27:36
TED2005

Robert Fischell: My wish: Three unusual medical inventions

ロバート・フィッシェル: 私の願いー医療のための3つのユニークな発明品

Filmed:

発明家のロバート・フィッシェルは2005年のTED Prize の受賞に際して、3つの願いを発表する。片頭痛を治療する移動式装置を再設計すること、うつ病の新しい治療法を発見すること、そして医療ミスに関する制度を改革することである。

- Biomedical inventor
Robert Fischell invented the rechargeable pacemaker, the implantable insulin pump, and devices that warn of epileptic seizures and heart attacks. Yet it's not just his inventive genius that makes him fascinating, but his determination to make the world a better place. Full bio

I'm going to discuss with you three of my inventions
私が発明した3つのものについて話します
00:25
that can have an effect on 10 to a 100 million people,
1千万人から1億人の人に影響を与えられるものです
00:29
which we will hope to see happen.
そうなることを我々は願っています
00:34
We discussed, in the prior film, some of the old things that we did,
以前 映像で 我々がやってきたことを
いくつかとりあげました
00:37
like stents and insulin pumps for the diabetic.
ステントや
糖尿病患者に対するインスリンポンプのことなど
00:41
And I'd like to talk very briefly about three new inventions
今日は3つの新しい発明について手短に話します
00:44
that will change the lives of many people.
それは多くの人の暮らしに変化をもたらすでしょう
00:49
At the present time, it takes an average of three hours
現在 心臓発作の最初の症状が本人に自覚されてから
00:53
after the first symptoms of a heart attack are recognized by the patient,
救急治療室にたどりつくまでに
00:56
before that patient arrives at an emergency room.
平均して3時間ぐらいの時間が必要です
00:59
And people with silent ischemia --
さらに無症状の
01:03
which, translated into English, means they don't have any symptoms --
虚血発作の場合には
01:05
it takes even longer for them to get to the hospital.
病院にたどりつくまで
もっと時間がかかることになります
01:09
The AMI, Acute Myocardial Infarction,
AMIすなわち急性心筋梗塞とは
01:12
which is a doctor's big word so they can charge you more money --
お金をたくさん請求するために
医者は難しい語を使うのですが
01:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:19
-- means a heart attack. Annual incidence: 1.2 million Americans.
心臓発作のことですが
年に120万人のアメリカ人がかかります
01:21
Mortality: 300,000 people dying each year.
毎年30万人の人が亡くなっています
01:25
About half of them, 600,000, have permanent damage to their heart
約半数 60万人の人が後遺症をかかえ
01:29
that will cause them to have very bad problems later on.
後に大きな問題を残すことになります
01:35
Thus 900,000 people either have died
つまり90万人の人が亡くなるか
01:40
or have significant damage to their heart muscle.
心筋に重大な損傷をこうむります
01:43
Symptoms are often denied by the patient, particularly us men,
患者はしばしば症状を否定します
特に男性は
01:46
because we are very brave. We are very brave,
我々は勇ましいから
01:50
and we don't want to admit that I'm having a hell of a chest pain.
胸にひどい痛みがあっても
それを認めたいと思いません
01:53
Then, approximately 25 percent of all patients never have any symptoms.
患者のうち25%近くは症状がまったくありません
01:57
What are we going to do about them? How can we save their lives?
そんな時どうすればいいでしょう
どうやって命を守ることができるか
02:02
It's particularly true of diabetics and elderly women.
とりわけ糖尿病患者や
高齢の女性がこれにあてはまります
02:05
Well, what is needed for the earliest possible warning of a heart attack?
心臓発作を早期に警告できるようにするには
何が必要でしょう
02:09
A means to determine if there's a complete blockage of a coronary artery.
冠動脈に完全な閉塞があるかどうか
判断する手段です
02:14
That, ladies and gentlemen, is a heart attack.
皆さん それが心臓発作です
02:18
The means consist of noting something a little technical,
その手段とは 少し技術的なことに
注目することになります
02:22
ST segment elevation of the electrogram --
心電図のSTの上昇に注目するのです
02:26
translated into English, that means that
言い換えると
02:29
if there's an electrical signal in the heart, and one part of the ECG --
もし心臓の電気信号 -
心電図上でSTと呼ばれる部分が
02:32
which we call the ST segment -- elevates,
上昇すると
02:38
that is a sure sign of a heart attack.
それは心臓発作の確かな兆候なのです
02:42
And if we had a computer put into the body of a person who's at risk,
もし心筋梗塞を起こしそうな人の体に
コンピューターを組み込めば
02:44
we could know, before they even have symptoms,
症状が自覚される前に
心臓発作を予測でき
02:49
that they're having a heart attack, to save their life.
命を救うことができるのです
02:52
Well, the doctor can program a level of this ST elevation voltage
さて医者はどの程度の ST上昇で
02:55
that will trigger an emergency alarm,
緊急アラームを鳴らすか
03:01
vibration like your cell phone, but right by your clavicle bone.
鎖骨のところで携帯電話のように
バイブさせるのかプログラムできます
03:04
And when it goes beep, beep, beep, you better do something about it,
そしてビー、ビーと鳴ったら
何かをすべきなのです
03:09
because if you want to live you have to get to some medical treatment.
生きたいのなら
治療が必要だということです
03:13
So we have to try these devices out
私たちがこの装置を
03:19
because the FDA won't just let us use them on people
試すまで
03:21
unless we try it out first,
食品医薬品局は
この装置を人に使用することを許可しません
03:24
and the best model for this happens to be pigs.
そしてその最適なモデルは豚でした
03:26
And what we tried with the pig was external electrodes on the skin,
救急治療室で見るような外部電極を
03:30
like you see in an emergency room,
豚の皮膚につけて試しました
03:35
and I'm going to show you why they don't work very well.
それがどうしてうまくいかなかったか
後でお見せします
03:37
And then we put a lead, which is a wire, in the right ventricle inside the heart,
次に心臓の右心室に
導線つまり電線を組み込みました
03:40
which does the electrogram, which is the signal voltage from inside the heart.
