08:42
TED2009

Ray Kurzweil: A university for the coming singularity

レイ・カーツワイル:今後現れるシンギュラリティ(技術的特異点)を学ぶ大学

Filmed:

レイ・カーツワイルの分析によると、最新の情報技術は好景気・不景気にかかわらず進化しつづけます。彼は彼の新しいプロジェクトを紹介しています。シンギュラリティ大学、最新の情報技術を学んで人類に貢献する手助けをする大学です

- Inventor, futurist
Ray Kurzweil is an engineer who has radically advanced the fields of speech, text and audio technology. He's revered for his dizzying -- yet convincing -- writing on the advance of technology, the limits of biology and the future of the human species. Full bio

Information technology grows in an exponential manner.
IT技術は指数的に進化していきます
00:13
It's not linear. And our intuition is linear.
直線的ではなく、指数的です そして、私たちの感覚は直線的です
00:16
When we walked through the savanna a thousand years ago
私たちが何千年前にサバンナを歩いていたころ
00:20
we made linear predictions where that animal would be,
どこに動物がいるか、直線的に予測していました
00:22
and that worked fine. It's hardwired in our brains.
そういうやりかたはうまくいってきました そして、私たちの頭にこびりついているのです
00:24
But the pace of exponential growth
しかし、IT技術は
00:27
is really what describes information technologies.
本当に指数的に進化していきます
00:30
And it's not just computation.
コンピュータだけの話ではありません
00:33
There is a big difference between linear and exponential growth.
直線的と指数的には本当に大きな違いがあります
00:36
If I take 30 steps linearly -- one, two, three, four, five --
直線的に30回進むとしましょう。1,2,3,4,5,
00:38
I get to 30.
30になりました
00:42
If I take 30 steps exponentially -- two, four, eight, 16 --
もし指数的に30回進めば、2,4,8,16
00:44
I get to a billion.
10億になります
00:47
It makes a huge difference.
本当に大きな違いです
00:49
And that really describes information technology.
IT技術はこういうことなんです
00:51
When I was a student at MIT,
私がMITの学生だったころ、
00:53
we all shared one computer that took up a whole building.
みんなで建物くらいの大きさの、1台のコンピュータを共同で使っていました
00:55
The computer in your cellphone today is a million times cheaper,
今では同じくらいのコンピュータがあなたの携帯に入っています 何百万分の1の値段で
00:57
a million times smaller,
何百万分の1の大きさで
01:00
a thousand times more powerful.
そして何千倍もパワフルな処理能力で
01:02
That's a billion-fold increase in capability per dollar
1ドルあたり、10憶倍にもなる可能性を秘めています
01:04
that we've actually experienced since I was a student.
それが私が学生の時から実際に経験してきたことです
01:07
And we're going to do it again in the next 25 years.
そして、これからの25年もそうなるでしょう
01:09
Information technology progresses
IT技術は進歩します
01:12
through a series of S-curves
S字カーブの繰り返しを通じて
01:14
where each one is a different paradigm.
ひとつひとつは違うパラダイムによるものかも知れませんが
01:16
So people say, "What's going to happen when Moore's Law comes to an end?"
みんな言うでしょう、「ムーアの法則が終わる時はどうなるの?」と
01:18
Which will happen around 2020.
これは2020年ころ起こるでしょう
01:21
We'll then go to the next paradigm.
そして、次のパラダイムへと移っていきます
01:23
And Moore's Law was not the first paradigm
ムーアの法則は、コンピューティングに指数的な成長をもたらした
01:25
to bring exponential growth to computing.
最初のパラダイムではないのです
01:27
The exponential growth of computing started
コンピュータ技術の指数的な成長は
01:29
decades before Gordon Moore was even born.
ゴードン・ムーアが生まれる何十年も前からのものです
01:31
And it doesn't just apply to computation.
そして、その成長はコンピュータだけにかかわるものではありません
01:33
It's really any technology where we can measure
根底にある情報の特性を測定可能な技術
01:37
the underlying information properties.
すべてにあてはまるのです
01:39
Here we have 49 famous computers. I put them in a logarithmic graph.
ここに49種類の有名なコンピュータがあります  対数グラフで表現してみました
01:42
The logarithmic scale hides the scale of the increase,
