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TED2009

Nalini Nadkarni: Conserving the canopy

ナリニ・ナドカルニ:「林冠の保全」

February 6, 2009

熱帯雨林の木々に住む鳥やサルたちはその熱帯雨林独特の生態系に守られています。ナリニ・ナドカルニはこの高木の枝葉が茂る林冠の世界を探求し、木下の世界に住む私たちとダンス、アートを通じ共存することを伝えます。

Nalini Nadkarni - Tree researcher
Called "the queen of canopy research," Nalini Nadkarni explores the rich, vital world found in the tops of trees. She communicates what she finds to non-scientists -- with the help of poets, preachers and prisoners. Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Trees are wonderful arenas for discovery
木にはすばらしい発見をする場所がたくさんあります
00:18
because of their tall stature, their complex structure,
その背の高く、複雑な構造
00:22
the biodiversity they foster and their quiet beauty.
その静かなる美しさと生物の多様性
00:26
I used to climb trees for fun all the time
私はいつも木に登るのが大好きでした
00:30
and now, as a grown-up, I have made my profession understanding trees
今、大人になり科学を通じて
00:32
and forests, through the medium of science.
木と森を理解する職業に就きました
00:37
The most mysterious part of forests is the upper tree canopy.
森の中でもっとも神秘的なのが枝葉の茂る林冠です
00:39
And Dr. Terry Erwin, in 1983,
1983年、テリー・アーウィン博士は
00:43
called the canopy, "the last biotic frontier."
この林冠を”最後の生命のフロンティア”と呼びました
00:45
I'd like to take you all on a journey up to the forest canopy,
これから、この木々がそびえる林冠の世界へとお連れし
00:49
and share with you what canopy researchers are asking
林冠の研究者達は何を問うているのか
00:52
and also how they're communicating with other people outside of science.
またどのように世界へ問いかけているのかを紹介します
00:55
Let's start our journey on the forest floor
まずは森を足元から見ましょう
01:00
of one of my study sites in Costa Rica.
研究拠点、コスタリカです
01:02
Because of the overhanging leaves and branches,
多くの葉や枝が茂っているため
01:04
you'll notice that the understory is very dark,
お気づきのように、足元はとても暗いのです
01:07
it's very still.
とても静か
01:10
And what I'd like to do is take you up to the canopy,
では高木の上、林冠へとお連れします
01:12
not by putting all of you into ropes and harnesses,
実際に皆さんをロープで吊り上げる代わりに
01:14
but rather showing you a very short clip
短いビデオをお見せしましょう
01:17
from a National Geographic film called "Heroes of the High Frontier."
ナショナルジオグラフィック「天空の辺境の英雄たち」より
01:19
This was filmed in Monteverde, Costa Rica
コスタリカ、モンテベルデで撮影されたものです
01:23
and I think it gives us the best impression of what it's like
絞め殺しイチジクに上る感覚が
01:25
to climb a giant strangler fig.
良くわかると思います
01:28
(Music)
(音楽)
01:31
(Growling)
(うなり声)
02:01
(Rustling)
(擦れる音)
02:04
So what you'll see up there is that it's really like the atmosphere of an open field,
木々の上には草原のような世界が広がっています
02:15
and there are tremendous numbers of plants and animals that have adapted
そこには数え切れないほどの植物や動物が
02:19
to make their way and their life in the canopy.
林冠に適するよう進化をしました
02:22
Common groups, like the sloth here, have clear adaptations
例えばこのナマケモノは
02:24
for forest canopies, hanging on with their very strong claws.
鋭いかぎつめを使い木にぶら下がれるよう進化しました
02:28
But I'd like to describe to you a more subtle kind of diversity
もう少し小さな多様性について話しましょう
02:31
and tell you about the ants.
蟻についてです
02:34
There are 10,000 species of ants that taxonomists --
10,000種もの蟻が
02:36
people who describe and name animals -- have named.
分類学者によって命名されました
02:39
4,000 of those ants live exclusively in the forest canopy.
そのうち4,000種もの蟻がこの林冠だけに生息しています
02:42
One of the reasons I tell you about ants
なぜ蟻について語るかというと
02:46
is because of my husband, who is in fact an ant taxonomist
私の夫が蟻の分類学者であり
02:49
and when we got married, he promised to name an ant after me, which he did --
結婚した時、蟻に私の名前をつけると約束したからです
02:52
Procryptocerus nalini, a canopy ant.
