22:39
TED2009

Willie Smits: How to restore a rainforest

ウィリー・スミッツの熱帯雨林再生計画

Filmed:

複雑な生態環境をうまく紡ぎ合わせることで、生物学者ウィリー・スミッツが、木々が伐採されたボルネオの熱帯雨林を再生する方法を見出しました。繊細なエコシステムを復元しながら、同時にオラウータンをも救う、革新的な計画案と実際の成果について語ります。

- Conservationist
Willie Smits has devoted his life to saving the forest habitat of orangutans, the "thinkers of the jungle." As towns, farms and wars encroach on native forests, Smits works to save what is left. Full bio

I was walking in the market one day with my wife,
ある日、市場を妻と歩いていたら、
00:18
and somebody stuck a cage in my face.
誰かが、ケージを目の前につきだしました。
00:21
And in between those slits
かごの隙間から見えたのは
00:23
were the saddest eyes I've ever seen.
とって悲愴な目をしたオラウータンの
00:25
There was a very sick orangutan baby, my first encounter.
赤ん坊でした。初めてオラウータンと出会った瞬間です。
00:27
That evening I came back to the market in the dark
その晩、暗くなった市場に戻ってみると、
00:30
and I heard "uhh, uhh,"
「ウー、ウー」という声が聞こえてきました。
00:33
and sure enough I found a dying orangutan baby on a garbage heap.
思った通り、ゴミの山に捨てられたオラウータンの赤ん坊を見つけました。
00:36
Of course, the cage was salvaged.
もちろん、私はゲージを持ち帰り、
00:41
I took up the little baby,
赤ん坊を取り出して、
00:43
massaged her, forced her to drink
マッサージをしてやり、水を飲ませて
00:45
until she finally started breathing normally.
赤ん坊はようやく正常に呼吸ができるまでになりました。
00:48
This is Uce.
これがUceです
00:51
She's now living in the jungle of Sungai Wain,
彼女は今、Sungai Wainのジャングルに住んでいます。
00:53
and this is Matahari, her second son,
そしてこれが彼女の息子、Matahariです。
00:55
which, by the way, is also the son of the second orangutan I rescued, Dodoy.
Matahariは私が2番目に助けたDodoyの息子でもあるんですよ。
00:57
That changed my life quite dramatically,
この出来事が、私の人生を大きく変えました。
01:02
and as of today, I have almost 1,000 babies in my two centers.
そして現在、1000の赤ん坊が私の2つの施設にいます。
01:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:09
No. No. No. Wrong.
いえ。いえ。違うんです!
01:11
It's horrible. It's a proof of our failing to save them in the wild.
悲惨な事なんです。野生に住む彼らを守れていない証拠なんですから。
01:13
It's not good.
とても悲しいことなんです。
01:16
This is merely proof of everyone failing to do the right thing.
私たちが勝手な行動をしている証拠なんです。
01:18
Having more than all the orangutans in all the zoos in the world together,
世界中の動物園で飼育されている数よりも、たくさんのオラウータンが自然界にいながら、
01:22
just now like victims for every baby,
こうしている今も、赤ん坊の犠牲者のように、
01:26
six have disappeared from the forest.
6頭が森から消え去りました。
01:29
The deforestation, especially for oil palm,
森林破壊。特に欧米向けの
01:32
to provide biofuel for Western countries
バイオ燃料のための油椰子栽培が
01:34
is what's causing these problems.
問題を引き起こしています。
01:37
And those are the peat swamp forests on 20 meters of peat,
元の湿原森林は、20mもの泥炭層上にあって、
01:40
the largest accumulation of organic material in the world.
世界でもっとも広大な有機物質の堆積地なのです。
01:43
When you open this for growing oil palms
これを油椰子栽培のために開拓すると、
01:46
you're creating CO2 volcanoes
CO2の火山を作ってしまいまい、
01:49
that are emitting so much CO2
多大なCO2が排出されるのです。
01:51
that my country is now the third largest emitter of greenhouse gasses in the world,
そのおかげで、インドネシアは中国、アメリカについで
01:54
after China and the United States.
3番目に温室効果ガスの排出量が多い国になりました。
01:59
And we don't have any industry at all --
なんの大規模な産業もなしにです。
02:01
it's only because of this deforestation.
すべて森林破壊によるものなのです。
02:04
And these are horrible images.
悲惨な状況を見ていただければ、わかると思います。
02:07
I'm not going to talk too long about it,
この事について長く話すつもりはありませんが、
02:10
but there are so many of the family of Uce,
Uceの家族の多くは
02:12
which are not so fortunate to live out there in the forest,
その森にしか住むことができず、
02:14
that still have to go through that process.
悲惨な状況下、生き抜かなければなりません。
02:18
And I don't know anymore where to put them.
