことで
07:10
the family was reunited.
この家族は元の生活に戻りました
07:13
But the welfare workers and the ambulance people
しかし児童福祉局も救急隊も裁判官も
07:15
and the judge all said the same thing:
みな一様に同じことを言っていました
07:18
"We hate to do it but we have to follow procedure."
「こんなことしたくはないが決まった手続きに従うしかない」
07:21
How do things like this happen?
こういった事はどうして起こるのでしょうか?
07:25
Scott Simon, who told this story on NPR,
スコット・サイモンはラジオでこの話をし、こんな指摘をしています
07:29
said, "Rules and procedures may be dumb,
「規則自体が私たちに命令してくるわけではないが」
07:33
but they spare you from thinking."
「規則は私たちから考える力を奪ってしまっている」
07:37
And, to be fair, rules are often imposed
規則は得てして強制されますが
07:40
because previous officials have been lax
それは過去の職員の対応が甘く
07:42
and they let a child go back to an abusive household.
子供を虐待のある家庭に戻してしまったからと言ったりします
07:45
Fair enough.
もっともです
07:48
When things go wrong, as of course they do,
よくあることですが、何かが間違った方向にいった時
07:49
we reach for two tools to try to fix them.
私たちは事態を収拾するために2つの方法をとります
07:52
One tool we reach for is rules.
1つは規則
07:56
Better ones, more of them.
よりよい規則を、より多く
07:59
The second tool we reach for is incentives.
2つ目は報奨
08:02
Better ones, more of them.
よりよい報奨を、より多く、です
08:05
What else, after all, is there?
結局、他に一体何があるでしょうか?
08:08
We can certainly see this in response to the current financial crisis.
これは今の経済危機に対する私たちの対処方法にも現れています
08:11
Regulate, regulate, regulate.
規制に規制を重ねていったり
08:16
Fix the incentives, fix the incentives, fix the incentives ...
毎回ちょっと違った報奨を与えます
08:19
The truth is that neither rules nor incentives
しかし、規則も報奨も
08:22
are enough to do the job.
何も変えてはくれません
08:25
How could you even write a rule that got the janitors to do what they did?
あの清掃員がしたようなことを指示する規則をどうやって作れるでしょうか?
08:27
And would you pay them a bonus for being empathic?
他人に思いやりを抱くことでボーナスがもらえるでしょうか?
08:31
It's preposterous on its face.
それでは本末転倒です
08:34
And what happens is that as we turn increasingly to rules,
もし私たちがより規則に依存するようになったら
08:38
rules and incentives may make things better in the short run,
規則や報奨は一時的に状況を改善するかもしれません
08:43
but they create a downward spiral
ですが、長期的には悪化していく
08:47
that makes them worse in the long run.
悪循環を生み出します
08:50
Moral skill is chipped away by an over-reliance on rules
私達は規則に頼りすぎることで
08:52
that deprives us of the opportunity
臨機応変に状況から学ぶ機会を失い
08:57
to improvise and learn from our improvisations.
倫理的技術を衰えさせてしまいます
08:59
And moral will is undermined
また、絶え間なく与えられる報奨という誘惑は
09:02
by an incessant appeal to incentives
私たちの「正しい行為をしたい」という思いを奪い
09:05
that destroy our desire to do the right thing.
倫理的意志は揺らいでいくでしょう
09:08
And without intending it,
そして私たちは無意識に
09:11
by appealing to rules and incentives,
規則や報奨に頼ることで
09:13
we are engaging in a war on wisdom.
知恵に対する戦いに巻き込まれています
09:17
Let me just give you a few examples,
いくつか例を挙げましょう
09:19
first of rules and the war on moral skill.
レモネードの話は規則と倫理的技術をめぐる
09:22
The lemonade story is one.
戦いのいい例です
09:25
Second, no doubt more familiar to you,
アメリカにおける近代教育の性質も
09:27
is the nature of modern American education:
皆さんよくご存知の通りでしょう
09:30
scripted, lock-step curricula.
すべて教科書に指定された横並びのカリキュラム
09:33
Here's an example from Chicago kindergarten.
