sponsored links
TED2002

Mae Jemison: Teach arts and sciences together

マエ・ジェミソン 諸芸術と諸科学を共に教える事について語る

February 2, 2002

マエ・ジェミソンは宇宙飛行士であり、学者であり、美術品収集家であり、舞踊家です。彼女自身の受けた教育から、そして宇宙における彼女の体験からの話を交えながら、教育者に対して、諸芸術と諸科学を共に、直観と論理を共に、一つのものとして教えるよう訴えかけます。大胆にものを考えられる人を生み出すために。

Mae Jemison - Astronaut, engineer, entrepreneur, physician and educator
Astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison‘s inclusive, audacious journey to improving life here on earth and beyond is paving the way for human interstellar travel. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What I want to do today is to spend
今日はお時間をいただいて
00:15
some time talking about some stuff that's
ここ数年間 感じている
00:17
sort of giving me a little bit of
ちょっとした実存的不安
00:19
existential angst, for lack of a better word,
というと語弊があるかもしれませんが
00:21
over the past couple of years, and
お話ししたいと思います
00:24
basically, these three quotes
何が起きているのかということは
00:26
tell what's going on.
基本的にこの3つの引用に示されています
00:29
"When God made the color purple,
「神が紫という色を創造した時
00:31
God was just showing off," Alice Walker
ただ誇示していた」 アリス・ウォーカーの
00:33
wrote in "The Color Purple," and
『カラーパープル』です
00:35
Zora Neale Hurston wrote in
ゾラ・ニール・ハーストンの
00:37
"Dust Tracks On A Road,"
『路上の砂塵』からです 「探究とは
00:39
"Research is a formalized curiosity.
形を整えた好奇心のことで
00:41
It's poking and prying with a purpose."
目的のために 探り歩き 覗き回ることだ」
00:43
And then finally,
そして最後です
00:45
when I think about the near future,
近い将来について考える時
00:47
you know, we have this attitude, well,
こんなスタンスを取るのですが
00:49
whatever happens, happens. Right?
起きうる事は何だって起きます
00:51
So that goes along with the Chesire Cat
チェシャ猫がこう言います
00:53
saying, "If you don't care much
「もし自分がどこに着きたいか
00:55
where you want to get to,
あまり気にしていないなら
00:57
it doesn't much matter which way you go."
どちらに行っても大した問題ではない」
00:59
But I think it does matter
とは言え どちらへ行くのか
01:01
which way we go, and what road we take,
どの道を選ぶかは大事だと思います
01:03
because when I think about design in the
というのは私が近い将来の構想を練る時
01:05
near future, what I think are the most
私が最も重要な課題と考え
01:07
important issues, what's really
実に決定的で不可欠な点は
01:09
crucial and vital is that we need
2002年の今 直ちに
01:11
to revitalize the arts and sciences
芸術と科学とを
01:13
right now in 2002.
再生させることだからです
01:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:18
If we describe the near future
もし近い将来として
01:23
as 10, 20, 15 years from now,
10年 20年 15年ほど先を考えるなら
01:25
that means that what we do today
今日する事が非常に重要になることを
01:27
is going to be critically important,
意味します
01:30
because in the year 2015,
というのは 2015年
01:32
and the year 2020, 2025, the world
2020年 2025年の社会は
01:34
our society is going to be building on,
今日の私達が作り上げた
01:36
the basic knowledge and abstract ideas,
基礎的知識と抽象的概念や
01:38
the discoveries that we came up with today,
発見の上に築かれるからです
01:40
just as all these wonderful things we're
このTEDコンファレンスでまさに今
01:43
hearing about here at the TED conference
聞く素晴らしい物事や
01:45
that we take for granted in the world
今の世界で当たり前になっている事が
01:47
right now, were really knowledge
50年代 60年代そして70年代に
01:49
and ideas that came up
芽を出した知識やアイデアであったことと
01:51
in the '50s, the '60s, and the '70s.
正に同じことなのです
01:53
That's the substrate that we're exploiting
これは今日 私達が活用している基質です
01:56
today, whether it's the internet,
それはインターネットであれ
01:59
genetic engineering, laser scanners,
遺伝子工学 レーザースキャナー
02:01
guided missiles, fiber optics, high-definition
誘導ミサイル 光ファイバー HDTV
02:03
television, sensing, remote-sensing
宇宙から遠隔探査して
02:05
from space and the wonderful
作成した画像
02:07
remote-sensing photos that we see in
立体織物
02:09
3D weaving, TV programs like Tracker,
『トラッカー』や『エンタープライズ』などのテレビ番組
02:11
and Enterprise, CD rewrite drives,
CD-R 薄型ディスプレイ
02:14
flatscreen, Alvin Ailey's Suite Otis,
アルビン・アイリーの『スイートオーティス』
02:16
or Sarah Jones' "Your Revolution Will Not
サラ・ジョーンズの『ユア・レボリューション』の
02:19
Be Between These Thighs," which
「革命は 太ももの間にはない」
02:22
by the way was banned by the FCC,
ちなみにFCCが放送禁止にしましたね
02:24
or ska, all of these things
またスカであれ これら全ては
02:26
without question, almost without exception,
疑いなく一つ残らず
02:28
are really based on ideas
まさに何年も前からのアイデアや
02:30
and abstract and creativity
概念や創造性に
02:32
from years before,
基づいているのです
02:34
so we have to ask ourselves,
そこで我々自身にこう問う必要があります
02:36
what are we contributing to that legacy
受け継いだ遺産に今何を加えているのかと
02:38
right now? And when I think about it,
そんなことを考えると
02:40
I'm really worried. To be quite frank,
本当に心配です かなり率直に言って
02:42
I'm concerned. I'm skeptical
私は懸念しています
02:44
that we're doing very much of anything.