この心電図は 心臓内部からの信号です
03:45
Well, with the pig, at the baseline,
豚の場合 心臓発作をシミュレーションしました
03:49
before we blocked the pig's artery to simulate a heart attack, that was the signal.
これが動脈を塞ぐ前の信号です
03:52
After 43 seconds, even an expert couldn't tell the difference,
43 秒後 専門家でも 違いがわかりません
03:57
and after three minutes -- well,
3 分後
04:02
if you really studied it, you'd see a difference.
よく観察すれば 違いがわかります
04:04
But what happened when we looked inside the pig's heart, to the electrogram?
豚の心臓の内部からの
心電図に起こったことは何か?
04:06
There was the baseline -- first of all, a much bigger and more reliable signal.
基準値がありました -
より大きな 信頼性の高い信号です
04:11
Second of all, I'll bet even you people who are untrained can see the difference,
訓練を受けていない人でもその違いがわかります
04:16
and we see here an ST segment elevation right after this sharp line.
この鋭い線の直後でSTの上昇が見られます
04:21
Look at the difference there. It doesn't take much --
この違いを見てください
04:26
every layperson could see that difference,
素人にもその違いがわかります
04:30
and computers can be programmed to easily detect it.
違いを簡単に検出するプログラムを
組み込むこともできます
04:32
Then, look at that after three minutes.
そして 3 分後を見てください
04:37
We see that the signal that's actually in the heart,
心臓内部からの信号です
04:39
we can use it to tell people that they're having a heart attack
それを使えば心臓発作が起こっていることを
伝えられるのです
04:43
even before they have symptoms so we can save their life.
症状を自覚する前からです
これなら命を守れます
04:47
Then we tried it with my son, Dr. Tim Fischell,
私の息子 ティム・フィッシェル博士と試してみました
04:51
we tried it on some human patients who had to have a stent put in.
ステントを入れなくてはならない患者さん何人かに
試しました
04:54
Well, he kept the balloon filled to block the artery,
彼はバルーンを膨らませて動脈を塞ぎ
04:58
to simulate a blockage, which is what a heart attack is.
心臓発作で実際に起こる閉塞を
シミュレーションしました
05:01
And it's not hard to see that -- the baseline
左上の最初の写真で
05:04
is the first picture on the upper left.
基準線を判定するのは難しくありません
05:07
Next to it, at 30 seconds, you see this rise here,
次が30 秒後で 上昇がわかります
05:09
then this rise -- that's the ST elevation.
これがST上昇です
05:13
And if we had a computer that could detect it,
もしそれを検出できるコンピューターがあれば
05:17
we could tell you you're having a heart attack so early
極めて早期から
心臓発作の発生を検出し
05:20
it could save your life and prevent congestive heart failure.
命を救ったり
うっ血性心不全を防ぐことができるのです
05:23
And then he did it again. We filled the balloon again a few minutes later
彼は数分後に再びバルーンを膨らませました
05:28
and here you see, even after 10 seconds, a great rise in this piece,
分かりますね
10 秒後には もう大きな上昇が見られます
05:33
which we can have computers inside, under your chest like a pacemaker,
ペース メーカーのように
コンピューターを体内に埋め込むことができます
05:37
with a wire into your heart like a pacemaker.
ペースメーカのように電極を心臓内に埋め込むのです
05:42
And computers don't go to sleep.
コンピューターは眠りません
05:45
We have a little battery and on this little battery
小さな電池で
05:47
that computer will run for five years without needing replacement.
5 年間 交換なしで動きます
05:51
What does the system look like?
その装置はどんなものなのでしょうか?
05:55
Well, on the left is the IMD, which is Implantable Medical Device,
左側がIMD 体内埋込医療機器です
05:57
and tonight in the tent you can see it -- they've exhibited it.
今晩テント内に展示されます
06:01
It's about this big, the size of a pacemaker.
ペースメーカーと同じサイズです
06:05
It's implanted with very conventional techniques.
それは従来の方法で埋め込まれます
06:08
And the EXD is an External Device that you can have on your night table.
そして EXD 外部装置を
ナイトテーブルの上に置きます
06:11
It'll wake you up and tell you to get your tail to the emergency room
音が鳴り あなたを起こし
救急治療室に向かわせます
06:15
when the thing goes off because, if you don't, you're in deep doo-doo.
さもないと
とても危険な状態に陥ります
06:20
And then, finally, a programmer that will set the level of the stimulation,
最終的に プログラムを組む人が
06:24
which is the level which says you are having a heart attack.
心臓発作を告げる感度を設定するのです
06:29
The FDA says, OK, test this final device after it's built in some animal,
食品医薬品局は
まず動物で検証するよう指示しました
06:34
which we said is a pig, so we had to get this pig to have a heart attack.
豚に心臓発作を起こすことにしました
06:41
And when you go to the farmyard, you can't easily get pigs to have heart attacks,
農場でも 豚に心臓発作を起こさせるのは
簡単でありません
06:45
so we said, well, we're experts in stents.
私達はステントの専門家であると言いました
06:49
Tonight you'll see some of our invented stents.
今晩 我々が発明したステントのいくつかを
見ることができます
06:52
We said, so we'll put in a stent,
我々はステントを植え込みますが
06:54
but we're not going to put in a stent that we'd put in people.
人間に植え込むステントではありません
06:57
We're putting in a copper stent,
銅のステントを植え込んだのです
06:59
and this copper stent erodes the artery and causes heart attacks.
この銅ステントは動脈を侵食し
心臓発作を引き起こします
07:01
That's not very nice, but, after all, we had to find out what the answer is.
気持ちよくありませんが 答えが必要だったので
07:05
So we took two copper stents and we put it in the artery of this pig,
我々は2 つの銅のステントを
豚の冠動脈に植え込みました
07:08
and let me show you the result that's very gratifying
結果をお見せしましょう
とても満足のいくものでした
07:13
as far as people who have heart disease are concerned.
