sponsored links
EG 2008

Tim Ferriss: Smash fear, learn anything

ティム・フェリス:恐怖に打ち勝って何でも学ぼう

December 5, 2008

EGカンファレンスより:生産性のカリスマ"、ティム・フェリスの楽しくて勇気を与えてくれるエピソードは、「これをやったら最悪どうなるか?」というシンプルな問いこそが、何事も習得する秘訣だと教えてくれる。

Tim Ferriss - Productivity guru, author
Tim Ferriss is author of bestseller The 4-Hour Workweek, a self-improvement program of four steps: defining aspirations, managing time, creating automatic income and escaping the trappings of the 9-to-5 life. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
This is Tim Ferriss circa 1979 A.D. Age two.
この写真は、1979年、2歳のティム フェリスです
00:16
You can tell by the power squat, I was a very confident boy --
このポーズを見てもわかる通り
00:22
and not without reason.
自信満々の少年でした
00:25
I had a very charming routine at the time,
この頃、可愛らしい日課がありました
00:27
which was to wait until late in the evening
私は夜になると
00:29
when my parents were decompressing from a hard day's work,
仕事で疲れた両親が
00:31
doing their crossword puzzles, watching television.
クロスワードやテレビでくつろいでいる時に
00:34
I would run into the living room, jump up on the couch,
居間に突撃し、ソファーに飛び乗り
00:36
rip the cushions off, throw them on the floor,
クッションを引っぺがして床に投げ
00:39
scream at the top of my lungs and run out
おなかの底から雄たけびを上げて、帰るのです
00:41
because I was the Incredible Hulk.
超人ハルクごっこです
00:43
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:45
Obviously, you see the resemblance.
ごらんの通り そっくりですね
00:47
And this routine went on for some time.
この日課はしばらく続きました
00:49
When I was seven I went to summer camp.
7歳の時、サマーキャンプに行かされました
00:53
My parents found it necessary for peace of mind.
両親は平安な一時を望んだのです
00:56
And at noon each day
毎日、正午になると
00:58
the campers would go to a pond,
みんなで池に行きます
01:00
where they had floating docks.
浮きドックがあり
01:02
You could jump off the end into the deep end.
そこから水に飛び込むのです
01:04
I was born premature. I was always very small.
未熟児として生まれた私は体が小さく
01:06
My left lung had collapsed when I was born.
生まれたとき左の肺が潰れていました
01:08
And I've always had buoyancy problems.
水にうまく浮けなかったため
01:10
So water was something that scared me to begin with.
もともと水は怖かったのですが
01:12
But I would go in on occasion.
それでも時々行っていました
01:14
And on one particular day,
キャンプのある日
01:16
the campers were jumping through inner tubes,
みんな浮き輪の中に飛び込んでいました
01:18
They were diving through inner tubes. And I thought this would be great fun.
浮き輪の内側へのダイブです。 面白そうなので
01:21
So I dove through the inner tube,
私も飛び込んだら
01:23
and the bully of the camp grabbed my ankles.
いじめっ子の一人に足首をつかまれました
01:25
And I tried to come up for air,
上にあがって息をしようとしましたが
01:28
and my lower back hit the bottom of the inner tube.
浮き輪が背中の上にあり
01:32
And I went wild eyed and thought I was going to die.
必死にもがき、死ぬかと思いました
01:34
A camp counselor fortunately came over and separated us.
幸いリーダーの人が来て、私たちを分けました
01:38
From that point onward I was terrified of swimming.
その時から、泳ぐことが恐くなりました
01:41
That is something that I did not get over.
ずっと克服できませんでした
01:45
My inability to swim has been
泳げないことは
01:48
one of my greatest humiliations and embarrassments.
私にとって一番の屈辱でした
01:50
That is when I realized that I was not the Incredible Hulk.
自分はハルクではないと思い知らされたのです
01:55
But there is a happy ending to this story.