プロクリプトシラス・ナリニ、林冠に生息する蟻です
02:56
We've had two children, August Andrew and Erika
そして二人の子供、アウガスアンドリューとエリカ
02:58
and actually, he named ants after them.
彼らの名前も蟻に付けられました
03:01
So we may be the only family that has an ant named after each one of us.
蟻に自分の名前がついた唯一の家族かもしれません
03:03
But my passion -- in addition to Jack and my children --
家族の他に私が情熱を注いでいるのは
03:07
are the plants, the so-called epiphytes,
植物、特に着生植物です
03:11
those plants that grow up on trees.
木の上に育つ着生植物は
03:13
They don't have roots that go into trunks nor to the forest floor.
着生する木の幹や土に根を下ろしません
03:16
But rather, it is their leaves that are adapted
着生植物は葉から
03:20
to intercept the dissolved nutrients that come to them in the form of mist and fog.
霧やもやに含まれる養分をとるのです
03:22
These plants occur in great diversity,
これら着生植物は
03:27
over 28,000 species around the world.
世界に28,000種以上もあり
03:30
They grow in tropical forests like this one
このような熱帯雨林に生息しています
03:32
and they also grow in temperate rainforests, that we find in Washington state.
ワシントン州の温暖な温帯雨林でも見つかっています
03:35
These epiphytes are mainly dominated by the mosses.
このような着生植物で多く見られるのはコケです
03:38
One thing I want to point out is that underneath these live epiphytes,
重要な点はこれらの着生植物が死に
03:41
as they die and decompose, they actually construct an arboreal soil,
分解された後には樹上性の土が作られることです
03:45
both in the temperate zone and in the tropics.
温帯と熱帯地域の両方で作られます
03:49
And these mosses, generated by decomposing,
主にコケの分解によって生まれるのですが
03:52
are like peat moss in your garden.
こういったコケはあなたの庭にもあるミズゴケのように
03:56
They have a tremendous capacity for holding on to nutrients and water.
沢山の水と栄養を蓄える力があります
03:58
One of the surprising things I discovered
驚くことに
04:01
is that, if you pull back with me on those mats of epiphytes,
この着生植物をめくってみると
04:04
what you'll find underneath them are connections, networks
沢山の網のような
04:07
of what we call canopy roots.
キャノピールーツという根がはっているのです
04:11
These are not epiphyte roots:
これらは着生植物の根ではなく
04:13
these are roots that emerge from the trunk and branch of the host trees themselves.
着生される親木の幹や枝から生えてくる根です
04:15
And so those epiphytes are actually paying the landlord a bit of rent
つまり、着生植物は住み着く木に貢献をし
04:18
in exchange for being supported high above the forest floor.
その代わりに高木に住むことができるのです
04:22
I was interested, and my canopy researcher colleagues have been interested
私も同僚も林冠とそれを取り巻く森の植物の
04:26
in the dynamics of the canopy plants that live in the forest.
進化と発達の変遷に心を惹かれたのです
04:29
We've done stripping experiments
私達は着生植物をはがしてから
04:32
where we've removed mats of epiphytes
どれくらいの速さで再着生するのか
04:34
and looked at the rates of recolonization.
という研究をしました
04:36
We had predicted that they would grow back very quickly
私達ははじめ、再生速度はとても速く
04:38
and that they would come in encroaching from the side.
端の方から忍び寄るように戻ると予想しました
04:41
What we found, however, was that they took an extremely long time --
ところが、とても長い年月が必要だとわかったのです
04:43
over 20 years -- to regenerate,
元通りになるのには20年以上が必要です
04:47
starting from the bottom and growing up.
木の根元から上へと成長し
04:49
And even now, after 25 years,
25年以上たった今もなお
04:51
they're not up there, they have not recolonized completely.
同じ高さに同じ状態に再生はしないのです
04:53
And I use this little image to say
私はこのイメージをよく使うのですが
04:56
this is what happens to mosses.
コケたちはこうなるのです
04:59
If it's gone, it's gone,
一度なくなったらそれまで
05:01
and if you're really lucky you might get something growing back from the bottom.
とってもラッキーだったら、下から生えてくるかもしれない
05:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:05
So, recolonization is really very slow.
