sponsored links
TED2009

Sylvia Earle: My wish: Protect our oceans

「海を守るという願い」―シルビア・アールによるTED Prize 講演

February 5, 2009

世界的権威である海洋科学者シルビア・アールが、美しい海の映像とその危機的状況を数字で示します。TED Prize 受賞に際して彼女の訴える願いは、彼女と共に地球の青い心を守って欲しいというものです。

Sylvia Earle - Oceanographer
Sylvia Earle is entranced by algae and coral reefs, and has been at the forefront of ocean exploration for more than four decades. The winner of the 2009 TED Prize, she's a tireless advocate for our oceans. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Fifty years ago, when I began exploring the ocean,
50年前に私が海を探検し出した頃には
00:20
no one -- not Jacques Perrin, not Jacques Cousteau or Rachel Carson --
誰も―ジャック・ペラン(映画監督) ジャック・クストー
(海洋学者) レイチェル・カーソン(生物学者)でさえ
00:23
imagined that we could do anything to harm the ocean
私たちが海に捨てた物や
海から穫った物のせいで
00:29
by what we put into it or by what we took out of it.
海が破壊されるなんて想像しませんでした
00:32
It seemed, at that time, to be a sea of Eden,
かつての海はエデンの園のようでした
00:35
but now we know, and now we are facing paradise lost.
今では「楽園喪失」が目前となっています
00:38
I want to share with you
私たちの誰もに影響を及ぼす―
00:44
my personal view of changes in the sea that affect all of us,
海の変化について 私の考えをお話しします
00:47
and to consider why it matters that in 50 years, we've lost --
大型の魚の90パーセントは この50年で
00:50
actually, we've taken, we've eaten --
私たちが捕獲して食べてしまったので
00:54
more than 90 percent of the big fish in the sea;
失われてしまいました
これがなぜ問題であるのか
00:57
why you should care that nearly half of the coral reefs have disappeared;
珊瑚礁の半分が消滅したことを
懸念すべきなのはなぜか
01:00
why a mysterious depletion of oxygen in large areas of the Pacific
太平洋における謎の酸素の減少が
海洋生物の生死にだけでなく
01:04
should concern not only the creatures that are dying,
皆さんにも関係するのはなぜか
01:10
but it really should concern you.
考えていきたいと思います
01:13
It does concern you, as well.
本当に皆さんにも関係があるのです
01:16
I'm haunted by the thought of what Ray Anderson calls "tomorrow's child,"
レイ・アンダーソンが朗読した「明日の子」に込められた
想いが心に残っています
01:18
asking why we didn't do something on our watch
なぜサメやクロマグロ イカや珊瑚の棲む
01:23
to save sharks and bluefin tuna and squids and coral reefs and the living ocean
生命に満ちた海を守らなかったのか
01:27
while there still was time.
まだ時間があったにも関わらず・・・
01:32
Well, now is that time.
今はまさに行動する時です
01:34
I hope for your help
皆さんに 支援いただいて
01:37
to explore and protect the wild ocean
海を探査するとともに
01:40
in ways that will restore the health and,
自然の海の健全な姿を戻すための保護を通じて
01:43
in so doing, secure hope for humankind.
人類の希望も守りたいのです
01:46
Health to the ocean means health for us.
海が健全であることは
私達の健康を意味します
01:50
And I hope Jill Tarter's wish to engage Earthlings includes dolphins and whales
ジル・ターター(天文学者)は地球外生命体の探索において
「地球人」という言葉を使っていますが
01:53
and other sea creatures
そこにイルカやクジラなど
02:00
in this quest to find intelligent life elsewhere in the universe.
海洋生物も含まれていることを願います
02:02
And I hope, Jill, that someday
そしていつの日か
この地球上の人類の中から
02:05
we will find evidence that there is intelligent life among humans on this planet.
「知的生命体」の存在を示す証拠を
見つけられることを願ってますよ ジル
02:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:15
Did I say that? I guess I did.
