sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2005

David Deutsch: Chemical scum that dream of distant quasars

デイヴィッド・ドイッチュ: 遠くのクエーサーを夢見る化学的泡

July 14, 2005

伝説の科学者、デイヴィッド・ドイッチュが、理論物理学は後回しにして、より緊急な課題:我々人類の生き残りについて語ります。地球温暖化解決のための最初のステップは、我々は問題を抱えていることを認めることだと、彼は言います。

David Deutsch - Quantum physicist
David Deutsch's 1997 book "The Fabric of Reality" laid the groundwork for an all-encompassing Theory of Everything, and galvanized interest in the idea of a quantum computer, which could solve problems of hitherto unimaginable complexity. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
危ない橋をわたって何か驚くようなことを
言ってみろなんていわれます
00:24
We've been told to go out on a limb and say something surprising.
今からやってみますが
00:30
So I'll try and do that, but
皆さんがよくご存知の2つの事から
話をはじめたいと思います
00:31
I want to start with two things that everyone already knows.
1つ目は実際のところ
00:38
And the first one, in fact, is something that
00:40
has been known for most of recorded history.
歴史的にほぼ受け入れられてきたことで
それは 地球という惑星だったり
太陽系だったり
00:44
And that is that the planet Earth, or the solar system,
環境などといった全てが
00:49
or our environment or whatever,
00:51
is uniquely suited to sustain our evolution -- or creation, as it used to be thought --
我々の進化 あるいは
かつて信じられていた神による創造と
現在における我々の存在や
さらに最も大切なことである
未来での生き残りに
ちょうど適しているということです
01:01
and our present existence, and most important, our future survival.
01:08
Nowadays this idea has a dramatic name: Spaceship Earth.
今や この考えには
宇宙船地球号という芝居がかった名前もあります
その考え方は宇宙船の外側―
01:13
And the idea there is that outside the spaceship,
01:15
the universe is implacably hostile,
つまり 宇宙は
冷酷無比なまでに過酷な場所で
01:18
and inside is all we have, all we depend on.
内側がすべてであり
我たちはそれに依存しており
01:22
And we only get the one chance: if we mess up our spaceship,
我々には一度のチャンスしかなく
もし宇宙船を台無しにすれば
01:25
we've got nowhere else to go.
他にどこにも
行くところはないのです
01:27
Now, the second thing that everyone already knows is that
さて 2つ目に
皆さんが既に良くご存知のことで
人類の歴史において
長く信じられてきたことに反し
01:31
contrary to what was believed for most of human history,
01:35
human beings are not, in fact, the hub of existence.
人間は 実際のところ
この世の中心ではないということです
01:41
As Stephen Hawking famously said,
スティーブン・ホーキングの
有名な言葉があります
私たちは
「典型的な銀河の外縁部の
01:44
we're just a chemical scum on the surface of a typical planet
01:48
that's in orbit around a typical star,
典型的な星の軌道上にある
典型的な惑星の表面にある
化学的な泡なのです
01:51
which is on the outskirts of a typical galaxy, and so on.
皆さんがご存知の
この2つの内 1つ目は
01:56
Now the first of those two things that everyone knows
01:59
is kind of saying that we're at a very un-typical place,
我々のいる場所はとても特別で
生存に適応した場所だ
02:03
uniquely suited and so on, and
2つ目は私たちは典型的な場所に
いるんだということです
02:06
the second one is saying that we're at a typical place.
この2つの言葉を生きていくための
深淵なる真理とみなし
02:09
And especially if you regard these two as deep truths to live by
02:13
and to inform your life decisions,
人生における意思決定の
拠り所とするのならば
それらは 相いに
やや矛盾しているようです
02:16
then they seem a little bit to conflict with each other.
しかし 両方ともが完全に間違っていることを
否定しえません
02:23
But that doesn't prevent them from both being completely false. (Laughter)
(笑)
02:29
And they are. So let me start with the second one:
どちらも間違っています
では 2つ目のことからお話します
02:37
Typical. Well -- is this a typical place? Well, let's look around, you know,
典型的―ここはありふれた場所でしょうか?