私も、もうどこに彼らを帰していいかわかりませんでした。
02:20
So I decided that I had to come up with a solution for her
そこで、彼女のためにも、解決策を見つけ出すことを決意したのです。
02:22
but also a solution
解決策は
02:26
that will benefit the people that are trying to exploit those forests,
森林を伐採してきた人々にも有益なものでなければなりません。
02:28
to get their hands on the last timber
木を切り倒すことが、
02:32
and that are causing, in that way,
生息地を破壊し、犠牲を増やすことに
02:35
the loss of habitat and all those victims.
つながっているのですから。
02:38
So I created the place Samboja Lestari,
そこで私は、Samboja Lestariという場所を作り上げました。
02:41
and the idea was,
アイディアはというと、
02:43
if I can do this on the worst possible place that I can think of
もし、私が何も残されていない最悪の場所で
02:45
where there is really nothing left,
成功することができたら、
02:48
no one will have an excuse to say, "Yeah, but ..."
もう誰も「うん、だけど、、」と言い訳はできなくなると思ったんです。
02:50
No. Everyone should be able to follow this.
みんな、できる事はあるのです。
02:54
So we're in East Borneo. This is the place where I started.
ボルネオの東部、そこがプロジェクトを始めた場所です。
02:58
As you can see there's only yellow terrain.
ご覧の通り、黄色の土地しかありません。
03:03
There's nothing left -- just a bit of grass there.
少し草が生えているだけで、何も残されていません。
03:05
In 2002 we had about 50 percent of the people jobless there.
2002年、ここに住む約半数が失業者で
03:08
There was a huge amount of crime.
犯罪も多発していました。
03:12
People spent so much of their money on health issues and drinking water.
住民は、生活費の大半を治療費や、飲み水に費やしました。
03:14
There was no agricultural productivity left.
農業的な生産力は何も残されていませんでした。
03:19
This was the poorest district in the whole province
州の中で一番貧しいエリアで、
03:22
and it was a total extinction of wildlife.
野生動植物は完全に絶滅していました。
03:25
This was like a biological desert.
そこは正に、生物が息絶えた砂漠でした。
03:28
When I stood there in the grass, it's hot -- not even the sound of insects --
とても暑く、そこに立ってみると、聞こえるのは昆虫の鳴き声ではなく、
03:30
just this waving grass.
風にさらされる草のみでした。
03:34
Still, four years later we have created jobs for about 3,000 people.
しかし、4年後、私たちは3千人もの住人に仕事を提供するまでに至り、
03:36
The climate has changed. I will show you:
気候まで変えました。これからお見せします。
03:41
no more flooding, no more fires.
洪水もなく、火災もなく、
03:44
It's no longer the poorest district,
一番貧しい地域でもなくなりました。
03:46
and there is a huge development of biodiversity.
そして生物の多様性も取り戻しました。
03:49
We've got over 1,000 species. We have 137 bird species as of today.
1千種の生物が住んでおり、現在137種の鳥類、
03:51
We have 30 species of reptiles.
30種の爬虫類がいます。
03:57
So what happened here? We created a huge economic failure in this forest.
何が起こったのでしょう?人間はこの森で、経済的な失敗を犯していたのです。
03:59
So basically the whole process of destruction
基本的に、森林破壊の工程は
04:05
had gone a bit slower than what is happening now with the oil palm.
石油枯渇問題の過程よりゆるやかなペースで起こっていました。
04:08
But we saw the same thing.
しかし、結果的には同じです。
04:11
We had slash and burn agriculture;
焼き畑農業をご存知ですよね。
04:13
people cannot afford the fertilizer,
農薬を買うことができない人々が、
04:15
so they burn the trees and have the minerals available there;
木々と、蓄積されたミネラルの半分を焼き払いました。
04:17
the fires become more frequent,
森林火災が多くなり、
04:20
and after a while you're stuck with an area of land
しばらくすると、痩せた土地だけが残され、
04:22
where there is no fertility left.
途方にくれることになります。
04:25
There are no trees left.
1本の木もなくなってしまいます。
04:27
Still, in this place, in this grassland
しかし、この草地の丘に
04:29
where you can see our very first office there on that hill,
私たちは最初のオフィスを建てて、
04:32
four years later, there is this one green blop on the Earth's surface ...
4年後、地球上に新しい緑のエリアが現れたのです。
04:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:40
And there are all these animals, and all these people happy,
そこでは、動物たちと、住人が共に幸せに暮らしています。
04:42
and there's this economic value.
独自の経済力も兼ね備えています。
04:45
So how's this possible?
さて、どうやって?
04:47
It was quite simple. If you'll look at the steps:
各段階を踏むと、それほど難しくありません。
04:49
we bought the land, we dealt with the fire,
土地を買い、森林火災に対処し、
04:51
and then only, we started doing the reforestation
その後に、農業と林業を合わせた
04:53
by combining agriculture with forestry.