私たちが何ひとつ貢献していないのではないかと疑っています
02:46
We're, in a sense, failing to act
ある意味で 将来にたいして
02:49
in the future. We're purposefully,
働きかけられていません
02:51
consciously being laggards.
意図的 意識的にぐずぐずしています
02:54
We're lagging behind.
私達は遅れをとっています
02:56
Frantz Fanon, who was a psychiatrist
マルティニーク出身の精神科医である
02:58
from Martinique, said, "Each generation
フランツ・ファノンは述べています
03:00
must, out of relative obscurity,
「曖昧な状況の中から 各世代ごとに
03:02
discover its mission, and fulfill or betray it."
使命を見出さねばならぬ そしてその使命を果たすか それに背くかだ」
03:04
What is our mission? What do we have
私達の使命は何でしょう 何をする必要が
03:09
to do? I think our mission is
あるのでしょうか 私達の使命は
03:11
to reconcile, to reintegrate
科学と芸術を
03:13
science and the arts, because right now
調和させ 再統合させる事だと思います
03:15
there's a schism that exists
というのは今のよくある見方では分裂していると
03:18
in popular culture. You know,
思われているからです
03:21
people have this idea that science
科学と芸術とは
03:23
and the arts are really separate.
まったく別の物だと思われていますよね
03:25
We think of them as separate
この二つは隔たりのある
03:27
and different things, and this idea was
別のものだと思われています
03:29
probably introduced centuries ago,
おそらく数世紀前からの考えですが
03:31
but it's really becoming critical now,
今や 本当に問題になってきました
03:33
because we're making decisions about our
というのは自分達の社会について
03:35
society every day that,
日々 ある決断をしていることになるからです
03:37
if we keep thinking that the arts
芸術と科学とは隔たったものだとか
03:40
are separate from the sciences,
こんな言い方が格好いいと
03:42
and we keep thinking it's cute to say,
考え続けることが問題なのです
03:44
"I don't understand anything about this one,
「この領域は何もわからない」
03:46
I don't understand anything about the other
「あちらの領域は何もわからない」
03:48
one," then we're going to have problems.
やがて厄介な事になります
03:50
Now I know no one here at TED
TEDにはそんな考えの人はいないはずです
03:52
thinks this. All of us, we already know
両者が深く関係していると
03:54
that they're very connected, but I'm going
誰もが知っています
03:56
to let you know that some folks
しかし 驚かないでください
03:58
in the outside world, believe it or not,
世の中には
04:00
they think it's neat when they say,
格好いいと思ってこう言う人もいるのです
04:02
"You know, scientists and science is not
「ほら 科学者や科学は創造的ではないんだ
04:04
creative. Maybe scientists are ingenious,
科学者は独創的かもしれないが
04:06
but they're not creative.
創作はできないのだ」
04:08
And then we have this tendency, the career
それからこんな傾向もあります
04:10
counselors and various people say things
職業カウンセラーなど多くの人がこう言います
04:12
like, "Artists are not analytical.
「芸術家は分析的ではない
04:14
They're ingenious, perhaps,
おそらく彼らは独創的ではあるが
04:16
but not analytical," and
分析的ではない」
04:19
when these concepts underly our teaching
これらの考えが教育や
04:22
and what we think about the world,
世界の捉え方の基盤となると
04:24
then we have a problem, because we
問題となります なぜなら
04:26
stymie support for everything.
すべての事への支援を妨げてしまうからです
04:28
By accepting this dichotomy,
冗談半分であっても
04:30
whether it's tongue-in-cheek, when
この二分法を受け入れて
04:32
we attempt to accommodate it in our world,
実際の世界にこれを適用しようとしたり
04:34
and we try to build our foundation
世界のための基盤を築こうとするなら
04:36
for the world, we're messing up the future,
未来を台無しにしようとしているのです
04:38
because, who wants to be uncreative?
だって 誰も独創性のない人間や
04:40
Who wants to be illogical?
非論理的な人間にはなりたくないでしょう
04:42
Talent would run from either of these fields
どちらかを選ばなければならないとしたら
04:44
if you said you had to choose either.
才能はどちらの領域からも逃げ出すでしょう
04:46
Then they're going to go to something
そして「創造的でありながら
04:48
where they think, "Well, I can be creative
同時に論理的でいられる」
04:50
and logical at the same time."
という考え方に至るのです
04:52
Now I grew up in the '60s and I'll admit it,
さて 私は60年代に育ちました 白状すると
04:54
actually, my childhood spanned the '60s,
私の子供時代は60年代そのものです
04:56
and I was a wannabe hippie and I always
そして私はヒッピーにあこがれていて
04:59
resented the fact that I wasn't really
まだ小さすぎてヒッピーになれないことが
05:01
old enough to be a hippie.
残念でなりませんでした
05:03
And I know there are people here, the
そして ヒッピーにあこがれる
05:05
younger generation who want to be hippies,
もっと若い世代の人もここにいるでしょう
05:07
but people talk about the '60s all the time,
いつでも60年代が話題にのぼると
05:09
and they talk about the anarchy
どんなに無秩序だったかと言う話になります
05:11
that was there, but when I think about
しかし 60年代を思いだして
05:13
the '60s, what I took away from it was
そこから学べると思うことは
05:15
that there was hope for the future.