周りを見てみましょう
どの方向を見ても
02:43
and look in a random direction, and we see a wall, and chemical scum -- (Laughter)
壁 それに化学的泡が見えますね
(笑)
でも これは宇宙での
ありふれたな様子では全くありません
02:51
-- and that's not typical of the universe at all.
あちらの方向に真っ直ぐ
数百キロほど移動して
02:56
All you've got to do is go a few hundred miles in that same direction and look back,
振り返ればわかります
03:00
and you won't see any walls or chemical scum at all --
壁や化学的泡なんかは
どこにも見あたらないでしょう
目に入るのは青い惑星
03:04
all you see is a blue planet. And if you go further than that,
そしてもっと遠くへ行けば
03:08
you'll see the sun, the solar system, and the stars and so on.
太陽 太陽系 それに
星々といったものが目に入ります
これすらも宇宙では
ありふれたことではありません
03:13
But that's still not typical of the universe, because stars come in galaxies.
星々は銀河の中にあるからです
03:18
And most places in the universe, a typical place in the universe,
銀河の近くは決して
宇宙における
ありふれた場所ではありません
03:23
is nowhere near any galaxies.
だから もっと遠くへ行って
銀河の外に出て振り返ってみます
03:25
So let's go out further, till we're outside the galaxy, and look back,
そうするどうでしょう
巨大な銀河の渦状腕が眼前に横たわっています
03:31
and yeah, there's the huge galaxy with spiral arms laid out in front of us.
03:35
And at this point we've come 100,000 light years from here.
ここから10万年光年も離れたところに
いるわけです
03:42
But we're still nowhere near a typical place in the universe.
それでも依然として
宇宙の典型的な場所には近づいていません
典型的な場所にたどり着くため
03:47
To get to a typical place,
さらに1000倍も遠くまで行って
03:49
you've got to go 1,000 times as far as that into intergalactic space.
銀河間空間へと入っていきます
するとどの様に見えるでしょうか?
ここは典型的です
03:56
And so what does that look like? Typical.
宇宙の典型的な場所は
どんな風にみえるでしょうか?
03:59
What does a typical place in the universe look like?
ではここで 莫大な費用をかけて
TEDが高解像度で体験できる
04:02
Well, at enormous expense, TED has arranged a high-resolution immersion
仮想現実レンダリングで作成した
銀河間空間をご用意しました
04:08
virtual reality rendering of intergalactic space
銀河間空間から見た景色です
04:12
-- the view from intergalactic space.
では ライトを消して頂けますか?
見えますか?
04:14
So can we have the lights off, please, so we can see it?
あまり完璧ではないですね
04:22
Well, not quite, not quite perfect -- you see, in intergalactic space
銀河間空間が見えますね
完全に真っ暗で漆黒です
04:28
-- intergalactic space is completely dark, pitch dark.
04:32
It's so dark that if you were to be looking at the nearest star to you,
本当に真っ暗なので
もし一番近くの星を見ていたとして
その星が超新星爆発をおこし
04:40
and that star were to explode as a supernova,
その光が届く瞬間に直接それを
凝視していたとしても
04:44
and you were to be staring directly at it at the moment when its light reached you,
それでも 目に入るのは
おぼろげな光にもなりません
04:49
you still wouldn't be able to see even a glimmer.
ですから 宇宙はどんなに大きくて
暗いかということなんです
04:53
That's how big and how dark the universe is.
超新星爆発は非常に明るく
華々しい出来事で
04:56
And that's despite the fact that a supernova is so bright, so brilliant an event,
数光年以内にいる生き物を
05:03
that it would kill you stone dead at a range of several light years. (Laughter)
皆殺しにするようなもので
あるにも関わらずです
(笑)
銀河間空間はあまりに離れているので
05:09
And yet from intergalactic space, it's so far away you wouldn't even see it.