この話にはハッピーエンドがあります
01:58
At age 31 -- that's my age now --
今年の8月、31歳の私は
02:01
in August I took two weeks to re-examine swimming,
2週間、水泳に再挑戦しました
02:05
and question all the of the obvious aspects of swimming.
基本的なことから疑問を解決していき
02:09
And went from swimming one lap --
最初はプールで
02:13
so 20 yards -- like a drowning monkey,
20ヤードを溺れる猿のように泳ぎ
02:15
at about 200 beats per minute heart rate --
それだけで心拍が
02:17
I measured it --
200にもなっていたのに
02:19
to going to Montauk on Long Island,
しばらくすると、故郷の近く
02:21
close to where I grew up,
ロングアイランドのモントークの海を
02:24
and jumping into the ocean and swimming one kilometer in open water,
1キロ泳げるまでになったのです
02:26
getting out and feeling better than when I went in.
最高の気分で海から上がりました
02:29
And I came out,
上がった時は
02:31
in my Speedos, European style,
Speedoの競泳用パンツをはいていましたが
02:33
feeling like the Incredible Hulk.
超人ハルクになった気分でした
02:36
And that's what I want everyone in here to feel like,
このプレゼンテーションの終わりには
02:38
the Incredible Hulk, at the end of this presentation.
皆さんにもハルクの気分になってもらいたいです
02:40
More specifically, I want you to feel like you're capable
皆さんもその気になれば
02:43
of becoming an excellent long-distance swimmer,
長距離スイマーにもなれ
02:45
a world-class language learner,
何カ国語も習得し
02:49
and a tango champion.
タンゴのチャンピオンにもなれます
02:51
And I would like to share my art.
今日は私の特技を紹介します
02:54
If I have an art, it's deconstructing things
怖くてどうしようもないものを
02:57
that really scare the living hell out of me.
分析していくというものです
02:59
So, moving onward.
では始めましょう
03:01
Swimming, first principles.
水泳 第一の原則
03:03
First principles, this is very important.
この原則はとても大事です
03:05
I find that the best results in life
結果を出せない人は
03:07
are often held back by false constructs and untested assumptions.
誤った考え方や未実証の仮定にとらわれています
03:09
And the turnaround in swimming came
私にとってのきっかけは
03:14
when a friend of mine said, "I will go a year without any stimulants" --
ダブルエスプレッソを日に6杯飲むような友人が
03:16
this is a six-double-espresso-per-day type of guy --
こう言ったことです。「コーヒーを1年絶つよ―
03:19
"if you can complete a one kilometer open water race."
お前が海で1キロ泳ぎ切ったらね」
03:22
So the clock started ticking.
私のチャレンジが始まりました
03:25
I started seeking out triathletes
私はトライアスロンの選手を探しました
03:27
because I found that lifelong swimmers often couldn't teach what they did.
水泳一筋の人は教えるのが上手くない、と気づいたからです
03:29
I tried kickboards.
ビート板での練習もしましたが
03:33
My feet would slice through the water like razors,
足がカミソリのように水を切るだけで
03:36
I wouldn't even move. I would leave demoralized, staring at my feet.
進みませんでした。やる気をなくし、足を見つめるだけでした
03:38
Hand paddles, everything.
ハンドパドルもやってみました
03:41
Even did lessons with Olympians -- nothing helped.
オリンピック選手に教わってもダメでした
03:43
And then Chris Sacca, who is now a dear friend mine,
今では親友のクリス サッカと出会いました
03:46
had completed an Iron Man with 103 degree temperature,
気温39℃の中、アイアンマンレースをフィニッシュした人です
03:48
said, "I have the answer to your prayers."
彼は「力になれるかもしれない」と言って
03:51
And he introduced me to
テリー ラフリンを
03:53
the work of a man named Terry Laughlin
紹介してくれました
03:55
who is the founder of Total Immersion Swimming.
Total Immersion Swimmingの創設者です
03:57
That set me on the road to examining biomechanics.
生体力学から学んでいき
03:59
So here are the new rules of swimming,
正しい泳ぎ方を知りました
04:02
if any of you are afraid of swimming, or not good at it.
