sponsored links
TED@State

Stewart Brand: 4 environmental 'heresies'

スチュアート・ブランド「環境に関する4つの異端的考察」

June 3, 2009

1960年代、70年代の環境保護運動の先駆けとなった彼は、都市化、原子力発電、遺伝子組み換え食材、さらには地球工学に関しての彼自身の考え方について、再考を行いました。この米国国務省に向けてのスピーチで、世界で話題になるであろう彼の力作を垣間見る事が出来ます

Stewart Brand - Environmentalist, futurist
Since the counterculture '60s, Stewart Brand has been creating our internet-worked world. Now, with biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, Stewart Brand has a bold new plan ... Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Because of what I'm about to say,
これからお話しする内容のために まず
00:16
I really should establish my green credentials.
環境問題を語る資格があることを
証明しておかなければなりませんね
00:18
When I was a small boy, I took my pledge
少年時代、私は固く誓いました
00:21
as an American, to save and faithfully defend from waste
アメリカ人として この国の天然資源を守り
00:23
the natural resources of my country,
無駄な利用を 誠実に防いでいこうと
00:26
its air, soil and minerals, its forests, waters and wildlife.
大気、土壌、鉱物、森林、水、そして野生生物などの資源です
00:28
And I've stuck to that.
そして その誓いをずっと守ってきました
00:31
Stanford, I majored in ecology and evolution.
スタンフォード大学では
生態学と進化論を専攻しました
00:33
1968, I put out the Whole Earth Catalog. Was "mister natural" for a while.
1968年に『ホール・アース・カタログ』を創刊し
「ミスター・ナチュラル」だった頃もありました
00:37
And then worked for the Jerry Brown administration.
その後 カリフォルニア州知事
ジェリー・ブラウンの下で働きました
00:41
The Brown administration, and a bunch of my friends,
ブラウンのチームと 私の多数の友人は
00:44
basically leveled the energy efficiency of California,
カリフォルニア州の エネルギー効率化に注目し
00:47
so it's the same now, 30 years later,
結果として 30年経った今もなお
00:50
even though our economy has gone up 80 percent, per capita.
1人あたり80%の経済成長があっても
基本的に 同レベルを保ち
00:53
And we are putting out less greenhouse gasses than any other state.
そしてどの州よりも少ない 温室ガスの排出量を保っています
00:57
California is basically the equivalent of Europe, in this.
カリフォルニアはこの点で基本的には
ヨーロッパと同レベルです
01:00
This year, Whole Earth Catalog has a supplement that I'll preview today,
今年 『ホール・アース・カタログ』の追録として
01:03
called Whole Earth Discipline.
『ホール・アース・ディシプリン(地球の論点)』が発行されます
01:08
The dominant demographic event of our time
現在 人口統計学上の最も大きな変化は
01:11
is this screamingly rapid urbanization
とてつもないスピードで進行している
01:13
that we have going on.
都市化というものです
01:16
By mid-century we'll be about 80 percent urban,
今世紀半ばまでには人類の8割が都市に住むようになり
01:18
and that's mostly in the developing world,
特に発展途上国では
01:22
where that's happening.
それが既に始まっています
01:25
It's interesting, because history is driven to a large degree
面白いのは 歴史というものが常に
01:27
by the size of cities.
都市のサイズに 大きく左右される点です
01:30
The developing world now has all of the biggest cities,
現在 ほとんどの巨大都市は 発展途上国にあり
01:32
and they are developing three times faster than the developed countries,
先進国の3倍の速さで かつ9倍の大きさに
01:35
and nine times bigger.
発展しています
01:38
It's qualitatively different.
質的に違います
過去を振り返ると大都市が
01:40
They are the drivers of history, as we see by looking at history.
歴史を左右してきたのがわかります
01:43
1,000 years ago this is what the world looked like.
これは千年前の世界の様子です
01:45
Well we now have a distribution of urban power
現在も 都市勢力の分布というものが
01:49
similar to what we had 1,000 years ago.
千年前と似たような形で存在します
01:52
In other words, the rise of the West,
これを見ると 欧米の台頭というものは
01:55
dramatic as it was, is over.
