sponsored links
TEDxUSC

Jane Poynter: Life in Biosphere 2

ジェーン・ポインター:バイオスフィア2での生活

March 23, 2009

ジェーン・ポインターがバイオスフィア2での2年間と20分の生活について語ります—この経験から、彼女は非常に過酷な環境で生命がどうすれば生き延びられるかを探ることになりました。これは、独自のTEDxイベントから採用された初めてのTEDTalkです。(南カリフォルニア大学にて)

Jane Poynter - Biospherian
After weathering two years in Biosphere 2, Jane Poynter is trying to create technologies that allow us to live in hostile environments -- like outer space. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I have had the distinct pleasure
私は二つのバイオスフィア(生物圏)に住むという
00:12
of living inside two biospheres.
めったにない喜びを得ました
00:15
Of course we all here in this room live in Biosphere 1.
この部屋にいる我々は皆バイオスフィア1に住んでいますが
00:18
I've also lived in Biosphere 2.
私はまたバイオスフィア2にも住んだのです
00:22
And the wonderful thing about that is that I get to compare biospheres.
そして素晴らしいことに、私はそれらのバイオスフィアを比較することができ
00:26
And hopefully from that I get to learn something.
そこから何かを学んでいると思います
00:30
So what did I learn? Well,
何を学んだのでしょうか?
00:33
here I am inside Biosphere 2, making a pizza.
これは私がバイオスフィア2の中でピザを作っているところです
00:35
So I am harvesting the wheat, in order to make the dough.
ピザ生地を作るために小麦を収穫し
00:38
And then of course I have to milk the goats
それからチーズを作るためにヤギの乳搾をして
00:41
and feed the goats in order to make the cheese.
もちろんヤギも飼育します
00:43
It took me four months in Biosphere 2 to make a pizza.
バイオスフィア2でピザを作るには4ヶ月かかりました
00:46
Here in Biosphere 1, well it takes me about two minutes,
こちらバイオスフィア1では2分しかかかりません
00:48
because I pick up the phone and I call and say,
電話を取って
00:51
"Hey, can you deliver the pizza?"
「ピザを届けてちょうだい」と言うだけですから
00:53
So Biosphere 2
バイオスフィア2は
00:55
was essentially a three-acre,
3エーカーの
00:58
entirely sealed, miniature world
外界と完全に遮断されたミニチュア世界です
01:00
that I lived in for two years and 20 minutes.
私はそこで2年と20分、生活していました
01:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:05
Over the top it was sealed with steel and glass,
上は鉄とガラスで遮断され
01:08
underneath it was sealed with a pan of steel --
下は鉄の底で遮断されていました
01:10
essentially entirely sealed.
本質的に、完全に密閉されていました
01:13
So we had our own miniature rainforest,
そこには自前のミニチュア熱帯雨林に、
01:15
a private beach with a coral reef.
珊瑚礁のあるプライベートビーチ、
01:17
We had a savanna, a marsh, a desert.
サバンナ、沼地、砂漠がありました
01:19
We had our own half-acre farm that we had to grow everything.
全ての栽培を行う半エーカーの農地と
01:22
And of course we had our human habitat, where we lived.
人間が住むための居住区がありました
01:25
Back in the mid-'80s when we were designing Biosphere 2,
80年代半ば、我々がバイオスフィア2を設計していた頃
01:28
we had to ask ourselves some pretty basic questions.
我々は非常に基本的なことを自問していました
01:31
I mean, what is a biosphere?
つまり、バイオスフィアとは何か?
01:33
Back then, yes, I guess we all know now
そのころ、我々が考えていたのは
01:35
that it is essentially the sphere of life around the Earth, right?
「地球をとりまく生命の球体」のことでした でしょう?
01:37
Well, you have to get a little more specific than that if you're going to build one.
でも、それを作ろうと思ったらもう少し具体的にしておく必要があります
01:40
And so we decided that what it really is
そこで我々は、実際はそれは
01:43
is that it is entirely materially closed --
物質的に完全に閉じていて
01:46
that is, nothing goes in or out at all, no material --
どんな物質も出入りせず、かつ
01:49
and energetically open,
エネルギー的には開いた系と定義しました
01:52
which is essentially what planet Earth is.