緑化に取り掛かりました。
04:56
Only then we set up the infrastructure and management and the monetary.
そして、インフラ、管理方法、経済支援を立ち上げました。
04:59
But we made sure that in every step of the way
どの段階でも、地域の人々の携わりを
05:03
the local people were going to be fully involved
欠くことはありませんでした。
05:06
so that no outside forces would be able to interfere with that.
そうする事で、外部からの抗力を防ぐことができ、
05:09
The people would become the defenders of that forest.
住民が、森を保護する側になったのです。
05:13
So we do the "people, profit, planet" principles,
”住民、利益、地球”を原則とし、
05:17
but we do it in addition
それに付け加えるのは、
05:19
to a sure legal status --
法的なステータスです。
05:21
because if the forest belongs to the state,
もし森林が国のものであれば、
05:23
people say, "It belongs to me, it belongs to everyone."
人は口々に、自分のものだ、みんなのものだと言だすからです。
05:25
And then we apply all these other principles
そして、他の原理も応用しました。例えば、
05:28
like transparency, professional management, measurable results,
計画の透明性や、プロの管理計算の結果。
05:31
scalability, [unclear], etc.
スケーラビリティなどです。
05:35
What we did was we formulated recipes --
私たちは、何もない状態から、
05:38
how to go from a starting situation where you have nothing
目標のある状態を作り上げていく
05:41
to a target situation.
レシピを作ったのです。
05:44
You formulate a recipe based upon the factors you can control,
まずは、コントロールできる要素から、レシピ作りが始まります。
05:46
whether it be the skills or the fertilizer or the plant choice.
技術だったり、農薬や、植物のチョイスなどです。
05:51
And then you look at the outputs and you start measuring what comes out.
それからの生産高に注目して、得られたものを記録します。
05:55
Now in this recipe you also have the cost.
そしてこのレシピにはコストも含まれます。
06:00
You also know how much labor is needed.
必要な労働量も考慮します。
06:02
If you can drop this recipe on the map
もし、このレシピを地図上に描くのならば、
06:05
on a sandy soil, on a clay soil,
砂地や、粘土
06:08
on a steep slope, on flat soil,
斜面や、平地など、それぞれに
06:10
you put those different recipes; if you combine them,
適したレシピが必要です。それらを混合することによって
06:12
out of that comes a business plan,
ビジネスプランや作業計画が
06:15
comes a work plan, and you can optimize it
出来上がります。
06:17
for the amount of labor you have available or for the amount of fertilizer you have,
持ち合わせている労働力と、農薬を念頭において計画を進める事が
06:20
and you can do it.
成功への鍵です。
06:24
This is how it looks like in practice. We have this grass we want to get rid of.
これが実際の効果です。まず雑草を根元から
06:26
It exudes [unclear]-like compounds from the roots.
取り除きます。
06:30
The acacia trees are of a very low value
アカシアは一見重要でないように思われますが、
06:33
but we need them to restore the micro-climate, to protect the soil
地域の天候を保ち、土壌を保護するため、そして
06:36
and to shake out the grasses.
草地を改良するために必要なのです。
06:39
And after eight years they might actually yield some timber --
8年後には、木材として利用もできます。
06:42
that is, if you can preserve it in the right way,
きちんと保管してやれば、竹の皮と共に
06:45
which we can do with bamboo peels.
建築資材として利用することができます。
06:48
It's an old temple-building technique from Japan
日本の古寺建設の技術に用いられていますが、
06:50
but bamboo is very fire-susceptible.
竹はとても火に弱く
06:53
So if we would plant that in the beginning
もし、初期に植えていたら、
06:55
we would have a very high risk of losing everything again.
またすべてを失ってしまう可能性が高かったのです。
06:57
So we plant it later, along the waterways
そこで後に、水際に植えました。
07:01
to filter the water, provide the raw products
水をろ過し、木材が手に入る頃に
07:03
just in time for when the timber becomes available.
資材を提供してくれます。
07:05
So the idea is: how to integrate these flows
一定の空間で、限られた手段を用いて
07:08
in space, over time and with the limited means you have.
変わりゆく過程をどう融合させるかがポイントです。
07:11
So we plant the trees, we plant these pineapples
植林をして、パイナップルを植えました。
07:16
and beans and ginger in between, to reduce the competition for the trees,
そして、生姜と豆を中間に育て、木々の生存競争を減少させました。
07:18
the crop fertilizer. Organic material is useful for the agricultural crops,
使った有機農薬は、農産物や人にやさしく、
07:22
for the people, but also helps the trees. The farmers have free land,
木々の成長も助けます。住民は自由に使える土地を手にし、
07:27
the system yields early income, the orangutans get healthy food
初期段階での収入源を確保し、オラウータンは健康的な餌を得ました。
07:30
and we can speed up ecosystem regeneration
そして、生態系の再生過程を早める事にも成功しました。
07:34
while even saving some money.