見る事すらできないこともあるでしょう
05:13
It's also very cold out there
加えてそこはとても冷たい―
絶対温度で3度以下です
05:16
-- less than three degrees above absolute zero.
そして 極めて空っぽの状態です
05:20
And it's very empty. The vacuum there is one million times less dense
その真空の程度は
現在の技術の粋を集めて作る
05:26
than the highest vacuum that our best technology on Earth can currently
最高の真空状態の
100万分の1以下の密度です
05:29
create. So that's how different a typical place is from this place.
典型的な場所と ここは
とても異なっています
この場所は全然典型的ではありません
05:37
And that is how un-typical this place is.
05:40
So can we have the lights back on please? Thank you.
では 照明をもどしてください
ありがとうございます
05:45
Now how do we know about an environment that's so far away,
さて 慣れ親しんだ環境とは異なり
ずっと離れた所にあって
05:50
and so different, and so alien, from anything we're used to?
異質で見知らぬ環境は
どうやって理解出来るのでしょう?
さて 地球は
我々人類の存在により
05:54
Well, the Earth -- our environment, in the form of us -- is creating knowledge.
知識を創造しています
05:59
Well, what does that mean? Well, look out even further than we've just been --
これはどういう意味でしょう?
さっきいた所からさらに遠くを見てみます
つまり ここから望遠鏡を覗いてみると
06:04
I mean from here, with a telescope -- and you'll see things that look like stars.
星のような物が見えるでしょう
「クエーサー」と呼ばれるものです
06:09
They're called "quasars." Quasars originally meant quasi-stellar object.
クエーサーの語源は擬似的な星
つまり星のように見えるもの
という意味です
06:14
Which means things that look a bit like stars. (Laughter) But they're not stars.
(笑)
でも星ではありません
06:19
And we know what they are. Billions of years ago, and billions of light years away,
その正体は分かっています
何十億年も前
そして何十億年光年も遠方で
銀河の中央にある物質は
超巨大なブラックホールへと
06:27
the material at the center of a galaxy collapsed towards a
崩れるように吸い込まれました
06:31
super-massive black hole.
06:33
And then intense magnetic fields directed some of the energy of
そして 重力崩壊による
エネルギーの一部が
強力な磁場を引き起こし
06:38
that gravitational collapse. And some of the matter,
一部の物質が
物凄いジェットとして噴出し
06:41
back out in the form of tremendous jets which illuminated lobes with the brilliance of
ローブを
おそらく
太陽1兆個分の明るさで輝かせます
06:46
-- I think it's a trillion suns.
人間の脳における物理現象は
ジェットで起きている物理現象とは
06:52
Now, the physics of the human brain could hardly be more unlike the physics of such a jet.
全く異なっています
06:58
We couldn't survive for an instant in it. Language breaks down
我々はその中では
一瞬たりとも生きられません
ジェットの中での体験を
表現するような言語を
07:02
when trying to describe what it would be like in one of those jets.
我々は持ち合わせていません
まるで 超新星爆発を
経験するようなものです
07:06
It would be a bit like experiencing a supernova explosion,
07:09
but at point-blank range and for millions of years at a time. (Laughter)
といっても至近距離から照らされ
何百万年も続きますが
(笑)
07:16
And yet, that jet happened in precisely such a way that billions of years later,
それは数十億年後になって ようやく
宇宙の反対側にいる
07:24
on the other side of the universe, some bit of chemical scum could accurately describe,
化学的泡の何人かが
正確に事象を記述し
07:30
and model, and predict, and explain, above all -- there's your reference
物理モデルを作って予測した通りの
ジェット現象が起きていたのです
実際に何が起きていたかは
07:36
-- what was happening there, in reality.
あちらでご覧になれます
1つの物理的なシステムである脳は
クエーサーという物理システムを記述する―
07:41
The one physical system, the brain,
07:43
contains an accurate working model of the other -- the quasar.