地球がまさしくそうなのです
01:54
This is a chamber that was 1/400th the size of Biosphere 2
これはバイオスフィア2の400分の1の部屋で
01:56
that we called our Test Module.
「テストモジュール」と呼んでいました
01:59
And the very first day that this fellow, John Allen,
そしてこの人物、ジョン・アレンが
02:01
walked in, to spend a couple of days in there
彼を生存させるために我々が持ち込んだ
02:03
with all the plants and animals and bacteria that we'd put in there
植物、動物、バクテリアと共に
02:05
to hopefully keep him alive,
この中で二日間過ごそうとした初日から
02:07
the doctors were incredibly concerned
医師団は、彼がなにか
02:09
that he was going to succumb to some dreadful toxin,
恐ろしい毒素にやられるか、バクテリアか菌糸かで
02:11
or that his lungs were going to get choked with bacteria or something, fungus.
窒息して死んでしまうのではないかと、ひどく恐れましたが
02:13
But of course none of that happened.
もちろんそんなことは起きませんでした
02:17
And over the ensuing few years,
その後の数年は
02:20
there were great sagas about designing Biosphere 2.
バイオスフィア2の設計の偉大な物語があり
02:22
But by 1991
1991年には
02:24
we finally had this thing built.
バイオスフィア2が建造されました
02:26
And it was time for us to go in
そして我々は
02:28
and give it a go.
その中に入ったのです
02:30
We needed to know,
我々は知りたかったのです
02:32
is life this malleable?
生命はこれに順応できるか?
02:34
Can you take this biosphere,
惑星規模に拡大した
02:36
that has evolved on a planetary scale,
このバイオスフィアを
02:38
and jam it into a little bottle,
小さなビンに入れて
02:40
and will it survive?
それでも生命は維持できるのか?
02:42
Big questions.
大きな問いかけです
02:44
And we wanted to know this both for being able to go somewhere else
我々はこの答えを、ひとつは
02:46
in the universe -- if we were going to go to Mars, for instance,
宇宙のどこか他の場所、たとえば火星に
02:49
would we take a biosphere with us, to live in it?
行くのに使えるのか知るために、
02:52
We also wanted to know so we can understand more about
もう一つは、我々の住む地球についてより深く知るために
02:54
the Earth that we all live in.
得たいと思いました
02:56
Well, in 1991 it was finally time for us to go in
1991年、ついにその時が来て、我々は中に入り
02:58
and try out this baby.
どうなるかを試しました
03:01
Let's take it on a maiden voyage.
処女航海です
03:03
Will it work? Or will something happen
うまくいくか? それともなにか我々が
03:05
that we can't understand and we can't fix,
理解や解決ができないことが起きて
03:07
thereby negating the concept of man-made biospheres?
人工のバイオスフィアというコンセプトが否定されるのか?
03:11
So eight of us went in: four men and four women.
男性4人、女性4人が中に入りました
03:15
More on that later.
そのあと増えたんですが
03:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:20
And this is the world that we lived in.
これが我々が住んだ世界です
03:22
So, on the top, we had
上には
03:25
these beautiful rainforests and an ocean,
美しい熱帯雨林と海
03:27
and underneath we had all this technosphere, we called it,
下には「テクノスフィア」がありました
03:29
which is where all the pumps and the valves
ポンプや、バルブや
03:33
and the water tanks and the air handlers, and all of that.
水タンクや、大気処理装置などなどです
03:35
One of the Biospherians called it "garden of Eden
メンバーの一人はこれを「空母の上のエデンの園」と
03:38
on top of an aircraft carrier."
呼びました
03:40
And then also we had the human habitat of course,
そしてもちろん居住区があり
03:42
with the laboratories, and all of that.
研究室がありました
03:44
This is the agriculture.
ここが農園で
03:46
It was essentially an organic farm.