劇的ではあったものの 過去のものだと解ります
01:57
The aggregate numbers are absolutely overwhelming:
総数を見るとすごいものです
02:01
1.3 million people a week coming to town,
1週間に130万人の人が都市部に移ってくる
02:04
decade after decade.
数十年に渡ってです
02:07
What's really going on?
何が起こっているのでしょう?
02:09
Well, what's going on is the villages of the world are emptying out.
答えは 世界中の村で進んでいる過疎化です
02:11
Subsistence farming is drying up basically.
自給自足をしていた農業は 基本的には干上がります
02:14
People are following opportunity into town.
村民はチャンスを求めて都市にやってきます
02:17
And this is why.
これが原因です
02:19
I used to have a very romantic idea about villages,
かつて 村なんてロマンチックだと思ったのですが
02:21
and it's because I never lived in one.
そういう所に住んだことがないからでしょうね
02:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:26
Because in town --
都市というものは
02:27
this is the bustling squatter city
これはナイロビ近くのキベラという
02:29
of Kibera, near Nairobi --
不法居住区ですが
02:31
they see action. They see opportunity.
活気やチャンスがあります
02:35
They see a cash economy that they were not able to participate in
現金社会もあります
02:37
back in the subsistence farm.
これは自給自足の農村では参加できなかったものです
02:40
As you go around these places there's plenty of aesthetics.
この様な所には美的側面も多く見られ
02:43
There is plenty going on.
活気もあります
02:45
They are poor, but they are intensely urban. And they are intensely creative.
彼らは貧しくても 極めて都会的でクリエイティブなのです
02:47
The aggregate numbers now
現在不法居住をしている
02:51
are that basically squatters,
総数10億にもなる人たちが
02:53
all one billion of them, are building the urban world,
都市世界を形成しています
02:56
which means they're building the world --
つまり 彼らが世界をつくりあげている
02:59
personally, one by one, family by family,
個人から 家族の単位へ
03:02
clan by clan, neighborhood by neighborhood.
部族単位になり さらには地域単位にまで広がり
03:04
They start flimsy and they get substantial as time goes by.
最初はもろいが 徐々にしっかりしたものになっていく
03:07
They even build their own infrastructure.
彼らは 自前のインフラさえ作り上げます
03:11
Well, steal their own infrastructure, at first.
もっとも最初は インフラを盗むところから始めるわけですが
03:13
Cable TV, water, the whole gamut, all gets stolen.
ケーブルテレビ、水、何から何まで盗みとる
03:16
And then gradually gentrifies.
そして だんだんとそのエリアは豊かになっていきます
03:19
It is not the case that slums undermine prosperity,
必ずしもスラムが繁栄を損なわせるわけではありません
03:23
not the working slums; they help create prosperity.
機能しているスラムの場合
繁栄をもたらす要因にもなります
03:26
So in a town like Mumbai, which is half slums,
例えばムンバイは 半分がスラムになっていますが
03:30
it's 1/6th of the GDP of India.
インドのGDPの6分の1を占めている街です
03:33
Social capital in the slums is at its most urban and dense.
スラムの社会資本はとても都市的で
密度が濃いのです
03:36
These people are valuable as a group.
これらの人たちはグループとしての価値があります
03:41
And that's how they work.
こういうしくみになっているのです
03:44
There is a lot of people who think about all these poor people,
この貧しい人たちを見て こう思う人たちも多いでしょう
03:46
"Oh there's terrible things. We've got to fix their housing."
「ひどい状態だ 住宅事情を改善しないと」と
03:49
It used to be, "Oh we've got to get them phone service."
「電話をつなげてやらないと」と心配したものでしたが
03:51
Now they're showing us how they do their phone service.
今では 彼らなりの電話サービスまでやっているのです
03:53
Famine mostly is a rural event now.
飢饉は ほとんどが田舎のものになりました
03:56
There are things they care about.
彼ら自身が気に掛けていること
03:58
And this is where we can help.
それこそが私たちが支援できることです
04:00
And the nations they're in can help.
また彼らが所属する国家も支援できます
04:03
And they are helping each other solve these issues.
彼ら自身もお互い協力して 問題を解決しています
04:05
And you go to a nice dense place like this slum in Mumbai.