お分かりのとおり、再着生にはとても時間がかかるのです
05:06
These canopy communities are fragile.
これら林冠は壊れやすいものの集まりなのです
05:09
Well, when we look out, you and I, over that canopy
私達がその手つかずの森で
05:12
of the intact primary forest,
林冠を見上げると
05:15
what we see is this enormous carpet of carbon.
巨大な炭素の層が広がって見えます
05:17
One of the challenges that canopy researchers are attacking today
林冠の研究員が今挑戦していることの一つが
05:21
is trying to understand the amount of carbon that is being sequestered.
森がどれくらいの炭素を取り入れているか解明することです
05:24
We know it's a lot,
多いというのはわかっていますが
05:28
but we do not yet know the answers to how much,
具体的な量はわかっていません
05:30
and by what processes, carbon is being taken out of the atmosphere,
そしてどのような過程で炭素が空気中から取り入れられ
05:32
held in its biomass, and moving on through the ecosystem.
そこに棲む植物に蓄積され、生態系を循環していくのかもわかりません
05:36
So I hope I've showed you that canopy-dwellers
林冠に生息するのものたちは
05:41
are not just insignificant bits of green up high in the canopy
ターザンの生活にだけ役に立つ
05:43
that Tarzan and Jane were interested in,
単なる草や葉っぱではなく
05:46
but rather that they foster biodiversity
生態系の多様性を養い
05:48
contribute to ecosystem nutrient cycles,
エコシステムの栄養素の循環に貢献し
05:51
and they also help to keep our global climate stable.
地球環境を安定させる役目があることがお分かり頂けたでしょうか
05:53
Up in the canopy, if you were sitting next to me
林冠の中で、例えば私の隣に座って
05:58
and you turned around from those primary forest ecosystems,
これらの森の生態系の外へ目を向けると
06:01
you would also see scenes like this.
こんな光景も見られます
06:04
Scenes of forest destruction, forest harvesting
森の破壊、森の収穫
06:06
and forest fragmentation,
そして森の断片化
06:08
thereby making that intact tapestry of the canopy
それがこの林冠で育てられる着生植物の
06:10
unable to function in the marvelous ways that it has
本来持つすばらしい働きを
06:13
when it is not disturbed by humans.
人の手で奪ってしまうのです
06:16
I've also looked out on urban places like this
私は都会にも目を向け
06:18
and thought about people who are disassociated from trees in their lives.
木とは縁のない生活をしている人たちのことを考えました
06:21
People who grew up in a place like this
このような場所で育った人たちは
06:24
did not have the opportunity to climb trees and form a relationship with trees
私が子供の時のように木登りをしたり
06:26
and forests, as I did when I was a young girl.
木や森と関係性を持つ機会がありません
06:30
This troubles me.
私にとって大きな障害です
06:33
Here in 2009, you know, it's not an easy thing to be a forest ecologist,
今日、森林生態学者としてやっていくのは決して簡単なことではありません
06:35
gripping ourselves with these kinds of questions
そしてこのような数々の問いに対して
06:40
and trying to figure out how we can answer them.
どうやって答えを探せばいいのか
06:43
And especially, you know, as a small brown woman
特に、私のような小さな混血の女性で
06:46
in a little college, in the upper northwest part of our country,
北東の小さな大学にいて
06:49
far away from the areas of power and money,
富や力とは程遠い場所にいる者にはなおさら難しい
06:52
I really have to ask myself, "What can I do about this?
だから私は自分に「どうやって木と人を再び繋げればいいの?」
06:55
How can I reconnect people with trees?"
と問い続けています
06:58
Well, I think that I can do something.
私には何かができると思っています
07:01
I know that as a scientist, I have information
学者として、私は情報を持っています
07:04
and as a human being, I can communicate with anybody,
人間として私は誰とでもコミュニケーションがとれます
07:07
inside or outside of academia.
研究者とも、その他の人とも
07:11
And so, that's what I've begin doing,
ここで私が始めた取り組み
07:13
and so I'd like to unveil the International Canopy Network here.
国際林冠ネットワークについて紹介しましょう
07:15
We consult to the media about canopy questions;
私達はメディアを通じ林冠についての質問を投げかけてみました
07:19
we have a canopy newsletter;
私達は林冠新聞と
07:22
we have an email LISTSERV.