泳ぐのが怖い人、苦手な人は
04:04
The first is, forget about kicking. Very counterintuitive.
まず脚のことを忘れてください 意外でしょうけど
04:07
So it turns out that propulsion isn't really the problem.
脚は大した推進力にはならないのです
04:10
Kicking harder doesn't solve the problem
強く蹴るだけでは解決しません
04:14
because the average swimmer only transfers about three percent
平均的なスイマーは、エネルギーのたった3%しか
04:16
of their energy expenditure into forward motion.
前進する力に変換できません
04:19
The problem is hydrodynamics.
問題は水の抵抗なのです
04:22
So what you want to focus on instead
意識すべきことは
04:24
is allowing your lower body to draft behind your upper body,
上半身に下半身を引っ張らせることです
04:26
much like a small car behind a big car on the highway.
大きい車の後ろを走る小さい車のようにです
04:28
And you do that by maintaining a horizontal body position.
そして体を水平に保つようにしてください
04:31
The only way you can do that
そのためには
04:34
is to not swim on top of the water.
水面を泳いではいけません
04:36
The body is denser than water. 95 percent of it would be,
密度の関係で、体の95%は
04:38
at least, submerged naturally.
自然に水の中に沈みます
04:41
So you end up, number three,
3つめのルールです
04:43
not swimming, in the case of freestyle,
クロールの場合、多くの人が
04:45
on your stomach, as many people think, reaching on top of the water.
お腹を下にして、水面に上がろうとしますが
04:48
But actually rotating from streamlined right
流れるように右から左へと
04:51
to streamlined left,
回転させるのが正解です
04:54
maintaining that fuselage position as long as possible.
胴体をまっすぐ保つようにしてください
04:56
So let's look at some examples. This is Terry.
例を見てみましょう 彼がテリーです
04:59
And you can see that he's extending his right arm
右腕を伸ばしていますが
05:01
below his head and far in front.
頭より低く、かなり前に伸ばしています
05:04
And so his entire body really is underwater.
全身が水中に入っています
05:06
The arm is extended below the head.
頭より低く腕を伸ばし
05:09
The head is held in line with the spine,
頭は背骨に沿った位置です
05:12
so that you use strategic water pressure to raise your legs up --
すると水圧で足が浮くようになります
05:14
very important, especially for people with lower body fat.
これは体脂肪が少ない人には特に重要です
05:18
Here is an example of the stroke.
ストロークの例です
05:21
So you don't kick. But you do use a small flick.
脚は蹴るのではなく、返す感じ
05:23
You can see this is the left extension.
左手を伸ばして
05:26
Then you see his left leg.
左脚を返します
05:28
Small flick, and the only purpose of that
それによって
05:30
is to rotate his hips so he can get to the opposite side.
腰を回転させます
05:32
And the entry point for his right hand -- notice this,
右手の浸水位置ですが
05:35
he's not reaching in front and catching the water.
真正面の水をかくのではなく
05:37
Rather, he is entering the water
腕を45度の角度で
05:39
at a 45-degree angle with his forearm,
入れていきます
05:42
and then propelling himself by streamlining -- very important.
水の抵抗を受けないように伸ばしています
05:44
Incorrect, above, which is what almost every swimming coach will teach you.
上は間違いです ほとんどの水泳コーチはこう教えます
05:50
Not their fault, honestly.
もちろん彼らに責任はありません
05:53
And I'll get to implicit versus explicit in a moment.
後で「表と裏」ということについてお話しします
05:55
Below is what most swimmers
下のような
05:58
will find enables them to do what I did,
私が説明した泳ぎ方をすることで
06:00
which is going from 21 strokes per 20-yard length
20ヤードで21ストロークだったものが
06:02
to 11 strokes
11ストロークになるのです
06:06
in two workouts with no coach, no video monitoring.
コーチ無し、ビデオ無しの二回の練習でできました
06:09
And now I love swimming. I can't wait to go swimming.