未来に向けた希望があったことです
05:17
We thought everyone could participate.
誰もがそれに関わることができそうでした
05:19
There were wonderful, incredible ideas
素晴らしく びっくりするようなアイデアが
05:21
that were always percolating,
常に広まって行きました
05:23
and so much of what's cool or hot today
今日注目されていることや格好良いことの多くは
05:25
is really based on some of those concepts,
そんな考えの一部に基づいています
05:28
whether it's, you know, people trying to
スタートレックの例の
05:30
use the prime directive from Star Trek
「艦隊の理念」を
05:32
being involved in things, or again that
実践しようとしている人だとか
05:34
three-dimensional weaving and
最新の科学技術として
05:36
fax machines that I read about in my
週刊誌で読んでいた
05:38
weekly readers that the technology
立体織物やファックスなども
05:40
and engineering was just getting started.
そんな例です
05:42
But the '60s left me with a problem.
しかし 60年代から残された問題が一つありました
05:44
You see, I always assumed I would go
つまり 私は宇宙に行きたいと
05:46
into space, because I followed all of this,
思い続けていました この全てに興味をもっていたからです
05:48
but I also loved the arts and sciences.
そしてまた 芸術も科学も大好きでした
05:51
You see, when I was growing up as
小さな子どもから
05:54
a little girl and as a teenager,
ティーンへと成長していくうちに
05:56
I loved designing and making dogs' clothes
デザインすることや犬の服を作るのが好きになり
05:58
and wanting to be a fashion designer.
ファッションデザイナーになりたいと願いました
06:00
I took art and ceramics. I loved dance.
美術や陶芸の授業をとり ダンスも好きでした
06:02
Lola Falana. Alvin Ailey. Jerome Robbins.
ロラ・ファラナにアルヴィン・エイリー そしてジェローム・ロビンス
06:05
And I also avidly followed the Gemini
そしてまたジェミニ計画や
06:09
and the Apollo programs.
アポロ計画も熱心に追っていました
06:11
I had science projects and tons of astronomy
科学の課題に取り組み 天文学の本を山ほど抱え
06:14
books. I took calculus and philosophy.
微積分学と哲学の授業を受けました
06:16
I wondered about the infinity
無限についてやビッグバン理論に
06:18
and the Big Bang theory.
思いを巡らしました
06:20
And when I was at Stanford,
そして私がスタンフォードに在学中
06:22
I found myself, my senior year,
4年生の時 私は
06:24
chemical engineering major, half the folks
化学工学の専攻でしたが
06:26
thought I was a political science and
友人の半分には 政治科学と演劇を
06:28
performing arts major, which was sort of
専攻していると思われていました
06:30
true because I was Black Student Union President
それももっともな話で 私は黒人学生連盟代表でしたし
06:32
and I did major in some other things,
いくつか他の科目も取っていたからです
06:34
and I found myself the last quarter juggling
最終学期にはスケジュールを縫うように
06:36
chemical engineering separation processes,
化学工学の分離過程と
06:38
logic classes, nuclear magnetic resonance
論理学の授業 NMR分光を学び
06:40
spectroscopy, and also producing
そしてまたダンスステージの制作と
06:42
and choreographing a dance production,
振り付けにも取り組みました
06:44
and I had to do the lighting and the
また照明やデザインの
06:46
design work, and I was trying to figure out,
仕事もしなければなりませんでした
06:48
do I go to New York City
ニューヨークに行ってプロの舞踊家を
06:51
to try to become a professional dancer,
目指して挑戦をするか それとも
06:53
or do I go to medical school?
医科大学に行くか 決めようとしていました
06:55
Now, my mother helped me figure
まぁ この問題に関しては母が
06:58
that one out. (Laughter)
けりを付けてくれました (笑)
07:00
But when I went into space,
しかし 私は宇宙へ行った時
07:03
when I went into space I carried a number
宇宙へ行った時には 沢山の物を
07:05
of things up with me. I carried a poster
持って行きました
07:07
by Alvin Ailey, which you can figure out
アルヴィン・エイリーのポスター
07:09
now, I love the dance company.
お察しのようにダンスが好きなのです
07:11
An Alvin Ailey poster of Judith Jamison
ジュディス・ジャミソンがクライ(Cry) を演ずる
07:13
performing the dance "Cry," dedicated to all
アルヴィン・エイリーのポスター
07:15
black women everywhere. A Bundu statue,
全ての黒人女性に捧げられたダンスです
07:17
which was from the Women's Society
シエラレオネの婦人協会からのブンドゥ像
07:19
in Sierra Leone, and a certificate for the
シカゴの公立学校から
07:21
Chicago Public School students to work to
科学と数学の向上に貢献した生徒に
07:23
improve their science and math,
与えられる認定証
07:25
and folks asked me,
同僚は私に尋ねました
07:27
"Why did you take up what you took up?"
「なぜそんなにいろいろ持って行ったの?」
07:29
And I had to say,
私はこう言う必要がありました
07:31
"Because it represents human creativity,
「人類の創造性を表しているからよ
07:33
the creativity that allowed us, that we were
スペースシャトルを構想して実現し
07:35
required to have to conceive and build
打ち上げるために求められる創造性
07:37
and launch the space shuttle, springs from
それを可能にした創造性
07:39
the same source as the imagination and
同じ源泉から ブンドゥ像を彫るときに要る
07:42
analysis it took to carve a Bundu statue,
想像力と分析だとか デザインや振り付けや
07:44
or the ingenuity it took to design,
『クライ』を上演するための独創性が
07:47
choreograph, and stage "Cry."