実用的なモデルを考え出しています
07:47
Not just a superficial image of it, though it contains that as well,
それは表面的な
クエーサーのイメージの描写にとどまらず
説明的なモデルであり
07:51
but an explanatory model, embodying the same mathematical
他と同様に 数学的な記述や
07:55
relationships and the same causal structure.
因果関係によって具現化されています
07:58
Now that is knowledge. And if that weren't amazing enough,
これが我々の有する知識です
これでもまだ驚くに足らぬということでしたら
モデルが予測する構造が
時と共に観測データに正確さを増して
08:03
the faithfulness with which the one structure resembles the other
近づいていることを述べておきます
08:07
is increasing with time. That is the growth of knowledge.
それが知識の発展というものです
物理法則はこのような特質を有しています
08:12
So, the laws of physics have this special property.
物理的な物体同士は
互いは似ていないかもしれませんが
08:15
That physical objects, as unlike each other as they could possibly be,
同じ数学的かつ因果的な構造を
具現化しているかもしれません
08:20
can nevertheless embody the same mathematical and causal structure
08:25
and to do it more and more so over time.
時とともに よりそのことが
明らかになってきています
08:29
So we are a chemical scum that is different. This chemical scum has universality.
さて私たちは他とは異なる化学的屑です
多面性を持った科学的屑です
我々はかつてなき精度で
世のあらゆる原理を
08:36
Its structure contains, with ever-increasing precision,
08:40
the structure of everything. This place, and not other places in the universe,
理解しています
ここ地球は宇宙の他の場所と異なり
08:45
is a hub which contains within itself the structural and causal essence of the
物理的な現実としての宇宙の仕組みや
因果関係の本質を理解する人間が存在する
宇宙の中心であるのです
08:52
whole of the rest of physical reality. And so, far from being insignificant,
これは取るに足らない話ではなくて
08:56
the fact that the laws of physics allow this, or even mandate that this can happen,
物理法則がこれを許容するだけではなく
そうさせているという事実は
09:02
is one of the most important things about the physical world.
物理的な世界における
最重要事項の一つです
09:07
Now how does the solar system -- and our environment, in the form of us --
さて 人間が住んでいるという
環境にある太陽系の
残りの宇宙との特別な関係とは
どのようなものでしょうか?
09:13
acquire this special relationship with the rest of the universe?
09:16
Well, one thing that's true about Stephen Hawking's remark -- I mean, it is true,
これに対するスティーブン・ホーキングの
コメントは正しいと思いますが
それは間違って強調されています
09:22
but it's the wrong emphasis. (Laughter) One thing that's true about it is that
何か特殊な物理学と
関係していないということは 真実です
09:26
it doesn't do it with any special physics. There's no special dispensation,
神から授かった特別な物でも
奇跡でもありません
09:32
no miracles involved. It does it simply with three things that we have here in abundance.
それは 単にある3つの物が
大量に存在していることと関係しています
そのうち1つは物質です
09:38
One of them is matter, because the growth of knowledge is a form of
なぜなら知識の増大は
情報処理にあり
09:43
information processing. Information processing is computation,
情報処理とは計算処理で
計算処理にはコンピュータが必要です
09:47
computation requires a computer --
物質なしでコンピュータを
作る方法はありません
09:49
there's no known way of making a computer without matter.
また コンピュータを作るため―
そして最も大事なことですが
09:52
We also need energy to make the computer, and most important,
09:55
to make the media in effect onto which we record the knowledge that we discover.
私たちが発見した知識を記録する
有効な媒体を作るのにも
エネルギーも必要です
そして 3番目は
あまり実感のないものですが
10:01
And then thirdly, less tangible, but just as essential for the open-ended creation
制約なき知識や解釈の創造にとって
本質的と言えるのが
10:07
of knowledge, of explanations, is evidence.
「物証」です
10:12
Now, our environment is inundated with evidence.