今は水泳が好きでたまりません
06:12
I'll be doing a swimming lesson later, for myself, if anyone wants to join me.
希望者がいれば、私が水泳のレッスンをしたいです
06:15
Last thing, breathing. A problem a lot of us have, certainly, when you're swimming.
最後に息継ぎです。 多くの人に問題となる部分です
06:19
In freestyle, easiest way to remedy this is
クロールでこれを治すには
06:23
to turn with body roll,
体を回転させたとき
06:25
and just to look at your recovery hand as it enters the water.
戻す手が水に入るところを見ることです
06:28
And that will get you very far.
これだけで ずっと良くなります
06:32
That's it. That's really all you need to know.
大切なのはこれだけです
06:35
Languages. Material versus method.
言語 素材vs方法
06:38
I, like many people, came to the conclusion
私は、多くの人と同じように
06:40
that I was terrible at languages.
語学が苦手だと思っていました
06:42
I suffered through Spanish for junior high, first year of high school,
中学から高校一年まで、スペイン語と苦闘し
06:44
and the sum total of my knowledge
知っているフレーズと言えば
06:48
was pretty much, "Donde esta el bano?"
"Donde esta el bano?" (トイレはどこですか?)くらい
06:50
And I wouldn't even catch the response. A sad state of affairs.
しかも返答されても分かりません。悲しい現実でした。
06:52
Then I transferred to a different school sophomore year, and
二年生で転校したとき、他の言語を選べることになりました
06:57
I had a choice of other languages. Most of my friends were taking Japanese.
友達のほとんどが日本語をとっていました
07:01
So I thought why not punish myself? I'll do Japanese.
私も挑戦してみようと 日本語を取ることにしました
07:03
Six months later I had the chance to go to Japan.
6ヶ月後、日本に行く機会がきました
07:07
My teachers assured me, they said, "Don't worry.
先生からは「心配するな」と言われました
07:10
You'll have Japanese language classes every day to help you cope.
「日本語の授業が毎日あるから、慣れるはずだ
07:12
It will be an amazing experience." My first overseas experience in fact.
素晴らしい経験になるぞ」と。 私にとって初の海外です。
07:16
So my parents encouraged me to do it. I left.
両親にも勧められ、出発しました
07:20
I arrived in Tokyo. Amazing.
東京に着くと素晴らしい気分でした
07:23
I couldn't believe I was on the other side of the world.
地球の反対側にいるのが不思議でした
07:25
I met my host family. Things went quite well I think,
ホストファミリーとも会いました
07:27
all things considered.
なかなか良いスタートが切れました
07:29
My first evening, before my first day of school,
最初の夜、学校が始まる前日に
07:31
I said to my mother, very politely,
ホストマザーに丁寧に頼みました
07:34
"Please wake me up at eight a.m."
8時に起こしてほしかったのです
07:36
So, (Japanese)
「8時に起こしてください」です
07:38
But I didn't say (Japanese). I said, (Japanese). Pretty close.
「おこしてください」ではなく「8時におかしてください」と言ってしまいました。似てますよね。
07:40
But I said, "Please rape me at eight a.m."
意味は「8時にレイプしてください」です
07:44
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:47
You've never seen a more confused Japanese woman.
あれほど困惑した日本人女性を初めてみました
07:50
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:52
I walked in to school.
歩いて学校に行くと
07:56
And a teacher came up to me and handed me a piece of paper.
先生に何かの紙を渡されましたが
07:58
I couldn't read any of it -- hieroglyphics, it could have been --
まったく読めません まるで象形文字です
08:01
because it was Kanji,
漢字で書いてあったのです
08:04
Chinese characters adapted into the Japanese language.
日本語で使われる中国生まれの文字です
08:06
Asked him what this said.
何が書いてあるか先生に尋ねると
08:08
And he goes, "Ahh, okay okay,
先生は「オーケー、オーケー
08:10
eehto, World History, ehh, Calculus,
えっと、世界史、数学
08:12
Traditional Japanese." And so on.
