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TED2005

Anna Deavere Smith: Four American characters

アナ・ディーバー=スミス: 4人のアメリカ人

February 25, 2005

作家で女優でもあるアナ・ディーバー=スミスが演じるのは、作家のスタッズ・ターケルと囚人ポウレット・ジェンキンズ、韓国系の商店主とロデオの牛乗り。 これは彼女の一人芝居「オン・ザ・ロード―アメリカの人物を探す」の一部です。

Anna Deavere Smith - Actor, playwright, social critic
Anna Deavere Smith's ground-breaking solo shows blur the lines between theater and journalism, using text from real-life encounters to create gripping portraits. Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So my grandfather told me when I was a little girl,
私が幼い時 祖父がこうい言いました
00:25
"If you say a word often enough, it becomes you."
”自分はこうなると言い続ければ
そういう人間になる”
00:27
And having grown up in a segregated city, Baltimore, Maryland,
私はメリーランド州ボルチモアという
人種隔離された街で育ちました
00:30
I sort of use that idea to go around America with a tape recorder --
テープレコーダーを持って
アメリカ中を回って―
00:33
thank God for technology --
テクノロジーの発展に感謝です―
00:36
to interview people, thinking that if I walked in their words --
人々にインタビューして 
人の言葉に寄り添えないかと…
00:38
which is also why I don't wear shoes when I perform --
―ステージで靴を履かない理由もそこです―
00:41
if I walked in their words, that I could sort of absorb America.
人々の言葉に足を踏み入れる事で
アメリカを吸収できるのではと考えたのです
00:43
I was also inspired by Walt Whitman,
ウォルト・ホイットマンに感化されました
00:47
who wanted to absorb America and have it absorb him.
アメリカを吸収し
アメリカに吸収されることを望んだ人です
00:48
So these four characters are going to be from that work
これから紹介する
4人のキャラクターは
00:51
that I've been doing for many years now,
私の長年の活動で出逢って
00:55
and well over, I don't know, a couple of thousand people
インタビューをした数千人の中の4人です
00:56
I've interviewed.
インタビューをした数千人の中の4人です
00:59
Anybody out here old enough to know Studs Terkel, that old radio man?
スタッズ・ターケルを知っている
年代の方はいらっしゃいますか?
01:00
So I thought he would be the perfect person
彼こそ アメリカ史上の
決定的瞬間を語る人物として
01:05
to go to to ask about a defining moment in American history.
うってつけの人だと思いました
01:07
You know, he was "born in 1912, the year the Titanic sank,
彼は1912年 タイタニック号沈没事件が
あった年に生まれました―
01:11
greatest ship every built. Hits the tip of an iceberg,
かつてない豪華客船が
氷山の一角に激突して
01:15
and bam, it went down. It went down and I came up. Wow, some century."
ザブーン!船は海に沈んで 
私はこの世に出て来た 何て時代だ
01:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:26
So this is his answer about a defining moment in American history.
アメリカ史上の決定的瞬間について
彼はこう言いました
01:28
"Defining moment in American history, I don't think there's one;
""アメリカ史上の決定的瞬間”
なんてありゃしないね
01:32
you can't say Hiroshima, that's a big one --
大事件だったが
広島原爆投下じゃないし
01:37
I can't think of any one moment I would say is a defining moment.
どれも決定的瞬間には
思えないね
01:39
The gradual slippage -- 'slippage' is the word
段階的な低下…
""低下""という言葉が
01:42
used by the people in Watergate, moral slippage --
ウォーターゲート事件で使われた
モラルの低下だ
01:45
it's a gradual kind of thing, combination of things.
ゆるやかでいて
いろいろ混じって
01:48
You see, we also have the technology.
テクノロジーの発達に伴って
01:50
I say, less and less the human touch.
人間同士のふれあいが
減ってきている
01:53
"Oh, let me kind of tell you a funny little play bit.
こんな事があったよ
話そうかね
01:56
The Atlanta airport is a modern airport,
アトランタ空港は
とても近代的だ
01:59
and they should leave the gate there.
ゲートを抜けると
そこには
02:01
These trains that take you out to a concourse and on to a destination.
電車があり 
出発ゲートへ連れて行ってくれる
02:02
And these trains are smooth,
その電車は
とてもスムーズに走って
02:07
and they're quiet and they're efficient.
とても静かで 能率的だ
02:09
And there's a voice on the train, you know the voice was a human voice.
車内アナウンスは
人の声のようだ
02:12
You see in the old days we had robots, robots imitated humans.
昔はロボットがあって
ロボットが人を真似していた
02:16
Now we have humans imitating robots.
今じゃ
人がロボットを真似ている
02:21
So we got this voice on this train: Concourse One: Omaha, Lincoln.
こんな感じの声で
「出発第1ゲート オマハ・リンカーン」
02:26
Concourse Two: Dallas, Fort Worth. Same voice.
「出発第2ゲート ダラス・フォートワース」
全く同じ声じゃないか
02:32
Just as a train is about to go, a young couple rush in
電車が出発する直前に
若いカップルが飛び乗った
02:35
and they're just about to close the pneumatic doors.