今 我々の環境は物証であふれています
10:16
We happen to get round to testing, let's say, Newton's Law of Gravity
例えば
ニュートンの万有引力の法則というものは
たまたま300年程前に発見されました
10:22
about 300 years ago.
しかし 自由落下の物証は
10:24
But the evidence that we used to do that was falling down on every square meter
地球上の至る所で
10:30
of the Earth for billions of years before that, and will continue to fall on for billions of years
何十億年も前から見られ
今後も何十億年と続いていきます
10:35
afterwards. And the same is true for all the other sciences.
同じようなことが
科学の他の分野でも当てはまります
我々が知る限り あらゆる科学の
最も基本的な真実を―
10:39
As far as we know, evidence to discover the most fundamental truths
発見するための物証は
まさにここ地球で得られるのです
10:44
of all the sciences is here just for the taking on our planet.
10:48
Our location is saturated with evidence, and also with matter and energy.
ここは物証と物質 さらには
エネルギーで満ちあふれています
銀河間空間では
10:54
Out in intergalactic space, those three prerequisites
制約なき知識創造のための
3つの必須条件は
10:57
for the open-ended creation of knowledge are at their lowest possible supply.
最低レベルでしか提供されません
お話したように
そこは空虚で冷たく暗いのです
11:02
As I said, it's empty; it's cold; and it's dark out there. Or is it?
そうでしょう?
11:08
Now actually, that's just another parochial misconception. (Laughter)
でも 実は それは
もう一つの偏狭な間違った考え方です
(笑)
11:13
Because imagine a cube out there in intergalactic space, the same size as
なぜなら
我々の住む太陽系と同じ大きさの立方体が
銀河間にあると想像してみると
11:20
our home, the solar system. Now that cube is very empty by human standards,
その立方体は人間の基準では
全くの空虚ですが
しかし なおも何百万トン以上の物質を
含んでいることを意味します
11:25
but that still means that it contains over a million tons of matter.
そして 百万トンあれば 必要なものが
すべてが揃った宇宙ステーションが作れ
11:30
And a million tons is enough to make, say, a self-contained space station,
そこでは 科学者集団が
11:35
on which there's a colony of scientists that are devoted to creating an
制約なき知識を次々に創造することに
勤しむことになるのです
11:39
open-ended stream of knowledge, and so on.
それは現代の技術の域を超えていて
11:42
Now, it's way beyond present technology to even gather the hydrogen
水素を銀河間空間から集めてきて
11:46
from intergalactic space and form it into other elements and so on.
他の元素を作るといったような
ことでさえあるのです
11:51
But the thing is, in a comprehensible universe,
しかし 我々が理解し得る宇宙において
物理法則に反しない限り
11:55
if something isn't forbidden by the laws of physics,
11:58
then what could possibly prevent us from doing it, other than knowing how?
手段を知らないということを別にして
その実現を妨げるものはあるのでしょうか?
12:02
In other words, it's a matter of knowledge, not resources.
言い換えれば それは知識の問題であって
資源の問題でありません
その実現は同時に
エネルギーの供給を意味します
12:06
And the same -- well, if we could do that we'd automatically have an energy supply,
12:09
because the transmutation would be a fusion reactor -- and evidence?
元素変換は
核融合反応を意味するからです
では 物証は?
繰り返しますが 人間の知覚では
そこは暗い場所です
12:15
Well, again, it's dark out there to human senses. But all you've got to do is
でも皆さんが望遠鏡を手に取ってみると
12:19
take a telescope, even one of present-day design,
それが現在のデザインのものであっても
12:22
look out and you'll see the same galaxies as we do from here.
ここから見るのと同じように
銀河が見えることでしょう
そして もっとパワフルな望遠鏡を使えば
12:27
And with a more powerful telescope, you'll be able to see stars, and planets.
銀河にある
星々や惑星を見ることができるでしょう
12:31
In those galaxies, you'll be able to do astrophysics, and learn the laws of physics.