同時に資金を貯めながら。
07:37
So beautiful. What a theory.
すばらしいセオリーでしょう!
07:39
But is it really that easy?
でも簡単なことではないんです。
07:41
Not really, because if you looked at what happened in 1998,
1998年に何が起こったかを見ていただければわかると思います。
07:44
the fire started.
火災が起こったんです。
07:47
This is an area of about 50 million hectares.
約5千万ヘクターの土地がこれです。
07:49
January.
1月
07:51
February.
2月
07:53
March.
3月
07:55
April.
4月
07:57
May.
5月
07:58
We lost 5.5 million hectares in just a matter of a few months.
550万ヘクターもの土地をたった数ヶ月で失ってしまいました。
07:59
This is because we have 10,000 of those underground fires
1万もの地下火災が起こったからなんです。
08:03
that you also have in Pennsylvania here in the United States.
ここ、アメリカのペンシルベニアでも起こりますよね。
08:06
And once the soil gets dried, you're in a dry season -- you get cracks,
土壌が干上がって、乾期に入ると、地面にひび割れが生じます。
08:10
oxygen goes in, flames come out and the problem starts all over again.
酸素が入っていって、火災が起こる。ふりだしに戻ってしまうのです。
08:13
So how to break that cycle?
このサイクルをどう打破しましょうか?
08:17
Fire is the biggest problem.
火災は一番やっかいな問題です。
08:19
This is what it looked like for three months.
3ヶ月この状態でした。
08:21
For three months, the automatic lights outside did not go off
3ヶ月間、自動点灯ライトが消えることはありませんでした。
08:24
because it was that dark.
それほどずっと暗かったんです。
08:27
We lost all the crops. No children gained weight for over a year;
すべての農産物を失い、子供達の体重は1年以上増えず、
08:29
they lost 12 IQ points. It was a disaster
IQレベルも低下し、最悪の状態でした。
08:33
for orangutans and people.
オラウータンにも住民にも。
08:36
So these fires are really the first things to work on.
火災に対処することが最も重要になるのです。
08:38
That was why I put it as a single point up there.
ですから、ここにキーポイントとして挙げました。
08:41
And you need the local people for that because these grasslands,
地域住民の協力も重要です。
08:44
once they start burning ... It goes through it like a windstorm
一旦彼らが草原を焼き始めると、それが風のように広がり、
08:47
and you lose again the last bit of ash and nutrients
残された灰や栄養は、雨によって海に流され
08:51
to the first rainfall -- going to the sea
失うことになり。海では
08:54
killing off the coral reefs there.
サンゴ礁を破壊する原因にもなるのです。
08:56
So you have to do it with the local people.
地域住民との連携が欠かせません。
08:59
That is the short-term solution but you also need a long-term solution.
これらの短期解決策の他に、長期解決策も必要です。
09:01
So what we did is, we created
そこで、私たちは
09:04
a ring of sugar palms around the area.
エリアを円状に囲むように砂糖椰子を植えました。
09:06
These sugar palms turn out to be fire-resistant --
砂糖椰子は火に強く
09:09
also flood-resistant, by the way --
洪水予防になり
09:12
and they provide a lot of income for local people.
そして、住民の収入源にもなります。
09:14
This is what it looks like:
このような植物で
09:18
the people have to tap them twice a day -- just a millimeter slice --
小さな切込みを入れて、1日2回、樹液を取り出します。
09:20
and the only thing you harvest is sugar water,
二酸化炭素に雨、そして少しの日光から
09:23
carbon dioxide, rain fall and a little bit of sunshine.
砂糖水が得られるのです。
09:26
In principle, you make those trees into
これらの木を、植物の
09:30
biological photovoltaic cells.
光電池にしてしまうというのが原理です。
09:32
And you can create so much energy from this --
たくさんのエネルギーが得られるんですよ。
09:35
they produce three times more energy per hectare per year,
1年、1ヘクターにつき3倍ものエネルギーを提供してくれます。
09:38
because you can tap them on a daily basis.
毎日樹液を採取できるからです。
09:43
You don't need to harvest [unclear]
他の植物や農産物を
09:45
or any other of the crops.
収穫する必要もありません。
09:47
So this is the combination where we have all this genetic potential in the tropics,
これは、満ち溢れた熱帯の、生態系の可能性と
09:49
which is still unexploited, and doing it in combination with technology.
テクノロジーをうまく組み合わせた結果です。
09:53
But also your legal side needs to be in very good order.
しかし。成功を導くには、きちんとした法的手続きも必要です。
09:57
So we bought that land,
ですから、土地を買い
10:01
and here is where we started our project --
そこでプロジェクトを始めたというわけです。
10:03
in the middle of nowhere.