…古文」と説明してくれました
08:16
And so it came to me in waves.
そこで初めて気づきました
08:20
There had been something lost in translation.
ちょっとした誤解があったようで
08:23
The Japanese classes were not Japanese instruction classes, per se.
日本語の授業とは、日本語を教える授業ではなく
08:26
They were the normal high school curriculum for Japanese students --
普通の日本人の高校生向けの授業だったのです
08:29
the other 4,999 students in the school, who were Japanese, besides the American.
私を除くその学校の生徒の4,999人は日本人でした
08:33
And that's pretty much my response.
私のリアクションはこんな感じでした
08:37
(Laughter)
(笑い)
08:40
And that set me on this panic driven search for the perfect language method.
それをきっかけに、言語の習得法を探しまくりました
08:41
I tried everything. I went to Kinokuniya.
あらゆるものを試しました。紀伊国屋に行き
08:46
I tried every possible book, every possible CD.
あらゆる本を読み、あらゆるCDを聞きましたが
08:48
Nothing worked until I found this.
効果がありませんでした。これを見つけるまでは。
08:51
This is the Joyo Kanji. This is a Tablet rather,
これは常用漢字の一覧表です
08:53
or a poster of the 1,945 common-use characters
一般的な1945の漢字が載っているポスターです
08:57
as determined by the Ministry of Education in 1981.
1981年に文部省が制定したものです
09:01
Many of the publications in Japan limit themselves to these characters,
読みやすさの観点から、ほとんどの出版物で使われる漢字は
09:04
to facilitate literacy -- some are required to.
ここにあるものに制限されています
09:08
And this became my Holy Grail, my Rosetta Stone.
これが私にとって大きな宝となりました
09:10
As soon as I focused on this material,
この素材を集中的に勉強し始めると
09:13
I took off.
一気にレベルが上がりました
09:18
I ended up being able to read Asahi Shinbu, Asahi newspaper,
朝日新聞を読めるほどになったのです
09:20
about six months later -- so a total of 11 months later --
それから6ヶ月後、つまりトータルで11ヵ月後には
09:23
and went from Japanese I to Japanese VI.
日本語I から日本語VI まで終えました
09:26
Ended up doing translation work at age 16 when I returned to the U.S.,
アメリカに戻り、16歳にして翻訳の仕事もしました
09:28
and have continued to apply this material
それ以後も、「方法」より「素材」を重視するやり方を
09:31
over method approach to close to a dozen languages now.
10個ほどの言語で試しました
09:36
Someone who was terrible at languages,
語学が苦手だった人間が
09:39
and at any given time, speak, read and write five or six.
5,6種類の言語を話し、読み、書けるようになったのです
09:41
This brings us to the point,
このことから言えるのは
09:46
which is, it's oftentimes what you do,
「どのように」するかではなく
09:48
not how you do it, that is the determining factor.
「何を」するかが重要だということです
09:51
This is the difference between being effective -- doing the right things --
つまり、「効果的」 ―重要なことをする― か
09:54
and being efficient -- doing things well whether or not they're important.
「効率的」 ―重要でないことも含め上手くこなす― の違いです
09:57
You can also do this with grammar.
これは文法にも言えます
10:00
I came up with these six sentences after much experimentation.
私は実験を通じて、この6つの文を使うようになりました
10:02
Having a native speaker allow you to deconstruct their grammar,
これらを 過去形 現在形 未来形 へと
10:06
by translating these sentences into past, present, future,
ネイティブに訳してもらうことで、文法を解析できます
10:09
will show you subject, object, verb,
それにより、主語、目的語、動詞、
10:12
placement of indirect, direct objects, gender and so forth.
直接/間接目的語の位置、性といったことが理解できます
10:14
From that point, you can then, if you want to,
複数の言語をマスターしたければ
10:16
acquire multiple languages, alternate them so there is no interference.
このルールを入れ替えてやるだけです
10:19
We can talk about that if anyone in interested.