それらの銀河から 天体物理学や
物理法則を学ぶことでしょう
12:35
And locally there you could build particle accelerators,
そして そこで粒子加速器を作れば
素粒子物理学や化学を
学ぶことができるでしょう
12:38
and learn elementary particle physics, and chemistry, and so on.
12:41
Probably the hardest science to do would be biology field trips -- (Laughter) -- because it would take
多分 最も困難な科学の分野は
生物学の野外調査でしょう
(笑)
生命のいる最も近い惑星までの往復に
12:48
several hundred million years to get to the nearest life-bearing planet and back.
何億年もかかりますからね
12:53
But I have to tell you -- and sorry, Richard --
白状しておきます
ごめんね リチャード(ドーキンス)
私は生物学の野外調査なんて
全く経験がありませんが
12:56
but I never did like biology field trips much,
(笑)
12:59
and I think we can just about make do with one every few hundred million years.
我々は数億年に1回だけ
出来ることでしょう
13:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:06
So in fact, intergalactic space does contain all the prerequisites for the open-ended
ですから実際 銀河間の空間には
全ての必須条件が揃っていて
制約のない知識の創造ができるのです
13:15
creation of knowledge. Any such cube, anywhere in the universe,
宇宙のいかなる場所にある立方体でも
13:19
could become the same kind of hub that we are,
同じく我々の生存の舞台となり得るのです
13:23
if the knowledge of how to do so were present there.
そこで過ごすノウハウされあれば
我々が唯一の住みやすい場所に
いるわけではありません
13:30
So we're not in a uniquely hospitable place.
13:33
If intergalactic space is capable of creating an open-ended stream of explanations,
もし 銀河間空間にいても
制約なく知識を創造できるのならば
13:38
then so is almost every other environment. So is the Earth. So is a polluted Earth.
ほとんど如何なる環境でもできるでしょう
地球でも―
汚染された地球でもそうです
どこであっても 制約する要素は
13:45
And the limiting factor, there and here, is not resources, because they're plentiful,
資源ではありません
それは豊富に存在するからです
13:51
but knowledge, which is scarce.
しかし 知識 これが欠乏しています
さて 宇宙に関する知識に基づく
こういった考えは おそらく ―いや きっと
13:54
Now this cosmic knowledge-based view may -- and I think ought to
我々を非常に特殊なものとして
感じさせます
14:00
-- make us feel very special. But it should also make us feel vulnerable,
しかし同時に脆い存在であるとも
感じさせます
なぜなら
宇宙で繰り広げられる試練に対して
14:05
because it means that without the specific knowledge that's needed to survive
生き残るための特別な知識をもたず
14:09
the ongoing challenges of the universe, we won't survive them.
そこでは生き残れないからです
超新星爆発が起きれば
数光年離れていても―
14:13
All it takes is for a supernova to go off a few light years away, and we'll all be dead!
みんな死んでしまいます!
14:18
Martin Rees has recently written a book about our vulnerability to all sorts of things,
マーティン・リースは最近の著書で
あらゆることに対する我々の脆弱性
について述べています
宇宙天文学、科学実験での大失敗
それに最も重要なのは
14:24
from astrophysics, to scientific experiments gone wrong,
テロリストが大量破壊兵器を使用すること
14:28
and most importantly to terrorism with weapons of mass destruction.
14:32
And he thinks that civilization has only a 50 percent chance of surviving this century.
彼は 文明社会が
今世紀末まで生き残る確率は
50%と考えています
14:37
I think he's going to talk about that later in the conference.
彼はこの後 この会議でお話すると思います
この問題を議論するのに
確率を持ち出すのは
14:41
Now I don't think that probability is the right category to discuss this issue in.
適切ではないでしょう
しかし 生きるか死ぬか
14:47
But I do agree with him about this. We can survive, and we can fail to survive.
2つの可能性しか無いことには同感です
しかしそれは偶然性ではなく
14:54
But it depends not on chance, but on whether we create the relevant knowledge in time.