メーリングリストをやっています
07:24
And so we're trying to disseminate information about the importance of the canopy,
それらを通じて林冠の大切さ
07:26
the beauty of the canopy,
林冠の美しさ
07:29
the necessity of intact canopies,
無傷の林冠の必要性を
07:30
to people outside of academia.
研究者以外の人たちに広めています
07:32
We also recognize that a lot of the products that we make --
ですが、私達の作る多くの製品が
07:35
those videos and so forth --
例えば、このビデオなど
07:39
you know, they don't reach everybody,
全ての人には届いていません
07:41
and so we've been fostering projects that reach people outside of academia,
生態学者の声が届く範囲を越えて多くの人に伝える
07:44
and outside of the choir that most ecologists preach to.
プロジェクトをすすめてきました
07:48
Treetop Barbie is a great example of that.
例えば木の上のバービー人形をつくりました
07:51
What we do, my students in my lab and I,
私と研究室の学生達が
07:54
is we buy Barbies from Goodwill and Value Village,
リサイクルショップでバービーを買い
07:56
we dress her in clothes that have been made by seamstresses
仕立てられた洋服を着せ
07:58
and we send her out with a canopy handbook.
林冠のハンドブックと一緒に人形を出荷します
08:02
And my feeling is --
私が思うに…
08:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:06
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
08:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:08
-- that we've taken this pop icon and we have just tweaked her a little bit
私達はこの多くの人が憧れる人形に少し手を加え
08:11
to become an ambassador who can carry the message
木の研究をする女性学者がいかにすばらしいか
08:14
that being a woman scientist studying treetops is actually a really great thing.
というメッセージを伝えているのです
08:17
We've also made partnerships with artists,
私達は木や林冠の美を理解し
08:21
with people who understand and can communicate the aesthetic beauty
伝えることのできる
08:24
of trees and forest canopies.
アーティストとパートナーシップを結びました
08:27
And I'd like to just tell you one of our projects,
そのひとつを紹介しましょう
08:29
which is the generation of Canopy Confluences.
「林冠の集合」です
08:31
What I do is I bring together scientists and artists of all kinds,
私の役割は生物学者とアーティストをめぐり合わせることです
08:33
and we spend a week in the forest on these little platforms;
私達は1週間、森の中で過ごし
08:37
and we look at nature, we look at trees, we look at the canopy,
自然や木々、林冠を見ながら
08:39
and we communicate, and exchange, and express what we see together.
話し合い、意見を交換し、表現しあうのです
08:42
The results have been fantastic.
結果はすばらしいものでした
08:47
I'll just give you a few examples.
いくつか例をお見せしましょう
08:49
This is a fantastic installation by Bruce Chao
このすばらしいインスタレーションは
08:51
who is chair of the Sculpture and Glass Blowing Department
ロードアイランドデザイン学校、彫刻・吹きガラス科の学部長
08:53
at Rhode Island School of Design.
ブルース・チャオさんの作品です
08:56
He saw nests in the canopy at one of our Canopy Confluences
彼は太平洋岸北西部にある「林冠の集合」のひとつに
08:58
in the Pacific Northwest, and created this beautiful sculpture.
鳥の巣を見つけこの美しい彫刻を創りました
09:01
We've had dance people up in the canopy.
ダンサーが林冠の上に上がったこともあります
09:05
Jodi Lomask, and her wonderful troupe Capacitor,
ジョディー・ロマスクとそのグループ「コンデンサ」が
09:07
joined me in the canopy in my rainforest site in Costa Rica.
コスタリカにある私の熱帯雨林研究グループに加わり
09:11
They made a fabulous dance called "Biome."
「Biome」というすばらしいダンスを創作してくれました
09:14
They danced in the forest,
彼らは森で踊り
09:17
and we are taking this dance, my scientific outreach communications,
私はこのダンスを通じて私の研究について広く伝え
09:19
and also linking up with environmental groups,
また他の環境グループと繋がっています
09:25
to go to different cities and to perform
沢山の町でパフォーマンスをすることで
09:27
the science, the dance and the environmental outreach
生物学とダンスと環境への支援活動が
09:29
that we hope will make a difference.
変革をもたらすと信じています
09:32
We brought musicians to the canopy,
音楽家たちは
09:34
and they made their music -- and it's fantastic music.