興味のある方には、今度詳しくお話ししましょう
10:21
And now I love languages.
今では私も言語が大好きです
10:24
So ballroom dancing, implicit versus explicit --
社交ダンス  表か裏か
10:26
very important.
とても重要です
10:29
You might look at me and say, "That guy must be a ballroom dancer."
私が社交ダンスが上手そうだと思った人
10:30
But no, you'd be wrong
間違いです
10:33
because my body is very poorly designed for most things --
私の体はほとんどのことに向いていません
10:35
pretty well designed for lifting heavy rocks perhaps.
岩を持ち上げるくらいにしか向いてません
10:38
I used to be much bigger, much more muscular.
以前はもっと体が大きく筋肉質でした
10:41
And so I ended up walking like this.
ですから、こんな歩き方でした
10:44
I looked a lot like an orangutan, our close cousins, or the Incredible Hulk.
オランウータンみたいでした。 超人ハルクでもいいですが。
10:46
Not very good for ballroom dancing.
社交ダンスには向いていません
10:52
I found myself in Argentina in 2005,
2005年、私はアルゼンチンにいました
10:54
decided to watch a tango class -- had no intention of participating.
タンゴのレッスンを見学しました。 ダンスする気はありませんでした。
10:57
Went in, paid my ten pesos,
10ペソ払って中に入ると
11:00
walked up -- 10 women two guys, usually a good ratio.
10人の女性と2人の男性がいました。 いい割合ですね。
11:02
The instructor says, "You are participating."
先生が言いました 「あなたもやりなさい」
11:05
Immediately: death sweat.
いきなり冷汗がでました
11:08
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:10
Fight-or-flight fear sweat, because I tried ballroom dancing in college --
実は大学で社交ダンスをやったのですが
11:11
stepped on the girl's foot with my heel. She screamed.
相手の足をかかとで踏んでしまい、悲鳴を上げられました
11:14
I was so concerned with her perception of what I was doing,
彼女のリアクションにショックを受け
11:17
that it exploded in my face,
大きく傷つきました
11:20
never to return to the ballroom dancing club.
二度とそのクラブには戻りませんでした
11:22
She comes up, and this was her approach, the teacher.
女の先生は私に近づいてきました
11:25
"Okay, come on, grab me."
「さあ、手を回して」
11:28
Gorgeous assistant instructor.
美人のアシスタント講師でした
11:30
She was very pissed off that I had pulled her from her advanced practice.
上級クラスの邪魔をされ怒っていました
11:32
So I did my best. I didn't know where to put my hands.
私は頑張りましたが、手を置く場所も分かりません
11:35
And she pulled back, threw down her arms,
彼女は腰に手を当て
11:38
put them on her hips, turned around and yelled across the room,
反対を向き、教室中に響く声で言いました
11:40
"This guy is built like a god-damned mountain of muscle,
「この男は筋肉の塊のくせに―
11:43
and he's grabbing me like a fucking Frenchman,"
フランス人みたいな掴み方しやがる!」
11:47
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:49
which I found encouraging.
私は励ましだと受け取りました
11:51
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:53
Everyone burst into laughter. I was humiliated.
大笑いされ、恥ずかしかったです
11:55
She came back. She goes, "Come on. I don't have all day."
彼女は「さあ早く。忙しいんだから」と言いました
11:57
As someone who wrestled since age eight, I proceeded to crush her,
8歳からレスリングをやってた私は、彼女を潰す勢いで
12:00
"Of Mice and Men" style.
男らしく抱きました
12:03
And she looked up and said,
彼女は私を見上げて
12:05
"Now that's better."
「良くなったわ」と言いました
12:07
So I bought a month's worth of classes.
私は1か月分の月謝を払いました
12:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:12
And proceeded to look at --
さらに目標として
12:13
I wanted to set competition so I'd have a deadline --
競技会への参加を決めました
12:15
Parkinson's Law,
パーキンソンの法則―
12:17
the perceived complexity of a task will expand to fill the time you allot it.