全く何もないところから。
10:05
And if you zoom in a bit you can see that all of this area
もう少し拡大してみると、エリア全体が、土の種類によって
10:07
is divided into strips that go over different types of soil,
分類されているのがご覧いただけると思います。
10:11
and we were actually monitoring,
そして、資金を費やし
10:14
measuring every single tree in these 2,000 hectares, 5,000 acres.
2千ヘクター(5千エーカー)の土地に生える全ての木の測定をしています。
10:17
And this forest is quite different.
この森は別格なんです。
10:23
What I really did was I just followed nature,
私はただ、自然の法則に従いました。
10:26
and nature doesn't know monocultures,
自然の法則に”単作”は存在せず、
10:28
but a natural forest is multilayered.
”多様性”が不可欠です。
10:31
That means that both in the ground and above the ground
地中でも地面上でも。
10:34
it can make better use of the available light,
それが、日光の有効利用を可能にし
10:36
it can store more carbon in the system, it can provide more functions.
二酸化炭素の貯蓄量を増やして、最大限に機能します。
10:39
But, it's more complicated. It's not that simple, and you have to work with the people.
しかし、それはとても複雑で、ここでも住民との協力が大切になるのです。
10:44
So, just like nature,
そこで、自然界のように
10:48
we also grow fast planting trees and underneath that,
成長の早い木を植え、その根元には
10:51
we grow the slower growing, primary-grain forest trees of a very high diversity
成長が遅く、日光を有効活用する、バラエティーに富んだ熱帯樹を
10:54
that can optimally use that light. Then,
植えました。そして、
11:00
what is just as important: get the right fungi in there
忘れてはいけないのが、適した菌類を共生させてやることです。
11:02
that will grow into those leaves, bring back the nutrients
木の葉が枯れ落ちても、菌類がそれらの分解を助け
11:06
to the roots of the trees that have just dropped that leaf within 24 hours.
葉が落ちてから24時間以内に、再び根に栄養を還元してくれます。
11:09
And they become like nutrient pumps.
やがてこれらが栄養ポンプとなります。
11:13
You need the bacteria to fix nitrogen,
窒素固定にはバクテリアが必要ですし
11:15
and without those microorganisms, you won't have any performance at all.
それらの微生物なしでは、なんの効果も期待できません。
11:18
And then we started planting -- only 1,000 trees a day.
その後、1日1千本の植林を始めました。
11:23
We could have planted many, many more, but we didn't want to
もっと多くの木を植えることもできましたが、あえて避けました。
11:27
because we wanted to keep the number of jobs stable.
長期の安定した労働を保持したかったからです。
11:30
We didn't want to lose the people
ここで働くことになる住民を
11:33
that are going to work in that plantation.
失いたくなかったのです。
11:36
And we do a lot of work here.
とても努力しました。
11:40
We use indicator plants to look at what soil types,
土壌の種類を見分けるために、指標植物を使いました。
11:42
or what vegetables will grow, or what trees will grow here.
どの野菜や木が育つかを調べてみたんです。
11:45
And we have monitored every single one of those trees from space.
1本1本の木を、宇宙からチェックしました。
11:48
This is what it looks like in reality;
実際にはこういった感じです。
11:53
you have this irregular ring around it,
100メーター幅の土地を
11:55
with strips of 100 meters wide, with sugar palms
円状に砂糖椰子で囲むことによって、
11:57
that can provide income for 648 families.
648世帯に収入をもたらしています。
12:01
It's only a small part of the area.
このエリア内には小さな
12:04
The nursery, in here, is quite different.
ユニークな育苗所があります。
12:07
If you look at the number of tree species we have in Europe, for instance,
例えば、ヨーロッパ生息する木々の種類と比べてみましょう。
12:10
from the Urals up to England, you know how many?
ウラルからイングランドまでの地域で、どれくらいだと思います?
12:13
165.
165なんです。
12:16
In this nursery, we're going to grow 10 times more than the number of species.
この育苗所ではその10倍の数の種を育てています。
12:18
Can you imagine?
驚きでしょう?
12:22
You do need to know what you are working with,
扱う植物のことを熟知する事も大切ですが、
12:24
but it's that diversity which makes it work.
自然界の”多様性”こそが、成功への鍵なのです。
12:26
That you can go from this zero situation,
ゼロの状態から改善するためには、
12:29
by planting the vegetables and the trees, or directly, the trees
野菜を育て、草地だったところに
12:32
in the lines in that grass there,
木々を植え
12:36
putting up the buffer zone, producing your compost,
緩衝地帯を作り、堆肥を生産し、
12:38
and then making sure that at every stage of that up growing forest
そして、どの森林再生段階でも、農産物の生産を
12:41
there are crops that can be used.