すばらしい音楽を作曲してくれました
09:36
We had wooden flutists, we had oboists,
木製のフルート奏者、オーボエ奏者
09:39
we had opera singers, we had guitar players,
オペラ歌手、ギター奏者
09:41
and we had rap singers.
そしてラップシンガーも
09:43
And I brought a little segment to give you
ではデューク・ブラディーの
09:45
of Duke Brady's "Canopy Rap."
「キャノピー・ラップ」の一部をお聞きください
09:47
(Music) That's Duke!
デュークです!
10:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:06
This experience of working with Duke
デュークと一緒に働いた経験は
10:10
also led me to initiate a program called Sound Science.
サウンドサイエンスというプログラムを立ち上げるきっかけとなりました
10:12
I saw the power of Duke's song with urban youth --
デュークの歌に都会の若者をひきつける魅力を見出したのです
10:15
an audience, you know, I as a middle-aged professor,
お分かりのように、私のような中年の教授には
10:18
I don't have a hope of getting to --
自然の大切さを若者に伝え
10:20
in terms of convincing them of the importance of wildlands.
若者をひきつける魅力を持ち合わせていません
10:22
So I engaged Caution, this rap singer,
そこでコーションというラップシンガーと
10:25
with a group of young people from inner-city Tacoma.
都市部のタコマに住む若者と引き合わせました
10:27
We went out to the forest, I would pick up a branch,
私達は森へ行き、枝を拾い
10:30
Caution would rap on it,
コーションがそれをラップで歌うのです
10:32
and suddenly that branch was really cool.
すると枝は突然かっこいいものになる
10:34
And then the students would come into our sound studios,
その後、生徒達はスタジオに招かれ
10:36
they would make their own rap songs with their own beats.
自分達のビートで、自分達のラップを作り
10:38
They ended up making a CD
最後にはCDを作って持ち帰りました
10:41
which they took home to their family and friends,
家に持ち帰った後は家族や友達と一緒に聞くのです
10:43
thereby expressing their own experiences with nature
彼らに響く媒体で
10:45
in their own medium.
自然での体験を表現するのです
10:48
The final project I'll talk about is one that's very close to my heart,
最後のプロジェクトは私がとても思い入れのあるもので
10:51
and it involves an economic and social value
経済的、社会的価値にかかわり
10:55
that is associated with epiphytic plants.
着生植物にもかかわるものです
10:57
In the Pacific Northwest,
太平洋岸北西部では
11:00
there's a whole industry of moss-harvesting
昔からある森から
11:02
from old-growth forests.
コケを収穫する市場があります
11:05
These mosses are taken from the forest;
これらのコケは森から剥がされ
11:07
they're used by the floriculture industry, by florists,
生花市場で花屋などに買われ
11:09
to make arrangements and make hanging baskets.
つり鉢のアレンジなどに使われます
11:12
It's a 265 million dollar industry
この2億6500万ドルの市場は
11:14
and it's increasing rapidly.
急速に拡大しています
11:17
If you remember that bald guy,
先に見せたハゲ頭を思い出すと
11:20
you'll know that what has been stripped off of these trunks
何が木の幹から剥がされたかわかると思います
11:22
in the Pacific Northwest old-growth forest
太平洋岸北西部の古い森で
11:24
is going to take decades and decades to come back.
再着生するのには何十年もかかるのです
11:27
So this whole industry is unsustainable.
すなわちこれは持続不可能な市場なのです
11:30
What can I, as an ecologist, do about that?
生態学者として私には何ができるのか?
11:34
Well, my thought was that I could learn how to grow mosses,
考えた結果は自然から採らずにすむ
11:37
and that way we wouldn't have to take them out of the wild.
コケの栽培を研究することでした
11:40
And I thought, if I had some partners that could help me with this,
誰かコケの栽培に援助してくれるパートナーがいたら
11:43
that would be great.
なんと素敵だろう
11:46
And so, I thought perhaps incarcerated men and women --
そして、監禁中の人であれば
11:48
who don't have access to nature,
自然に触れる機会が無く
11:50
who often have a lot of time, they often have space,
時間があり、場所もあり
11:52
and you don't need any sharp tools to work with mosses --
鋭利な道具を使わないで作業できるので
11:56
would be great partners.