要するに有機農園です
03:48
The day I walked into Biosphere 2,
バイオスフィア2に入ったその日、
03:51
I was, for the first time,
私は、はじめて、
03:53
breathing a completely different atmosphere
7人のメンバーと共に
03:55
than everybody else in the world,
世界の他と誰とも全く異なる
03:58
except seven other people.
空気を吸っていました
04:00
At that moment I became part of that biosphere.
その瞬間、私はそのバイオスフィアの一部になったのです
04:02
And I don't mean that in an abstract sense;
それは抽象的な意味でなく
04:06
I mean it rather literally.
文字どおりそうなのです
04:09
When I breathed out, my CO2
私が吐いた呼気のCO2が
04:11
fed the sweet potatoes that I was growing.
私の栽培するサツマイモになるのです
04:14
And we ate an awful lot of the sweet potatoes.
我々はサツマイモをものすごくたくさん食べました
04:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:21
And those sweet potatoes
そしてそのサツマイモが
04:23
became part of me.
私の一部となるのです
04:25
In fact, we ate so many sweet potatoes
サツマイモを食べ過ぎたせいで
04:27
I became orange with sweet potato.
自分がオレンジ色になったくらいです
04:29
I literally was eating the same carbon over and over again.
私は文字通り同じ炭素をなんども繰り返し食べていました
04:31
I was eating myself in some strange sort of bizarre way.
ものすごく奇妙な方法で、私は私自身を食べていたのです
04:35
When it came to our atmosphere, however,
しかし、大気について言えば
04:39
it wasn't that much of a joke over the long term,
長期的には、そんな冗談では済みませんでした
04:41
because it turned out that we were losing oxygen, quite a lot of oxygen.
なぜなら、私たちは非常にたくさんの酸素を失っていたからです
04:45
And we knew that we were losing CO2.
私たちは二酸化炭素も失っていました
04:49
And so we were working to sequester carbon.
それで私たちは炭素を「隔離」しようとしました
04:51
Good lord -- we know that term now.
おお、今だとこの用語も使えるのね
04:54
We were growing plants like crazy.
我々は狂ったように植物を育てました
04:56
We were taking their biomass, storing them in the basement,
そのバイオマスを地下室に貯蔵し
04:58
growing plants, going around, around, around,
また植物を育て、それを何度も繰り返しました
05:00
trying to take all of that carbon out of the atmosphere.
大気から炭素を除去しようとしたのです
05:02
We were trying to stop carbon from going into the atmosphere.
炭素が大気に放出されるのを防ごうとしました
05:04
We stopped irrigating our soil, as much as we could.
土地の灌漑を最小限にしました
05:07
We stopped tilling, so that we could prevent greenhouse gasses from going into the air.
土を耕すのをやめました 温室効果ガスが大気に混じるのを防ぐためです
05:09
But our oxygen was going down faster
それでも酸素は二酸化炭素が増えるより
05:13
than our CO2 was going up, which was quite unexpected,
早く減っていきました 予想もしなかったことです
05:15
because we had seen them going in tandem in the test module.
テストモジュールではそれらは一緒に変化していたからです
05:18
And it was like playing atomic hide-and-seek.
まるで原子レベルでのかくれんぼのようなものでした
05:21
We had lost seven tons of oxygen.
我々は7トンの酸素を失い
05:24
And we had no clue where it was.
どこにいったのか全く分かりませんでした
05:26
And I tell you, when you lose a lot of oxygen --
そして、大量の酸素を失うとどうなるかというと
05:28
and our oxygen went down quite far;
我々の場合
05:31
it went from 21 percent down to 14.2 percent --
21%から14.2%まで下がりましたが
05:33
my goodness, do you feel dreadful.
おお、恐ろしいですよ
05:36
I mean we were dragging ourselves around the Biosphere.
われわれはバイオスフィア内を身体を引きずるように歩いていました
05:39
And we had sleep apnea at night.
夜には睡眠時無呼吸症候群がおこり
05:42
So you'd wake up gasping with breath,
大きく息を吸い込んで目が覚めるんです
05:44
because your blood chemistry has changed.