心臓病を患っている人にとってはですが
07:17
So there it was, Thursday morning we stopped the pig's medication
結果はこうです
木曜の朝 豚に対する投薬をやめ
07:20
and there is his electrogram, the signal from inside the pig's heart
これが心電図です 豚の心臓内部からの信号です
07:26
coming out by radio telemetry.
信号は無線で出てきます
07:31
Then, on Friday at 6:43, he began to get certain signs,
金曜の 6:43 豚は兆候を出しはじめました
07:33
which later we had the pig run around --
その後 豚を走らせました
07:38
I'm not going to go into this early stage.
この初期の段階のことは詳しく話しませんが
07:41
But look what happened at 10:06 after we removed this pig's medication
投薬をやめて 10:06に何が起こったか見てください
07:44
that kept him from having a heart attack.
薬物治療が心臓発作を防いでいたのですが
07:50
Any one of you now is an expert on ST elevation. Can you see it there?
皆さんはもうST上昇の専門家ですから
お分かりでしょう
07:52
Can you see it in the picture after the big rise of the QRS -- you see ST elevation?
QRS の大きな波形後にSTが上昇しているのを
07:57
This pig at 10:06 was having a heart attack.
この豚は 10:06 に心臓発作を起こしました
08:02
What happens after you have the heart attack, this blockage?
心臓発作 つまり動脈閉塞の後 
何が起こるかわかりますか?
08:07
Your rhythm becomes irregular, and that's what happened 45 minutes later.
心拍リズムが不規則になります 
それが 45 分後です
08:11
Then, ventricular fibrillation, the heart quivers instead of beats --
その後 心室細動が起こり 
心臓は鼓動ではなく震えるだけです
08:18
this is just before death of the pig -- and then the pig died; it went flat-line.
これが豚の死の直前です
死んで心電図は平らになりました
08:22
But we had a little bit over an hour where we could've saved this pig's life.
しかし豚の命を救うのに
1時間以上の時間がありました
08:28
Well, because of the FDA, we didn't save the pig's life,
食品医薬品局のための研究なので
豚の命を救いませんでしたが
08:31
because we need to do this type of animal research for humans.
我々には人間のために 動物を使った
この種の研究が必要なのです
08:35
But when it comes to the sake of a human, we can save their life.
しかし 患者さんだったら
その命を救うことができるのです
08:39
We can save the lives of people who are at high risk for a heart attack.
心臓発作の高いリスクをかかえている人々の
命を救うことができます
08:43
What is the response to acute myocardial infarction, a heart attack, today?
今日 急性心筋梗塞への対応はどんなでしょうか?
08:50
Well, you feel some chest pain or indigestion.
胸が痛い あるいは消化不良を感じ
08:56
It's not all that bad; you decide not to do anything.
でもそれほどひどくないからと 放っておくことにする
08:59
Several hours pass and it gets worse, and even the man won't ignore it.
数時間経ち 無視できない状態まで悪化し
09:02
Finally, you go to the emergency room.
結局 あなたは救急治療室に行くことになります
09:07
You wait as burns and other critical patients are treated,
火傷や他の重症患者が治療を受けるのを
待つことになります
09:10
because 75 percent of the patients who go to an emergency room with chest pains
なぜなら胸痛で救急治療室に行く患者の75%は
09:13
don't have AMI, so you're not taken very seriously.
急性心筋梗塞ではないので
深刻には扱われないのです
09:18
They finally see you. It takes more time
やっと診てもらっても 更に時間がかかります
09:22
to get your electrocardiogram on your skin and diagnose it,
心電図をとったり 診断するのに
09:24
and it's hard to do because they don't have the baseline data,
病院には基準値がないので 診断も困難です
09:27
which the computer we put in you gets.
埋め込まれたコンピューターならわかる基準値が
09:30
Finally, if you're lucky, you are treated in three or four hours after the incident,
最終的に 幸運でも
治療は発作から3-4時間後になるでしょう
09:34
but the heart muscle has died.
しかし もう心筋は死んでいます
09:37
And that is the typical treatment in the advanced world -- not Africa --
これはアフリカではなく
先進国で行われている典型的な治療なのです
09:39
that's the typical treatment in the advanced world today.
これが 進歩した世界の典型的な治療の姿なのです
09:44
So we developed the AngelMed Guardian System
そこで 我々は
エンジェルメッド・ガーディアン システムを開発しました
09:48
and we have a device inside this patient, called the Implanted AngelMed Guardian.
この装置を患者さんに埋め込みました
インプラント型エンジェルメッド・ガーディアンです
09:51
And when you have a blockage, the alarm goes off
冠動脈に閉塞があると 音が鳴り始めます
09:55
and it sends the alarm and the electrogram to an external device,
そして外部装置にアラームと心電図が送られます
09:59
which gets your baseline electrogram from 24 hours ago
その装置には24 時間前からの
あなたの基準心電図が記録されています
10:03
and the one that caused the alarm, so you can take it to the emergency room
アラームの原因となった異常心電図もついていて
救急治療室に持っていけるのです
10:06
and show them, and say, take care of me right away.
それを見せて すぐ手当をしてくださいと言えるのです
10:09
Then it goes to a network operations center,
データは ネットワーク オペレーション センターにも届き
10:13
where they get your data from your patient database
データベースから
あなたのデータを取り出すこともできます
10:16
that's been put in at some central location, say, in the United States.
それはたとえばアメリカの中央施設に集積されていて
10:18
Then it goes to a diagnostic center, and within one minute of your heart attack,
診断センターにも送られ 心臓発作の1分以内に
10:23
your signal appears on the screen of a computer
あなたの心電図は
コンピューターの画面に表示されます
10:27
and the computer analyzes what your problem is.