最適かもしれないと考えました
11:58
And they have become excellent partners.
こうして彼らは最適なパートナーとなりました
12:00
The best I can imagine.
想像以上でした
12:02
They were very enthusiastic.
彼らはとても意欲的で
12:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:07
They were incredibly enthusiastic about the work.
彼らはものすごく仕事に対して意欲的で
12:12
They learned how to distinguish different species of mosses,
コケの種類の識別も学びました
12:15
which, to tell you the truth,
本当のことを言うと
12:17
is a lot more than my undergraduate students at the Evergreen College can do.
私の受け持つエバーグリーン大学の生徒よりも優秀です
12:19
And they embraced the idea that they could help develop a research design
そして彼らはコケを育てることで研究に貢献できるという考えに
12:22
in order to grow these mosses.
賛同してくれました
12:27
We've been successful as partners
それ以来
12:29
in figuring out which species grow the fastest,
どの種類が速く育つか発見し
12:31
and I've just been overwhelmed with how successful this has been.
パートナーとして予想を上回る成功をおさめています
12:33
Because the prison wardens were very enthusiastic about this as well,
刑務所の監視員もこのプロジェクトに熱心だったこともあり
12:36
I started a Science and Sustainability Seminar in the prisons.
私は科学と持続可能性について刑務所でセミナーを開き始めました
12:41
I brought my scientific colleagues and sustainability practitioners into the prison.
私以外にも同僚や持続的営みを実践している人たちを迎え
12:45
We gave talks once a month,
月に1回スピーチをしました
12:50
and that actually ended up implementing
これがきっかけとなり驚くほど
12:52
some amazing sustainability projects at the prisons --
持続可能性に関するプロジェクトが刑務所で発展しました
12:54
organic gardens, worm culture, recycling,
有機栽培の庭、ミミズ堆肥、リサイクル
12:57
water catchment and beekeeping. (Applause)
水の再利用に養蜂
13:00
Our latest endeavor,
助成金を利用して
13:02
with a grant
(拍手)
13:05
from the Department of Corrections at Washington state,
ワシントン州更生局からの助成金を利用して
13:07
they've asked us to expand this program to three more prisons.
他3つの刑務所でこのプログラムの実施を約束してくれました
13:10
And our new project is having the inmates and ourselves
また、新しいプロジェクトでは受刑者と私達で
13:14
learn how to raise the Oregon spotted frog
ワシントン州とオレゴン州で絶滅の危機に瀕した両生類の
13:16
which is a highly endangered amphibian in Washington state and Oregon.
オレゴン斑点カエルの育成の研究をしています
13:19
So they will raise them -- in captivity, of course --
受刑者はこのカエルをもちろん囚われの身で
13:22
from eggs to tadpoles and onward to frogs.
卵からおたまじゃくしへ、そしてカエルへと育てるのです
13:25
And they will have the pleasure, many of them,
多くの受刑者が育てる喜びを感じながら
13:29
of seeing those frogs that they've raised from eggs and helped develop,
卵から孵しカエルになると
13:34
helped nurture, move out into protected wildlands
自然に帰し
13:37
to augment the number of endangered species out there in the wild.
絶滅危機種の増殖に貢献するのです
13:40
And so, I think for many reasons --
多くの理由から
13:45
ecological, social, economic and perhaps even spiritual --
生態系、社会、経済、そしておそらく人間の魂にも
13:47
this has been a tremendous project
このプロジェクトはすばらしい効果がありました
13:50
and I'm really looking forward to
私や私の生徒達だけでなく
13:52
not only myself and my students doing it,
他の学者達にこの研究方法を教え伝えることで
13:54
but also to promote and teach other scientists how to do this.
将来に多くの期待をしています
13:57
As many of you are aware, the world of academia is a rather inward-looking one.
皆さんご存知のように、学者の世界は内向的になりがちです
14:01
I'm trying to help researchers move more outward
私は研究者達にもっと外向的になるように
14:05
to have their own partnerships
学者以外のコミュニティーに
14:09
with people outside of the academic community.
それぞれのパートナーを探すように呼びかけています
14:11
And so I'm hoping that my husband Jack, the ant taxonomist,
そして蟻分類学者である夫ジャックがバービーの会社の
14:14
can perhaps work with Mattel to make Taxonomist Ken.