空気ドアが閉まる
瞬間スレスレだった
02:40
And that voice, without losing a beat, says,
すると 
その声は全くペースを崩ないで
02:43
'Because of late entry, we're delayed 30 seconds.'
「遅れた乗客アリ 30秒遅れの発車です」
と言うと
02:46
Just then, everybody's looking at this couple with hateful eyes
乗り合わせた人々は
嫌な顔で2人をにらんだ
02:49
and the couple's going like this, you know, shrinking.
カップルはこんな風に
ちじこまっていたよ
02:54
Well, I'd happened to have had a couple of drinks before boarding --
私はちょっと
一杯ひっかけて来ていたので
02:56
I do that to steel my nerves -- and so
いい気分だった
02:59
I imitate a train call, holding my hand on my --
だから 電車の声をまねて
こう言ったんだ
03:02
'George Orwell, your time has come,' you see.
「ジョージ・オーウェルさん
君の時代が来たぞ!」ほら
03:05
Well, some of you are laughing. Everybody laughs
笑ってるよね
普通 笑うだろ
03:09
when I say that, but not on this train. Silence.
ところが その電車の中では
皆んな シーンとして
03:11
And so suddenly they're looking at me.
私の事をジロっと見たんだよ
03:15
So here I am with the couple, the three of us
そして カップルと私の3人は
03:16
shrinking at the foot of Calvary about to be up, you know.
死刑前の囚人みたいに
ちじこまってた
03:19
"Just then I see a baby, a little baby in the lap of a mother.
そしたら母親の膝に乗った
赤ん坊が目に入った
03:23
I know it's Hispanic because she's speaking Spanish to her companion.
話している言葉で
スペイン系だと分った
03:30
So I'm going to talk to the baby. So I say to the baby,
赤ん坊に話しかけようとして
03:35
holding my hand over my mouth because my breath must be 100 proof,
酒臭いだろうから
手で口を覆って
03:38
I say to the baby, 'Sir or Madam,
こう言った 
""お尋ねしますが“
03:42
what is your considered opinion of the human species?'
""人間という生物について
どのような見解をお持ちかね?""
03:46
And the baby looks, you know, the way babies look at you clearly,
赤ん坊は 
こちらを真っすぐに見て
03:51
starts laughing,
笑い始めた
03:53
starts busting out with this crazy little laugh.
そのうち キャッキャと
大笑いし始めた
03:54
I say, 'Thank God for a human reaction, we haven't lost yet.'
私は言った""人の反応だ!良かった
人間はまだ失ってなかった""と
03:57
"But you see, the human touch, you see, it's disappearing.
だが確実に 人間同士のふれあいは
失われつつある
04:01
You know, you see, you've got to question the official truth.
公で真実とされている事に対し
疑いの目を持つべきだ
04:03
You know the thing that was so great about Mark Twain --
マーク・トウェインの素晴らしさは
04:06
you know we honor Mark Twain, but we don't read him.
彼を賞賛はするが 
彼を読んでいる訳ではない
04:09
We read 'Huck Finn,' of course, we read 'Huck Finn' of course.
『ハックルベリー・フィン』は
誰もが読んだ本だろう
04:13
I mean, Huck, of course, was tremendous.
もちろんハックが良いんだよ
04:16
Remember that great scene on the raft, remember what Huck did?
いかだの上での名場面だ
ハックがした事を覚えているかい?
04:18
You see, here's Huck; he's an illiterate kid; he's had no schooling,
ハックは学校に行ってない
無教養な子供だった
04:21
but there's something in him.
けれども 彼の中には
素晴らしい何かがあった
04:24
And the official truth, the truth was, the law was,
公式とされる真実
法律において
04:26
that a black man was a property, was a thing, you see.
黒人はかつて所有物だった
モノ扱いだったんだ
04:29
And Huck gets on the raft with a property named Jim, a slave, see.
ハックが筏の上で その所有物
奴隷のジムと一緒だった
04:32
And he hears that Jim is going to go and take his wife and kids
ジムが子供と妻を連れて逃げる
と聞いて
04:36
and steal them from the woman who owns them,
しかも 内緒で連れ出すと…
04:40
and Huck says, 'Ooh, oh my God, ooh, ooh --
ハックは取り乱して
""神様 どうしよう""
04:42
that woman, that woman never did anybody any harm.
""どうしよう あの女主人は
何も悪い事していない""
04:46
Ooh, he's going to steal; he's going to steal;
""ジムは家族を内緒で連出す… 
これは 盗みだ“
04:49
he's going to do a terrible thing.'
""いけない事をしようとしてる""
04:50
Just then, two slavers caught up, guys chasing slaves, looking for Jim.
2人の奴隷売買者が
ジムを追いかけてやってきた
04:52
'Anybody up on that raft with you?' Huck says, 'Yeah.'
""いかだに誰か乗せたか?""と聞かれ
ハックは ""はい""と答えた
04:57
'Is he black or white?' 'White.' And they go off.
""白人か?黒人か?""
""白人""と答えると2人は去っていった
05:06
And Huck said, 'Oh my God, oh my God, I lied, I lied, ooh,
ハックはうろたえて ""どうしよう 神様""
""嘘をついてしまった""
05:13
I did a terrible thing, did a terrible thing -- why do I feel so good?'