あなたの問題をコンピューターが分析し
10:31
And the person who's there, the medical practitioner, calls you --
そこにいる医療関係者が あなたに電話をするのです
10:34
this is also a cell phone -- and says,
携帯電話でこんな風に
10:38
"Mr. Smith, you're in deep doo-doo; you have a problem.
「スミスさん あなたは危険な状態です
問題があります
10:40
We've called the ambulance. The ambulance is on the way.
救急車を呼びました 
今そちらに向かっています
10:43
It'll pick you up, and then we're going to call your doctor, tell him about it.
あなたを救急車に乗せ
あなたがかかっている医者に連絡し、報告します
10:47
We're going to send him the signal that we have, that says you have a heart attack,
そして心臓発作を示す信号を医者に送ります
10:52
and we're going to send the signal to the hospital
病院にも送り
10:56
and we're going to have it analyzed there,
そこで分析してもらいます
10:58
and there you're going to be with your doctor
そこであなたの医者に診てもらえます
11:01
and you'll be taken care of so you won't die of a heart attack."
あなたは治療を受け
心臓発作で命を落とすことはないでしょう」
11:03
That's the first invention that I wanted to describe.
これが私が述べたかった最初の発明です
11:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:09
And now I want to talk about something entirely different.
今度は全く別のものについて話しをさせて下さい
11:13
At first I didn't think migraine headaches were a big problem
私は最初
片頭痛は大きな問題ではないと思っていました
11:16
because I'd never had a migraine headache,
私自身 片頭痛の経験がなかったからです
11:20
but then I spoke to some people who have three or four every week of their life,
その後 週に3-4回の片頭痛に
苦しむ人たちと話をしました
11:22
and their lives are being totally ruined by it.
彼らの生活はすっかり台無しになっていました
11:27
We have a mission statement for our company doing migraine, which is,
我々の会社は片頭痛に対する取り組みについて
次の声明を出しています
11:30
"Prevent or ameliorate migraine headaches
「片頭痛を予防、改善すること
11:34
by the application of a safe, controlled magnetic pulse
安全で、制御された磁気パルスを利用して
11:36
applied, as needed, by the patient."
患者の必要に応じた磁気パルスで」
11:40
Now, you're probably very few physicists here.
ここにはおそらく物理学者の方は
ほとんどいないでしょう
11:43
If you're a physicist you'd know there's a certain Faraday's Law,
物理学者の方でしたら
ファラデーの法則をご存知でしょう
11:46
which says if I apply a magnetic pulse on salt water --
それによれば 食塩水に磁気パルス与えると
11:49
that's your brains by the way --
―食塩水は脳に相当するわけですが
11:54
it'll generate electric currents, and the electric current in the brain
電流を生じ それが
11:56
can erase a migraine headache.
片頭痛を取り去ってくれるのです
12:01
That's what we have discovered.
そのことを我々は発見したのです
12:03
So here's a picture of what we're doing.
これは我々が現在していることです
12:05
The patients who have a migraine preceded by an aura
前兆があってから片頭痛になる患者には
12:08
have a band of excited neurons -- that's shown in red --
活発なニューロンの帯域があります - 赤の部分です
12:13
that moves at three to five millimeters a minute towards the mid-brain.
これが1分間に3-5ミリの速さで中脳に移ります
12:17
And when it hits the mid-brain, that's when the headache begins.
中脳に到達した時 頭痛が始まるのです
12:22
There's this migraine that is preceded by a visual aura,
この片頭痛には視覚の前兆があるのです
12:27
and this visual aura, by the way -- and I'll show you a picture --
視覚の前兆は お見せしますが
12:32
but it sort of begins with little dancing lights,
最初は小さな ダンスをしているような光が
12:35
gets bigger and bigger until it fills your whole visual field.
だんだん大きくなって
視野をおおいつくすほどになります
12:38
And what we tried was this; here is a device called the Cadwell Model MES10.
そして我々が試みたのはこれです 
カドウェルMES10 と呼ばれる装置です
12:41
Weighs about 70 pounds, has a wire about an inch in diameter.
約 32キロの重さ
直径約 2.5センチのワイアーがついています
12:48
And here's one of the patients who has an aura
ここに前兆のある患者さんが一人います
12:52
and always has a headache, bad one, after the aura. What do we do?
常に前兆の後に 頭痛
ひどい頭痛のある患者さんに何をするか?
12:55
This is what an aura looks like.
前兆とはこんな感じです
13:01
It's sort of funny dancing lights, shown there on the left and right side.
踊っている奇妙な光で 左右両方にあります
13:03
And that's a fully developed visual aura, as we see on top.
そしてこれはいっぱいに大きくなった前兆です
ごらんのように
13:07
In the middle, our experimentalist, the neurologist, who said,
途中で 神経学者の実験者がこう言いました
13:11
"I'm going to move this down a little and I'm going to erase half your aura."
「これを少し移動して 前兆を半分消去するつもりです」
13:17
And, by God, the neurologist did erase it, and that's the middle picture:
驚いたことに神経学者はそれを消したのです
真ん中の写真です
13:20
half of the aura erased by a short magnetic pulse.
磁気パルスによって前兆の半分が消されたのです
13:25
What does that mean?
それはどういう意味でしょう
13:28
That means that the magnetic pulse is generating an electric current
つまり 磁気パルスが電流を生成し
13:30
that's interfering with the erroneous electrical activity in the brain.
脳の誤った電気活動を妨害しているのです
13:34
And finally he says, "OK, now I'm going to -- "
最後に彼はこう言います
「OK これから
13:39
all of the aura get erased with an appropriately placed magnetic pulse.
残りの前兆も全部
磁気パルスで消しましょう」
13:41
What is the result? We designed a magnetic depolarizer
その結果は?我々は磁気脱分極器を設計しました
13:46
that looks like this, that you could have -- a lady, in her pocket book --
こんなもので 女性だったらハンドバックに入ります
13:50
and when you get an aura you can try it and see how it works.
そして前兆が始まったら
これを試して様子を見るのです
13:55
Well, the next thing they have to show is what was on ABC News,
次にお見せしたいのは ABC ニュースで
13:59
Channel 7, last week in New York City, in the 11 o'clock news.