ミテルと分類学者ケンを作ることを期待しています
14:17
Perhaps Ben Zander and Bill Gates could get together
またベン・ザンダーとビル・ゲイツが一緒に
14:20
and make an opera about AIDS.
エイズについてのオペラを作ったり
14:26
Or perhaps Al Gore and Naturally 7 could make a song about climate change
アル・ゴアとナチュラリー7が気候変動の歌を作ったり
14:28
that would really make you clap your hands.
実現すればみんな拍手喝采でしょう
14:33
So, although it's a little bit of a fantasy, I think it's also a reality.
架空の話めいてますが、現実でもありえると思います
14:36
Given the duress that we're feeling environmentally in these times,
環境問題の深刻さが増す今日
14:39
it is time for scientists to reach outward,
学者達は外交的になる時が来ています
14:43
and time for those outside of science to reach towards academia as well.
同時に、科学と関わりない人も学術に目を向けるときが来ているのです
14:45
I started my career with trying to understand the mysteries of forests
私は科学という道具を使い
14:52
with the tools of science.
森の神秘を探るためこの職に就きました
14:57
By making these partnerships that I described to you,
またお話したようにパートナーシップを持つことで
14:59
I have really opened my mind and, I have to say, my heart
視野を広げ、自分の可能性も広げ
15:02
to have a greater understanding,
より深く自然や自分自身について
15:06
to make other discoveries about nature and myself.
理解をすることができるようになりました
15:08
When I look into my heart, I see trees --
自分の心を見ると、そこに木を見て取れます
15:12
this is actually an image of a real heart --
これは本物の心臓の画像です
15:15
there are trees in our hearts,
木は私達の心にあるのです
15:17
there are trees in your hearts.
あなたの心の中にも
15:19
When we come to understand nature,
自然を理解するとき
15:21
we are touching the most deep, the most important parts of our self.
私達は奥底にある私たちの一番大切な部分に触れているのです
15:23
In these partnerships, I have also learned
パートナーシップを通じ、人間は
15:28
that people tend to compartmentalize themselves
お互いを分類したがる傾向があることも知りました
15:31
into IT people, and movie star people, and scientists,
ITをする人、映画俳優、学者
15:34
but when we share nature,
しかし、自然を享受するとき
15:38
when we share our perspectives about nature,
自然を分かち合うとき
15:40
we find a common denominator.
私達には共通項を探すことができるのです
15:43
Finally, as a scientist and as a person
最後に、学者として、そして人として
15:46
and now, as part of the TED community,
また、新たにTEDコミュニティーの一員となることにより
15:50
I feel that I have better tools
私は木々や森や自然と向き合い
15:54
to go out to trees, to go out to forests, to go out to nature,
新たな自然を発見するより良いツールを持つことが出来ました
15:57
to make new discoveries about nature --
そしてどこにいても、誰であっても
16:01
and about humans' place in nature
自然界における人間の居場所を
16:04
wherever we are and whomever you are.
発見することができるんだと思います
16:06
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
16:10
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:12
Translator:Emily Sakata
Reviewer:Masahiro Kyushima

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Nalini Nadkarni - Tree researcher
Called "the queen of canopy research," Nalini Nadkarni explores the rich, vital world found in the tops of trees. She communicates what she finds to non-scientists -- with the help of poets, preachers and prisoners.

Why you should listen

Nalini Nadkarni has spent two decades climbing the trees of Costa Rica, Papua New Guinea, the Amazon and the Pacific Northwest, exploring the world of animals and plants that live in the canopy and never come down; and how this upper layer of the forest interacts with the world on the ground. A pioneering researcher in this area, Nadkarni created the Big Canopy Database to help researchers store and understand the rich trove of data she and others are uncovering.

Nadkarni teaches at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, but her work outside the academy is equally fascinating -- using nontraditional vectors to teach the general public about trees and the ecosystem. For instance, she recently collaborated with the dance troupe Capacitor to explore the process of growth through the medium of the human body. In another project, she worked with prison inmates to grow moss for the horticulture trade, to relieve the collecting pressure on wild mosses. The project inspired in her students a new reverence for nature -- and some larger ecochanges at the prison.

She's the author of Between Earth and Sky: Our Intimate Connections to Trees.

The original video is available on TED.com
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