これはシカゴの幼稚園の例です
09:36
Reading and enjoying literature
「文学と親しみながら」
09:39
and words that begin with 'B.'
「Bで始まる単語を考えます」
09:41
"The Bath:" Assemble students on a rug
「Bath(お風呂)という言葉で子供達を絨毯の上に集め」
09:43
and give students a warning about the dangers of hot water.
「熱湯が危険だと教えます」
09:46
Say 75 items in this script to teach a 25-page picture book.
25ページの絵本に75個のアイテムがあるとします
09:48
All over Chicago in every kindergarten class in the city,
シカゴ中のあらゆる幼稚園ですべての先生が
09:53
every teacher is saying the same words in the same way on the same day.
同じ日に、同じような口調で、同じ単語を言っていることになります
09:56
We know why these scripts are there.
私たちは教師用の教本がどうして必要かわかっています
10:03
We don't trust the judgment of teachers enough
私たちは教師それぞれの解釈や判断を
10:07
to let them loose on their own.
信頼していないからです
10:10
Scripts like these are insurance policies against disaster.
こういった教本は万一の失敗を防ぐための予防策です
10:13
And they prevent disaster.
実際、教本のおかげでひどい事態は免れます
10:16
But what they assure in its place is mediocrity.
しかし教本はあらゆるクラスを凡庸にしてしまいます
10:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:24
Don't get me wrong. We need rules!
どうぞ誤解しないでください。規則は必要です!
10:31
Jazz musicians need some notes --
ジャズミュージシャンも音譜がいります
10:33
most of them need some notes on the page.
ほとんどのジャズミュージシャンが譜面を使います
10:35
We need more rules for the bankers, God knows.
当然、銀行家にはより多くの規則が必要です
10:37
But too many rules prevent accomplished jazz musicians
ですが規則が多過ぎると、熟練したジャズミュージシャンは
10:39
from improvising.
即興しづらくなります
10:43
And as a result, they lose their gifts,
結果、才能を発揮し切れなくなる
10:45
or worse, they stop playing altogether.
それどころか演奏をやめてしまう
10:48
Now, how about incentives?
報奨についてはどうでしょう?
10:51
They seem cleverer.
報奨の方が効果がありそうですね
10:54
If you have one reason for doing something
何かをする動機があったとして
10:56
and I give you a second reason for doing the same thing,
同じことをしてもらうために別の動機を与えるとしたら
10:58
it seems only logical that two reasons are better than one
動機は1つより2つあった方がいいように思えます
11:01
and you're more likely to do it.
動機が2つある方が行動を起こしやすくなるかもしれない
11:04
Right?
そうでしょう?
11:07
Well, not always.
まあ、絶対とは言えませんが
11:09
Sometimes two reasons to do the same thing seem to compete with one another
理由が2つあるとお互いサポートし合うというより
11:11
instead of complimenting,
矛盾してしまう場合がありますから
11:14
and they make people less likely to do it.
そうなると行動しなくなります
11:16
I'll just give you one example because time is racing.
時間が押しているので例を1つだけお話しします
11:19
In Switzerland, back about 15 years ago,
15年前にスイスで
11:22
they were trying to decide where to site nuclear waste dumps.
核廃棄物をどこで処理するか議論していました
11:25
There was going to be a national referendum.
国民投票が実施される際、心理学者は街頭で世論調査をし
11:28
Some psychologists went around and polled citizens who were very well informed.
事態をよく理解している人に「自分の住む地域で」
11:31
And they said, "Would you be willing to have a nuclear waste dump in your community?"
「核廃棄物を引きうけてもよいか?」と尋ねました
11:34
Astonishingly, 50 percent of the citizens said yes.
信じられないことに50%の人がイエスと解答しました
11:37
They knew it was dangerous.
危険を承知の上です
11:42
They thought it would reduce their property values.
所有地の価値が下がるとわかっていましたが
11:44
But it had to go somewhere
どこかで処理する必要があり
11:47
and they had responsibilities as citizens.
それは国民の義務だと考えたのです
11:50
The psychologists asked other people a slightly different question.