""悪い事をした…でも…なんで
こんなに気分がいいんだ?""
05:17
"But it's the goodness of Huck, that stuff that Huck's been made of,
とても素晴らしい
ハックの良い行いだ
05:22
you see, all been buried; it's all been buried.
色んな良さが葬られてしまった
05:24
So the human touch, you see, it's disappearing.
人間同士のふれあいが
失われつつある
05:26
So you ask about a defining moment --
アメリカ史上の決定的瞬間
と聞かれても
05:29
ain't no defining moment in American history for me.
そんなモノは無いと答えるね
05:31
It's an accretion of moments that add up to where we are now,
一瞬が積み重なって今があるだけだろう
05:33
where trivia becomes news.
ささいな事がニュースとして
取り上げられ
05:36
And more and more, less and less awareness of the pain of the other.
そんなモノが増加する一方で
人への思いやりが消えてゆく
05:38
Huh. You know, I don't know if you could use this or not,
これは当てはまるか知らんが
05:44
but I was quoting Wright Morris, a writer from Nebraska, who says,
ネブラスカ出身の作家
ライト・モーリスはこう言った
05:48
'We're more and more into communications
「コミュニケーションの
方法は増えているが―
05:52
and less and less into communication.'
コミュニケーションでの繋がりは
減っている」
05:55
Okay, kids, I got to scram, got to go see my cardiologist."
この辺でおいとまするよ
心臓の医者との予約があるんだ
06:00
And that's Studs Terkel.
「スタッズ・ターケル」でした
06:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:06
So, talk about risk taking. I'm going to do somebody that nobody likes.
リスクを負うという事を話しましょう
皆が嫌うキャラクターをやります
06:12
You know, most actors want to do characters that are likeable --
役者は好かれる役を演じる事を
好むものですが
06:19
well, not always, but the notion, especially at a conference like this,
いつもという訳ではありません
特に今日のような集まりでは
06:24
I like to inspire people.
人に感銘を与えたいですし
06:27
But since this was called "risk taking,"
でも""リスクを負う""ことを語るには
06:29
I'm doing somebody who I never do, because she's so unlikeable
自分とは全く別の人物を演じます
まったく好まれない人物像で
06:31
that one person actually came backstage
ある人が楽屋に来て
06:35
and told me to take her out of the show she was in.
自分も出る舞台で こんな人物を
演じないでほしいと言われたほどです
06:36
And I'm doing her because I think we think of risk,
リスくを負ってでも
あえて やろうと思います
06:40
at a conference like this, as a good thing.
今日のような集まりでは
受け入れられるのでないでしょうか
06:43
But there are certain other connotations to the word "risk,"
""リスク""にはある暗示的意味があります
06:45
and the same thing about the word "nature." What is nature?
”性質” にも 
これと同じような事が言えます
06:48
Maxine Greene, who's a wonderful philosopher
マキシーヌ・グリーンという
素晴らしい哲学者がいます
06:51
who's as old as Studs, and was the head of a philosophy --
スタッズ氏と同年代で
哲学界のリーダー的存在です
06:54
great, big philosophy kind of an organization --
大きな哲学者の組織のリーダーです
06:58
I went to her and asked her what are the two things
彼女に会って こんな質問をしました
07:02
that she doesn't know, that she still wants to know.
「まだわからず これから知りたいことを
2つ教えて下さい」
07:04
And she said, "Well, personally, I still feel like I have to curtsey
彼女はこう言いました
”自分の方がずっと年上になってしまっても
07:07
when I see the president of my university.
大学の学長に会うと
丁寧にお辞儀しなきゃと感じたり
07:09
And I still feel as though I've got to get coffee
男性の同僚にコーヒーを
入れてあげなきゃといった
07:12
for my male colleagues, even though I've outlived most of them."
義務感にかられるのは何故か
未だに分からないわ”
07:14
And she said, "And then intellectually,
それから ""知的な面では
07:16
I don't know enough about the negative imagination.
マイナスの想像力について
まだ十分わかっていません
07:19
And September 11th certainly taught us
911の事件によって 
マイナスの想像力について
07:22
that that's a whole area we don't investigate."
自分たちは考えてこなかったと
知らされました""
07:24
So this piece is about a negative imagination.
この作品はマイナスの想像力に関するもので
07:26
It raises questions about what nature is, what Mother Nature is,
人間性や自然について
そしてリスクについて
07:29
and about what a risk can be.
考えさせられるものです
07:33
And I got this in the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women.
メリーランドの女性専用の更生施設の
収容者から話を聞きました
07:35
Everything I do is word for word off a tape.
オフレコで聞いた話を再現します
07:37
And I title things because I think people speak in organic poems,
人の言葉は自由詩と同じなので
聞いた話にタイトルをつけます これは
07:40
and this is called "A Mirror to Her Mouth."
「彼女の口に鏡をあてる」
07:44
And this is an inmate named Paulette Jenkins.
ポウレット・ジェンキンズという
収容者のインタビューです
07:45
"I began to learn how to cover it up,
""隠すのが上手くなっていったの
07:56
because I didn't want nobody to know that this was happening in my home.