湧き出ているからよ」
07:50
Each one of them are different
それらの一つ一つは創造性の異なった
07:53
manifestations, incarnations, of creativity,
現れ方 具現化であり
07:55
avatars of human creativity,
人類の創造性の権化であるのです
07:58
and that's what we have to reconcile
自分達の精神の中で
08:01
in our minds, how these things fit together.
これらのつながりを調和させる必要があります
08:03
The difference between arts and sciences
芸術と科学の間の違いは
08:05
is not analytical versus intuitive, right?
分析的に対して直観的ということではありませんよね
08:07
E=MC squared required
E=mc の 2 乗には
08:10
an intuitive leap, and then you had
直観的な飛躍が必要でした
08:13
to do the analysis afterwards.
そして後から分析が必要だったのです
08:15
Einstein said, in fact, "The most beautiful
アインシュタインは実際こう言いました 「我々が経験する
08:17
thing we can experience is the mysterious.
最も美しい事は未知なる事である
08:19
It is the source of all true art and science."
それが全ての真の芸術と科学の源である」
08:22
Dance requires us to express and want
ダンスは人生における喜びを表現すること
08:25
to express the jubilation in life, but then you
そして表現への情熱を求めます
08:27
have to figure out, exactly
そして
08:29
what movement do I do to make sure
どのような動きをするとそれが正しく伝わるのか
08:31
that it comes across correctly?
考えだす必要があります
08:33
The difference between arts and sciences
芸術と科学の間の違いは
08:35
is also not constructive versus
構成的と分解的という違いではありません
08:37
deconstructive, right? A lot of people
だって そうでしょう 多くの人が
08:39
think of the sciences as deconstructive.
科学は分解するものだと考えています
08:41
You have to pull things apart.
物事をばらばらにする必要があるのです
08:43
And yeah, sub-atomic physics
そうです 素粒子物理学は分解します
08:45
is deconstructive. You literally try to
文字通りそれらの内部に
08:47
tear atoms apart to understand
何があるか理解するために
08:49
what's inside of them. But sculpture, from
原子をばらばらにしようとします
08:51
what I understand from great sculptors,
偉大な彫刻家から学んだことですが
08:53
is deconstructive, because you see a piece
彫刻も分解的です なぜなら部分をとらえ
08:55
and you remove what doesn't
そこから不要なものを
08:57
need to be there.
取り除くからです
08:59
Biotechnology is constructive.
生物工学は構成的です
09:01
Orchestral arranging is constructive.
管弦楽の編曲は構成的です
09:03
So in fact we use constructive and
つまり実際 構成的な技術と
09:05
deconstructive techniques in everything.
分解する技術は全てに用いられます
09:07
The difference between science
科学と芸術の間の違いは
09:09
and the arts is not that they
コインの表裏という
09:12
are different sides of the same coin, even,
わけではありません
09:15
or even different parts
同じ連続体の異なった部分と言う
09:17
of the same continuum, but rather
わけでもありません むしろ
09:19
they're manifestations of the same thing.
一つのことの別の示し方にすぎません
09:21
Different quantum states of an atom?
一つの原子の異なった量子状態のように
09:24
Or maybe if I want to be more 21st century
あるいは21世紀風に言えば
09:26
I could say that they are different harmonic
超弦理論の異なった振動状態と
09:28
resonances of a superstring.
言えるでしょう
09:30
But we'll leave that alone. (Laughter)
この話は止めましょう (笑)
09:32
They spring from the same source.
この二つは同じ源から生じているのです
09:34
The arts and sciences are avatars of
芸術と科学は人類の創造性の
09:36
human creativity. It's our attempt
権化なのです
09:38
as humans to build an understanding
私達を取り巻く世界である宇宙を
09:40
of the universe, the world around us.
人類として理解する試みなのです
09:42
It's our attempt to influence things,
自分達の内側や
09:44
the universe internal to ourselves
そして外側にある宇宙に影響を与えようという
09:46
and external to us.
試みなのです
09:48
The sciences, to me, are manifestations
私にとって科学とは 理解や経験を
09:50
of our attempt to express
表現して伝えて
09:52
or share our understanding,
自分達の外側にある宇宙に
09:55
our experience, to influence the universe
働きかけようという
09:57
external to ourselves.
試みを具現化したものです
09:59
It doesn't rely on us as individuals.
科学は個人に依るものではありません
10:02
It's the universe, as experienced
全ての人々が経験するような
10:04
by everyone, and the arts manifest
宇宙を表しています
10:06
our desire, our attempt to share
芸術は私達の願いを表現して伝え
10:08
or influence others through experiences
特に個人として特有の経験を通して
10:11
that are peculiar to us as individuals.
他の人に働きかける試みです
10:14
Let me say it again another way:
もう一度言い換えさせてください
10:16
science provides an understanding
科学は普遍的な経験について
10:18
of a universal experience, and
理解させるものです
10:20
arts provides a universal understanding
芸術は個人的な経験についての
10:23
of a personal experience.
普遍的に理解させるものです
10:26
That's what we have to think about,
私達はこのことを考えなければいけません
10:29
that they're all part of us, they're
どちらも私達の一部であり
10:31
all part of a continuum.
どちらも連続体の一部であるのです
10:33
It's not just the tools, it's not just
それは単なる道具ではなく
10:35
the sciences, you know, the mathematics
単なる科学的知識や 数学でも
10:37
and the numerical stuff and the statistics,
ただの数値でも 統計学でもありません
10:39
because we heard, very much on this
なぜならまさにこの舞台で
10:41
stage, people talked about music
音楽が数学的だという話を
10:43
being mathematical. Right? Arts don't just
聞きましたよね
10:45
use clay, aren't the only ones that use clay,
芸術は 粘土だけを使うのではありません
10:47
light and sound and movement.