血液の組成が変わってしまっていて
05:47
And that you literally do that. You stop breathing and then you -- (Gasps) --
本当にそうなるんです 息が止まって
05:49
take a breath and it wakes you up. And it's very irritating.
深呼吸で目が覚めるんです とてもいらいらします
05:52
And everybody outside thought we were dying.
外界の人たちはみんな、私たちが死にかかっていると思いました
05:54
I mean, the media was making it sound like were were dying.
メディアがそう報道したのです
05:56
And I had to call up my mother every other day saying, "No, Mum, it's fine, fine.
私は一日おきに、母親に「大丈夫、大丈夫」と電話しなくてはなりませんでした
05:58
We're not dead. We're fine. We're fine."
「私は死んでないわよ、大丈夫よ」って
06:01
And the doctor was, in fact, checking us
実際は隊員の医師が、我々が本当に
06:03
to make sure we were, in fact, fine.
大丈夫かどうかチェックしていました
06:05
But in fact he was the person who was most susceptible to the oxygen.
しかし実際は彼自身が一番酸素に敏感だったのです
06:07
And one day he couldn't add up a line of figures.
ある日、彼はついに一連の足し算ができなくなり
06:11
And it was time for us to put oxygen in.
我々は外部から酸素を導入しました
06:13
And you might think, well,
あなたはこう考えるかも つまり
06:17
"Boy, your life support system
「あなたの生命維持装置は
06:19
was failing you. Wasn't that dreadful?"
動作不能になっている 恐ろしいことだ」と
06:21
Yes. In a sense it was terrifying.
たしかにある意味ではそれは恐ろしことです
06:23
Except that I knew I could walk out the airlock door
事態が悪化すれば、いつでもエアロックから
06:27
at any time, if it really got bad,
歩いて出られると分かっている以外は
06:30
though who was going to say, "I can't take it anymore!"?
でも誰か「もうがまんできない!」といったでしょうか?
06:32
Not me, that was for sure.
私で無い事は確かです
06:35
But on the other hand, it was the scientific gold of the project,
しかし一方ではこれはプロジェクトの珠玉の発見でもありました
06:37
because we could really crank this baby up,
なぜなら、わたしたしはこのシステムを実際に
06:41
as a scientific tool,
科学の道具として動かして
06:43
and see if we could, in fact, find
7トンの酸素がどこへいってしまったのか
06:45
where those seven tons of oxygen had gone.
発見できるかどうか試すことができたからです
06:47
And we did indeed find it.
そして、実際それは発見できました
06:50
And we found it in the concrete.
それはコンクリートのなかにあったのです
06:52
Essentially it had done something very simple.
実はとても簡単なことでした
06:54
We had put too much carbon in the soil in the form of compost.
我々は過剰な炭素をコンポストの土に入れてしまい
06:56
It broke down; it took oxygen out of the air;
それが分解して大気から酸素を奪い
06:59
it put CO2 into the air; and it went into the concrete.
CO2が大気に放出され、さらにコンクリートに蓄積されたのです
07:01
Pretty straightforward really.
とても単純なことでした
07:04
So at the end of the two years
それで、2年の後に
07:06
when we came out, we were elated,
我々は達成感と共に出て来ました
07:08
because, in fact, although you might say
たしかに、我々は
07:10
we had discovered something that was quite "uhh,"
酸素が減り続けて
07:13
when your oxygen is going down,
生命維持装置を使っての実験をやめたという
07:16
stopped working, essentially, in your life support system,
とても「だめ」な結果を得ました
07:18
that's a very bad failure.
まさしくひどい失敗でした ただし
07:21
Except that we knew what it was. And we knew how to fix it.
その原因と、対応方法もわかっていました
07:23
And nothing else emerged
それ以外に重大な問題は
07:26
that really was as serious as that.
起きずに
07:28
And we proved the concept, more or less.
コンセプトそのものは、どうにか証明したわけです
07:30
People, on the other hand, was a different subject.
一方、われわれ被験者の問題はまた別でした
07:32
We were -- yeah I don't know that we were fixable.