家の中で起こっている事を
誰にも知られたくなかったから
08:00
I want everybody to think we were a normal family.
普通の家庭だと
思われたかったの
08:05
I mean we had all the materialistic things,
物質的にも
とても恵まれていたわ
08:08
but that didn't make my children pain any less;
でもそれでは
子供達の心の傷は癒えなかった
08:11
that didn't make their fears subside.
彼らの恐れが和らぐ事もなかった
08:14
I ran out of excuses about how we got black eyes
顔中のアザと傷が
どうして出来たか?
08:17
and busted lips and bruises. I didn't had no more excuses.
説明するための嘘も
使い果たしてしまったわ
08:20
And he beat me too. But that didn't change the fact
結局 彼はまた暴力を振るう
何も無かったかのようなふりをしても
08:24
that it was a nightmare for my family; it was a nightmare.
悪夢は消し去れない
家族の悪夢はそのまま
08:27
And I failed them dramatically,
そして 
どんどんエスカレートしていった
08:31
because I allowed it to go on and on and on.
私がそれを許してしまったから
08:33
"But the night that Myesha got killed --
でもメイシャが死んでしまったあの夜
08:37
and the intensity just grew and grew and grew,
激しさが何倍にも増していた
08:39
until one night we came home from getting drugs,
薬を取りに行って帰ってきたら
08:43
and he got angry with Myesha, and he started beating her,
彼がメイシャに対して酷く怒って
殴り始めた
08:48
and he put her in a bathtub. Oh, he would use a belt.
バスタブにあの子を押し込め
ベルトを使って叩いた
08:51
He had a belt because he had this warped perverted thing
彼がベルトを使ったのは
歪んだ変態な妄想で
08:54
that Myesha was having sex with her little brother
メイシャと弟がセックスしたと
08:57
and they was fondling each other -- that would be his reason.
二人が愛し合っていると
思い込んで
08:59
I'm just talking about the particular night that she died.
メイシャが死んだ夜の事を
話しているの
09:01
And so he put her in the bathtub,
だからバスタブに押し込めて
09:05
and I was in the bedroom with the baby.
私は赤ん坊と寝室に居たの
09:08
"And four months before this happened, four months before Myesha died,
メイシャが死ぬ4ヶ月前
09:09
I thought I could really fix this man. So I had a baby by him -- insane --
あの男を治せると思ったの
だから子供を生んだ 狂ってたわ
09:13
thinking that if I gave him his own kid, he would leave mine alone.
血の繋がった子供が出来れば
あの子達から離れると…
09:19
And it didn't work, didn't work.
そうはいかなかった
09:22
And I ended up with three children, Houston, Myesha and Dominic,
ヒューストン、メイシャ、ドミニク
私は3人の子供の母親となった
09:26
who was four months old when I came to jail.
ドミニクが4ヶ月の時
私は刑務所に入った
09:30
"And I was in the bedroom. Like I said, he had her in the bathroom
さっきも言ったけど 寝室にいたの
09:33
and he -- he -- every time he hit her, she would fall.
二人は風呂場にいて
殴られる度に あの子は倒れて
09:35
And she would hit her head on the tub. It happened continuously, repeatedly.
バスタブに頭をぶつけて
何度も何度も
09:40
I could hear it, but I dared not to move. I didn't move.
それが聞こえていた 
なのに何も出来なかった しなかった
09:45
I didn't even go and see what was happening.
様子を見に行く事さえも
しなかった
09:49
I just sat there and listened.
ただ座って聞いていた
09:51
And then he put her in the hallway.
そのうち 彼はあの子を
廊下に連れて来て
09:54
He told her, just set there. And so she set there for about four or five hours.
そこでジッとしているようにと言った
娘は5時間そこに居た
09:59
And then he told her, get up.
それから立つようにと言われた
10:06
And when she got up, she says she couldn't see.
立ち上がったけど
何も見えないと言ってた
10:09
Her face was bruised. She had a black eye.
顔はアザだらけで
目の周りは真っ黒になっていて
10:12
All around her head was just swollen;
頭は腫上がって
10:17
her head was about two sizes of its own size.
2倍の大きさになっていたわね
10:19
I told him, 'Let her go to sleep.' He let her go to sleep.
""もう寝かせてあげて”と言うと
彼は言う事を聞いてくれたけど
10:25
"The next morning she was dead.
翌朝 あの子は死んでいた
10:32
He went in to check on her for school, and he got very excited.
朝 娘を起こしに行った彼は
すごく動揺してた
10:37
He says, 'She won't breathe.'
""息をしてない”と言っていた
10:40
I knew immediately that she was dead.
娘は死んだとすぐ分かったわ
10:42
I didn't even want to accept the fact that she was dead, so I went in
娘が死んだなんて認めたくなかった
だからあの子のところに行って
10:46
and I put a mirror to her mouth --
口元に鏡をあてたの
10:49
there was no thing, nothing, coming out of her mouth.
何もおきない
まったく息をしていなかった
10:51
He said, he said, he said,
彼が…彼が…言ったの
10:55
'We can't, we can't let nobody find out about this.'