芸術は粘土と光や音や動きをだけを用いるわけではありません
10:49
They use analysis as well.
同様に分析も用います
10:52
So people might say, well,
それでもこう言う人はいるでしょう
10:55
I still like that intuitive versus analytical
やっぱり直観的に対して 分析的だなどと
10:57
thing, because everybody wants to do the
考えるのが好きです だって誰でも
10:59
right brain, left brain thing, right?
右脳か左脳かという話は好きですよね
11:01
We've all been accused of being
私達はみんな あるとき
11:03
right-brained or left-brained at some point
右脳的だとか左脳的だという理由で
11:05
in time, depending on who
非難されます 誰に反対したかによって
11:07
we disagreed with. (Laughter)
決まる話です(笑)
11:09
You know, people say intuitive, you know
ほら 直観的と言えば自然との触れ合い
11:11
that's like you're in touch with nature,
自分自身を探り
11:13
in touch with yourself and relationships.
関係を探るようなもの
11:15
Analytical: you put your mind to work, and
分析的といえば 課題に意識を向けること
11:17
I'm going to tell you a little secret. You all
ちょっとした秘密を話します
11:19
know this though, but sometimes people
皆さんはご存知でしょうが 時として
11:21
use this analysis idea, that things are
こういうのが分析的な考えだと思われます
11:23
outside of ourselves, to be, say, that this
私達自身の外部における真実や
11:25
is what we're going to elevate
真実まで高められるものが
11:27
as the true, most important sciences, right?
最も重要な科学と考えられています
11:29
And then you have artists, and you all
一方に芸術家がいます ご存知のように
11:32
know this is true as well,
これも同様に真実ですが
11:34
artists will say things about scientists
芸術家は科学者について
11:36
because they say they're too concrete,
科学者は実体にこだわりすぎて
11:39
they're disconnected with the world.
世間から切り離されているなどと言います
11:41
But, we've even had that here on stage,
この舞台で出た話ですから
11:44
so don't act like you don't know
何の話だかわからない
11:46
what I'm talking about. (Laughter)
ふりをしないで下さい (笑)
11:48
We had folks talking about the Flat Earth
フラットアースソサイエティや
11:50
Society and flower arrangers, so there's
華道家の話を聞きました
11:52
this whole dichotomy that we continue
理解が深まったとしても ここに
11:54
to carry along, even when we know better.
分裂がずっとついてまわります
11:56
And folks say we need to choose either or.
どちらか一方を選ぶ必要があるなどと言いますが
11:59
But it would really be foolish to choose
どちらか一つを選べなんて
12:02
either one, right?
ほんとうに馬鹿げた話ですね
12:04
Intuitive versus analytical?
直観的か 分析的かのどちらか
12:06
That's a foolish choice. It's foolish,
それは馬鹿げた選択です
12:08
just like trying to choose between
まるで現実的か理想的かを
12:10
being realistic or idealistic.
選べというようなものです
12:12
You need both in life. Why do people
人生には両方必要です
12:14
do this? I'm just gonna quote
なぜ片方を選ぼうとするのでしょうか
12:16
a molecular biologist, Sydney Brenner,
シドニー・ブレナーは分子生物学者で
12:18
who's 70 years old so he can say this. He said,
彼は70歳で このように悟っています
12:20
"It's always important to distinguish
「貞操とインポテンツとを
12:22
between chastity and impotence."
区別するのは重要である」
12:24
Now... (Laughter)
さて・・・ (笑)
12:26
I want to share with you
簡単な方程式をみなさんに
12:29
a little equation, okay?
共有したいと思います いいですか
12:32
How do understanding science
どのように科学と芸術についての
12:35
and the arts fit into our lives
理解を自分達の生き方に適用するか
12:38
and what's going on and the things
この分野で何が起きているのか
12:40
that we're talking about here
このデザイン会議で話されていることなどについて
12:42
at the design conference, and this is
これは私にとっての
12:44
a little thing I came up with, understanding
ささやかな気付きなのですが
12:46
and our resources and our will
理解 + 注力 + 意志 = 得られる結果 です
12:48
cause us to have outcomes.
理解 + 注力 + 意志 = 得られる結果 です
12:50
Our understanding is our science, our arts,
理解することが 私達の科学や芸術であり
12:52
our religion, how we see the universe
信じるものであり まわりの世界を
12:54
around us, our resources, our money,
どう知覚するかです 注力するのは資源や財産であり
12:56
our labor, our minerals, those things
努力であり 鉱石であり
12:58
that are out there in the world we have
世界のこんな物を活用して私達は
13:00
to work with.
取り組む必要があるのです
13:02
But more importantly, there's our will.
さらに重要なことには 私達の意志があります
13:04
This is our vision, our aspirations
ビジョンや未来についての願い
13:06
of the future, our hopes, our dreams,
希望や夢や
13:08
our struggles and our fears.
苦闘や恐れです
13:10
Our successes and our failures influence
私達の成功も失敗も
13:12
what we do with all of those, and to me,
今言ったすべての取り組みに影響します
13:14
design and engineering, craftsmanship and
私にとって デザインをすること 工学そして
13:16
skilled labor, are all the things that work on
熟達した労働のどれも
13:18
this to have our outcome,
取り組みにかかわり
13:20
which is our human quality of life.