ムンバイにあるこのような
とても密集したスラム地域に行くと
04:08
You look at that lane on the right.
右にあるような道路が目に付きます
04:12
And you can ask, "Okay what's going on there?"
「何があるんだろう」と疑問になります
04:14
The answer is, "Everything."
答えは「すべて」 です
04:16
This is better than a mall. It's much denser.
これはショッピングモールよりもよくできています
04:19
It's much more interactive.
より密集してやり取りも盛んです
04:22
And the scale is terrific.
とてつもない規模です
04:24
The main event is, these are not people crushed by poverty.
重要なのは この人たちは貧困にあえいでいるのではなく
04:26
These are people busy getting out of poverty
貧困から抜けだすのに忙しいということです
04:30
just as fast as they can.
できるだけ早く抜けだそうと必死です
04:32
They're helping each other do it.
彼らは互いに助けあいます
04:34
They're doing it through an outlaw thing,
法を無視してでもやってのけます
04:36
the informal economy.
非公式な経済なのです
04:38
The informal economy, it's sort of like dark energy in astrophysics:
この非公式経済は
天文物理学における暗黒エネルギーのようなものです
04:40
it's not supposed to be there, but it's huge.
存在すべきではない 何か巨大なもの
04:44
We don't understand how it works yet, but we have to.
その作用はわかっていませんが
理解は大切でしょう
04:46
Furthermore, people in the informal economy,
さらにいえば 非公式経済である
04:49
the gray economy --
グレーエコノミーでは
04:51
as time goes by,
時がたつにつれて
04:53
crime is happening around them. And they can join the criminal world,
犯罪が起こります 犯罪社会に巻き込まれていく人もいれば
04:55
or they can join the legitimate world.
合法的な社会に加わる人もいます
04:59
We should be able to make that choice
合法的な世界を選択しやすくなるように
05:03
easier for them to get toward the legitimate world,
支援するのが我々の仕事です
05:05
because if we don't, they will go toward the criminal world.
そうしないと 彼らは犯罪社会へ向かってしまう
05:07
There's all kinds of activity.
ここには いろいろな活動があります
05:11
In Dharavi the slum performs not only
ダーラヴィでは スラムは
05:14
a lot of services for itself,
スラム街のさまざまなサービスだけでなく
05:16
but it performs services for the city at large.
市のためのサービスまで行います
05:18
And one of the main events are these ad-hoc schools.
大切な活動の一つが 「アドホック学校」です
05:21
Parents pool their money to hire some local teachers
親たちが 地元の先生を雇うために
お金を持ち寄ります
05:24
to a private, tiny, unofficial school.
私立の小さな非公式の 学校です
05:28
Education is more possible in the cities, and that changes the world.
教育は都市部ではより受けやすく
それが世界を変えていきます
05:30
So you see some interesting, typical, urban things.
都市独特の面白いことが ここでも見られます
05:35
So one thing slammed up against another,
何かが別のものにぶつけられるという事が
05:38
such as in Sao Paulo here.
ここサオパウロでも起こっています
05:40
That's what cities do. That's how they create value,
街とはこうやって価値を創り上げていくのです
05:42
is by slamming things together.
ものをぶつけ合うことによって
05:44
In this case, supply right next to demand.
ここ場合は需要のすぐ隣に供給があります
05:46
So the maids and the gardeners and the guards
メイドや庭師や警備員は
05:48
that live in this lively part of town on the left
左側の 街の中でも活気あるエリアに住んでいて
05:50
walk to work, in the boring, rich neighborhood.
歩いて 退屈な高級住宅地に通勤します
05:53
Proximity is amazing.
近接性というのは素晴らしい
05:58
We are learning about how dense proximity can be.
密集した近接というものが どんなものかを見てみましょう
06:01
Connectivity between the city and the country
街と地方を接続するということは
06:16
is what's going to keep the country good,
地方の良いところを保ちます
06:19
because the city has interesting ways of doing things.
街のやり方は独特なところがあります
06:22
This is what makes cities --
これこそが都市を
06:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:36
this is what makes cities so green in the developing world.
これが発展途上国において都市が環境に良い原因です
06:40
Because people leave the poverty trap, an ecological disaster
人々が 自給自足の農家の貧困や環境災害を逃れ
06:43
of subsistence farms, and head to town.