確保します。
12:46
In the beginning, maybe pineapples and beans and corn;
最初は、パイナップルや豆、とうもろこし。
12:48
in the second phase, there will be bananas and papayas;
その次に、バナナとパパイヤ。
12:50
later on, there will be chocolate and chilies.
その後はカカオやチリ。
12:53
And then slowly, the trees start taking over,
そして徐々に木が生い茂り、
12:56
bringing in produce from the fruits, from the timber, from the fuel wood.
フルーツ、木材、薪などの農産物が手に入るようになります、
12:58
And finally, the sugar palm forest takes over
最後には、砂糖椰子が成長し、
13:02
and provides the people with permanent income.
永続的な収入源となります。
13:05
On the top left, underneath those green stripes,
左上の、緑色のストライプ下の、
13:07
you see some white dots -- those are actually individual pineapple plants
白い斑点は、個々のパイナップルの株で、
13:10
that you can see from space.
宇宙からでも見えるんです。
13:14
And in that area we started growing some acacia trees
このエリアには、アカシアの木も育てました。
13:16
that you just saw before.
先ほどお見せしましたよね。
13:21
So this is after one year.
さて、これが1年後の様子です。
13:23
And this is after two years.
そして2年後。
13:25
And that's green. If you look from the tower --
これは塔の上から見た図です。
13:27
this is when we start attacking the grass.
この時期に草の除去に取り掛かりました。
13:30
We plant in the seedlings
バナナや、パパイヤといった
13:33
mixed with the bananas, the papayas, all the crops for the local people,
地域住民のための農産物の苗木を、植え付け、空いた間隔では
13:35
but the trees are growing up fast in between as well.
木々がどんどん大きくなります。
13:39
And three years later, 137 species of birds are living here.
そして3年後、137種の鳥類の住処となるのです。
13:42
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:45
So we lowered air temperature three to five degrees Celsius.
そしてさらに、気温を3~5℃下げることにもつながりました。
13:51
Air humidity is up 10 percent.
湿度は10%上昇し、
13:55
Cloud cover -- I'm going to show it to you -- is up.
後ほどお見せしますが、雲量も増え、
13:57
Rainfall is up.
降水量が増えました。
13:59
And all these species and income.
全てが、収入源につながります。
14:01
This ecolodge that I built here,
私がここに建てたエコロッジ、
14:03
three years before, was an empty, yellow field.
3年前までは褐色の荒野の中にありました。
14:05
This transponder that we operate with the European Space Agency --
欧州宇宙機関と共同でオペレートするこの応答機は
14:08
it gives us the benefit that every satellite that comes over to calibrate itself
上空を通過する全ての衛星の情報を処理し、
14:12
is taking a picture.
画像にします。
14:16
Those pictures we use to analyze how much carbon, how the forest is developing,
その画像を元に、二酸化炭素量や、森林再生の経過などを分析します。
14:18
and we can monitor every tree using satellite images through our cooperation.
この衛星画像を利用して、全ての木々を観察することも可能です。
14:22
We can use these data now
そしてこのデータを、
14:28
to provide other regions with recipes and the same technology.
森再生方法や技術と共に、他の地域に提供できるまでになりました。
14:30
We actually have it already with Google Earth.
すでにGoogle Earthで利用されています。
14:34
If you would use a little bit of your technology to put tracking devices in trucks,
データの変化を処理する技術と、
14:36
and use Google Earth in combination with that,
Google Earthを駆使すれば、
14:40
you could directly tell what palm oil has been sustainably produced,
どのパームオイルが環境にやさしく生産されたか、どの企業が
14:43
which company is stealing the timber,
木を切り倒しているのかもわかります。
14:47
and you could save so much more carbon
熱帯雨林は地球上最大の
14:50
than with any measure of saving energy here.
二酸化炭素貯蔵庫なのです。
14:52
So this is the Samboja Lestari area.
これがSamboja地域です。
14:55
You measure how the trees grow back,
森が再生していくのも見て取れますが、
14:58
but you can also measure the biodiversity coming back.
さらに、生態系の多様性が蘇ってくるのもわかります。
15:00
And biodiversity is an indicator of how much water can be balanced,
その多様性によって、どれだけの水または薬草が
15:04
how many medicines can be kept here.
保たれているのかがわかります。
15:08
And finally I made it into the rain machine
そして、私は自然の降水機を作りあげました。
15:11
because this forest is now creating its own rain.
この森自身が雨を降らせているのです。
15:14
This nearby city of Balikpapan has a big problem with water;
近くにあるBalikpapanの町は水に悩まされていました。
15:17
it's 80 percent surrounded by seawater,
8割を海水に囲まれていて
15:21
and we have now a lot of intrusion there.
侵食も多くなってきました。
15:24
Now we looked at the clouds above this forest;
この森の上空の雲を見てみましょう
15:26
we looked at the reforestation area, the semi-open area and the open area.
reinforestエリア、semi-openエリア、openエリアがありますね。
15:29
And look at these images.