それは 人生の質という結果に影響します
13:22
Where do we want the world to be?
どんな世界を願うのでしょうか
13:25
And guess what?
いいですか
13:27
Regardless of how we look at this, whether
この事を私達がどう見なそうと つまり
13:29
we look at arts and sciences are separate
私達が芸術と科学は分離している だとか
13:31
or different, they're both being influenced
別だと見なそうとも この二つは共に影響されて
13:33
now and they're both having problems.
共に問題を抱えています
13:35
I did a project called S.E.E.ing the Future:
『ミライをカ・キ・コする』というプロジェクトを
13:37
Science, Engineering and Education, and
立ち上げました 科学 教育と工学の略です
13:39
it was looking at how to shed light on
政府基金の有効な利用法について
13:41
most effective use of government funding.
どうやって評価すべきか考えるものでした
13:43
We got a bunch of scientists in all stages
さまざまな職位の科学者を集めました
13:45
of their careers. They came to Dartmouth
私が教えていた
13:47
College, where I was teaching, and they
ダートマス大学に来て
13:49
talked about with theologians and financiers,
神学者や経営学者と話し合いました
13:51
what are some of the issues of public
科学と工学の研究のための公的資金における
13:53
funding for science and engineering
問題は何であるかを議論しました
13:55
research? What's most important about it?
最も重要なことは何でしょう
13:57
There are some ideas that emerged that
そこで問題として出されたものは
13:59
I think have really powerful parallels
芸術において聞いたことのあるような
14:01
to the arts. The first thing they said was that
問題でした まず最初に
14:03
the circumstances that we find ourselves in
科学や工学はこんな状況だという話です
14:05
today in the sciences and engineering that
私達を世界のリーダーにした
14:07
made us world leaders is very different
科学や工学における状況は
14:09
than the '40s, the '50s, and the '60s
40年代 50年代 60年代そして
14:11
and the '70s when we emerged
私達が世界のリーダーとして台頭した
14:14
as world leaders, because we're no longer
70年代とは違っているのです
14:16
in competition with fascism, with
ファシズムやソ連型共産主義と
14:18
Soviet-style communism, and by the way
競っているわけではないからです
14:20
that competition wasn't just military,
あの競争は軍事だけではなく
14:22
it included social competition
社会的な競争や
14:24
and political competition as well,
政治的な競争でもありました
14:26
that allowed us to look at space
そこで私達の社会システムの方が
14:28
as one of those platforms to prove
優れていることを証明するための
14:30
that our social system was better.
舞台として宇宙にも目が向けられたのです
14:32
Another thing they talked about was the
彼らが話し合ったもう一つの事は
14:35
infrastructure that supports the sciences
科学を支える社会基盤が
14:37
is becoming obsolete. We look at
時代遅れになっているということです
14:39
universities and colleges, small, mid-sized
国中の総合大学や単科大学 小中規模の
14:41
community colleges across the country,
コミュニティカレッジを見ると
14:44
their laboratories are becoming obsolete,
実験室は時代遅れになっています
14:46
and this is where we train most of our
しかもそここそが
14:49
science workers and our researchers,
科学者や研究者やそして教員を
14:51
and our teachers, by the way,
育てる場所なのです
14:53
and then that there's a media that doesn't
そしてメディアが
14:55
support the dissemination of any more than
平凡で空虚な情報しか広めようとしない
14:57
the most mundane and inane of information.
という問題があります
14:59
There's pseudo-science, crop circles,
疑似科学だの ミステリーサークルだの
15:01
alien autopsy, haunted houses,
エイリアンの解剖だの 幽霊屋敷だの
15:03
or disasters. And that's what we see.
惨事が扱われますが
15:05
And this isn't really the information
これは毎日の暮らしを送ったり
15:08
you need to operate in everyday life
今の民主主義への関わり方を決めたり
15:10
and figure out how to participate in this
何が起きているかを判断するために
15:12
democracy and determine what's going on.
本当に必要な情報ではありません
15:14
They also said that there's a change
またこんな話もありました
15:16
in the corporate mentality. Whereas
企業の姿勢も変わってきたと言います
15:18
government money had always been there
政府資金は常に基礎的な
15:20
for basic science and engineering research,
科学技術研究にあてられてきました
15:22
we also counted on some companies to do
一部の企業も基礎研究を行うことが
15:24
some basic research, but what's happened
期待されていました
15:26
now is companies put more energy into
今や企業は より多くのエネルギーを
15:28
short-term product development
基礎的な科学技術研究よりも
15:30
than they do in basic engineering
短期的な製品開発に
15:32
and science research.
つぎ込んでいるのです
15:34
And education is not keeping up.
そして教育の水準も維持されていません
15:37
In K through 12, people are taking out
幼稚園と小学校からは 実験室が無くなりつつあります
15:40
wet labs. They think if we put a computer
コンピュータを設置するだけで
15:43
in the room it's going to take the place
酸を混ぜたりすることや
15:45
of actually, we're mixing the acids,
ジャガイモを育てたりすることの
15:47
we're growing the potatoes.
代わりになると考えているようです
15:49
And government funding is decreasing
そして政府の資金の支出額は
15:51
in spending and then they're saying,
減少しています こんな言い分です
15:53
let's have corporations take over,
企業に引き継がせよう これは間違いです
15:55
and that's not true. Government funding
政府資金を
15:57
should at least do things like recognize
基礎的な科学技術の研究にあてたとき
15:59
cost-benefits of basic science and
その費用には見返りもあると
16:01
engineering research. We have to know
認めるべきです
16:03
that we have a responsibility
私達には地球市民としての責任があると
16:05
as global citizens in this world.