心理学者は質問を変えて他の人に聞いてみました
11:53
They said, "If we paid you six weeks' salary every year
毎年6週間分の給与を払ったら自分の地域で
11:57
would you be willing to have a nuclear waste dump in your community?"
核廃棄物を処理しても構わないかと尋ねました
12:00
Two reasons. It's my responsibility and I'm getting paid.
国民の責任とお金、2つの理由ができました
12:04
Instead of 50 percent saying yes,
ところが
12:08
25 percent said yes.
25%の人がイエスと答えただけでした
12:11
What happens is that
なぜかというと
12:14
the second this introduction of incentive gets us
報奨を与えると言った途端、我々は
12:17
so that instead of asking, "What is my responsibility?"
「自分の責任は何か?」と問うのではなく
12:21
all we ask is, "What serves my interests?"
「どんな利益を得られるか」と考えてしまうのです
12:24
When incentives don't work,
報奨の仕組みが機能しない場合
12:27
when CEOs ignore the long-term health of their companies
CEOが膨大なボーナスを出すために短期的な収益を追い求めるあまり
12:29
in pursuit of short-term gains that will lead to massive bonuses,
長期的な会社としての健全さを無視した場合
12:32
the response is always the same.
周りの反応はいつでも同じです
12:36
Get smarter incentives.
よりよい報酬を得ようとします
12:40
The truth is that there are no incentives that you can devise
でも本当は人に満足を与え続けられるに足る
12:44
that are ever going to be smart enough.
十分な報奨の仕組みなどないのです
12:47
Any incentive system can be subverted by bad will.
どんな報奨制度も悪意によって堕落する可能性があります
12:50
We need incentives. People have to make a living.
報奨は必要です。私たちはそれで生計を立てています
12:54
But excessive reliance on incentives
しかし報奨への過度な依存は
12:58
demoralizes professional activity
2つの意味で
13:00
in two senses of that word.
労働から倫理観を奪ってしまいます
13:03
It causes people who engage in that activity to lose morale
まずその仕事をする人の士気を低下させます
13:06
and it causes the activity itself to lose morality.
次に仕事そのものから倫理が失われるのです
13:10
Barack Obama said, before he was inaugurated,
就任前オバマ氏は「利益を生み出すか否かだけでなく」
13:14
"We must ask not just 'Is it profitable?' but 'Is it right?'"
「正しいかどうか判断しなければならない」と言いました
13:19
And when professions are demoralized,
仕事における倫理観が危機にさらされるとき
13:23
everyone in them becomes dependent on -- addicted to -- incentives
その職についている人は報酬に依存し、虜となります
13:26
and they stop asking "Is it right?"
そして「これは正しいのか?」と問わなくなる
13:31
We see this in medicine.
医療の世界でも見られます
13:34
("Although it's nothing serious, let's keep an eye on it to make sure it doesn't turn into a major lawsuit.")
「大したことじゃないが、裁判沙汰にならないように見張っておこう」
13:37
And we certainly see it in the world of business.
同様にビジネスでも見られます
13:41
("In order to remain competitive in today's marketplace, I'm afraid we're going to have to replace you with a sleezeball.")
「今の市場で勝ち抜くためには君じゃなくもっと性格の悪い奴にしないとだめなんだ」
13:43
("I sold my soul for about a tenth of what the damn things are going for now.")
「この茶番の10分の1の価値もないもんに魂を売ってしまった」
13:49
It is obvious that this is not the way people want to do their work.
明らかに誰もこんな風に働きたいとは思っていません
13:54
So what can we do?
では私たちに何ができるでしょうか?
13:57
A few sources of hope:
希望は少しあります
14:00
we ought to try to re-moralize work.
仕事における倫理観を取り戻すことです
14:03
One way not to do it: teach more ethics courses.
ですが倫理の授業を増やしても意味はありません
14:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:12
There is no better way to show people that you're not serious
倫理について伝えるべきことを何でもかんでも
14:15
than to tie up everything you have to say about ethics
学校の授業任せにしてしまうと
14:18
into a little package with a bow and consign it to the margins as an ethics course.