都市へと向かうので
06:46
And when they're gone the natural environment
彼らが去った後 自然環境は
06:49
starts to come back very rapidly.
非常に速いスピードで 元の姿へと戻り始めます
06:51
And those who remain in the village can shift over to cash crops
そして村に残った人たちも 売れる農作物へとシフトします
06:53
to send food to the new growing markets in town.
育てた食料を大きくなる街のマーケットへと送るのです
06:56
So if you want to save a village, you do it with a good road,
もしも農村を救いたいと思っているのなら
整備された道路や
07:00
or with a good cell phone connection, and ideally some grid electrical power.
通信状態のよい携帯電話や
送電系統を整備することで実現できます
07:03
So the event is: we're a city planet. That just happened.
人類は都市惑星に住むようになったということです
07:07
More than half.
半数以上がそうなのです
07:10
The numbers are considerable. A billion live in the squatter cities now.
相当な数です 不法居住に住む人は10億人にのぼります
07:12
Another billion is expected.
さらにもう10億人増えることが予想されています
07:15
That's more than a sixth of humanity living a certain way.
人類の6分の1以上の人が
こういった暮らしをしているのです
07:18
And that will determine a lot of how we function.
これは私たちが どう機能にするかに大きく影響します
07:21
Now, for us environmentalists,
私達 環境保護者にとって 都市化の一番の利点は
07:25
maybe the greenest thing about the cities is they diffuse the population bomb.
人口の爆発にストップがかかるという事かもしれません
07:27
People get into town.
人々は街に住むようになると
07:30
The immediately have fewer children.
突然産む子供の数を減らします
07:33
They don't even have to get rich yet. Just the opportunity of
豊かになっていなくても そのチャンスがあるというだけで
07:35
coming up in the world means they will have fewer, higher-quality kids,
より少数の質の高い子供を持つようになり
07:38
and the birthrate goes down radically.
出生率は急速に下がります
07:42
Very interesting side effect here,
おもしろい副作用です
07:44
here's a slide from Phillip Longman.
フィリップ・ロングマンからのスライドです
07:46
Shows what is happening.
見ると何が起きているか解ります
07:48
As we have more and more old people, like me,
私のような 年寄りがどんどん増えていくにつれ
07:50
and fewer and fewer babies.
赤ん坊の数はどんどん減っていきます
07:52
And they are regionally separated.
そして居住エリアが分かれていきます
07:54
What you're getting is a world which is
ここでわかることは 年寄りは 古い町で
07:57
old folks, and old cities, going around doing things the old way,
昔からのやり方で暮らしています
07:59
in the north.
北部において。
08:04
And young people in brand new cities they're inventing,
そして若い人たちは 彼らが作り上げた真新しい都市で
08:06
doing new things, in the south.
新しいことをしているのです 南部において。
08:09
Where do you think the action is going to be?
活気があるのはは どちらでしょう?
08:11
Shift of subject. Quickly drop by climate.
テーマを変えて気候の話を少しします
08:14
The climate news, I'm sorry to say, is going to keep getting worse
気候のニュースは残念な事に
08:17
than we think, faster than we think.
予想以上の規模とスピードで 悪化しています
08:19
Climate is a profoundly complex, nonlinear system,
気候は非常に複雑で 非直線的なシステムです
08:22
full of runaway positive feedbacks,
暴走する正のフィードバックや 隠れた限界
08:24
hidden thresholds and irrevocable tipping points.
引き返せない転換点にあふれています
08:27
Here's just a few samples.
いくつか例をみてみましょう
08:29
We're going to keep being surprised. And almost all
驚くような事が次々と起こり
08:32
the surprises are going to be bad ones.
そういうものは悪い事が多いものです
08:34
From your standpoint this means
これが人類に与える影響は
08:36
a great increase in climate refugees
気候難民の大幅な増加を意味します
08:39
over the coming decades,
それは今後数十年の間に起こるのです
08:41
and what goes along with that, which is resource wars
その結果 資源戦争や
08:43
and chaos wars,
混乱の戦争が起こります
08:46
as we're seeing in Darfur.
スーダン ダルフールの紛争のようなものです
08:48
That's what drought does.