知る必要があります
16:07
We have to look at the education
人の教育に目を向ける必要もあります
16:09
of humans. We need to build our resources
自分達の資源を集中して
16:11
today to make sure that they're trained so
これらのことの重要性を理解できるような
16:13
that they understand the importance of
教育が行われるようにする必要があります
16:15
these things, and we have to support
科学の活力を支えなければなりません
16:17
the vitality of science, and that doesn't
しかしそれは全てを一律に扱って
16:19
mean that everything has to have one thing
何か一つのことを共有すべきだとか
16:21
that's going to go on, or we know
その結果がどうなるのかを
16:23
exactly what's going to be the outcome of it,
わかっているという意味ではありません
16:25
but that we support the vitality and the
しかし 活力とそれに伴う知的好奇心を
16:27
intellectual curiosity that goes along,
支援することにはなります
16:29
and if you think about those parallels
科学と芸術が相似と思い至れば
16:31
to the arts, the competition
ボリショイバレエ団との競争が
16:33
with the Bolshoi Ballet spurred
ジョフリー・バレエ・スクールや
16:35
the Joffrey and the New York City Ballet
ニューヨークシティバレエ団を
16:37
to become better.
どんなに良くしたか分かるでしょう
16:39
Infrastructure museums, theaters,
基盤となる博物館 劇場
16:41
movie houses across the country
映画館が国中から消えようとしています
16:43
are disappearing. We have more
見るべき物が無いのに
16:45
television stations with less to watch,
テレビ局は増えています
16:47
we have more money spent on
古いテレビ番組を映画として
16:49
rewrites to get old television programs
リメイクするためにますます多くの
16:52
in the movies.
お金を使っています
16:55
We have corporate funding now that,
こんな企業の資金もあります
16:57
when it goes to some company, when it
ある会社では支援の条件として
16:59
goes to support the arts, it almost requires
芸術家が描く絵のどこかに
17:01
that the product be part of the picture
その会社の製品を描くように
17:03
that the artist draws, and we have
求めます
17:05
stadiums that are named over and over
企業によって何度も何度も改名される
17:08
again by corporations.
スタジアムもあります
17:10
In Houston, we're trying to figure out
エンロンスタジアムをどうしたものか
17:12
what to do with that Enron Stadium thing.
ヒューストンでの課題です
17:14
(Laughter) And fine arts and education
(笑)そして学校における美術と教育は
17:16
in the schools is disappearing, and we have
消滅しつつあります
17:18
a government that seems like it's gutting
全米教育協会や他のプログラムを
17:20
the NEA and other programs,
政府は骨抜きにしようとしているようです
17:22
so we have to really stop and think,
本当に立ち止まって 考えるべきです
17:24
what are we trying to do
私達は科学と芸術を
17:26
with the sciences and the arts?
どうしようとしているのか
17:28
There's a need to revitalize them.
新たに活力を与える必要があります
17:30
We have to pay attention to it. I just want
注意を払わなければなりません
17:32
to tell you really quickly what I'm doing.
私が取り組んでいることを手短かに
17:34
(Applause)
お話ししようと思います(拍手)
17:36
I want to tell you what I've been doing
何をしてきているのか
17:42
a little bit since... I feel this need
簡単にですが
17:44
to sort of integrate some of the ideas
ずっとあたためてきたいくつかのアイデアを
17:48
that I've had and run across over time.
統合していく必要を感じています
17:50
One of the things that I found out
精神と体の分裂を
17:52
is that there's a need to repair
適切に正す
17:55
the dichotomy between the mind and body
必要があることに気づいています
17:57
as well. My mother always told me,
私の母はいつも私にこう言いました
17:59
you have to be observant, know what's
「注意深く観察して自分の精神と体に
18:01
going on in your mind and your body,
何が起きているか知る必要がある」
18:03
and as a dancer I had this tremendous
そして ダンサーとして私は
18:05
faith in my ability to know my body,
自分の身体を十分に知ることができます
18:07
just as I knew how to sense colors.
色がわかるのと同じようにわかります
18:09
Then I went to medical school, and I was
そして 私は医科大学へ行きました
18:11
supposed to just go on
身体について機械で計測したことを
18:13
what the machine said about bodies.
元に判断するように言われました
18:15
You know, you would ask patients
ほら 患者に質問をしようとすると
18:17
questions and some people would tell you,
こんなふうに言う人もいるのです
18:19
"Don't, don't, don't listen to what
「だめ だめ 患者が言った事に
18:21
the patients said." We know that patients
耳を傾けてはだめ 」
18:23
know and understand their bodies better,
患者の方が自分の身体を知っているので
18:25
but these days we're trying to divorce them
今では古い考えから決別しようとしています
18:27
from that idea. We have to reconcile the
患者の身体について
18:29
patient's knowledge of their body
患者自らの知識と内科医の診断とを
18:31
with physician's measurements.
突き合わせる必要があります
18:33
We had someone talk about
感情を測定してそれを機械に
18:35
measuring emotions and getting machines
分からせて異常行動を防ごうという
18:37
to figure out what, to keep us
トークをした人も
18:39
from acting crazy. Right?
いましたよね
18:41
No, we shouldn't measure,
測定すべきではありません
18:43
we shouldn't use machines
ドライバーの激怒を測定するとか
18:45
to measure road rage and then do
それを防ぐためには
18:47
something to keep us from engaging in it.