誰も真剣に受け取ってくれなくなります
14:21
What to do instead?
ではどうするか?
14:26
One: Celebrate moral exemplars.
倫理的模範を称えるのです
14:28
Acknowledge, when you go to law school,
実際、ロースクールに行くと
14:32
that a little voice is whispering in your ear
アティカス・フィンチ(架空の理想の弁護士)について
14:35
about Atticus Finch.
みなが囁き合っています
14:38
No 10-year-old goes to law school to do mergers and acquisitions.
10歳児はM&Aのことを学ぶためにロースクールに行きはしません
14:41
People are inspired by moral heroes.
誰もが倫理的な英雄に感銘を受けます
14:44
But we learn that with sophistication
しかし成長と共に、倫理的英雄と崇める人がいることを
14:47
comes the understanding that you can't acknowledge that you have moral heroes.
認めづらくなってきます
14:50
Well, acknowledge them.
どうぞ認めてください
14:54
Be proud that you have them.
心の中の倫理的英雄に誇りを持ってください
14:56
Celebrate them.
倫理的英雄を賞賛してください
14:58
And demand that the people who teach you acknowledge them and celebrate them too.
あなた方の先生にはご自分を認め、讃えるよう伝えてください
15:00
That's one thing we can do.
これが私たちにできることです
15:03
I don't know how many of you remember this:
15年前にポーラテックを作ったマサチューセッツの
15:06
another moral hero, 15 years ago, Aaron Feuerstein,
メルデン・ミルズの代表をやっていた
15:09
who was the head of Malden Mills in Massachusetts --
もう1人の倫理的英雄、アーロン・フェウエルステインを
15:13
they made Polartec --
覚えている人はいますか?
15:16
The factory burned down.
工場が燃えてしまったんですが
15:18
3,000 employees. He kept every one of them on the payroll.
従業員3000人すべてを守りました
15:20
Why? Because it would have been a disaster for them
解雇されたら従業員は路頭に迷い
15:23
and for the community if he had let them go.
コミュニティ全体への打撃も大きいからです
15:26
"Maybe on paper our company is worth less to Wall Street,
「私たちの会社は金融街の連中にとって以前ほど書面上の価値はないかもしれない」
15:29
but I can tell you it's worth more. We're doing fine."
「でも本当は価値は上がってる。ちゃんと経営できてますからね」
15:33
Just at this TED we heard talks from several moral heroes.
ここTEDでも倫理的英雄の皆さんが話してくださいました
15:37
Two were particularly inspiring to me.
特に感銘を受けた話が2つあります
15:41
One was Ray Anderson, who turned --
1つはレイ・アンダーソン
15:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:47
-- turned, you know, a part of the evil empire
"悪の帝国の一味"を一変させ
15:50
into a zero-footprint, or almost zero-footprint business.
地球環境への負担を限りなくゼロに近くしました
15:53
Why? Because it was the right thing to do.
レイはそれが正しいことだからしたのです
15:56
And a bonus he's discovering is
それは思いがけないプレゼントを彼にもたらしました
16:00
he's actually going to make even more money.
より一層の収益を得ることになったのです
16:03
His employees are inspired by the effort.
社員はレイの努力に感動しています
16:06
Why? Because there happy to be doing something that's the right thing to do.
正しい行いをする喜びを知っているからです
16:09
Yesterday we heard Willie Smits talk about re-foresting in Indonesia.
昨日、ウィリー・スミッツがインドネシアの植林運動について話してくれました
16:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:18
In many ways this is the perfect example.
ウィリーの話は正しい行いをしようとする意志が
16:21
Because it took the will to do the right thing.
何をもたらすか示す完璧な例です
16:24
God knows it took a huge amount of technical skill.
膨大な技術力が求められました
16:27
I'm boggled at how much he and his associates needed to know
植林活動を計画するためにウィリー達が必要とした
16:30
in order to plot this out.
知識の量には舌を巻きました
16:33
But most important to make it work --
しかしこの計画を成功させるのに
16:36
and he emphasized this --
最も重要だったのは地域住民を
16:39
is that it took knowing the people in the communities.