対数をとることで、増加の割合がわかりやすくなります
01:46
because this represents trillions-fold increase
1890年の調査から何兆倍にも
01:50
since the 1890 census.
なりますので
01:52
In 1950s they were shrinking vacuum tubes,
1950年代は、真空管を用いていました
01:55
making them smaller and smaller. They finally hit a wall;
それらを 小さく、小さくしていきます。ついには限界につきあたります
01:57
they couldn't shrink the vacuum tube any more and keep the vacuum.
真空管をそれ以上小さく作ることができなくなりました
02:00
And that was the end of the shrinking of vacuum tubes,
そして真空管の時代の終わりがきます
02:02
but it was not the end of the exponential growth of computing.
しかしコンピュータ技術の指数的成長の終わりというわけではないのです
02:05
We went to the fourth paradigm, transistors,
4番目のパラダイムとなるトランジスタとなり
02:08
and finally integrated circuits.
そして、IC(集積回路)です
02:10
When that comes to an end we'll go to the sixth paradigm;
6番目のパラダイムへと続きます
02:12
three-dimensional self-organizing molecular circuits.
3次元の自己進化型分子回路です
02:14
But what's even more amazing, really, than this
しかし本当に面白いことは
02:18
fantastic scale of progress,
進化の度合いよりも
02:21
is that -- look at how predictable this is.
この進化の度合が予測可能であることです
02:23
I mean this went through thick and thin,
つまりこの進化は終始一貫して当てはまるのです
02:25
through war and peace, through boom times and recessions.
戦争でも平和でも、好景気でも不景気でも・・・
02:27
The Great Depression made not a dent in this exponential progression.
世界大恐慌でも、この指数的成長には全く影響ありませんでした
02:30
We'll see the same thing in the economic recession we're having now.
最近の景気の悪化も、同じことがおこるでしょう
02:34
At least the exponential growth of information technology capability
少なくとも情報技術の指数的な成長は
02:38
will continue unabated.
弱まらずに続くでしょう
02:41
And I just updated these graphs.
これらのグラフはアップデートしたところです
02:44
Because I had them through 2002 in my book, "The Singularity is Near."
2002年に書いた本、"The Signularity is Near"で使ったグラフなので
02:46
So we updated them,
だから私はアップデートしました
02:49
so I could present it here, to 2007.
今、ここの2007年のところです
02:51
And I was asked, "Well aren't you nervous?
私はよく聞かれます 「不安になりませんか?
02:54
Maybe it kind of didn't stay on this exponential progression."
指数的成長から少し外れているかもしれませんよ」と
02:56
I was a little nervous
実のところ、私は少し不安でした
03:00
because maybe the data wouldn't be right,
なぜなら、もしかするとデータが正しくないかもしれないからです
03:02
but I've done this now for 30 years,
しかし、こういったことを30年も私はやってきているのです
03:04
and it has stayed on this exponential progression.
そして、30年の間この指数的成長を遂げてきているのです
03:06
Look at this graph here.You could buy one transistor for a dollar in 1968.
このグラフを見てください。1968年には、1ドルで1つのトランジスタを買えました
03:09
You can buy half a billion today,
今では1ドルで5億個も買えます
03:12
and they are actually better, because they are faster.
さらに、動作の速い、ずっと性能の良いものを買えるのです
03:14
But look at how predictable this is.
しかし、これがいかに予測可能なものかを見てください
03:16
And I'd say this knowledge is over-fitting to past data.
この仮説は過去のデータとよく一致します
03:18
I've been making these forward-looking predictions for about 30 years.
私はこんな風に、未来予測を30年もの間続けてきました
03:21
And the cost of a transistor cycle,
そして、トランジスタの値段の変動サイクル
03:25
which is a measure of the price performance of electronics,
これはエレクトロニクス製品の価格の基準になるものですが
03:27
comes down about every year.
これは毎年下がっていっています
03:29
That's a 50 percent deflation rate.
50%の価格低下率になります
03:31
And it's also true of other examples,
そしてほかの例にもあてはまります
03:33
like DNA data or brain data.
たとえばDNAや脳の情報といった例です
03:35
But we more than make up for that.
値段を下げて需要量を補うだけではありません
03:37