このイメージを見てください。
15:33
I'll just run them very quickly through.
ささっと流してしまいますが、
15:36
In the tropics, raindrops are not formed from ice crystals,
熱帯では、雨粒は温帯でのように、氷の結晶から
15:38
which is the case in the temperate zones,
できるのではなく、
15:41
you need the trees with [unclear], chemicals that come out of the leaves of the trees
木の葉から放出される物質が雨粒の
15:43
that initiate the raindrops.
もとになるのです。
15:48
So you create a cool place where clouds can accumulate,
雲が蓄積されるひんやりとした場所と、木が雨を降らせるのに
15:50
and you have the trees to initiate the rain.
必要なのです。
15:54
And look, there's now 11.2 percent more clouds --
そして、見てください。3年後には雲が
15:56
already, after three years.
11.2%増えました。
16:00
If you look at rainfall, it was already up 20 percent at that time.
降水量に着目すると、3年目には既に20%増で、
16:02
Let's look at the next year,
翌年も
16:07
and you can see that that trend is continuing.
増え続けています。
16:09
Where at first we had a small cap of higher rainfall,
最初は狭い範囲で降水量が増加し、
16:11
that cap is now widening and getting higher.
その範囲は広がり降水量も多くなってきています、
16:14
And if we look at the rainfall pattern
雨の降り方ですが、
16:17
above Samboja Lestari, it used to be the driest place,
Samboja Lestari上はかつて最も乾いていました。
16:20
but now you see consistently see a peak of rain forming there.
しかし現在では、雨量が最も多い地帯になりました。
16:24
So you can actually change the climate.
実際に天候を変えることは可能なんです。
16:28
When there are trade winds of course the effect disappears,
もちろん、貿易風の影響で効果は消え去りますが、
16:32
but afterwards, as soon as the wind stabilizes,
一旦風が落ち着くと、
16:36
you see again that the rainfall peaks come back above this area.
雨の波が、この地域上に再び現れます。
16:39
So to say it is hopeless is not the right thing to do,
「絶望的だ」と言いきってしまうのは、間違っています。
16:43
because we actually can make that difference
実際、現状打破できるのですから。
16:48
if you integrate the various technologies.
あらゆる技術を組み合わせる事で。
16:50
And it's nice to have the science, but it still depends mostly upon the people,
サイエンスも大切ですが、大半は住民の協力や、自身の努力や
16:54
on your education.
教育によるものです。
16:58
We have our farmer schools.
農業学校も設立しましたが、
17:00
But the real success of course, is our band --
一番の成功はやはり、このバンドでしょう。
17:02
because if a baby is born, we will play, so everyone's our family
赤ちゃんが産まれると、みんなで演奏して歓迎します。
17:04
and you don't make trouble with your family.
結局は、家族が一番大切なのです。
17:08
This is how it looks.
さて、これを見ていただくと、
17:10
We have this road going around the area,
道路がありますよね。そのおかげで
17:12
which brings the people electricity and water from our own area.
住民に電力と水を供給できるようになりました。
17:14
We have the zone with the sugar palms,
砂糖椰子の栽培エリアもありますし、
17:18
and then we have this fence with very thorny palms
トゲ椰子でフェンスも作りました。
17:20
to keep the orangutans -- that we provide with a place to live in the middle --
オラウータンの住処を中央に確保し、人間のスペースと
17:22
and the people apart.
隔離するためです。
17:27
And inside, we have this area for reforestation
フェンス内には、森林再生エリアがあり、
17:29
as a gene bank to keep all that material alive,
生物の育成を保持する、遺伝子バンクの役割があります。
17:31
because for the last 12 years
過去12年間
17:34
not a single seedling of the tropical hardwood trees has grown up
たった一本として熱帯に生息する堅木が育たなかったのです。
17:36
because the climatic triggers have disappeared.
これも気候変動によるものでした。
17:40
All the seeds get eaten.
種はすべて食べられてしまいますし。
17:43
So now we do the monitoring on the inside --
そこで、内部のモニタリングを徹底します。
17:45
from towers, satellites, ultralights.
塔から、衛生から、そしてグライダーから。
17:47
Each of the families that have sold their land now get a piece of land back.
一旦土地を手放した人達は、再び自分達の土地を取り戻し、
17:50
And it has two nice fences of tropical hardwood trees --
熱帯樹木のフェンスも作りました。
17:54
you have the shade trees planted in year one,
1年目に日陰用の木を植え、
17:58
then you underplanted with the sugar palms,
その後、砂糖椰子を植えて
18:00
and you plant this thorny fence.
いばらのフェンスを建てます。
18:03
And after a few years, you can remove some of those shade trees.