先週ニューヨークの7チャンネル
11時のニュースで流されたものです
14:03
Anchor: For anyone who suffers from migraine headaches --
(アンカー) 片頭痛に苦しんでいる人のために
14:07
and there are 30 million Americans who do -- tonight: a possible answer.
3000 万のアメリカ人が苦しんでいますが
今晩解決法が見つかりそうです
14:09
Eyewitness news reporter Stacy Sager tonight, with a small and portable machine
目撃ニュースの レポーター ステイシー・セイガーが
小さな携帯機器を持って
14:13
that literally zaps your migraines away.
あなたの片頭痛を文字通り消去します
14:17
Christina Sidebottom: Well, my first reaction was that it was --
(サイドボトム) 私の最初の印象は
14:21
looked awfully gun-like, and it was very strange.
銃みたいで 奇妙に見えました
14:23
Stacy Sager: But for Christina Sidebottom, almost anything was worth trying
(セイガー) でもサイドボトムさんにとっては
なんでも試してみる価値があります
14:27
if it could stop a migraine.
もし片頭痛を止めてくれるなら
14:31
It may look silly or even frightening as you walk around with it in your purse,
バッグに入れて持ち歩くのは
愚かしく恐ろしく見えるかもしれませんが
14:33
but researchers here in Ohio organizing clinical trials for this migraine zapper,
この片頭痛除去器の臨床試験をしている
オハイオ州の研究者は
14:39
say it is scientifically sound --
これは科学的に確たるものだと言っています
14:44
that, in fact, when the average person gets a migraine,
実際、平均的な人が感じる片頭痛は
14:47
it's caused by something similar to an electrical impulse.
電気的衝撃のようなもので引き起こされるものです
14:49
The zapper creates a magnetic field to counteract that.
除去器はこれに対抗するための磁場を作るのです
14:53
Yousef Mohammed: In other words, we're treating electricity with electricity,
(ユーセフ・モハメッド) 言い換えると
電気でもって電気を制しているのです
14:57
rather than treating electricity with the chemicals that we're using nowadays.
薬品を使って電気を制するのでなく
15:00
SS: But is it safe to use everyday?
(セイガー) しかし毎日使用しても安全ですか?
15:05
Experts say the research has actually been around for more than a decade,
専門家によれば 研究は実際十年以上続けられていて
15:07
and more long-term studies need to be done. Christina now swears by it.
今後も 長期的な研究が必要だそうですが
クリスティーナは今すっかり信じています
15:11
CS: It's been the most wonderful thing for my migraine.
(サイドボトム) それは私の片頭痛には一番いいんです
15:16
SS: Researchers are hoping to present their studies to the FDA this summer.
(セイガー) 研究者たちはこの夏には研究結果を
食品医薬品局 に提出したいと考えています
15:19
Robert Fischell: And that is the invention to treat migraines.
片頭痛を治療するための発明でした
15:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:25
You see, the problem is, 30 million Americans have migraine headaches,
問題は3千万人のアメリカ人が
片頭痛を持っているということです
15:27
and we need a means to treat it, and I think that we now have it.
それを治療する手段が必要であり
今その手段を手にしました
15:32
And this is the first device that we did, and I'm going to talk about my second wish,
これは、私たちが作った最初の装置です
2つ目の私の願いについてお話をします
15:36
which has something to do with this.
それはこの装置と関係があります
15:41
Our conclusions from our studies so far, at three research centers,
3つの研究センターでこれまでに得られた結論は
次の通りです
15:43
is there is a marked improvement in pain levels after using it just once.
一度だけでもそれを使用した後に
痛みのレベルには顕著な改善がありました
15:46
The most severe headaches responded better after we did it several times,
最も重症な頭痛でも 数回試すと良い反応を示しました
15:50
and the unexpected finding indicates that even established headaches,
そして予期しないことに 前兆のある頭痛だけでなく
15:55
not only those with aura, get treated and get diminished.
頑固な頭痛にも有効で
痛みが和らげられることがわかりました
15:59
And auras can be erased and the migraine, then, does not occur.
そして前兆が消された時は
片頭痛は起こらないのです
16:03
And that is the migraine invention that we are talking about and that we are working on.
以上が我々が今 取り組んでいる
片頭痛に関する発明です
16:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:15
The third and last invention began with an idea.
3 番目の発明はひとつの考えから始まりました
16:17
Epilepsy can best be treated by responsive electrical stimulation.
てんかんは 応答性電気刺激が一番ききます
16:22
Now, why do we use -- add on, nearly, an epileptic focus?
なぜ我々はそれを 利用するのでしょうか
てんかん病巣に?
16:27
Now, unfortunately, us technical people, unlike Mr. Bono,
残念ながら ボノ氏とは違って 我々技術屋は
16:31
have to get into all these technical words.
こうした専門用語を使ってしまうのですが
16:35
Well, "responsive electrical stimulation" means
「応答性電気刺激」とは
16:37
that we sense, at a place in your brain which is called an "epileptic focus,"
脳の「てんかん病巣」と呼ばれる場所
16:42
which is where the epileptic seizure begins --
てんかんの発作が始まる場所のことですが
16:47
we sense there, that it's going to happen,
その場所で てんかんが始まると考えます
16:52
and then we respond by applying an electrical energy at that spot,
我々はその場所に電気エネルギーを加えます
16:55
which erases the errant signal
誤った信号を消去するためです
17:00
so that you don't get the clinical manifestations of the migraine headache.
片頭痛の症状が出ないように
17:03
We use current pacemaker defibrillator technology that's used for the heart.
心臓用のペース メーカー/除細動器の技術を
利用しています
17:08
We thought we could adapt it for the brain.
我々は脳にそれを適応できると考えました
17:13
The device could be implanted under the scalp
その装置は頭皮の下に埋め込むことができます
17:15
to be totally hidden and avoid wire breakage,
すっかり隠され 断線を避けられます
17:17
which occurs if you put it in the chest and you try to move your neck around.