これは冗談ですけどね
02:17
For me, as a scientist,
すべてが始まったのは
02:22
it all began in 1953
科学者として1953年に
02:25
when I first tried scuba.
スキューバダイビングを始めた時でした
02:28
It's when I first got to know fish swimming
この時初めて泳いでいる魚の姿を見ました
02:31
in something other than lemon slices and butter.
レモンとバターで調理された魚とは別物です
02:34
I actually love diving at night;
私はナイトダイビングが大好きです
02:37
you see a lot of fish then that you don't see in the daytime.
夜は昼間見れない様々な魚が見られます
02:40
Diving day and night was really easy for me in 1970,
1970年の私にとって
昼夜問わずダイビングすることは容易でした
02:43
when I led a team of aquanauts living underwater for weeks at a time --
当時はダイバーのグループを率いて
何週間も水中で暮らしていました
02:47
at the same time that astronauts were putting their footprints on the moon.
ちょうど宇宙飛行士が月面着陸した頃です
02:52
In 1979 I had a chance to put my footprints on the ocean floor
1979年 私はジムと呼ばれる潜水装置を使って
02:59
while using this personal submersible called Jim.
海底に足跡を残すことができました
03:03
It was six miles offshore and 1,250 feet down.
約10キロの沖で水深約375メートルの海底でした
03:06
It's one of my favorite bathing suits.
私の大好きな水着の1つです
03:10
Since then, I've used about 30 kinds of submarines
それ以来 30種の潜水艇を使い
03:15
and I've started three companies and a nonprofit foundation called Deep Search
3つの会社とディープサーチというNPOを創設しました
03:19
to design and build systems
それは深海を訪れるためのシステムを
03:22
to access the deep sea.
設計して 開発するためです
03:25
I led a five-year National Geographic expedition,
また5年間のナショナル・ジオグラフィックの調査や
03:27
the Sustainable Seas expeditions,
海洋生物保護のための調査を
03:30
using these little subs.
こんな小型の潜水艇で行いました
03:33
They're so simple to drive that even a scientist can do it.
取扱いは簡単で 科学者にも操作できます
03:35
And I'm living proof.
私がその証拠です
03:38
Astronauts and aquanauts alike
宇宙飛行士もダイバーも 共に
03:40
really appreciate the importance of air, food, water, temperature --
空気 食物 水 温度など
03:42
all the things you need to stay alive in space or under the sea.
生きるために必要なものの重要性を熟知しています
03:47
I heard astronaut Joe Allen explain
宇宙飛行士のジョー・アレンからもこう聞きました
03:51
how he had to learn everything he could about his life support system
生命維持システムに関しては学べる限りを学び
03:54
and then do everything he could
システムの維持に必要な管理は
03:57
to take care of his life support system;
すべて行ったのだ と
04:00
and then he pointed to this and he said, "Life support system."
それから 彼はこの地球を指さして
「生命維持システムだ」と言いました
04:03
We need to learn everything we can about it
私たちは同様に学べることをすべて学び
04:08
and do everything we can to take care of it.
全力を尽くして保護する必要があるのです
04:11
The poet Auden said, "Thousands have lived without love;
詩人オーデンの言葉です
「愛なくして生きた者は幾千あれども」
04:14
none without water."
「水なくして生きた者はいない」
04:18
Ninety-seven percent of Earth's water is ocean.
地球上の水の97%は海が占めています
04:21
No blue, no green.
水なくして緑はないのです
04:24
If you think the ocean isn't important,
もし海が重要ではないと感じるのであれば
04:27
imagine Earth without it.
海がない地球を想像してみてください
04:29
Mars comes to mind.
火星はまさしくそうです
04:32
No ocean, no life support system.
海もない ゆえに生命維持システムもない
04:34
I gave a talk not so long ago at the World Bank
少し前に世界銀行に対してスピーチを行ったとき
04:36
and I showed this amazing image of Earth
私はこの美しい地球の絵を見せて言ったんです
04:39
and I said, "There it is! The World Bank!"