We actually ship more than twice as much
実際にIT技術を用いることで
03:39
of every form of information technology.
出荷量は倍以上に増えています
03:41
We've had 18 percent growth in constant dollars
インフレ調整後の価格で18%の成長をしてきました
03:43
in every form of information technology for the last half-century,
先の半世紀の間にIT技術の分野で
03:46
despite the fact that you can get twice as much of it each year.
毎年2倍の成長を得ることができるにもかかわらずです
03:49
This is a completely different example.
こちらは、全く別の例です
03:53
This is not Moore's Law.
これはムーアの法則に沿っていません
03:55
The amount of DNA data
DNA情報の解析については
03:57
we've sequenced has doubled every year.
毎年2倍ずつ進んでいます
03:59
The cost has come down by half every year.
毎年コストは半分に下がっています
04:01
And this has been a smooth progression
これは、ゲノム解析プロジェクトの初めから考えると
04:04
since the beginning of the genome project.
非常にスムーズな進歩です
04:06
And halfway through the project, skeptics said,
プロジェクトの途中で、懐疑的な人は言いました
04:08
"Well, this is not working out. You're halfway through the genome project
うまくいっていないんじゃないか、プロジェクトの半分が経過したのに
04:10
and you've finished one percent of the project."
まだ1%ほど終わったに過ぎないではないかと
04:13
But that was really right on schedule.
しかし、本当にスケジュール通りでした
04:15
Because if you double one percent seven more times,
1%を2倍にすることを、7回繰り返したら
04:17
which is exactly what happened,
どうなるでしょうか?
04:19
you get 100 percent. And the project was finished on time.
100%に達するのです プロジェクトは期限通りに終わりました
04:21
Communication technologies:
次に、通信技術についてです
04:24
50 different ways to measure this,
これは、50もの評価の尺度があります
04:26
the number of bits being moved around, the size of the Internet.
通信するビット数であったり、インターネットの大きさなど
04:28
But this has progressed at an exponential pace.
しかし、これも指数的ペースで成長してきました
04:31
This is deeply democratizing.
非常に民主的です
04:33
I wrote, over 20 years ago in "The Age of Intelligent Machines,"
20年以上前,"The Age of Intellignet Machines"という本を私は書きました
04:35
when the Soviet Union was going strong, that it would be swept away
ソビエト連邦が強力になりつつあったころです ソビエトは通信技術の進歩に
04:38
by this growth of decentralized communication.
よって、一掃されるだろうと
04:41
And we will have plenty of computation as we go through the 21st century
そして私たちは21世紀には
04:45
to do things like simulate regions of the human brain.
人間の脳をシミュレートするに十分な計算能力を得るでしょう
04:48
But where will we get the software?
でも、そのソフトウェアはどうすれば手に入るでしょう?
04:52
Some critics say, "Oh, well software is stuck in the mud."
批評家はいうでしょう、そんなソフトウェアはありえないと
04:54
But we are learning more and more about the human brain.
しかし私たちは、人間の脳について多く研究し続けています
04:57
Spatial resolution of brain scanning is doubling every year.
人間の脳のスキャン精度は毎年精密になっています
04:59
The amount of data we're getting about the brain is doubling every year.
脳についてのデータは、毎年増えているのです
05:02
And we're showing that we can actually turn this data
そして、このデータをもとに動くモデルやシミュレーションを
05:05
into working models and simulations of brain regions.
することができるようになるでしょう
05:08
There is about 20 regions of the brain that have been modeled,
脳の機能のなかで、モデル化してシミュレーション、テストを
05:11
simulated and tested:
できる領域はだいたい20くらいあります
05:13
the auditory cortex, regions of the visual cortex;
聴覚皮質、視覚野の部分
05:15
cerebellum, where we do our skill formation;
運動機能をつかさどる小脳
05:18
slices of the cerebral cortex, where we do our rational thinking.
思考をする、大脳皮質
05:20
And all of this has fueled
これら全てによって、とてもスムーズ且つ予想どおりに
05:24
an increase, very smooth and predictable, of productivity.