我々自身は、修復できるかわかりませんでした
07:35
We all went quite nuts, I will say.
言うなれば、頭が変になってしまったようでした
07:38
And the day I came out of Biosphere 2,
私がバイオスフィア2から出て来た日
07:40
I was thrilled I was going to see all my family and my friends.
私は家族や友人に会えるのでわくわくしていました
07:42
For two years I'd been seeing people through the glass.
それまでの2年間、ずっとガラス越しに見ていたのですから
07:46
And everybody ran up to me.
みんなが私の所に駆けてきました
07:49
And I recoiled. They stank!
が、わたしはあとずさりしました 彼らはひどい臭いがしたのです!
07:51
People stink!
みんなひどく臭うのです!
07:55
We stink of hairspray and underarm deodorant,
ヘアスプレーや腋の臭い消しや
07:57
and all kinds of stuff.
そういったものの臭いがするのです
08:00
Now we had stuff inside Biosphere to keep ourselves clean,
私たちはバイオスフィアのなかで清潔にする道具を持っていましたが
08:02
but nothing with perfume.
香水の類いは持っていませんでした
08:05
And boy do we stink out here.
しかし、こちら側では臭うのです
08:07
Not only that,
それだけでなく
08:10
but I lost touch of where my food came from.
私は自分の食物がどこからくるか分からなくなりました
08:12
I had been growing all my own food.
以前は私は自分の食べるもの全てを育てていました
08:16
I had no idea what was in my food, where it came from.
しかし今では自分の食べ物に何が入っているか、それがどこからくるか分からなくなりました
08:19
I didn't even recognize half the names in most of the food that I was eating.
それどころか自分が食べているものの名前が半分くらいしか分かりません
08:22
In fact, I would stand for hours in the aisles of shops,
店の棚のところで、何時間も
08:25
reading all the names on all of the things.
全商品の成分を調べていたりします
08:28
People must have thought I was nuts.
頭が変になったと思われているでしょう
08:30
It was really quite astonishing.
本当に驚くべきことで
08:32
And I slowly lost track
私は次第に、自分たちが住んでいる
08:38
of where I was in this big biosphere, in this big biosphere that we all live in.
この大きなバイオスフィアの中のどこにいるか分からなくなりました
08:41
In Biosphere 2 I totally understood
バイオスフィア2では、私自身が
08:45
that I had a huge impact on my biosphere, everyday,
バイオスフィアに対して常に大きな影響を持つこと、
08:48
and it had an impact on me,
バイオスフィアが私に影響することを理解していました
08:52
very viscerally, very literally.
とても肉体的にも、また文字通りにも
08:54
So I went about my business:
そこで私はパラゴン宇宙開発という
08:56
Paragon Space Development Corporation,
会社を始めました
08:58
a little firm I started with people while I was in the Biosphere,
私がバイオスフィアにいた頃の仲間と始めた小さな会社です
09:00
because I had nothing else to do.
他にやることがありませんでしたから
09:02
And one of the things we did was
私たちがやったことのひとつは
09:04
try to figure out: how small can you make these biospheres,
バイオスフィアをどこまで小さくできるか
09:06
and what can you do with them?
それでなにができるかを試してみることした
09:08
And so we sent one onto the Mir Space Station.
そのバイオスフィアをミール宇宙ステーションに載せ
09:10
We had one on the shuttle and one on the International Space Station,
スペースシャトルに載せ、国際宇宙ステーションにも16ヶ月載せました
09:13
for 16 months, where we managed to produce
われわれは、宇宙空間で完全なライフサイクルを
09:16
the first organisms to go through
なんども繰り返す生物を
09:18
complete multiple life cycles in space --
作るのに成功しました
09:20
really pushing the envelope
我々の生命システムがどこまで
09:22
of understanding how malleable
順応できるかを理解する
09:24
our life systems are.
枠組みに挑戦しました
09:26
And I'm also proud to announce
そして、光栄にも、みなさんに、
09:29
that you're getting a sneak preview -- on Friday we're going to announce
金曜日に公開する予定の、月で生育する植物のシステムを開発する
09:31
that we're actually forming a team
チームをつくったことを
09:34
to develop a system to grow plants on the Moon,
報告いたします
09:36
which is going to be pretty fun.