""この事は誰にも知られないように
しなくしゃいけない""
10:56
He say, 'You've got to help me.' I agree. I agree.
""助けてくれるよな”って彼が言うから
""わかってる” 言ったの
10:58
"I mean, I've been keeping a secret for years and years and years,
どうせ 何年も秘密を
守ってきたんだから
11:02
so it just seemed like second hand to me, just to keep on keeping it a secret.
それを続ければいいんだって
11:05
So we went to the mall and we told a police that we had, like, lost her,
ショッピングモールに行って
娘が迷子だと警察に言ったの
11:09
that she was missing.
行方不明だって
11:15
We told a security guard that she was missing,
警備員にも
娘が迷子だって伝えたわ
11:18
though she wasn't missing.
嘘をついたの
11:24
And we told the security guard what we had put on her
何を着ているかとかも伝えた
11:26
and we went home and we dressed her in exactly the same thing
家に帰って 
警備員に伝えた通り
11:28
that we had told the security guard that we had put on her.
全く同じ服を着せて
11:31
"And then we got the baby and my other child,
赤ん坊ともう一人の子供を連れて
11:35
and we drove out to, like, I-95.
95号高速へと車を走らせた
11:40
I was so petrified and so numb,
私は呆然としていた
感覚が麻痺していたわ
11:47
all I could look was in the rear-view mirror.
ずっと
バックミラーを見つめていた
11:50
And he just laid her right on the shoulder of the highway.
彼が高速の道路脇に
死んだ娘を置き去りにしたの
11:55
My own child, I let that happen to."
自分の子供を
あんな目に合わせてしまった
12:05
So that's an investigation of the negative imagination.
これはマイナスの想像力についての調査事例でした
12:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:20
When I started this project
”オン・ザ・ロード―
アメリカの人物を探す”
12:25
called "On the Road: A Search For an American Character"
テープレコーダーを持って
このプロジェクトを始めた時
12:27
with my tape recorder, I thought that I was going to go around America
アメリカ中を渡り歩いて
色んな人の話を聞きたいと思いました
12:29
and find it in all its aspects -- bull riders, cowboys, pig farmers,
ロデオ選手やカウボーイ
養豚場主から
12:31
drum majorettes -- but I sort of got tripped on race relations,
バトンガールまで
ですが人種問題で道が逸れて
12:36
because my first big show was a show about a race riot.
私の初の大舞台が
人種暴動の話だったからです
12:40
And so I went to both -- two race riots,
2つの暴動に出向きました
12:43
one of which was the Los Angeles riot. And this next piece is from that.
その一つがロスアンゼルス暴動でした
これから演じるキャラクターは
12:46
Because this is what I would say
そこでのインタビューを元にしたものです
12:49
I've learned the most about race relations, from this piece.
ここでは 人種問題について
色んな事を学びました
12:51
It's a kind of an aria, I would say, and in many tapes that I have.
多くのインタビューの中でも
これはオペラのアリアのようです
12:55
Everybody knows that the Los Angeles riots happened
ロサンゼルス暴動は何故起きたか?
は皆さんご存知ですよね
12:59
because four cops beat up a black man named Rodney King.
ロドニー・キングという黒人男性が
白人警官4人に暴行を受けたからです
13:02
It was captured on videotape -- technology --
これもテクノロジーの恩恵で
それがビデオに撮影され
13:05
and it was played all over the world.
その映像は
世界中に広がったのです
13:07
Everybody thought the four cops would go to jail.
皆が4人の白人警官は
刑務所送りになると思っていたのに
13:09
They did not, so there were riots.
彼らに無罪放免
そして暴動が起きたのです
13:10
And what a lot of people forget, is there was a second trial,
お忘れかもしれませんが
ブッシュ大統領の指示でーー
13:13
ordered by George Bush, Sr.
2度目の裁判が行われました
13:15
And that trial came back with two cops going to jail
その判決では2人の警官は
刑務所行きでしたが
13:17
and two cops declared innocent. I was at that trial.
あと2人は無罪判決が出ました
私は公判を傍聴していました
13:22
And I mean, the people just danced in the streets
次なる暴動を恐れていた人々は
13:25
because they were afraid there was going to be another riot.
浮かれていました
13:27
Explosion of joy that this verdict had come back this way.
逆転判決への喜びが爆発する中
13:29
So there was a community that didn't -- the Korean-Americans,
喜べない人々がいました
韓国系アメリカ人です
13:32
whose stores had been burned to the ground.
暴動によって
店が焼かれてしまった人々です
13:36
And so this woman, Mrs. Young-Soon Han,
ヨン・スンハンさん
13:38
I suppose will have taught me the most that I have learned about race.
人種差別とは何かということのほとんど全てを
この女性から学んだように思います
13:40
And she asks also a question that Studs talks about:
彼女もスタッド氏と同じく
疑問を持っていました
13:44
this notion of the "official truth," to question the "official truth."
公式とされる真実に
疑問を持ち
13:47
So what she's questioning here, she's taking a chance
この場をかりて 問いかけていました
13:50
and questioning what justice is in society.