干ばつが起こると こうなります
08:55
It brings carrying capacity down,
干ばつにより 生活に必要なリソースが減り
08:57
and there's not enough carrying capacity
人々の生活を維持できなくなります
08:59
to support the people. And then you're in trouble.
そして トラブルが発生する
09:01
Shift to the power situation.
電力についてお話しましょう
09:04
Baseload electricity is what it takes to run a city,
ベースロード電力は都市
この都市惑星の維持に必要な
09:07
or a city planet.
最低限の電力です
09:10
So far there is only three sources of baseload electricity:
ベースロード用に使える発電は
現在三つしかありません
09:12
coal, some gas,
石炭やガスなどの火力発電と
09:16
nuclear and hydro.
原子力と水力発電ですが
09:19
Of those, only nuclear and hydro are green.
このうち原子力発電と水力発電だけが
環境に優しいものです
09:21
Coal is what is causing the climate problems.
石炭は温暖化の原因ですが
09:25
And everyone will keep burning it
皆がそれを燃やし続けるのは
09:27
because it's so cheap, until governments make it expensive.
これがとても安いからです
政府が値段をつりあげない限り
09:29
Wind and solar can't help, because so far we don't have a way to store that energy.
風力とソーラーパワーは使えません
電力を蓄積しておく方法が まだないからです
09:32
So with hydro maxed out,
水力発電は限界に近く
09:37
coal and lose the climate,
火力発電では温暖化を進めてしまう
09:40
or nuclear, which is the current operating low-carbon source,
現在稼動している低炭素資源である原子力を使って
09:43
and maybe save the climate.
温暖化を防げるかもしれません
09:46
And if we can eventually get good solar in space,
そして最終的に宇宙空間に
優れた太陽光発電所ができれば
09:48
that also could help.
それもまた助けになるでしょう
09:51
Because remember, this is what drives the prosperity in the developing world
これこそが 発展途上国や農村や都市の
09:53
in the villages and in the cities.
繁栄をもたらす原動力だからです
09:58
So, between coal and nuclear,
ではここで 石炭と原子力発電の
10:01
compare their waste products.
燃料廃棄物を比較してみましょう
10:03
If all of the electricity you used in your lifetime was nuclear,
もしもあなたの一生のうちの電力を
原子力発電だけでまかなうとしたら
10:05
the amount of waste that would be added up
燃料廃棄物の総量は
10:09
would fit in a Coke can.
コーラの1缶に収まってしまいます
10:11
Whereas a coal-burning plant,
一方で石炭の火力発電所では
10:14
a normal one gigawatt coal plant, burns 80 rail cars of coal a day,
通常の1ギガワットの発電所で
一日に 列車80車両分もの石炭が 燃やされます
10:16
each car having 100 tons.
1車両あたり100トンです。
10:20
And it puts 18 thousand tons
そして18000トンの
10:23
of carbon dioxide in the air.
二酸化炭素を空気中に排出しています
10:25
So and then when you compare the lifetime emissions
人が一生のうちに排出する二酸化炭素の量を
10:29
of these various energy forms,
エネルギー源ごとに 比べると
10:31
nuclear is about even with solar and wind,
原子力は太陽光や風力とほぼ同じで
10:33
and ahead of solar --
太陽光より
10:35
oh, I'm sorry -- with hydro and wind, and ahead of solar.
失礼、水力や風力と同等で 太陽光より優れています
10:37
And does nuclear really compete with coal?
原子力は石炭に対して競争力があるのでしょうか
10:40
Just ask the coal miners in Australia.
オーストラリアの炭鉱員に聞くと分かります
10:42
That's where you see some of the source,
答えは こういうところで見つかります
10:44
not from my fellow environmentalists,
環境保護主義者の仲間からではなく
10:46
but from people who feel threatened by nuclear power.
原子力の台頭に不安を感じている人達からです
10:48
Well the good news is that
よいニュースとしては
10:51
the developing world, but frankly, the whole world,
発展途上国 概していえば世界全体が
10:53
is busy building, and starting to build, nuclear reactors.
原子力発電所の建設や その準備を進めていることです
10:55
This is good for the atmosphere.
これは大気にとってはよいことです
10:59
It's good for their prosperity.