「これが世界銀行です!」
04:42
That's where all the assets are!
「ここにすべての財産があります!」
04:45
And we've been trawling them down
そして私たちは自然システムが修復するより
04:51
much faster than the natural systems can replenish them.
早いスピードで根こそぎの破壊をしてきました
04:54
Tim Worth says the economy is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the environment.
ティム・ワースは言います
「経済活動は環境に全面的に依存している」
04:57
With every drop of water you drink,
皆さんが飲む一滴の水も
05:00
every breath you take,
一息の空気も
05:02
you're connected to the sea.
海につながっているのです
05:04
No matter where on Earth you live.
地球のどこに住んでいても同じです
05:07
Most of the oxygen in the atmosphere is generated by the sea.
大気中の酸素の大半は海で生成されます
05:09
Over time, most of the planet's organic carbon
長年に渡って 地球上の有機炭素の大半は
05:12
has been absorbed and stored there,
海に生きる微生物によって
05:15
mostly by microbes.
吸収され蓄えられてきました
05:18
The ocean drives climate and weather,
気候や天気 気温の安定化 地球における化学まで
05:20
stabilizes temperature, shapes Earth's chemistry.
すべて海に支配されているのです
05:22
Water from the sea forms clouds
海水の水分が雲を生み
05:24
that return to the land and the seas
雨やあられ そして雪として
05:26
as rain, sleet and snow,
陸や海に帰り
05:29
and provides home for about 97 percent of life in the world,
97パーセントもの地球上の生命に
生きる場を与えています
05:31
maybe in the universe.
宇宙でもそうかもしれません
05:35
No water, no life;
水がなければ 命はありません
05:37
no blue, no green.
青い海がなければ 緑の大地もありません
05:39
Yet we have this idea, we humans,
しかし私たち人間は
05:41
that the Earth -- all of it: the oceans, the skies --
地球は 海も空も
05:44
are so vast and so resilient
とても広大で 回復力があるので
05:47
it doesn't matter what we do to it.
何をしても地球に影響がないと思いがちです
05:50
That may have been true 10,000 years ago,
これは一万年前には真実だったかもしれません
05:52
and maybe even 1,000 years ago
もしかしたら千年前もそうだったかもしれません
05:55
but in the last 100, especially in the last 50,
しかしこの百年 特に最近50年となると
05:58
we've drawn down the assets,
この考え方はもはや通用しません
06:00
the air, the water, the wildlife
空気 水 動物などの自然を
06:02
that make our lives possible.
私たちは使い過ぎたのです
06:05
New technologies are helping us to understand
近年 新たな技術の登場によって
06:08
the nature of nature;
自然の本来の姿や自然界での出来事が
06:11
the nature of what's happening,
少しずつ分かる様になってきました
06:14
showing us our impact on the Earth.
私たちが及ぼした影響も分かる様になりました
06:16
I mean, first you have to know that you've got a problem.
まず問題があることに気付かなければ始まりません
06:19
And fortunately, in our time,
そして今 幸いなことに
06:22
we've learned more about the problems than in all preceding history.
自分たちの問題について
かつてないほど多くを学んできました
06:25
And with knowing comes caring.
知ることによって思いやりが生まれ
06:28
And with caring, there's hope
思いやりによって希望がもたらされます
06:31
that we can find an enduring place for ourselves
私たちが依存する自然システムの中に
06:33
within the natural systems that support us.
永遠の居場所が見出だせるかもしれません
06:36
But first we have to know.
しかしまずは初めに知る必要があります
06:39
Three years ago, I met John Hanke,
3年前 グーグルアースのリーダー
06:42
who's the head of Google Earth,
ジョン・ハンキに会いました
06:45
and I told him how much I loved being able to hold the world in my hands
世界中を手元に引き寄せ
自由に擬似的な探査ができるのは
06:47
and go exploring vicariously.
すばらしいと彼に伝えました
06:50
But I asked him: "When are you going to finish it?
そして「いつグーグルアースは完成するの?