適切な知識を間に合うように
生み出せるかに依っています
絶滅の危険には前例が
無かったわけではありません
15:00
The danger is not at all unprecedented. Species go extinct all the time.
種はいつだって絶滅しています
15:06
Civilizations end. The overwhelming majority of all species and all civilizations
文明は終息します
かつて存在した圧倒的多数の種と
あらゆる文明は
今や過去のものとなっています
15:12
that have ever existed are now history.
15:14
And if we want to be the exception to that, then logically our only hope
もし我々がその例外となりたいなら
論理的な唯一の望みは
15:20
is to make use of the one feature that distinguishes our species,
我々の種と文明を他の全てものと
異ならしめている
15:25
and our civilization, from all the others --
特長を上手く使って―
即ち 人類と物理法則との特別な関係により
15:28
namely, our special relationship with the laws of physics,
15:32
our ability to create new explanations, new knowledge -- to be a hub of existence.
新たな説明と知識を造りだす能力によって
存在の中心となることです
これを昨今の論争にあてはめてみましょう
15:40
So let me now apply this to a current controversy,
特定の解決案を支持しようというのではなく
15:44
not because I want to advocate any particular solution,
私が意味するところを
例示したいからです
15:47
but just to illustrate the kind of thing I mean.
15:49
And the controversy is global warming.
地球温暖化が論争になっています
私は物理学者ですが
地球温暖化に通じている―
15:52
Now, I'm a physicist, but I'm not the right kind of physicist. In regard to global warming,
物理学者ではありません
全くの素人です
15:57
I'm just a layman. And the rational thing for a layman to do is to take seriously
素人としての合理的な行動は
普及している科学的理論を
真剣に受け止めることです
16:03
the prevailing scientific theory. And according to that theory,
そして その理論に拠れば
惨事を避けるには既に遅すぎるということです
16:08
it's already too late to avoid a disaster.
現時点での最善策が
京都議定書で述べられたような
16:11
Because if it's true that our best option at the moment is to prevent CO2 emissions
二酸化炭素の排出を抑制することならば
16:17
with something like the Kyoto Protocol, with its constraints on economic activity
それは経済活動を抑制し
16:21
and its enormous cost of hundreds of billions of dollars or whatever it is,
数十兆円もの巨大なコストが掛かるので
どんな合理的な手段をとったとしても
それは既に惨事です
16:25
then that is already a disaster by any reasonable measure.
16:30
And the actions that are advocated are not even purported to solve the problem,
そして 支持が得られている行動は
その問題を解決するものではなく
16:35
merely to postpone it by a little. So it's already too late to avoid it, and it
単にそれを少し
遅らせるだけのものなのです
だから 回避するには既に遅く
誰かが危険性に気づいた時には
16:40
probably has been too late to avoid it ever since before anyone realized the danger.
おそらく既に手遅れだったのです
16:46
It was probably already too late in the 1970s,
おそらく 1970年代には
手遅れになっていました
当時の最も有効な科学理論に拠れば
16:50
when the best available scientific theory was telling us that industrial emissions
排ガスは新しい氷河期の到来を引き起こし
16:54
were about to precipitate a new ice age in which billions would die.
数十億人が死ぬだろうと予測していました
16:59
Now the lesson of that seems clear to me,
ここから何を学ぶか
私にとっては明らかで
どうして公の議論にならなかったのか
理解できません
17:02
and I don't know why it isn't informing public debate.
17:05
It is that we can't always know. When we know of an impending disaster,
我々はいつも知ることが
出来るとは限りません
差し迫る惨事を知り
17:11
and how to solve it at a cost less than the cost of the disaster itself,
惨事自体のコストより安く
解決する術を知っている時には
実際 大きな議論にはならないものです
17:16
then there's not going to be much argument, really.
17:18
But no precautions, and no precautionary principle,
しかし どんな予防措置や
予防的な原理も
17:23
can avoid problems that we do not yet foresee.
まだ予知されていない問題の
解決策とはなりません
17:27
Hence, we need a stance of problem-fixing, not just problem-avoidance.