機械を使うべきではありません
18:49
Maybe we can have machines help us
自分達が激怒していると
18:51
to recognize that we have road rage and
気づくことを助ける機械は出来るでしょう
18:53
then we need to know how to control that
それから その状況を機械に頼らずに
18:55
without the machines. We even need to be
どう抑えるか知る必要があります
18:57
able to recognize that without the machines.
機械がなくても気づけないといけません
18:59
What I'm very concerned about
私がとても関心のある事は
19:01
is how do we bolster our self-awareness
どのように人間として 生体組織としての
19:03
as humans, as biological organisms?
自己認識を強めればよいのかです
19:05
Michael Moschen spoke of having to teach
マイケル・モスシェンは
19:08
and learn how to feel with my eyes,
目で触れて手で見ることを教え
19:10
to see with my hands.
学ばなければならないと語りました
19:12
We have all kinds of possibilities to use
私達の感覚の活用については
19:15
our senses by, and that's
あらゆる可能性を有しています
19:18
what we have to do.
それが取り組まねばならないことです
19:20
That's what I want to do, is to try to use
私も取り組みたい事は生体計測を
19:22
bioinstrumentation, those kind of things
活用する試みです 私達の行動において
19:24
to help our senses in what we do,
感覚を補助するものです
19:27
and that's the work I've been doing now as
今 バイオセンティエント(BioSentient) という名の会社で
19:29
a company called BioSentient Corporation.
取り組んでいる仕事です
19:32
I figured I'd have to do that ad, because
それをする必要があるとわかりました
19:34
I'm an entrepreneur, because entrepreneur
私は起業家だからです 起業家は
19:36
says that that's somebody who does what
フルタイムの仕事をするほど困ってはいないので
19:38
they want to do because they're not broke
自分がしたいと思う事をする
19:40
enough that they have to get a real job.
のだと言います
19:42
(Laughter) But that's the work I'm doing
(笑) 私が今
19:44
with BioSentient Corporation trying to figure
バイオセンティエント社で研究しているのは
19:46
out how do we integrate these things?
こういったことの統合です
19:48
Let me finish by saying that
最後にひとこと
19:50
my personal design issue for the future
未来に向けた個人的な設計課題とは
19:52
is really about integrating, to think about
直観と分析とを考慮して
19:55
that intuitive and that analytical.
統合することです
19:57
The arts and sciences are not separate.
芸術と科学は別物ではありません
20:00
High school physics lesson before you
最後に高校の物理の授業から
20:04
leave. High school physics teacher used to
高校の物理の先生はボールを持ち上げて
20:06
hold up a ball. She would say this ball
こう言ったものです
20:08
has potential energy, but nothing
このボールには位置エネルギーがあるが
20:10
will happen to it, it can't do any work
私がこれを離して 状態が変化するまでは
20:12
until I drop it and it changes states.
何も起きません
20:14
I like to think of ideas as potential energy.
アイデアを位置エネルギーと考えるといいのです
20:16
They're really wonderful, but nothing
アイデアは本当に素晴らしいものですが
20:19
will happen until we risk
思い切って実行に移すまでは
20:21
putting them into action.
何も起こりません
20:24
This conference is filled
このコンファレンスは素晴らしい
20:26
with wonderful ideas.
アイデアで溢れています
20:28
We're going to share lots of things
多くのことが広められていますが
20:30
with people, but nothing's going to happen
これらのアイデアを思い切って
20:32
until we risk putting those ideas into action.
実行に移すまでは何も起こらないでしょう
20:34
We need to revitalize the arts and sciences
今日の芸術と科学には新たな活力を
20:37
of today, we need to take responsibility
与える必要があります 未来に向けて
20:39
for the future. We can't hide behind saying
責任を負う必要があるのです
20:41
it's just for company profits,
企業の利益のためだからとか ビジネスだからとか
20:43
or it's just a business, or I'm an artist
芸術家だからとか 研究者だからとか
20:46
or an academician.
言い訳は出来ません
20:48
Here's how you judge what you're doing.
やっていることをどう判断すべきでしょう
20:50
I talked about that balance between
直観と分析の間のバランスについて
20:52
intuitive, analytical.
お話ししました
20:54
Fran Lebowitz, my favorite cynic,
私の好きな皮肉屋の
20:56
she said the three questions
フラン・レヴォウィッツの述べた
20:59
of greatest concern, now I'm going to
重要な三つの問いがあります
21:01
add on to design, is,
デザインに適用してみましょう
21:03
"Is it attractive?"
「それは魅力があるか」
21:05
That's the intuitive.
これは直観
21:07
"Is it amusing?" The analytical.
「唖然とさせられるか」これは分析
21:09
"And does it know its place?"
「謙虚さがあるか」
21:12
The balance. Thank you very much.
これがバランス ありがとうございました
21:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:17
Translator:Nobumitsu Nishida
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Mae Jemison - Astronaut, engineer, entrepreneur, physician and educator
Astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison‘s inclusive, audacious journey to improving life here on earth and beyond is paving the way for human interstellar travel.

Why you should listen

Dr. Mae Jemison, the first woman of color in space, is at the forefront of integrating physical and social sciences with art and culture to solve problems and foster innovation. Leading the 100 Year Starship seed funded by DARPA to ensure interstellar capabilities, she exploits her experience as a physician, engineer, social scientist and dancer to build a global movement generating radical leaps in knowledge, technology and humanity.

A member of the National Academies, Jemison founded two technology companies and nonprofit Dorothy Jemison Foundation, was Area Peace Corps Medical Officer for Sierra Leone and Liberia --­­ and appeared on Star Trek.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.