世間で言われる正義とは何か?
13:52
And this is called, "Swallowing the Bitterness."
「悔しさを飲み込んで」です
13:55
"I used to believe America was the best.
以前はね アメリカが一番と
信じていましたよ
13:59
I watched in Korea many luxurious Hollywood lifestyle movie.
高級なハリウッドの生活を
韓国のテレビで観ていましたからね
14:04
I never saw any poor man, any black.
貧乏人も黒人も
そこにはいなかった
14:12
Until 1992, I used to believe America was the best -- I still do;
1992年まではアメリカが1番と
思っていました 実は今でも…
14:17
I don't deny that because I am a victim.
それは否定できません
私は被害者だから
14:21
But at the end of '92, when we were in such turmoil,
92年の終わり頃 
本当に大変でした
14:25
and having all the financial problems, and all the mental problems,
お金にも困っていたし
精神的にも参ってました
14:30
I began to really realize that Koreans
そこで気付いたのです
私たち韓国人は
14:34
are completely left out of this society and we are nothing.
完全に社会から外れている事を
まるで存在していないみたいに
14:38
Why? Why do we have to be left out?
何で? 
どうして仲間はずれなの?
14:45
We didn't qualify for medical treatment, no food stamp, no GR,
医療費控除、食品援助や一般扶助制度の 
生活保護は一切 受けられなかった
14:48
no welfare, anything. Many African-Americans who never work
多くの働かない
アメリカ黒人が
14:54
got minimum amount of money to survive.
生活最低限のお金を
受け取って生活しているのに
15:01
We didn't get any because we have a car and a house.
車と家があるからって
多額納税者だからって
15:05
And we are high taxpayer. Where do I find justice?
全く国の援助が受けられなかった
不公平じゃないですか?
15:13
"OK. OK? OK. OK.
ですよね
そうでしょ
15:24
Many African-Americans probably think that they won by the trial.
多くのアメリカ黒人は
裁判に勝ったと喜んでいる
15:31
I was sitting here watching them the morning after the verdict,
判決の翌朝
私がここに座って見ていると
15:35
and all the day they were having a party, they celebrated,
皆んな勝利を祝って
一日中パーティーをしていた
15:38
all of South Central, all the churches. And they say,
サウスセントラル地区の教会は
こぞって
15:42
'Well, finally justice has been done in this society.'
やっと社会で公正な行いがされた
と言っていたけど
15:45
Well, what about victims' rights?
暴動の被害者の権利は
どうなっているのでしょう?
15:51
They got their rights by destroying innocent Korean merchants.
黒人達は関係のない韓国人の商店を
破壊して 平等を勝ち取った
15:54
They have a lot of respect, as I do, for Dr. Martin King.
あの人達も私と同じく
キング牧師を尊敬しているのでしょ
16:07
He is the only model for black community; I don't care Jesse Jackson.
彼だけが黒人社会の模範よ
ジェシー・ジャクソンは嫌い
16:14
He is the model of non-violence, non-violence --
キング牧師は非暴力主義の
象徴で
16:21
and they would all like to be in his spirit.
その精神は受け継がれているはず
16:25
"But what about 1992? They destroyed innocent people.
なのに 1992年のあれは何?
関係の無い人々を襲った
16:30
And I wonder if that is really justice
あれが平等を勝ち取るための
16:37
for them, to get their rights in that way.
彼らの正義だと言うのでしょうか?
16:41
I was swallowing the bitterness, sitting here alone and watching them.
悔しさを呑み込んで 
ここで座って彼らを見ているのです
16:48
They became so hilarious, but I was happy for them.
すごくはしゃいで おかしいわ
良かったと思いますよ
16:57
I was glad for them. At least they got something back, OK.
何かを勝ち取る事が出来たのだから
17:04
Let's just forget about Korean victims and other victims
韓国人や他の犠牲者の事は
忘れましょう
17:09
who were destroyed by them.
彼らにめちゃくちゃにされた人がいるという事は
17:16
They fought for their rights for over two centuries,
200年もの間 彼らは
権利をめぐって戦ってきたのだから
17:21
and maybe because they sacrifice other minorities,
ヒスパニック系 アジア系
その他の有色人種達よりも
17:30
Hispanic, Asian, we would suffer more in the mainstream.
苦しい思いをしてきたのだから
17:33
That's why I understand;
彼らの気持ちも分かる
17:38
that's why I have a mixed feeling about the verdict.
だから 今回の判決に関しては
複雑な思いになるのです
17:39
"But I wish that, I wish that, I wish that
でも 出来たら
出来る事なら
17:42
I could be part of the enjoyment.
一緒に祝えたらなと思うのです
17:47
I wish that I could live together with black people.
また黒人達と一緒の地域で
暮らせたらと
17:50
But after the riot, it's too much difference.
でも暴動の後
もうそれは出来ません
17:57
The fire is still there. How do you say it? [Unclear].
まだ火が…何でしたっけ?
18:07
Igniting, igniting, igniting fire. Igniting fire.
種火 種火がそこにはまだあって
18:14
It's still there; it can burst out anytime."
種火がまだあって いつでもまた
激しく燃え盛るかもしれないから…
18:22
Mrs. Young-Soon Han.