06:52
You did a great job with the land, the dirt.
陸上については完璧に見れるけれども
06:55
What about the water?"
海はいつ見れるの?」と彼に尋ねました
06:58
Since then, I've had the great pleasure of working with the Googlers,
それ以来 グーグルやDOER Marine
07:01
with DOER Marine, with National Geographic,
ナショナル・ジオグラフィック そして
07:05
with dozens of the best institutions and scientists around the world,
世界中の最高の研究所と科学者たちを巻き込んで
07:08
ones that we could enlist,
グーグルアースに「海」を作るために活動できたことは
07:13
to put the ocean in Google Earth.
とても光栄でした
07:16
And as of just this week, last Monday,
ちょうど今週月曜日にそれが完成し
07:19
Google Earth is now whole.
グーグルアースは本当の意味で「地球」になりました
07:21
Consider this: Starting right here at the convention center,
これを見てください
わたしたちがいるこの建物からスタートして
07:24
we can find the nearby aquarium,
近くの水族館も見えますし
07:27
we can look at where we're sitting,
私たちの座っているここも見れます
07:29
and then we can cruise up the coast to the big aquarium, the ocean,
さらに海岸線を上って行くと大きな水族館や海があります
07:31
and California's four national marine sanctuaries,
カリフォルニアの4つの国立海洋保護区に
07:34
and the new network of state marine reserves
新しい州立海洋保護指定区も分かります
07:37
that are beginning to protect and restore some of the assets
ここでまさに 私たちの財産である海を守り
回復する取り組みが始まっています
07:40
We can flit over to Hawaii
ハワイにパッと飛べば
07:44
and see the real Hawaiian Islands:
ハワイ列島が見れます
07:47
not just the little bit that pokes through the surface,
それも海面から顔を出してる島だけではなく
07:50
but also what's below.
海面下にあるものも見れるんです
07:53
To see -- wait a minute, we can go kshhplash! --
ちょっと待ってくださいね。ザッブーン!
07:56
right there, ha --
そう!こんな感じで!
07:59
under the ocean, see what the whales see.
ここは海の中
クジラが見ているのと同じ景色を見ることができます
08:02
We can go explore the other side of the Hawaiian Islands.
普段は見えないハワイ列島がここでは見れます
08:05
We can go actually and swim around on Google Earth
グーグルアースで海を自由に泳ぎ回って
08:10
and visit with humpback whales.
ザトウクジラに会うこともできます
08:14
These are the gentle giants that I've had the pleasure of meeting face to face
彼らは大きいけれども穏やかで 水中でいつ会っても
08:18
many times underwater.
嬉しく感じる生き物です
08:23
There's nothing quite like being personally inspected by a whale.
クジラにじっと見られるのは何ともいいようのない体験です
08:26
We can pick up and fly to the deepest place:
最も深い場所を選び 行ってみましょう
08:29
seven miles down, the Mariana Trench,
水面下 約11kmにあるマリアナ海溝
08:33
where only two people have ever been.
歴史上わずか2人しか訪れていない世界へ
08:36
Imagine that. It's only seven miles,
たった11kmなのに
08:38
but only two people have been there, 49 years ago.
2人しか行ったことがないのです。しかも49年前に
08:41
One-way trips are easy.
片道切符でなら簡単ですが
08:44
We need new deep-diving submarines.
新しい深海用潜水艦が必要です
08:47
How about some X Prizes for ocean exploration?
なぜ海洋探検にはエックスプライズ財団がないのかしら?
08:50
We need to see deep trenches, the undersea mountains,
深い海溝や海山も
08:53
and understand life in the deep sea.
海の生命を理解するためにもっと探査する必要があります
08:57
We can now go to the Arctic.
さて次は北極に行きましょう
09:00
Just ten years ago I stood on the ice at the North Pole.
10年前に私は北極の氷の上に立ちましたが
09:03
An ice-free Arctic Ocean may happen in this century.