生産性の向上に拍車がかかりました
05:26
We've gone from 30 dollars to 130 dollars
人間の時間当り労働単価は
05:29
in constant dollars in the value of an average hour of human labor,
インフレ調整後で30ドルから130ドルに上昇しました
05:31
fueled by this information technology.
このIT技術の支援をうけてです
05:35
And we're all concerned about energy and the environment.
そして、私たちはみんなエネルギーと環境問題を心配しています
05:38
Well this is a logarithmic graph.
これもまた、対数的増加であらわされます
05:41
This represents a smooth doubling,
こちらは、スムーズに2倍となることを示します
05:43
every two years, of the amount of solar energy we're creating,
2年ごとの、私たちが作りだすソーラーエネルギーの量です
05:45
particularly as we're now applying nanotechnology,
ソーラーパネルには、情報技術の分野としては
05:49
a form of information technology, to solar panels.
特にナノテクノロジーが応用されます
05:51
And we're only eight doublings away
あとわずか8回倍増させれば
05:54
from it meeting 100 percent of our energy needs.
エネルギー需要の100%がカバーされるのです
05:56
And there is 10 thousand times more sunlight than we need.
そして、太陽のエネルギーは人類の必要量の1万倍にも達します
05:58
We ultimately will merge with this technology. It's already very close to us.
最終的にはこの技術と一体となるでしょう。ほとんど実現は間近です
06:02
When I was a student it was across campus, now it's in our pockets.
私が学生のころはキャンパスのはじからはじまでもありました いまはポケットの中に入ります
06:07
What used to take up a building now fits in our pockets.
昔、ビルディングにおさまっていたものが 今ではポケットの中なのです
06:10
What now fits in our pockets would fit in a blood cell in 25 years.
今ポケットの中に入っている程度の大きさのものは、25年もたてば血液細胞の大きさになるでしょう
06:13
And we will begin to actually deeply influence
そして、私たちは実際にこれらの技術を知るにつれて
06:16
our health and our intelligence,
私たちの健康と知性に
06:20
as we get closer and closer to this technology.
実際に影響をあたえるようになりつつあります
06:22
Based on that we are announcing, here at TED,
ここTEDでアナウンスします
06:26
in true TED tradition, Singularity University.
シンギュラリティー・ユニバーシティ
06:29
It's a new university
これは、新しい大学です
06:32
that's founded by Peter Diamandis, who is here in the audience,
ここにおりますピーター・ディアマンデスと
06:34
and myself.
私が設立者です
06:36
It's backed by NASA and Google,
NASA と Google
06:38
and other leaders in the high-tech and science community.
そして他のハイテク・科学界のバックアップを受けています
06:40
And our goal was to assemble the leaders,
我々の目標は 生徒としてあるいは先生として
06:44
both teachers and students,
リーダーたちを集めることです
06:47
in these exponentially growing information technologies,
これらの指数的なIT技術の発展と
06:49
and their application.
応用に関する分野です
06:51
But Larry Page made an impassioned speech
ラリー・ペイジは、印象深いスピーチをしました
06:53
at our organizing meeting,
私たちの準備ミーティングで
06:55
saying we should devote this study
私たちは、この研究に時間を割くべきであると
06:57
to actually addressing some of the major challenges facing humanity.
実際に何らかの人類が立ち向かう大きな問題に向けて
07:02
And if we did that, then Google would back this.
そして、もしそうするのであれば、Googleはバックアップします
07:06
And so that's what we've done.
我々はそれを実行しました
07:08
The last third of the nine-week intensive summer session
9週間の集中夏季レッスンのうち 最後の3分の1は
07:10
will be devoted to a group project to address
グループプロジェクトに時間を割きます
07:14
some major challenge of humanity.
いくつかの、人類共通のチャレンジについてです
07:16
Like for example, applying the Internet,
たとえば、インターネットです
07:18
which is now ubiquitous, in the rural areas of China or in Africa,
インターネットは中国やアフリカの田舎であってもどこでも接続できます
07:20
to bringing health information
健康関連の情報を伝えることができます
07:25
to developing areas of the world.
世界の発展途上国に向けて
07:27
And these projects will continue past these sessions,