そして彼らの繁栄にとってもよいことです
11:01
I want to point out one interesting thing,
ここで興味深いものを紹介します
11:03
which is that environmentalists like the thing we call micropower.
環境保護主義者の好きな
マイクロパワーというもので
11:05
It's supposed to be, I don't know, local solar and wind and cogeneration,
上手く行くか わかりませんが
ローカルで太陽光と風力の発電を
11:08
and good things like that.
同時に行う類のものです
11:11
But frankly micro-reactors which are just now coming on,
現在開発が進んでいる 原子力の
11:13
might serve even better.
マイクロリアクターは更に良さそうです
11:15
The Russians, who started this, are building floating reactors,
ロシアでは水に浮かぶリアクターを造っています
11:17
for their new passage, where the ice is melting, north of Russia.
ロシア北部の氷が解け始めたところで使うのです
11:19
And they're selling these floating reactors,
この35メガワット足らずの浮かぶリアクターを
11:23
only 35 megawatts, to developing countries.
発展途上国に売り始めています
11:26
Here's the design of an early one from Toshiba.
こちらが東芝の初期のデザイン
11:30
It's interesting, say, to take a 25-megawatt,
興味深いのは 25メガワットのもの_
11:32
25 million watts,
つまり 2500万ワットのものを
11:35
and you compare it to the standard big iron
普通のウェスティングハウスやアリヴァなどの
11:37
of an ordinary Westinghouse or Ariva,
12億ワットや16億ワットを発電する
11:39
which is 1.2, 1.6 billion watts.
標準的な巨大な鉄のかたまりに比べると
11:43
These things are way smaller. They're much more adaptable.
これらはかなり小さく 順応性が高いのです
11:46
Here's an American design from Lawrence Livermore Lab.
これはアメリカのローレンス・リバモア研究所のデザイン
11:50
Here's another American design that came out
もうひとつ これもアメリカのデザインで
11:53
of Los Alamos, and is now commercial.
ロスアラモス研究所の設計で
実用化もされています
11:55
Almost all of these are not only small, they are proliferation-proof.
これらは小さいだけでなく 不拡散にも有効です
11:58
They're typically buried in the ground.
これらの原子炉は基本的には土の中に埋められています
12:00
And the innovation is moving very rapidly.
発明はものすごく速く進んでいます
12:03
So I think microreactors is going to be important for the future.
マイクロリアクターは 将来とても重要になるでしょう
12:05
In terms of proliferation,
核の不拡散について考えると
12:08
nuclear energy has done more
原子力発電は 核兵器を廃止するために
12:10
to dismantle nuclear weapons than any other activity.
他のどの活動よりも 貢献したといえます
12:12
And that's why 10 percent of the electricity in this room,
この部屋で使われている 10パーセントの電力か
12:15
20 percent of electricity
20パーセントの電力が
12:19
in this room is probably nuclear.
たぶん原子力発電によるものです
12:21
Half of that is coming from dismantled warheads from Russia,
その燃料の半分は 解体したロシア核弾頭から来ていて
12:23
soon to be joined by our dismantled warheads.
まもなく米国のものが加わります
12:27
And so I would like to see the GNEP program,
ブッシュ政権の発表した
GNEP(国際原子力パートナーシップ)が
12:30
that was developed in the Bush administration, go forward aggressively.
積極的に進められることを願っています
12:33
And I was glad to see that president Obama
喜ばしいことにオバマ大統領も
12:36
supported the nuclear fuel bank strategy
核燃料バンク構想を
12:38
when he spoke in Prague the other week.
数週間前のプラハでの演説で支持しました
12:41
One more subject. Genetically engineered food crops,
最後のテーマは 遺伝子組み換えの農産物ですが
12:43
in my view, as a biologist,
私の生物学者としての見解では
12:46
have no reason to be controversial.
議論になる理由などありません
12:48
My fellow environmentalists, on this subject,
環境保護主義者たちはこれに対して
12:50
have been irrational, anti-scientific, and very harmful.
不合理で、非科学的で、とても有害な立場をとっています
12:52
Despite their best efforts,
彼らの最大限の努力にもかかわらず
12:56
genetically engineered crops are the most
遺伝子組み換え穀物は
12:58
rapidly successful agricultural innovation in history.