今世紀中には北極海の氷は無くなってしまうかもしれません
09:07
That's bad news for the polar bears.
これはホッキョクグマにとって非常に残念なニュースですが
09:12
That's bad news for us too.
私たちにとっても残念なニュースです
09:16
Excess carbon dioxide is not only driving global warming,
過剰な二酸化炭素排出は温暖化を促進しているのみならず
09:19
it's also changing ocean chemistry,
海水の酸性化など
09:22
making the sea more acidic.
海の状態にも大きく影響しているのです
09:25
That's bad news for coral reefs and oxygen-producing plankton.
これは酸素を作り出すプランクトンやサンゴ礁にとって
09:28
Also it's bad news for us.
当然私たちにも残念なニュースです
09:31
We're putting hundreds of millions of tons of plastic
私たちは数えきれない量のプラスチックを
09:34
and other trash into the sea.
そのまま海に捨てています
09:37
Millions of tons of discarded fishing nets,
大量に捨てられた漁業用の網も
09:39
gear that continues to kill.
海中の生物の命を奪っているのです
09:42
We're clogging the ocean, poisoning the planet's circulatory system,
私たちは海を汚し
地球の循環システムに毒を注いでいます
09:45
and we're taking out hundreds of millions of tons of wildlife,
その結果 私たちは数えきれないほど多くの自然生物の
09:49
all carbon-based units.
命を奪っているのです
09:52
Barbarically, we're killing sharks for shark fin soup,
私たちは残忍にもフカヒレスープのためにサメを殺すことで
09:57
undermining food chains that shape planetary chemistry
食物連鎖を断ち切り 地球上の化学物質による
10:02
and drive the carbon cycle, the nitrogen cycle,
炭素循環や窒素循環
10:05
the oxygen cycle, the water cycle --
酸素循環に水循環など
10:08
our life support system.
あらゆる生命維持システムを壊しているのです
10:11
We're still killing bluefin tuna; truly endangered
絶滅危惧種にも指定されているクロマグロは
10:14
and much more valuable alive than dead.
その尊い命を奪われ続けています
10:18
All of these parts are part of our life support system.
これらはすべて生命維持システムの一部なのです
10:22
We kill using long lines, with baited hooks every few feet
数十センチ毎に針の付いた釣り縄を80kmも延ばし
10:27
that may stretch for 50 miles or more.
海中の生物の命を奪っているのです
10:33
Industrial trawlers and draggers are scraping the sea floor
商業用のトロール船や底曳き漁船は
10:35
like bulldozers, taking everything in their path.
ブルドーザーの様に海底にあるすべてをさらってゆきます
10:39
Using Google Earth you can witness trawlers --
グーグルアースを使えばトロール船が
10:42
in China, the North Sea, the Gulf of Mexico --
両シナ海 北海 メキシコ湾などで
10:45
shaking the foundation of our life support system,
生命維持システムの根底を揺るがし
10:49
leaving plumes of death in their path.
「死」の跡を残している姿を目撃します
10:53
The next time you dine on sushi -- or sashimi,
次回 皆さんがお寿司や刺身
10:55
or swordfish steak, or shrimp cocktail,
カジキのステーキやシュリンプカクテル
10:58
whatever wildlife you happen to enjoy from the ocean --
海産物を食べる機会があるときは
11:00
think of the real cost.
隠れた真の犠牲のことを考えてみて下さい
11:03
For every pound that goes to market,
市場に出回る 500グラムに対して
11:06
more than 10 pounds, even 100 pounds,
5キロ以上 ときには50キロもの魚が混獲され
11:08
may be thrown away as bycatch.
捨てられているのです
11:12
This is the consequence of not knowing
これは海から獲れる資源には限りがある
ということを
11:16
that there are limits to what we can take out of the sea.
知らないゆえに 起こっているのです
11:19
This chart shows the decline in ocean wildlife
この図で1900年から2000年までの
11:22
from 1900 to 2000.
海洋生物の減少をお見せします
11:26
The highest concentrations are in red.