理解することだったとウィリーは強調していました
16:41
Unless the people you're working with are behind you,
一緒に働く人と歩調が合っていなければ
16:44
this will fail.
必ず失敗します
16:49
And there isn't a formula to tell you how to get the people behind you,
各コミュニティには異なる人々がいて
16:51
because different people in different communities
違った生活を営んでいますから
16:54
organize their lives in different ways.
理解や支援を得るための公式などありません
16:57
So there's a lot here at TED, and at other places, to celebrate.
ですからここTEDや色々な場所で、讃えることが山ほどあります
17:00
And you don't have to be a mega-hero.
ものすごく偉大な英雄である必要はありません
17:03
There are ordinary heroes.
普通の英雄でいいんです
17:06
Ordinary heroes like the janitors who are worth celebrating too.
病院の清掃員も讃えるべき日常の英雄です
17:08
As practitioners each and every one of us should strive
私たち1人1人、特別な英雄にならなくてもいいですから
17:11
to be ordinary, if not extraordinary heroes.
普通の英雄になるべく切磋琢磨すべきです
17:14
As heads of organizations,
組織のリーダーとして
17:17
we should strive to create environments
私たちは倫理的技術と
17:19
that encourage and nurture both moral skill and moral will.
倫理的意志をともに伸ばし、育てられる環境を作らねばなりません
17:21
Even the wisest and most well-meaning people
組織において逆流に立ち向かって
17:26
will give up if they have to swim against the current
泳がなければならない時は
17:29
in the organizations in which they work.
最も賢く、善良な意志を持った人間でさえ諦めてしまうでしょう
17:32
If you run an organization, you should be sure
経営者の方は決して、けっして、
17:35
that none of the jobs -- none of the jobs --
従業員誰一人としてあの清掃員のような
17:38
have job descriptions like the job descriptions of the janitors.
職務明細書を持たせてはいけません
17:41
Because the truth is that
他者と関わる仕事は
17:44
any work that you do that involves interaction with other people
それがどんな仕事であれ
17:47
is moral work.
倫理的な仕事なのですから
17:50
And any moral work depends upon practical wisdom.
そしてあらゆる倫理的な仕事は実践知を必要とします
17:53
And, perhaps most important,
恐らくなにより大事なことは
17:57
as teachers, we should strive to be the ordinary heroes,
教える者として、指導する相手にとって
18:00
the moral exemplars, to the people we mentor.
日常の中での英雄となり、倫理の手本となることです
18:03
And there are a few things that we have to remember as teachers.
私たちは指導者として、自分が教えている間
18:07
One is that we are always teaching.
常に誰かが見張っていて
18:10
Someone is always watching.
カメラはいつも回っている
18:14
The camera is always on.
という意識を持つべきです
18:17
Bill Gates talked about the importance of education
ビル・ゲイツは教育の重要性
18:19
and, in particular, the model that KIPP was providing:
特にKIPPという教育プログラムについて話しました
18:22
"Knowledge is power."
その名の通り「知識は力なり」です
18:25
And he talked about a lot of the wonderful things
ビルは
18:28
that KIPP is doing
貧しい地域の子供が
18:31
to take inner-city kids and turn them in the direction of college.
大学を目指せるようにするKIPPの教育について話しましたね
18:33
I want to focus on one particular thing KIPP is doing
ビルが取り上げなかった部分をお話ししましょう
18:37
that Bill didn't mention.
子供たちが
18:40
That is that they have come to the realization
本当に学ぶべき唯一大事なことは
18:43
that the single most important thing kids need to learn
人としての品格だけだとKIPPは
18:46
is character.
気付いたのです
18:48
They need to learn to respect themselves.
子供は自己を尊敬することを学ばなくてはいけません
18:49
They need to learn to respect their schoolmates.
友達を尊敬することを学ばなくてはなりません
18:52
They need to learn to respect their teachers.
先生を尊敬することを学ばなくてはなりません
18:55
And, most important, they need to learn to respect learning.
もっとも重要なのは、学ぶことをを重んじることです
18:58
That's the principle objective.