歴史的に見て 最も急速な農業革命を起こしました
13:00
They're good for the environment because they enable no-till farming,
これらは環境にとってよいことです
無耕農業が可能になります
13:04
which leaves the soil in place,
これにより土壌は地面に残り
13:07
getting healthier from year to year --
年を追うごとに土の状態はよくなっていきます
13:09
slso keeps less carbon dioxide going from the soil
土壌から空気中に排出される二酸化炭素が
13:11
into the atmosphere.
減っていくということにもなります
13:13
They reduce pesticide use.
殺虫剤の利用も減らせます
13:15
And they increase yield, which allows you to have your
そして収穫高は上がり これによって
13:17
agricultural area be smaller,
農業地帯を小さくすることができる
13:19
and therefore more wild area is freed up.
その結果 野生地帯が増えます
13:22
By the way, this map from 2006
この2006年の時代遅れの
13:25
is out of date because it shows Africa
地図を見ると 当時のアフリカが
13:27
still under the thumb of Greenpeace,
グリーンピースとフレンズ・オブ・ジ・アースの
13:29
and Friends of the Earth from Europe,
干渉をうけていたのが わかります
13:31
and they're finally getting out from under that.
最近 やっとその影響から逃れる傾向にあります
13:34
And biotech is moving rapidly in Africa, at last.
そしてついにアフリカで
バイオテクノロジーが急速に進んでいます
13:36
This is a moral issue.
これはモラルの問題です
13:39
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics
ナフィールド生命倫理審議会は
13:41
met on this issue twice in great detail
この問題を二回に渡って協議し
13:43
and said it is a moral imperative
遺伝組み換えの農産物を早急に
13:45
to make genetically engineered crops readily available.
人々に供給するのは モラル上必須だと結論をだしました
13:47
Speaking of imperatives, geoengineering is taboo now,
必須事項と言えば 地球工学は今やタブーです
13:50
especially in government circles,
特に政府関係機関でです
13:53
though I think there was a DARPA meeting on it a couple of weeks ago,
DARPAは数週間前にこれについて協議していましたが
13:55
but it will be on your plate --
これは避けられない事になるでしょう
13:57
not this year but pretty soon,
今年ではないですが すぐにそうなります
13:59
because some harsh realizations are coming along.
なぜなら 辛辣な実現が迫ってくるからです
14:02
This is a list of them.
これはそのリストです
14:05
Basically the news is going to keep getting more scary.
基本的に そのニュースは恐ろしさを増していくでしょう
14:07
There will be events,
これらが起こりうる出来事です
14:10
like 35,000 people dying of a heat wave,
3万5千人の命がヒートウェーブで危険にさらされたり
14:12
which happened a while back.
これは少し前に起こりました
14:15
Like cyclones coming up toward Bangladesh.
またサイクロンが バングラディッシュに接近したりします
14:17
Like wars over water,
水を奪い合うような戦争も起こります
14:20
such as in the Indus.
これはインダス川で起こりました
14:22
And as those events keep happening
こういった出来事が発生し続けると
14:24
we're going to say, "Okay, what can we do about that really?"
私たちに「何が出来るのか」ということになります
14:26
But there's this little problem with geoengineering:
しかし地球工学には 次のような小さな問題がついてくるのです
14:28
what body is going to decide
どの機関が決定を下し
14:33
who gets to engineer? How much they do? Where they do it?
誰がどこで どれだけ エンジニアリングを行うのか
14:37
Because everybody is downstream,
皆がそれぞれの影響下にあり
14:39
downwind of whatever is done.
操作の風下にいるわけです
14:41
And if we just taboo it completely
しかし それを完全にタブーにしてしまうと
14:44
we could lose civilization.
文明が失われるかもしれません
14:46
But if we just say "OK,
しかし単純に「なるほど、中国よ
14:48
China, you're worried, you go ahead.
心配なのでしょう、お好きにどうぞ
14:51
You geoengineer your way. We'll geoengineer our way."
貴方達は貴方達のやり方で地球工学をやればいい
私たちもそうします」とすると
14:53
That would be considered an act of war by both nations.
これは2国間での戦争行為とみなされてしまう
14:57
So this is very interesting diplomacy coming along.