生物の密度の高いところを赤く示しています
11:29
In my lifetime, imagine,
信じられないことに私が生きている間に
11:32
90 percent of the big fish have been killed.
大型魚の90パーセントが殺されてしまったのです
11:34
Most of the turtles, sharks, tunas and whales
カメ サメ マグロ そしてクジラの
11:38
are way down in numbers.
ほとんどの種が激減しています
11:40
But, there is good news.
しかし良いニュースもあります
11:44
Ten percent of the big fish still remain.
10パーセントの大型魚はまだ生きているのです
11:46
There are still some blue whales.
まだシロナガスクジラが生きています
11:48
There are still some krill in Antarctica.
南極にはオキアミもまだ生きています
11:50
There are a few oysters in Chesapeake Bay.
チェサピーク湾にはカキが生きています
11:53
Half the coral reefs are still in pretty good shape,
まだ半数のサンゴ礁はとても良い状態で
11:55
a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet.
地球の真ん中に美しいベルトをかけています
11:58
There's still time, but not a lot,
状況を変えるためにまだ時間はあります
12:01
to turn things around.
しかし多くの時間は残されていません
12:04
But business as usual means that in 50 years,
このまま漁業を続けると50年後には
12:06
there may be no coral reefs --
珊瑚礁が消えてしまうかもしれません
12:08
and no commercial fishing, because the fish will simply be gone.
漁業もなくなってしまうかもしれません
魚がいなくなってしまうからです
12:11
Imagine the ocean without fish.
魚のいない海を想像してみて下さい
12:15
Imagine what that means to our life support system.
それがどれだけ生命維持システムに影響することか
12:19
Natural systems on the land are in big trouble too,
陸の自然環境も大きな問題を抱えていますが
12:23
but the problems are more obvious,
問題が目に見えて分かりやすく
12:26
and some actions are being taken to protect trees, watersheds and wildlife.
森や川 動物を守る取組みがすでに行われています
12:28
And in 1872, with Yellowstone National Park,
1872年のイエローストーン国立公園を皮切りに
12:34
the United States began establishing a system of parks
アメリカで国立公園が制定され始めました
12:38
that some say was the best idea America ever had.
アメリカがした一番良かった事と言う人もいます
12:41
About 12 percent of the land around the world is now protected:
現在では国土の約12パーセントが保護されています
12:46
safeguarding biodiversity, providing a carbon sink,
生物の多様性を守り 二酸化炭素の吸収源を提供し
12:50
generating oxygen, protecting watersheds.
酸素を生成し 川を守っているのです
12:54
And, in 1972, this nation began to establish a counterpart in the sea,
1972年には陸だけでなく海にも
12:56
National Marine Sanctuaries.
国立海洋保護区が設立されました
13:01
That's another great idea.
これも素晴らしいことでした
13:03
The good news is
さらに良いニュースは
13:05
that there are now more than 4,000 places in the sea, around the world,
今では世界中の海に4,000カ所以上も
13:07
that have some kind of protection.
保護区ができているのです
13:11
And you can find them on Google Earth.
グーグルアースで見ることができます
13:13
The bad news is
残念なことに よく注意して探さないと
13:15
that you have to look hard to find them.
見つからないのです
13:17
In the last three years, for example,
例えばこの3年間で
13:19
the U.S. protected 340,000 square miles of ocean as national monuments.
アメリカは約88万平方キロもの海を保護区に指定しました
13:21
But it only increased from 0.6 of one percent
しかしそれは海全体からみればわずか0.6パーセントから
13:27
to 0.8 of one percent of the ocean protected, globally.
0.8パーセントに増加しただけのことなのです
13:30
Protected areas do rebound,
保護区域は確かに改善の方向ですが
13:35
but it takes a long time to restore
元に戻すには 時間が長くかかります
13:38
50-year-old rockfish or monkfish, sharks or sea bass,
― 50歳のロックフィッシュ アンコウ サメやスズキ
13:40
or 200-year-old orange roughy.