胸のところに入れると
首を動かすと断線してしまいます
17:21
Form a company to develop a neuro-pacemaker for epilepsy,
てんかん用の神経ペースメーカーを
開発する会社を立ち上げました
17:25
as well as other diseases of the brain, because all diseases of the brain
脳の他の疾病も扱っています
脳に関するすべての疾患は
17:28
are a result of some electrical malfunction in it,
何らかの電気的誤動作の結果です
17:34
that causes many, if not all, of brain disorders.
すべてではありませんが多くはそうです
17:38
We formed a company called NeuroPace
我々はニューロペースという会社を
立ち上げました
17:43
and we started work on responsive neurostimulation,
応答性神経刺激について取り組み始めました
17:47
and this is a picture of what the device looked like,
こんな装置です
17:50
that's placed into the cranial bone.
頭蓋骨の中に埋め込まれます
17:53
This is probably a better picture.
この方がよくわかります
17:56
Here we have our device in which we put in a frame.
枠のなかに装置を組み込みます
17:58
There's a cut made in the scalp; it's opened; the neurosurgeon has a template;
頭皮を切開し
神経外科医はひな形を持っていて
18:03
he marks it around, and uses a dental burr
周りに印をつけ 歯科用ドリルを使って
18:09
to remove a piece of the cranial bone exactly the size of our device.
頭蓋骨を 装置と同じ大きさだけ 取り除きます
18:11
And tonight, you'll be able to see the device in the tent.
今夜 テントの中で装置をご覧なることができます
18:16
And then with four screws, we put in a frame,
4 本のネジで枠を取り付けます
18:19
then we snap in the device and we run with wires --
そして装置をはめ込み ワイヤーを配置し
18:23
the one shown in green will go to the surface of the brain with electrodes,
緑色のものは電極が付いていて脳の表面に付けます
18:26
to the epileptic focus, the origin of the epilepsy,
つまり てんかん病巣
―てんかんの発生するところで
18:31
where we can sense the electrical signal
電気信号を検出できるのです
18:34
and have computer analysis that tells us when to hit it with some electrical current
コンピューターに解析させ
いつ電流を流すか決めさせます
18:37
to prevent the clinical manifestation of the seizure.
発作症状が出ないように
18:42
In the blue wire, we see what's called a deep brain electrode.
青色の線で脳深部電極と呼ばれるものも見えます
18:45
If that's the source of the epilepsy, we can attack that as well.
もしてんかんの病巣が深部だとしても
これも攻められます
18:48
The comprehensive solution: this is the device;
まとめると この装置は
18:53
it's about one inches by two inches and, oddly enough,
約2.5 ×5 センチで
18:56
just the thickness of most cranial bones.
ちょうど頭蓋骨と同じ厚さです
18:59
The advantages of responsive neurostimulation:
応答性神経刺激の利点は
19:03
It can detect and terminate seizures before the clinical symptoms occur,
症状が発生する前に発作を検知し
抑制することができることです
19:06
provide stimulation only when needed,
また必要なときにだけ刺激を与えることも
19:10
can be turned off if seizures disappear; it has minimal side effects --
発作がおさまるとオフにすることもできます
副作用は最小限で
19:13
as a matter of fact, in all our clinical trials to date,
実際これまで すべての臨床試験で
19:18
we've seen no side effects in the 40 or so patients in whom it's been implanted --
装置を埋め込んだ40人ぐらいの患者さんの中で
副作用はありませんでした
19:21
and it's invisible, cosmetically hidden,
装置は隠れて見えないので
19:26
so, if you have epilepsy and you have the device,
てんかんがあって 装着していても
19:29
no one will know it because you can't tell that it's there.
誰にもわかりません
19:32
And this shows what an electroencephalogram is,
これは脳波を示しています
19:35
and on the left is the signal of a spontaneous seizure of one of the patients.
左側は患者さんの自発性発作の信号です
19:39
Then we stimulated, and you see how that heavy black line
そこで我々は刺激を加えました
太い黒の線を見てください
19:43
and then you see the electroencephalogram signal going to normal,
脳波信号が正常になっていくのがわかります
19:47
which means they did not get the epileptic seizure.
てんかんの発作は起きなかったことを示しています
19:51
That concludes my discussion of epilepsy,
以上がてんかんに関する話しです
19:54
which is the third invention that I want to discuss here this afternoon.
以上が今日お話をしたかった3 番目の発明です
19:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:03
I have three wishes. Well, I can't do much about Africa.
私には3 つの願いがあります 
アフリカに関してはあまりできませんが
20:07
I'm a tech; I'm into medical gadgetry,
私は技術者です
医療器具が専門です
20:12
which is mostly high-tech stuff like Mr. Bono talked about.
ボノ氏も話していたように
主にハイテクに関するものです
20:15
The first wish is to use the epilepsy responsive neurostimulator,
第一の願いは
てんかん応答性神経刺激装置を利用することです
20:19
called RNS, for Responsive NeuroStimulator -- that's a brilliant acronym --
応答性神経刺激装置 - 略して RNSです
見事な略語ですね
20:24
for the treatment of other brain disorders.
他の脳疾患の治療のためにも使って欲しいのです
20:29
Well, if we're going to do it for epilepsy, why the hell not try it for something else?
てんかんのためにこれを使えるのだったら
他の病気だって大丈夫なはずです
20:31
Then you saw what that device looked like,
あの装置がどんなかご覧になりましたよね
20:36
that the woman was using to fix her migraines?
女性が片頭痛を直すのに使っていた装置です
20:39
I tell you this: that's something which some research engineer like me would concoct,
あれは私のような研究技師が無理やり作ったもので
20:41
not a real designer of good equipment.