そして こういったプロジェクトはレッスンが終わった後も続きます
07:30
using collaborative interactive communication.
双方向通信のコラボレーションを用いて
07:33
All the intellectual property that is created and taught
すべての知的財産は
07:36
will be online and available,
オンラインであり、使用可能です
07:40
and developed online in a collaborative fashion.
そして、オンラインのコラボレーションにより進められます
07:42
Here is our founding meeting.
これが創立総会の写真です
07:45
But this is being announced today.
でも、まだ今日アナウンスしたところです
07:47
It will be permanently headquartered in Silicon Valley,
この大学はシリコンバレーを本拠地にします
07:49
at the NASA Ames research center.
NASAのリサーチセンター内です
07:52
There are different programs for graduate students,
大学院生用と、様々な会社の幹部用に
07:54
for executives at different companies.
別々のプログラムを用意しています
07:56
The first six tracks here -- artificial intelligence,
最初の6トラックがこちらです。AI(人工知能)
07:59
advanced computing technologies, biotechnology, nanotechnology --
応用コンピュータ技術、バイオテクノロジー、ナノテク
08:01
are the different core areas of information technology.
情報技術の他の分野です
08:04
Then we are going to apply them to the other areas,
ほかの分野にも広げようとしています
08:08
like energy, ecology,
エネルギーやエコロジー
08:10
policy law and ethics, entrepreneurship,
法律、倫理学、起業について
08:13
so that people can bring these new technologies to the world.
みなさんがこれらの新しい技術を世界に広げられるように
08:15
So we're very appreciative of the support we've gotten
私たちは、皆さんの支援に本当に感謝しています
08:19
from both the intellectual leaders, the high-tech leaders,
学術界のリーダーや、ハイテク企業のリーダーのみなさんからの支援
08:24
particularly Google and NASA.
特にGoogleとNASAです
08:26
This is an exciting new venture.
これはエキサイティングな、新しいチャレンジです
08:28
And we invite you to participate. Thank you very much.
みなさんにも参加してもらいたいと思っています どうもありがとう
08:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:33
Translated by yutaka usui
Reviewed by Masaaki Ueno

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Ray Kurzweil - Inventor, futurist
Ray Kurzweil is an engineer who has radically advanced the fields of speech, text and audio technology. He's revered for his dizzying -- yet convincing -- writing on the advance of technology, the limits of biology and the future of the human species.

Why you should listen

Inventor, entrepreneur, visionary, Ray Kurzweil's accomplishments read as a startling series of firsts -- a litany of technological breakthroughs we've come to take for granted. Kurzweil invented the first optical character recognition (OCR) software for transforming the written word into data, the first print-to-speech software for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition.

Yet his impact as a futurist and philosopher is no less significant. In his best-selling books, which include How to Create a Mind, The Age of Spiritual Machines, The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, Kurzweil depicts in detail a portrait of the human condition over the next few decades, as accelerating technologies forever blur the line between human and machine.

In 2009, he unveiled Singularity University, an institution that aims to "assemble, educate and inspire leaders who strive to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies." He is a Director of Engineering at Google, where he heads up a team developing machine intelligence and natural language comprehension.

More profile about the speaker
Ray Kurzweil | Speaker | TED.com