200歳のヒウチダイを取り戻す時間
13:44
We don't consume 200-year-old cows or chickens.
陸上では200歳の牛や鶏を食べたりしません
13:46
Protected areas provide hope
エド・ウィルソン(生物学者)が夢見たように
13:50
that the creatures of Ed Wilson's dream
「生物大百科」に載る海洋生物がみな
13:53
of an encyclopedia of life, or the census of marine life,
リストや写真や文章で残されるだけでなく
13:56
will live not just as a list,
保護区域では生き残るだろうという
14:00
a photograph, or a paragraph.
希望が生まれます
14:04
With scientists around the world, I've been looking at the 99 percent of the ocean
世界中の科学者と共に漁業や資源採掘
14:08
that is open to fishing -- and mining, and drilling, and dumping, and whatever --
原油の掘削やゴミ捨てに利用される海域の99パーセントを調査しました
14:11
to search out hope spots,
まだ復元できる海域を探すため そして
14:15
and try to find ways to give them and us a secure future.
海洋生物と私たちの未来を守る途を探るためです
14:17
Such as the Arctic --
北極などはその一例で
14:21
we have one chance, right now, to get it right.
今を逃すと もうチャンスはありません
14:23
Or the Antarctic, where the continent is protected,
南極もそうです
大陸は保護されていますが
14:26
but the surrounding ocean is being stripped of its krill, whales and fish.
近隣の海からはオキアミ クジラ
そして魚が奪われています
14:29
Sargasso Sea's three million square miles of floating forest
800万平方kmのサルガッソ海から
14:35
is being gathered up to feed cows.
牛のエサにするために海藻が刈リ集められています
14:40
97 percent of the land in the Galapagos Islands is protected,
ガラパゴス諸島の97パーセントは保護されていますが
14:43
but the adjacent sea is being ravaged by fishing.
近郊海域は漁業によって壊されています
14:47
It's true too in Argentina
パタゴニアの大陸棚の上にあるアルゼンチンでも
14:51
on the Patagonian shelf, which is now in serious trouble.
深刻な問題になっています
14:53
The high seas, where whales, tuna and dolphins travel --
クジラやマグロ イルカが回遊する外洋は
14:56
the largest, least protected, ecosystem on Earth,
地上で最大かつ最も保護されていない生態系です
15:01
filled with luminous creatures,
発光生物もたくさん生きていて
15:04
living in dark waters that average two miles deep.
平均すると深さ3キロの暗い海にいます
15:07
They flash, and sparkle, and glow
閃光のように 花火のように
15:10
with their own living light.
あるいはぼんやりと 光る命です
15:13
There are still places in the sea as pristine as I knew as a child.
海には私が子供の頃からずっと
手つかずの場所がまだあります
15:16
The next 10 years may be the most important,
これから10年は今までで最も重要で
15:19
and the next 10,000 years the best chance our species will have
この10年次第で次の1万年に守るべき
15:23
to protect what remains of the natural systems that give us life.
自然環境があるかないかが決まります
15:27
To cope with climate change, we need new ways to generate power.
気候変化に対応すべく
新たなエネルギー源が必要です
15:33
We need new ways, better ways, to cope with poverty, wars and disease.
貧困 戦争 病気に対処するため
新しい 優れた方法が必要です
15:36
We need many things to keep and maintain the world as a better place.
あらゆるものを守り
世界をより良い場所にする必要があります
15:42
But, nothing else will matter
しかしそれができたとしても
15:46
if we fail to protect the ocean.
海を守れなければ意味を成しません
15:49
Our fate and the ocean's are one.
私たちの未来は海と共にあるのです
15:52
We need to do for the ocean what Al Gore did for the skies above.
アル・ゴアが空に対して行ったことが海にも必要なのです
15:56
A global plan of action
世界規模での計画が進行しています
16:00
with a world conservation union, the IUCN,
国際自然保護連合, IUCNの下で
16:03
is underway to protect biodiversity,
生物の多様性を維持し
16:05
to mitigate and recover from the impacts of climate change,
気候変動の影響を軽減し
回復させる活動を
16:07
on the high seas and in coastal areas,
外洋や沿岸海域を問わず
16:11
wherever we can identify critical places.