ヨン・スンハンさんでした
18:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:36
The other reason that I don't wear shoes
靴を履いてない
もう一つの理由は
18:44
is just in case I really feel like I have to cuddle up
人に寄り添った時
18:48
and get into the feet of somebody,
足を踏んでしまわないように
18:51
walking really in somebody else's shoes.
その人の靴を履いて歩けるように
18:53
And I told you that in -- you know, I didn't give you the year,
さっき年代について
触れませんでしたが
18:55
but in '79 I thought that I was going to go around
79年にアメリカ中を回って
18:58
and find bull riders and pig farmers and people like that,
ロデオ選手や養豚場主達を
探しそうと思いつつ
19:01
and I got sidetracked on race relations.
人種問題へと
横道に逸れて行ってしまったのですが
19:03
Finally, I did find a bull rider, two years ago.
2年前にやっと
ロデオ選手に会う事が叶いました
19:06
And I've been going to the rodeos with him, and we've bonded.
彼とロデオを観に行った訳ですが
仲良くなって
19:09
And he's the lead in an op-ed I did about the Republican Convention.
最近書いた共和党大会の論評の
主要記事は彼についてなのですが
19:12
He's a Republican -- I won't say anything about my party affiliation, but anyway --
彼は共和党支持者です 
私の政党の好みは置いておいて
19:17
so this is my dear, dear Brent Williams,
とにかく 大好きな
ブレント・ウイリアムズの話です
19:22
and this is on toughness,
タフネスについてです
19:26
in case anybody needs to know about being tough
仕事をしている上で
どうやってタフでいられるか
19:27
for the work that you do. I think there's a real lesson in this.
この話の中に
教訓となるものがあるでしょう
19:30
And this is called "Toughness."
タイトルは「タフネス」です
19:33
"Well, I'm an optimist. I mean basically I'm an optimist.
俺はな 基本的に
楽天家なんだよ
19:36
I mean, you know, I mean, it's like my wife, Jolene,
俺のかみさんジョリーンの家族は
19:41
her family's always saying,
口を揃えて いつもこう言うんだ
19:43
you know, you ever think he's just a born loser?
奴が生まれついての敗北者と
思わない?
19:45
It seems like he has so much bad luck, you know.
とにかく運が悪いね
19:47
But then when that bull stepped on my kidney, you know,
でもよ 闘牛が俺の腎臓を
踏みつけたっていうのに
19:49
I didn't lose my kidney -- I could have lost my kidney,
腎臓は無事だったんだぜ
普通なら潰れただろうよ
19:51
I kept my kidney, so I don't think I'm a born loser.
腎臓が無事だったんだよ
だから運が悪いとは思うもんか
19:53
I think that's good luck.
すげぇ幸運じゃねぇか
19:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:56
"And, I mean, funny things like this happen.
こういう面白い事もあったよ
19:58
I was in a doctor's office last CAT scan,
CT検査で医者に行った時
20:00
and there was a Reader's Digest, October 2002.
2002年10月号の
リーダーズ・ダイジェストがあって
20:04
It was like, 'seven ways to get lucky.' And it says
7つの運を上げる方法
という記事があった
20:07
if you want to get lucky,
幸運を得たければ
20:10
you know, you've got to be around positive people.
まず前向きな人と
付き合わなければいけない だってよ
20:11
I mean, like even when I told my wife that you want to come out here
あんたが俺と会って話したい
って言ってると
20:13
and talk to me, she's like, 'She's just talking;
かみさんに言ったら 
口だけよ
20:17
she's just being nice to you. She's not going to do that.'
ただ言っているだけで
本当に来るわけないわよ と言ったんだ
20:19
"And then you called me up and you said you wanted to come out here
でもアンタは本当に電話してきて
インタビューをしたいと言うじゃねぇか
20:21
and interview me and she went and looked you up on the Internet.
それでよ アイツはインターネットで
アンタを調べてこう言うわけよ
20:23
She said, 'Look who she is.
ほら こういう人よ
20:25
You're not even going to be able to answer her questions.'
アンタが彼女の質問に
答えられるもんですか
20:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:29
And she was saying you're going to make me look like an idiot
恥をかくだけだとも言ったぜ
20:33
because I've never been to college,
俺は大学へ行ってないし
20:35
and I wouldn't be talking professional or anything.
専門的な知識もないからと
20:36
I said, 'Well look, the woman talked to me for four hours.
でも 言ってやったぜ
4時間話したってな
20:38
You know, if I wasn't talking -- you know,
もし俺が話をしなかったら
20:40
like, you know, she wanted me to talk,
話を聞きたいと思ってなかったら
20:42
I don't think she would even come out here.'
こんな所まで
やって来ないだろようよ
20:43
"Confidence? Well, I think I ride
自信? 
ただ 乗るだけだよ
20:48
more out of determination than confidence.
自信って言うよりは
肝を据えるってやつだ
20:51
I mean, confidence is like, you know,
自信はな そのな
20:54
you've been on that bull before; you know you can ride him.
あの雄牛に一度乗れたら
また乗れるってな感じかね
20:55
I mean, confidence is kind of like being cocky, but in a good way.