これが本質的な目的です
19:01
If you do that, the rest is just pretty much a coast downhill.
これさえ押さえれば、あとは自然と楽に進めます
19:03
And the teachers: the way you teach these things to the kids
学ぶ大切さを教えるために、教師も他の職員も毎日
19:07
is by having the teachers and all the other staff embody it every minute of every day.
1分1秒、自分たち自身が学ぶ重要性を実感しながらそれを実践していかなければいけません
19:10
Obama appealed to virtue.
オバマ大統領は人間の美徳を喚起しました
19:17
And I think he was right.
私は彼は正しいと思います
19:19
And the virtue I think we need above all others is practical wisdom,
そして何よりも必要な美徳は実践知です
19:21
because it's what allows other virtues -- honesty, kindness, courage and so on --
実践知を持つことで私たちは、正直さや優しさ、勇気などの美徳を
19:25
to be displayed at the right time and in the right way.
必要な時に最適な形で示すことができるのです
19:32
He also appealed to hope.
オバマ大統領は希望も呼び起こしました
19:35
Right again.
またしても正しい
19:38
I think there is reason for hope.
希望を持つ理由がちゃんとありますから
19:40
I think people want to be allowed to be virtuous.
人間は高潔でありたいと望んでいると思います
19:43
In many ways, it's what TED is all about.
TEDはまさにその象徴です
19:46
Wanting to do the right thing
正しい動機のもと、正しいタイミングで
19:50
in the right way
正しい行いをしたいと
19:53
for the right reasons.
願っている
19:55
This kind of wisdom is within the grasp of each and every one of us
私たち1人1人、すべての人が注意を向け始めれば
19:57
if only we start paying attention.
この知恵は私たちのものとなるでしょう
20:00
Paying attention to what we do,
一番重要なのは
20:03
to how we do it,
知恵の芽を
20:06
and, perhaps most importantly,
押しつぶすのではなく
20:08
to the structure of the organizations within which we work,
育てるために自分たちの行動とそのプロセスに注意を払い
20:10
so as to make sure that it enables us and other people to develop wisdom
私たちが働いている会社などの
20:13
rather than having it suppressed.
組織の構造に注意を向けることです
20:18
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
20:21
Thank you.
どうもありがとう
20:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:26
Chris Anderson: You have to go and stand out here a sec.
クリス・アンダーソン:皆さんまだ拍手していますよ
20:29
Barry Schwartz: Thank you very much.
バリー・シュワルツ:どうもありがとうございました
20:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:37
Translator:Naho Iguchi
Reviewer:Akira Kudo

sponsored links

Barry Schwartz - Psychologist
Barry Schwartz studies the link between economics and psychology, offering startling insights into modern life. Lately, working with Ken Sharpe, he's studying wisdom.

Why you should listen

In his 2004 book The Paradox of Choice , Barry Schwartz tackles one of the great mysteries of modern life: Why is it that societies of great abundance — where individuals are offered more freedom and choice (personal, professional, material) than ever before — are now witnessing a near-epidemic of depression? Conventional wisdom tells us that greater choice is for the greater good, but Schwartz argues the opposite: He makes a compelling case that the abundance of choice in today's western world is actually making us miserable.

Infinite choice is paralyzing, Schwartz argues, and exhausting to the human psyche. It leads us to set unreasonably high expectations, question our choices before we even make them and blame our failures entirely on ourselves. His relatable examples, from consumer products (jeans, TVs, salad dressings) to lifestyle choices (where to live, what job to take, who and when to marry), underscore this central point: Too much choice undermines happiness.

Schwartz's previous research has addressed morality, decision-making and the varied inter-relationships between science and society. Before Paradox he published The Costs of Living, which traces the impact of free-market thinking on the explosion of consumerism -- and the effect of the new capitalism on social and cultural institutions that once operated above the market, such as medicine, sports, and the law.

Both books level serious criticism of modern western society, illuminating the under-reported psychological plagues of our time. But they also offer concrete ideas on addressing the problems, from a personal and societal level.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.