環境破壊にさらされている地域で行っています
16:15
New technologies are needed to map, photograph and explore
海の95パーセントは未知なので
地図を作り 写真を撮り
16:19
the 95 percent of the ocean that we have yet to see.
探査するために新技術が必要です
16:23
The goal is to protect biodiversity,
私たちのゴールは生物の多様性を維持し
16:27
to provide stability and resilience.
安定と回復を促すことです
16:30
We need deep-diving subs,
海の探査には 深く潜れる潜水艦の
16:32
new technologies to explore the ocean.
新たな技術が必要なのです
16:34
We need, maybe, an expedition --
次のステップを見つけるために
16:37
a TED at sea --
海洋保護のためのTEDが
16:40
that could help figure out the next steps.
まさしく必要なのです
16:42
And so, I suppose you want to know what my wish is.
そろそろ私の TED Wish に移ります
16:45
I wish you would use all means at your disposal --
映画 探査 インターネット 新しい潜水艦など
16:49
films, expeditions, the web, new submarines --
可能な限りあらゆる手段を使って
16:54
and campaign to ignite public support
支援活動の活性化を皆さんにお願いしたいのです
16:57
for a global network of marine protected areas --
海洋保護区域を世界中に広げるため
17:00
hope spots large enough to save and restore the ocean,
海を救い回復させることができる大きな保護区域のため
17:03
the blue heart of the planet.
そして地球の青い心を守るために
17:07
How much?
どれほど広い保護区か
17:10
Some say 10 percent, some say 30 percent.
中には10パーセントという人 0パーセントという人がいます
17:12
You decide: how much of your heart do you want to protect?
どれだけ海を守りたいかは皆さんが決めてください
17:15
Whatever it is,
ただそれがどれくらいであれ
17:20
a fraction of one percent is not enough.
1パーセントに満たないようでは足りないのです
17:22
My wish is a big wish,
私の願いは大きすぎるかもしれません
17:26
but if we can make it happen, it can truly change the world,
しかし実現できれば
本当に世界を変えることができるのです
17:28
and help ensure the survival
そしてそれは私が1番好きな種の
17:32
of what actually -- as it turns out -- is my favorite species;
存続につながります
17:35
that would be us.
つまり人類の存続に
17:41
For the children of today,
今の子供たちのために
17:43
for tomorrow's child:
そして明日の子供たちのために
17:45
as never again, now is the time.
今度ではな く 今が動くときなのです
17:47
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:53
Translator:Yusuke Takada
Reviewer:Megumi Shimizu

sponsored links

Sylvia Earle - Oceanographer
Sylvia Earle is entranced by algae and coral reefs, and has been at the forefront of ocean exploration for more than four decades. The winner of the 2009 TED Prize, she's a tireless advocate for our oceans.

Why you should listen

Sylvia Earle, called "Her Deepness" by the New Yorker, "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress and a "Hero for the Planet" by Time, is an oceanographer, explorer, author and lecturer with a deep commitment to research through personal exploration.

Earle has led more than 50 expeditions and clocked more than 7,000 hours underwater. As captain of the first all-female team to live underwater in 1970, she and her fellow scientists received a ticker-tape parade and White House reception upon their return to the surface. In 1979, she walked untethered on the sea floor at a lower depth than any other woman before or since. In the 1980s, she started the companies Deep Ocean Engineering and Deep Ocean Technologies with engineer Graham Hawkes to design undersea vehicles that allow scientists to work at previously inaccessible depths. In the early 1990s, she served as Chief Scientist of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.

Earle speaks of our oceans with wonder and amazement, and calls them “the blue heart of the planet.” The winner of the 2009 TED Prize, she wished to ignite public support for marine protected areas, so that they cover 20% of the world's oceans by 2020.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.