「作業の複雑さは割り当てた時間を使い切るまで膨れあがる」ものです
12:19
So I had a very short deadline for a competition.
目前の競技会を目標にしました
12:23
I got a female instructor first,
まず女性の先生に
12:26
to teach me the female role, the follow,
女性のリードされ方を教わりました
12:29
because I wanted to understand the sensitivities and abilities
リードされる側の繊細さや技術を
12:32
that the follow needed to develop, so I wouldn't have a repeat of college.
知ることで 大学での悪夢を避けようとしました
12:34
And then I took an inventory of the characteristics,
さらに彼女と一緒に
12:37
along with her, of the
過去の優勝者の特徴や
12:40
of the capabilities and elements of different dancers who'd won championships.
技術を調査していきました
12:44
I interviewed these people because they all taught in Buenos Aires.
ブエノスアイレスで教えるチャンピオン達をインタビューしていきました
12:47
I compared the two lists,
結果、私は2つのリストを作りました
12:51
and what you find is that there is explicitly,
一つは、彼らが明示的に
12:53
expertise they recommended, certain training methods.
勧める技術やトレーニングの「表の」リスト
12:55
Then there were implicit commonalities
もう一つは、彼らがやっていない―
12:58
that none of them seemed to be practicing.
共通点をまとめた「裏の」リストです
13:00
Now the protectionism of Argentine dance teachers aside,
アルゼンチンのダンス講師の保守性は置いておいて
13:03
I found this very interesting. So I decided to focus on three of those commonalities.
彼らが薦めなかった3つをあえて攻めることにしました
13:06
Long steps. So a lot of milongueros --
まずはロングステップです
13:10
the tango dancers will use very short steps.
多くのタンゴダンサーはショートステップを使います
13:12
I found that longer steps were much more elegant.
でも私は長いステップのほうがエレガントだと感じました
13:16
So you can have --
小さなスペースでも
13:20
and you can do it in a very small space in fact.
このステップはできます
13:22
Secondly, different types of pivots.
2つめは 変わった種類のピボットです
13:24
Thirdly, variation in tempo.
3つめは テンポの変化です
13:27
These seemed to be the three areas that I could exploit to compete
この3つのエリアを攻略すれば
13:30
if I wanted to comptete against people who'd been practicing for 20 to 30 years.
2-30年やっているダンサーとも勝負できると考えました
13:33
That photo is of the
この写真は
13:37
semi-finals of the Buenos Aires championships, four months later.
4ヶ月後のブエノスアイレス選手権、準決勝のものです
13:40
Then one month later, went to the world championships,
それから1ヶ月後、世界選手権で
13:43
made it to the semi-final. And then set a world record, following that,
準決勝まで行きました。 その2週間後
13:46
two weeks later.
あのギネス記録を作りました
13:48
I want you to see part of what I practiced.
では練習を見ていただきましょう
13:49
I'm going to jump forward here.
ちょっと早送りします
13:52
This is the instructor that Alicia and I chose for the male lead.
これはリードの先生としてエリシアと私が選んだ―
13:55
His name is Gabriel Misse.
ガブリエル ミセーさんです
14:00
One of the most elegant dancers of his generation,
彼の世代では屈指のエレガントさを持っています
14:02
known for his long steps, and his tempo changes
ロングステップとテンポの変化
14:06
and his pivots.
そしてピボットが有名です
14:08
Alicia, in her own right, very famous.
エリシアもとても有名です
14:13
So I think you'll agree, they look quite good together.
2人が合っていることは明らかですね
14:15
Now what I like about this video
この映像ですが、実は二人が
14:20
is it's actually a video of the first time they ever danced together
初めて一緒に踊った時のものです
14:23
because of his lead. He had a strong lead.
彼は力強いリードをします
14:25
He didn't lead with his chest, which requires you lean forward.
胸でリードをすると前傾姿勢になり
14:28
I couldn't develop the attributes in my toes,
私のつま先の力では
14:30
the strength in my feet, to do that.