故に 我々は単なる問題回避ではなく
問題解決のスタンスが必要です
予防は治療に勝る
という格言は正しいですが
17:36
And it's true that an ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure,
17:39
but that's only if we know what to prevent.
しかし 我々が何を避けるかを
知っているときの話です
17:42
If you've been punched on the nose, then the science of medicine does not
もし鼻っ面にパンチを喰らったらといって
医療科学はパンチを避ける方法を
17:46
consist of teaching you how to avoid punches. (Laughter)
教えてくれません
(笑)
もし 医学が治療の研究をやめて
予防のみに注力したとしても
17:50
If medical science stopped seeking cures and concentrated on prevention only,
やはり大した成果は期待できないでしょう
17:55
then it would achieve very little of either.
世界は今 いかなるコストをかけてでも
17:58
The world is buzzing at the moment with plans to force reductions
温暖化ガス排出を強制的に削減する
計画について議論しています
18:02
in gas emissions at all costs.
18:04
It ought to be buzzing with plans to reduce the temperature,
気温を下げる計画で
がやがや議論するだけでなく
18:09
and with plans to live at the higher temperature --
より高い気温で暮らす計画も
考えるべきです
18:12
and not at all costs, but efficiently and cheaply. And some such plans exist,
また いかなるコストを掛けるのではなく
効率的かつ安くあるべきです
そういう計画がいくつかあります
宇宙にたくさんの鏡を設置して
太陽光を逸らすといった計画
18:17
things like swarms of mirrors in space to deflect the sunlight away,
18:21
and encouraging aquatic organisms to eat more carbon dioxide.
二酸化炭素をもっと摂取する水棲生物を
助長するといった計画
今のところ これらは傍流の研究です
18:25
At the moment, these things are fringe research.
18:28
They're not central to the human effort to face this problem, or problems in general.
この問題や一般的な問題の
解決手法として
これらの研究は注目されていません
そして まだ知られていない問題に対し
18:34
And with problems that we are not aware of yet, the ability to put right --
全くの運頼みで漠然と回避するのではなく
対処する能力が
18:39
not the sheer good luck of avoiding indefinitely -- is our only hope,
我々の唯一の希望であり
それは問題解決だけでなく
18:44
not just of solving problems, but of survival.
生き残りのための希望なのです
2つの石碑を手に取って刻印しましょう
18:48
So take two stone tablets, and carve on them.
18:55
On one of them, carve: "Problems are soluble."
2つのうち1つには
『問題は解決可能』と刻みます
そしてもう1つには
『問題は回避不能』と刻みます
19:00
And on the other one carve: "Problems are inevitable."
19:04
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございます
(拍手)
Translator:Yoshifumi Yamada
Reviewer:Tomoyuki Suzuki

sponsored links

David Deutsch - Quantum physicist
David Deutsch's 1997 book "The Fabric of Reality" laid the groundwork for an all-encompassing Theory of Everything, and galvanized interest in the idea of a quantum computer, which could solve problems of hitherto unimaginable complexity.

Why you should listen

David Deutsch will force you to reconsider your place in the world. This legendary Oxford physicist is the leading proponent of the multiverse (or "many worlds") interpretation of quantum theory -- the idea that our universe is constantly spawning countless numbers of parallel worlds.

In his own words: "Everything in our universe -- including you and me, every atom and every galaxy -- has counterparts in these other universes." If that doesn't alter your consciousness, then the other implications he's derived from his study of subatomic physics -- including the possibility of time travel -- just might.

In The Fabric of Reality, Deutsch tied together quantum mechanics, evolution, a rationalist approach to knowledge, and a theory of computation based on the work of Alan Turing. "Our best theories are not only truer than common sense, they make more sense than common sense,"Deutsch wrote, and he continues to explore the most mind-bending aspects of particle physics.

In 2008, he became a member of the Royal Society of London.
 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.