非常に興味深い外交が出てきます
15:00
I should say, it is more practical than people think.
人々が思うよりずっと実践的なものだと思います
15:04
Here is an example that climatologists like a lot,
これは気候学者が とても好きな事例ですが
15:07
one of the dozens of geoengineering ideas.
数ある地球工学のアイデアのうちの一つです
15:10
This one came from the sulfur dioxide
1991年にピナツボ火山が噴火し
15:12
from Mount Pinatubo in 1991 --
二酸化硫黄から発生し
15:14
cooled the earth by half a degree.
地球の温度が0.5度下がった事から
ヒントを得ました
15:17
There was so much ice in 1992, the following year,
翌年の1992年にはたくさんの氷があり
15:21
that there was a bumper crop of polar bear cubs
たくさんの北極グマが生まれ
15:23
who were known as the Pinatubo cubs.
ピナツボ・カブと呼ばれていました
15:26
To put sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere
成層圏に二酸化硫黄を散布するには
15:28
would cost on the order of a billion dollars a year.
年間 約10億ドルものコストがかかります
15:30
That's nothing, compared to all of the other
しかし他のエネルギー対策にに比べたら
15:33
things we may be trying to do about energy.
大したことありません
15:36
Just to run by another one:
もうひとつのアイディアは
15:38
this is a plan to brighten the reflectance of ocean clouds,
海上の雲に海水を噴霧して
15:41
by atomizing seawater;
雲の反射率を高めるものです
15:44
that would brighten the albedo of the whole planet.
地球全体のアルべドが高くなります
15:46
A nice one, because it can happen
次にお見せするのは簡単にどこでも出来る
15:48
lots of little ways in lots of little places,
なかなか良いもので
15:50
is by copying the ancient Amazon Indians
古代アマゾンのインディアンのやり方をまねしたものです
15:52
who made good agricultural soil
彼らは 質の高い農耕土を生成しました
15:54
by pyrolizing, smoldering, plant waste,
植物廃棄物を熱分解とくすぶり燃焼させ
15:56
and biochar fixes large quantities of carbon
土壌を改良しながら
16:00
while it's improving the soil.
大量の炭素を封じ込めます
16:03
So here is where we are.
これが現在の人類の状況です
16:05
Nobel Prize-winning climatologist Paul Crutzen
ノーベル賞を受賞した気候学者のパウル・クルッツェンは
16:08
calls our geological era the Anthropocene,
現在の地質時代を「アントロポセン」と呼びます
16:11
the human-dominated era. We are stuck
人類が地球を支配する時代です
16:14
with its obligations.
私たちはその責任から逃れられません
16:17
In the Whole Earth Catalog, my first words were,
『ホール・アース・カタログ』の巻頭に こう書きました
16:20
"We are as Gods, and might as well get good at it."
「私たちは神のごとく、
ものごとをうまく処理することが望まれる」
16:22
The first words of Whole Earth Discipline
『ホール・アース・ディシプリン(地球の論点)』は
これで始まります
16:24
are, "We are as Gods, and have to get good at it."
「私たちは神のように振る舞わなければならず、
しかも巧みにやり遂げなければならない」
16:27
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:31
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:33
Translator:Ayako Kato
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Stewart Brand - Environmentalist, futurist
Since the counterculture '60s, Stewart Brand has been creating our internet-worked world. Now, with biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, Stewart Brand has a bold new plan ...

Why you should listen

With biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, the revival of extinct species is becoming possible. Stewart Brand plans to not only bring species back but restore them to the wild.

Brand is already a legend in the tech industry for things he’s created: the Whole Earth Catalog, The WELL, the Global Business Network, the Long Now Foundation, and the notion that “information wants to be free.” Now Brand, a lifelong environmentalist, wants to re-create -- or “de-extinct” -- a few animals that’ve disappeared from the planet.

Granted, resurrecting the woolly mammoth using ancient DNA may sound like mad science. But Brand’s Revive and Restore project has an entirely rational goal: to learn what causes extinctions so we can protect currently endangered species, preserve genetic and biological diversity, repair depleted ecosystems, and essentially “undo harm that humans have caused in the past.”

His newest book is Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.