うまくリードできません
14:32
So he uses a lead that focuses on
そこで、肩と腕を使った
14:35
his shoulder girdle and his arm.
リードを教わりました
14:38
So he can lift the woman to break her, for example.
彼女を持ち上げられるという
14:41
That's just one benefit of that.
利点もあります
14:43
So then we broke it down.
この動きを分析していきました
14:45
This would be an example of one pivot.
これはピボットの一種です
14:49
This is a back step pivot.
バックステップのピボットです
14:51
There are many different types.
たくさんの種類があります
14:53
I have hundreds of hours of footage --
何百時間もの映像をすべて分類しました
14:55
all categorized, much like George Carlin
ジョージ カーリンが自分の
14:58
categorized his comedy.
コメディーを分類するのと同じようにです
15:00
So using my arch-nemesis,
私の天敵、スペイン語で
15:06
Spanish, no less, to learn tango.
タンゴを習いました
15:08
So fear is your friend. Fear is an indicator.
恐怖心は友達であり、バロメーターです
15:10
Sometimes it shows you what you shouldn't do.
「してはいけないこと」を示すこともありますが
15:12
More often than not it shows you exactly what you should do.
多くの場合「するべきこと」を教えてくれます
15:14
And the best results that I've had in life,
私の最高の成果や
15:17
the most enjoyable times, have all been from asking a simple question:
最高に楽しい時間は、一つの質問から生まれました
15:19
what's the worst that can happen?
「これをやったら最悪どうなるか?」
15:22
Especially with fears you gained when you were a child.
特に子供の頃からの恐怖を克服するには
15:24
Take the analytical frameworks,
分析のフレームワークと自分の能力を
15:28
the capabilities you have, apply them to old fears.
恐怖の対象にぶつけましょう
15:31
Apply them to very big dreams.
そして大きな夢にぶつけましょう
15:33
And when I think of what I fear now, it's very simple.
今、私が怖いものをお教えしましょう
15:36
When I imagine my life,
もしも、これまでの私の学びの機会が
15:39
what my life would have been like
なかったとしたら
15:42
without the educational opportunities that I had,
私の人生はどうなっていたかと
15:44
it makes me wonder.
怖くなります
15:48
I've spent the last two years trying to deconstruct
ここ2年、私はアメリカの
15:50
the American public school system,
公立学校のシステムを分析し
15:52
to either fix it or replace it.
修正点を探してきました
15:55
And have done experiments with about 50,000 students thus far --
約5万人の生徒を対象に試行を行いました
15:57
built, I'd say, about a half dozen schools,
学校も、6つほど建てました
16:00
my readers, at this point.
読者のおかげです
16:02
And if any of you are interested in that,
興味をお持ちのすべての皆さん、
16:04
I would love to speak with you.
是非、話をしましょう
16:06
I know nothing. I'm a beginner.
私は何も知らない初心者ですが
16:08
But I ask a lot of questions, and I would love your advice.
質問はたくさんあります。助言をください。
16:10
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
16:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:15
Translator:Masaki Ishizuka
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Tim Ferriss - Productivity guru, author
Tim Ferriss is author of bestseller The 4-Hour Workweek, a self-improvement program of four steps: defining aspirations, managing time, creating automatic income and escaping the trappings of the 9-to-5 life.

Why you should listen

Tim Ferris brings an analytical, yet accessible, approach to the challenges of self-improvement and career advancement through what he calls "lifestyle design." His 2007 book, The 4-Hour Workweek, and his lectures on productivity are stuffed with moving, encouraging anecdotes -- often from his own life -- that show how simple decisions, made despite fears or hesitation, can make for a drastically more meaningful day-to-day experience at work, or in life.

Word-of-blog chatter in Silicon Valley may have propelled his book to bestselling success, but Ferriss himself takes a fervid stance against the distractions of technologies like email and PDAs, which promote unnecessary multitasking.

Following the success of his book, Ferriss has become a full-time angel investor.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.