これはとても面白いことになるでしょう
09:39
And the legacy of that is a system that we were designing:
そして、その元になっているのは、私たちが設計していたシステムです
09:41
an entirely sealed system to grow plants to grow on Mars.
火星でも植物を育てられる、完全に分離されたシステムです
09:44
And part of that is that we had to model
その設計の過程で
09:48
very rapid circulation of CO2
酸素と二酸化炭素の非常に高速な
09:50
and oxygen and water through this plant system.
循環システムを設計しなくてはなりませんでした
09:54
As a result of that modeling
その設計の結果、
09:57
I ended up in all places,
わたしはアフリカの突端
09:59
in Eritrea, in the Horn of Africa.
エリトリアの各地に行くことになりました
10:01
Eritrea, formerly part of Ethiopia,
もとはエチオピアの一部だったエリトリアは
10:04
is one of those places that is astonishingly beautiful,
驚くほど美しく、信じられないくらい荒涼とした場所で、
10:07
incredibly stark, and I have no understanding
私はここで人々がどうやって稼いで
10:12
of how people eke out a living there.
生活しているかまったくわかりませんでした
10:16
It is so dry.
ものすごく乾燥しています
10:18
This is what I saw.
これが私が目にしたものです
10:20
But this is also what I saw.
が、これもまたわたしが見たものです
10:22
I saw a company that had
私は、ある会社が
10:24
taken seawater
海水と
10:27
and sand, and they were growing
砂を利用して、まったく無処理で
10:30
a kind of crop that will grow on pure salt water without having to treat it.
純粋な海水で育つ植物を育てているのを見ました
10:33
And it will produce a food crop.
食料を作り出すのですが、
10:37
In this case it was oilseed.
この場合はオイルシードです
10:39
It was astonishing. They were also producing mangroves
私は驚きました 彼らはまたプランテーションで
10:41
in a plantation.
マングローブを育てていました
10:44
And the mangroves were providing wood
マングローブは木材、蜂蜜、
10:46
and honey and leaves for the animals,
動物に使われる葉となり
10:48
so that they could produce milk and whatnot,
ミルクなど、我々がバイオスフィアで
10:50
like we had in the Biosphere.
生産したようなものを生産していました
10:52
And all of it was coming from this: shrimp farms.
そしてそれらはすべて、エビの養殖場からもたらされます
10:54
Shrimp farms are a scourge on the earth,
率直に環境の観点から言うと
10:58
frankly, from an environmental point of view.
エビの養殖場は地球の悩みの種です
11:00
They pour huge amounts of pollutants into the ocean.
大量の汚染物を海に流し込みます
11:02
They also pollute their next-door neighbors.
それはまた隣りの池も汚染します お互いに汚しあっているのです
11:05
So they're all shitting each other's ponds, quite literally.
文字通りに
11:08
And what this project was doing
このプロジェクトが行おうとしているのは
11:11
was taking the effluent of these,
この汚染の流れを取り込んで
11:14
and turning them into all of this food.
すべて食物にすることです
11:16
They were literally turning pollution into abundance for a desert people.
彼らは文字通り、汚染物を砂漠の人々の財産にしているのです
11:18
They had created an industrial ecosystem, of a sense.
ある意味では工業的なエコシステムを作ったのです
11:23
I was there because I was actually modeling the mangrove portion
実は私は国連の京都議定書の
11:27
for a carbon credit program, under the U.N.
炭素排出枠プログラムのための
11:31
Kyoto Protocol system.
マングローブ分野のモデル設計の為そこにいました
11:33
And as I was modeling this mangrove swamp,
このマングローブの沼の設計中に
11:35
I was thinking to myself, "How do you put a box around this?"
私は考えました「どうやって周りに箱を作るのか?」と
11:37
When I'm modeling a plant in a box, literally,
私は植物を入れる箱を設計するとき、文字通り
11:40
I know where to draw the boundary.