数年後には、日陰用の木は収穫できるまでになり、
18:05
The people get that acacia timber which we have preserved with the bamboo peel,
アカシア木材と保存しておいた竹を用いて
18:09
and they can build a house, they have some fuel wood to cook with.
家を建てたり、火をおこす燃料にもなります。
18:13
And they can start producing from the trees as many as they like.
この木材のおかげで、たくさんの事が可能になり、
18:16
They have enough income for three families.
3家族分の収入をも、もたらします。
18:20
But whatever you do in that program, it has to be fully supported by the people,
このプログラムは、すべてにおいて住民のサポートが大切です。
18:24
meaning that you also have to adjust it to the local, cultural values.
すなわち、地域や文化に適したものでなければいけません。
18:28
There is no simple one recipe for one place.
それぞれの土地に適応したレシピが必要です。
18:32
You also have to make sure that it is very difficult to corrupt --
綿密に
18:36
that it's transparent.
必要があります。
18:40
Like here, in Samboja Lestari,
Samboja Lestariの場合、
18:42
we divide that ring in groups of 20 families.
1区域の土地を20家族に分けました。
18:44
If one member trespasses the agreement,
もし、1人が約束を破って
18:47
and does cut down trees,
木を伐採したら、
18:49
the other 19 members have to decide what's going to happen to him.
ほかの19家族が、その1人の処分を考えます。
18:51
If the group doesn't take action,
もしグループが何もしなかったら、
18:54
the other 33 groups have to decide what is going to happen to the group
ほかの33のグループが計画を乱しているグループの
18:56
that doesn't comply with those great deals that we are offering them.
処分を考えます。
19:00
In North Sulawesi it is the cooperative --
協調性のある
19:04
they have a democratic culture there,
民主的な文化では
19:07
so there you can use the local justice system to protect your system.
その地域の道徳を生かして、計画を練るとよいでしょう。
19:09
In summary, if you look at it, in year one the people can sell their land
まとめると、1年目に住民は土地を売って、収入を得ます。
19:14
to get income, but they get jobs back in the construction and the reforestation,
そして、彼らに建設業や森林再生の仕事や、オラウータンの世話
19:17
the working with the orangutans, and they can use the waste wood to make handicraft.
木工工芸品作成の仕事に就いてもらいます。
19:22
They also get free land in between the trees,
植林した木の間の土地は無償で住民に返し、
19:26
where they can grow their crops.
農作物を育ててもらいます。
19:29
They can now sell part of those fruits to the orangutan project.
育った果物の一部はオラウータン救済計画が買い取ります。
19:31
They get building material for houses,
建築材も手に入りますし、
19:35
a contract for selling the sugar,
砂糖椰子を売る契約もできます。
19:37
so we can produce huge amounts of ethanol and energy locally.
その結果、地域で燃料を作り出すことが可能になります。
19:39
They get all these other benefits: environmentally, money,
環境改善をしながら、お金や教育などの利益が得られる
19:43
they get education -- it's a great deal.
すばらしい計画なのです。
19:46
And everything is based upon that one thing --
すべては1つの理念に基づいています。
19:48
make sure that forest remains there.
森を守るということです。
19:51
So if we want to help the orangutans --
オラウータンを助けたかったら、
19:54
what I actually set out to do --
これは私が実際やったことですが、
19:57
we must make sure that the local people are the ones that benefit.
地域の人々こそに、利益がある計画を立てることが大切です。
20:00
Now I think the real key to doing it, to give a simple answer,
シンプルですが、一番のキーポイントは
20:04
is integration.
"調和"です。
20:08
I hope -- if you want to know more, you can read more.
詳しく知りたい方はもっと読んでみてください。
20:10
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:14
Translated by Akari Takenishi
Reviewed by Hikari Fukuda

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Willie Smits - Conservationist
Willie Smits has devoted his life to saving the forest habitat of orangutans, the "thinkers of the jungle." As towns, farms and wars encroach on native forests, Smits works to save what is left.

Why you should listen

Willie Smits works at the complicated intersection of humankind, the animal world and our green planet. In his early work as a forester in Indonesia, he came to a deep understanding of that triple relationship, as he watched the growing population of Sulawesi move into (or burn for fuel) forests that are home to the orangutan. These intelligent animals were being killed for food, traded as pets or simply failing to thrive as their forest home degraded.

Smits believes that to rebuild orangutan populations, we must first rebuild their forest habitat -- which means helping local people find options other than the short-term fix of harvesting forests to survive. His Masarang Foundation raises money and awareness to restore habitat forests around the world -- and to empower local people. In 2007, Masarang opened a palm-sugar factory that uses thermal energy to turn sugar palms (fast-growing trees that thrive in degraded soils) into sugar and even ethanol, returning cash and power to the community and, with luck, starting the cycle toward a better future for people, trees and orangs.

More profile about the speaker
Willie Smits | Speaker | TED.com