良い製品ですがデザインは芳しくありません
20:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:48
We want to have some people, who really know how to do this,
デザインがきちんとできる人が必要なのです
20:50
perform human engineering studies to develop the optimum design
最適なデザインを開発する
人間工学を実践できる人を
20:53
for the portable device for treating migraine headaches.
片頭痛を治す携帯機器のために
20:57
And some of the sponsors of this TED meeting are such organizations.
この TED 会議のスポンサーには
そのような会社もあるようですが
21:00
Then we're going to challenge the TED attendees
みなさんにチャレンジして欲しいのです
21:05
to come up with a way to improve health care in the USA,
米国の医療を改善する方法を生み出すことに
21:08
where we have problems that Africa doesn't have.
我々には問題があります アフリカにはない問題が
21:12
And by reducing malpractice litigation --
医療過誤訴訟を減らすこと
21:15
malpractice litigation is not an African problem; it's an American problem.
それはアフリカにはない
まさに米国が抱えている問題です
21:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:22
So, to get quickly to my first wish --
私の第一の願いをまとめると
21:25
the brain operates by electrical signals.
脳は電気信号によって作動します
21:28
If the electrical signals create a brain disorder,
もし電気信号が脳障害を生むとしたら
21:31
electro-stimulation can overcome that disorder by acting on the brain's neurons.
電気刺激を神経に作用させることで
その障害を克服できます
21:34
In other words, if you've screwed up electrical signals,
言い換えれば電気信号が問題を起こしたら
21:38
maybe, by putting other electrical signals from a computer in the brain,
コンピューターから他の電気信号を脳に送れば
21:42
we can counteract that.
それを修正することができる
21:46
A signal in the brain that triggers brain dysfunction
脳機能障害を引き起こす脳の信号は
21:49
might be sensed as a trigger for electro-stimulation
電気刺激の引き金として感知できるかもしれません
21:52
like we're doing with epilepsy.
てんかんへの対応時と同様に
21:55
But even if there is no signal,
たとえ信号がなくても
21:57
electro-stimulation of an appropriate part of the brain can turn off a brain disorder.
ふさわしい場所を電気刺激すれば
脳障害を消すことができる
21:59
And consider treating psychotic disorders --
精神病性障害の治療のことも考えて下さい
22:04
and I want this involved with the TED group --
TEDグループの人たちに関わって欲しい問題です
22:08
such as obsessive-compulsive disorder
たとえば強迫性障害です
22:11
that, presently, is not well treated with drugs, and includes five million Americans.
現在、薬物治療はうまく行きません
しかも5百万人のアメリカ人がかかっています
22:13
And Mr. Fischer, and his group at NeuroPace, and myself believe
フィッシャー氏や ニューロペースのスタッフ
そして私はこう信じています
22:19
that we can have a dramatic effect in improving OCD in America and in the world.
我々は米国や世界中の強迫性障害の治療に
劇的な影響をあたえることができると
22:23
That is the first wish.
以上が最初の願いです
22:29
(Applause)
(拍手)
22:32
The second wish is, at the present time,
2 番目の願いは、現時点で
22:37
the clinical trials of transcranial magnetic stimulators --
経頭蓋磁気刺激装置の臨床試験です
22:40
that's what TMS means, device to treat migraine headaches --
それはTMSと言われているものですが
片頭痛治療の機器です
22:45
appears to be quite successful.
とてもうまくいきそうです
22:49
Well, that's the good news.
喜ばしいニュースであります
22:51
The present portable device is far from optimally designed,
現在の携帯機器はうまく設計されているとは
とても言えません
22:53
both as to human factors as appearance.
人間工学的にも外観も
22:55
I think she said it looks like a gun. A lot of people don't like guns.
彼女は銃のようだと言っていましたが
銃はみなさん嫌でしょう
22:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
23:02
Engage a company having prior successes
人間工学および工業デザインで
23:04
for human factors engineering and industrial design
実績のある会社と連携し
23:06
to optimize the design of the first portable TMS device
最初のTMS 携帯機器の設計を
洗練されたものにすることです
23:09
that will be sold to the patients who have migraine headaches.
片頭痛の患者さんたちに販売されることでしょう
23:14
And that is the second wish.
以上が 2 番目の願いです
23:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:19
And, of the 100,000-dollar prize money, that TED was so generous to give me,
TEDが寛大にも私に与えてくれることになった
10万ドルの賞金のうち
23:24
I am donating 50,000 dollars to the NeuroPace people
5万ドルはニューロペースのスタッフ に
寄付したいと思います
23:28
to get on with the treatment of OCD, obsessive-compulsive disorder,
強迫性障害の治療を推進してもらうために
23:32
and I'm making another 50,000 available for a company
そして残りの5万ドルは片頭痛用の機器の設計をする
23:37
to optimize the design of the device for migraines.
会社に提供したいと思います
23:41
And that's how I'll use my 100,000-dollar prize money.
そんなふうに10万 ドルの賞金を使わせてもらいます
23:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:48
Well, the third and final wish is somewhat --
さて 3 番目 そして最後の願いは
23:54
unfortunately, it's much more complicated because it involves lawyers.
残念ながらずっと複雑なものです
弁護士がらみですから
23:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
24:01
Well, medical malpractice litigation in the US
米国では医療過誤訴訟が
24:03
has escalated the cost of malpractice insurance,
医療過誤保険のコストを引き上げています
24:05
so that competent physicians are leaving their practice.
その結果 有能な医師たちが仕事を離れています
24:07
Lawyers take cases on contingency with the hope of a big share
弁護士は成功報酬制で弁護を引き受けます
同情的な陪審員による
24:10
of a big settlement by a sympathetic jury, because this patient really ended up badly.
大きな調停から多くの報酬を得ることを期待して
患者は大きな被害を受けたのですから
24:14
The high cost of health care in the US is partly due to litigation and insurance costs.
米国の高い医療費の一因は訴訟と保険のコストです
24:19
I've seen pictures, graphs in today's USA Today
今日の USA トゥデイにグラフが載っていました
24:24
showing it skyrocketing out of control, and this is one factor.