どこを境界にすればよいか知っていますが
11:43
In a mangrove forest like this I have no idea.
マングローブの森でどうするかはわかりませんでした
11:45
Well, of course you have to draw the boundary around the whole of the Earth.
もちろん地球の周りにも境界線を引かなくてはなりません
11:48
And understand its interactions with the entire Earth.
全ては地球全体と関連しているのです
11:51
And put your project in that context.
そしてプロジェクトをその文脈のなかに置く必要があります
11:54
Around the world today we're seeing an incredible transformation,
今日世界中で、我々は信じられないような変貌を目にしています
11:59
from what I would call a biocidal species,
それは「殺生命」型の種族、
12:04
one that -- whether we intentionally or unintentionally --
意図的あるいはそうでなくとも
12:08
have designed our systems to kill life, a lot of the time.
非常に多くの生命を殺すようシステムを設計した種族によるものです
12:11
This is in fact, this beautiful photograph,
この美しい写真は、実は
12:15
is in fact over the Amazon.
アマゾン上空からのものですが
12:19
And here the light green are areas of massive deforestation.
ライトグリーンの大規模な森林破壊の領域がみられ
12:21
And those beautiful wispy clouds
このふわふわと美しい雲は
12:26
are, in fact, fires, human-made fires.
実は人工的な山火事です
12:28
We're in the process of transforming from this,
私たちは、この状態から
12:32
to what I would call a biophilic society,
いわば「生命順応的な」社会に変わる途上にあります
12:35
one where we learn to nurture society.
そこで我々は社会を育むことを学ぶでしょう
12:39
Now it may not seem like it, but we are.
そうは思えないかもしれませんが、そうなのです
12:42
It is happening all across the world,
それは世界中のあらゆる
12:45
in every kind of walk of life,
生活の営みで、
12:48
and every kind of career
あらゆる職業や
12:50
and industry that you can think of.
思いつくあらゆる産業界で起こっています
12:52
And I think often times people get lost in that.
その中で人々はしばしば迷います
12:56
They go, "But how can I possibly find my way in that?
「この世界でどうやって道を見つけたらいいんだ?」と
12:59
It's such a huge subject."
それほど大掛かりな命題なのです
13:02
And I would say that the small stuff counts. It really does.
そこでは、非常に小さなことがらが重要なのです 本当に
13:04
This is the story of a rake in my backyard.
これは私の家の裏庭の「熊手(箒)」の話です
13:08
This was my backyard,
ここがうちの裏庭です
13:13
very early on, when I bought my property.
ずっと昔、わたしが(もちろん)アリゾナに
13:15
And in Arizona, of course, everybody puts gravel down.
家を買った頃、庭には砂利を敷いたものです
13:17
And they like to keep everything beautifully raked. And they keep all the leaves away.
そして庭に美しく箒がけをして、落ち葉は全て取り除きました
13:20
And on Sunday morning the neighbors leaf blower comes out,
日曜の朝、隣人が落ち葉を吹き飛ばす機械を持ち出すと
13:24
and I want to throttle them.
それを止めたいと思いました
13:27
It's a certain type of aesthetic.
それはある種の美意識です
13:29
We're very uncomfortable with untidiness.
ちらかっているのがとても嫌だったのでしょう
13:32
And I threw away my rake.
私は箒をほうり出しました
13:35
And I let all of the leaves fall from the trees that I have on my property.
そして自分の土地の木から落ち葉が落ちるに任せました
13:39
And over time, essentially what have I been doing?
時がたつと、どうなったでしょう?
13:43
I've been building topsoil.
私は表土を作っていたことになるのです
13:45
And so now all the birds come in. And I have hawks.
するとたくさんの鳥がやって来て、鷹もやって来て
13:47
And I have an oasis.
オアシスが出来たのです
13:49
This is what happens every spring. For six weeks,
毎年春になるとこうなります
13:53
six to eight weeks, I have this flush of green oasis.
6週間か8週間は緑のオアシスになるのです
13:57
This is actually in a riparian area.
ここは河岸になったのです
14:00
And all of Tucson could be like this
(アリゾナの)ツーソンのどこでもこうなり得るのです
14:02
if everybody would just revolt and throw away the rake.
皆が立ち止まって、箒を捨てさえすれば
14:04
The small stuff counts.
小さなことが、意味を持つのです
14:07
The Industrial Revolution -- and Prometheus --
産業革命とプロメテウス(火)が
14:11
has given us this, the ability to light up the world.
私たちに世界を照らす力をもたらしました
14:14
It has also given us this,
それはまた
14:19
the ability to look at the world from the outside.
世界を外側から見る力も与えました
14:21
Now we may not all have
私たち全ての人が
14:25
another biosphere that we can run to,
人工のバイオスフィアで生活し
14:27
and compare it to this biosphere.
その世界とこの世界を比べることはないかもしれませんが
14:29
But we can look at the world,
それでも私たちは世界を見渡し
14:32
and try to understand where we are in its context,
その枠組みの中で自分がどこにいるかを知ろうとし
14:34
and how we choose to interact with it.
それとどうかかわるべきか選ぼうとすることはできます
14:39
And if you lose where you are in your biosphere,
そして、もしあなたがバイオスフィアのどこにいるか分からなくなったり
14:43
or are perhaps having a difficulty connecting
あるいは自分のバイオスフィア上の位置と
14:46
with where you are in the biosphere,
繋がりが持ちにくくなったとき
14:48
I would say to you,
あなたにこう申しましょう
14:50
take a deep breath.
深呼吸をしてください
14:53
The yogis had it right.
ヨガの導師は正しかった
14:56
Breath does, in fact, connect us all
呼吸は、我々全てをつないでいます
14:58
in a very literal way.
文字通りの意味で
15:01
Take a breath now.
息をしてください
15:03
And as you breathe, think
あなたが息をする時
15:05
about what is in your breath.
その息になにが入っているか考えてください
15:07
There perhaps is the CO2 from the person sitting next-door to you.
隣りの人からきたCO2があるでしょう
15:11
Maybe there is a little bit of oxygen
近くの海岸の海藻が作った
15:16
from some algae on the beach not far from here.
酸素もいくらか入っているかもしれない
15:18
It also connects us in time.
息は時間ともつながっています
15:23
There may be some carbon in your breath
あなたの息の中の炭素は
15:26
from the dinosaurs.
恐竜のものだったかもしれない
15:30
There could also be carbon that you are exhaling now
あなたの吐く息の中の炭素が
15:33
that will be in the breath
あなたの曾、曾、曾、曾孫の息に
15:38
of your great-great-great-grandchildren.
なるかもしれないのです
15:42
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
15:45
Translator:Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewer:Akira KAKINOHANA

sponsored links

Jane Poynter - Biospherian
After weathering two years in Biosphere 2, Jane Poynter is trying to create technologies that allow us to live in hostile environments -- like outer space.

Why you should listen

Jane Poynter is one of only eight people to live in Biosphere 2 for two years. In 1991, she and seven others were locked in a three-acre, hermetically-sealed environment in the Arizona desert. Nothing was allowed in or out, and everything had to be recycled. Poynter, and the rest of the team, endured dangerously low oxygen levels and constant hunger, but they survived -- something many scientists said was impossible. 

After leaving Biosphere 2, Poynter went on to found Paragon Space Development Corporation, along with her former fellow biospherian and now husband, Taber MacCallum. Paragon develops technologies that might allow humans to live in extreme environments such as outer space and underwater. As president of Paragon, Poynter has had experiments flown on the International Space Station, Russian Mir Space Station and US Space Shuttle, as well as working on underwater technologies with the US Navy. 

However, Poynter has not given up on her homeland -- Biosphere 1. She continues to consult on and write about sustainable development and new green technologies. In concert with the World Bank, she has worked on projects to mitigate climate change and to grow crops in typically arid and hostile regions of Africa and Central America. Through talks and appearances, she builds awareness of the fragile state of the environment. After all, she knows what it's like to watch your biosphere begin to break down.

The New York Times looks back on the Biosphere 2 story >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.