そのコストは手に負えないほどに急騰しています
これが一つの要因です
24:29
Well, how can the TED community help with this situation?
さて TED コミュニティーは
このような状況に何ができるでしょうか
24:32
I have a couple of ideas to begin with.
手始めにいくつかのアイデアがあります
24:36
As a starting point for discussion with the TED group,
TEDグループとの議論の出発点として
24:39
a major part of the problem is the nature of the written extent
大きな問題は
インフォームド ・コンセントに関わる書類のことです
24:43
of informed consent that the patient or spouse must read and sign.
患者や配偶者が読んだり署名する書類がどんなか
24:46
For example, I asked the epilepsy people
たとえば私はてんかんの関係の人たち に尋ねます
24:50
what are they using for informed consent.
インフォームド・ コンセントのために
どんな書類を使っていますか
24:53
Would you believe, 12 pages, single space,
信じられますか
行間も詰まった12ページ分の文書です
24:55
the patient has to read before they're in our trial to cure their epilepsy?
患者はてんかん治療を
受ける前に読まなくてはならないのです
24:59
What do you think someone has at the end of reading 12 single-spaced pages?
行間も詰めた12ページの最後で
その人は何を理解したでしょう?
25:04
They don't understand what the hell it's about.
さっぱり理解しませんでした
25:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
25:10
That's the present system. How about making a video?
それが現在のやり方です
ではビデオを作ったらどうでしょう
25:12
We have entertainment people here;
ここにはエンターテインメント系の人々がいますね
25:15
we have people who know how to do videos,
ビデオの扱いをご存知です
25:17
with visual presentation of the anatomy and procedure done with animation.
解剖学や操作手順について
アニメーションを使ったプレゼンができます
25:19
Everybody knows that we can do better with a visual thing
ご存じのように
インタラクティブな映像もうまく使えるでしょう
25:23
that can be interactive with the patient, where they see the video
患者にビデオを見せて
その様子は撮影しておきます
25:28
and they're being videoed and they press, do you understand this? No, I don't.
理解できましたか?と質問して
答えが「いいえ」なら
25:32
Well, then let's go to a simpler explanation.
もっと簡単な説明に移ります
25:37
Then there's a simpler one and, oh yes, I understand that.
簡単な説明の後で
今度は「わかりました」ボタンが押されたら
25:39
Well, press the button and you're on record, you understand.
そのボタンを押したところを記録して
理解してもらえた というわけです
25:42
And that is one of the ideas.
これもアイデアの一つです
25:45
Now, also a video is done of the patient or spouse and medical presenter,
またビデオは患者、配偶者
医療のプレゼンターの間で使えます
25:48
with the patient agreeing that he understands the procedure to be done,
患者は治療手段について理解したと同意をします
25:51
including all the possible failure modes.
あらゆる失敗の可能性も含めてです
25:56
The patient or spouse agrees not to file a lawsuit
患者または配偶者が
訴訟を起こさないという同意もします
25:59
if one of the known procedure failures occurs.
たとえ治療手段がうまくいかなくてもです
26:01
Now, in America, in fact, you cannot give up your right to trial by jury.
これは米国では陪審員裁判を受ける権利の
放棄ではありません
26:04
However, if a video is there that everything was explained to you,
しかしすべてを説明してくれるビデオがあれば
26:10
and you have it all in the video file,
すべてがビデオ ファイルにしてあれば
26:14
it'll be much less likely that some hotshot lawyer
腕利きの弁護士が弁護を引き受けなくなるでしょう
26:16
will take this case on contingency, because it won't be nearly as good a case.
成功報酬制でも
あまりもうかる訴訟ではなくなるので
26:19
If a medical error occurs, the patient or spouse agrees to a settlement
医療ミスがあっても
患者や配偶者は和解に同意するでしょう
26:24
for fair compensation by arbitration instead of going to court.
裁判所に行かなくても公正な調停補償金で
26:29
That would save hundreds of millions of dollars in legal costs in the United States
米国では何億ドルという
法的費用が節約されるでしょう
26:34
and would decrease the cost of medicine for everyone.
国民の医療コストは減少するでしょう
26:39
These are just some starting points.
これらは出発点に過ぎませんが
26:42
And, so there, that's the end of all my wishes.
そしてこれが私の最後の願いです
26:45
I wish I had more wishes but three is what I've got and there they are.
もっと願いがあったらと思いますが
とりあえず今ある3つでした
26:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
26:53
Translated by shozo senda
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Robert Fischell - Biomedical inventor
Robert Fischell invented the rechargeable pacemaker, the implantable insulin pump, and devices that warn of epileptic seizures and heart attacks. Yet it's not just his inventive genius that makes him fascinating, but his determination to make the world a better place.

Why you should listen

Robert Fischell began his work in space development, and created a 16-satellite system called Transit that was a key precursor to GPS. When he turned his attention to medical devices, he had the key insight that a pacemaker is like a tiny satellite within the body. The medical devices he has pioneered -- starting with a pacemaker that didn't require a new battery every two years -- have saved thousands of lives and improved countless more.

Fischell's true genius is his ability to see across technologies and sciences. His uncanny intuition allowed him to invent special features of the implantable cardiac defibrillator that has saved more than 60,000 lives -- followed by the implantable insulin pump, coronary stents used to open clogged arteries, and two extraordinary feedback systems that provide early warning of epileptic seizures and heart attacks. Though he is officially retired, he continues to create new devices to treat a wide range of ailments, from heart attacks to chronic migraines.

Accepting his 2005 TED Prize, Fischell made three wishes. First, he wished for help in developing an implantable device to treat brain disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder; second, he asked for help in designing his portable Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator (TMS), a drug-less migraine treatment -- for the latest news on this device, see the website for his company Neuralieve. For his third wish, Fischell took on the medical malpractice system, which, he believes, puts doctors at the mercy of lawyers and insurers.

More profile about the speaker
Robert Fischell | Speaker | TED.com