自信ってやつぁ 
いい感じに うぬぼれる感じだな
20:57
But determination, you know, it's like just, you know, 'Fuck the form,
肝を据えるってゆうのはな
つべこべ考えてねぇで
21:01
get the horn.'
角を獲ってやる
21:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:06
That's Tuff Hedeman, in the movie '8 Seconds.'
『8 seconds』のタフ・ヘドマンのセリフだ
21:10
I mean, like, Pat O'Mealey always said when I was a boy,
ガキの頃 
パット・オマリーが言ってたぜ
21:12
he say, 'You know, you got more try than any kid I ever seen.'
他の子供が見た事もない挑戦をしろ
ってな
21:14
And try and determination is the same thing.
挑戦と肝を据えるは
同じ事だ
21:17
Determination is, like, you're going to hang on that bull,
肝を据えるってのはな
何が何でも雄牛にしがみつくだ
21:19
even if you're riding upside down.
下に落ちそうになっても
21:21
Determination's like, you're going to ride
肝を据えて 乗るんだ
21:23
till your head hits the back of the dirt.
頭が泥につくまでな
21:25
"Freedom? It would have to be the rodeo.
自由?
それがロデオってもんだ
21:28
"Beauty? I don't think I know what beauty is.
美しさ? 
美ってやつぁ良くわからんけど
21:32
Well, you know, I guess that'd have to be the rodeo too.
ロデオってのは美しいんじゃねえかな
21:37
I mean, look how we are, the roughy family,
俺らは荒っぽいファミリーだ
21:39
palling around and shaking hands and wrestling around me.
握手をすれば
レスリングが始まるような
21:40
It's like, you know, racking up our credit cards on entry fees and gas.
ガソリンも入場料も
がんがんカードできって
21:43
We ride together, we, you know, we, we eat together
一緒に乗って
一緒に飯喰って
21:46
and we sleep together.
一緒に寝て
21:49
I mean, I can't even imagine what it's going to be like
ロデオを辞める日が来るなんて事は
21:50
the last day I rodeo. I mean, I'll be alright.
想像できねぇよ 
俺は大丈夫
21:53
I mean, I have my ranch and everything,
牧場も持ってるけどよ
21:55
but I actually don't even want to think the day that comes.
ロデオの最後の日なんて
考えたくもねぇ
21:56
I mean, I guess it just be like --
それは その日は
21:59
I guess it be like the day my brother died.
俺の弟が死んだ日みたい
なんじゃねえかな
22:01
"Toughness? Well, we was in West Jordan, Utah, and this bull
タフネス? そうだな
ユタ州のウエストジョーダンで
22:05
shoved my face right through the metal shoots in a --
この雄牛に押しこくられて
22:10
you know, busted my face all up and had to go to the hospital.
金具に顔が打ち当たって
病院に運ばれてよ
22:13
And they had to sew me up and straighten my nose out.
顔中縫って鼻を元に戻したんだよ
22:16
And I had to go and ride in the rodeo that night,
その晩 ロデオに
出なくちゃいけねぇから
22:18
so I didn't want them to put me under anesthesia,
麻酔なしで 
やってもらったんだ
22:20
or whatever you call it. And so they sewed my face up.
その 顔中縫って
22:23
And then they had to straighten out my nose,
鼻を整えるために
22:26
and they took these rods and shoved them up my nose
管を鼻に通すわけよ
22:28
and went up through my brains
それが脳までいっちゃって
22:31
and felt like it was coming out the top of my head,
頭が爆発したみてぇな
感じがしたぜ
22:33
and everybody said that it should have killed me,
ショックで死んでもおかしくないって
皆んな言ってたぜ
22:35
but it didn't, because I guess I have a high tolerance for pain.
でも生きてるぜ
俺ぁ痛みにめっぽう強いんだな
22:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
22:41
But the good thing was, once they shoved those rods up there
でもよ よかったぜ
その管のお陰で
22:44
and straightened my nose out, I could breathe,
鼻が通って 
息が出来るようになったぜ
22:47
and I hadn't been able to breathe
息が出来なかったんだよ
22:49
since I broke my nose in the high school rodeo."
高校の時にロデオで
鼻を折っちまってよ
22:51
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
22:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
22:56
Translator:Makiko Motojima
Reviewer:uub leuro

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Anna Deavere Smith - Actor, playwright, social critic
Anna Deavere Smith's ground-breaking solo shows blur the lines between theater and journalism, using text from real-life encounters to create gripping portraits.

Why you should listen

Hailed by Newsweek as "the most exciting individual in American theater," Anna Deavere Smith uses solo performance as a public medium to explore issues of race, identity and community in America. Her grandfather once told her, "Say a word often enough, and it becomes you."

Inspired by this and Walt Whitman's idea "to absorb America," Deavere Smith began interviewing people (more than 2,000 now) across the country some 20 years ago. Without props, sets or costumes, she translates those encounters into profound performances, each drawing verbatim from the original recorded interview. She has an uncanny ability to inhabit the characters -- or rather the people -- she's representing onstage, regardless of their race, gender or age. And while her approach to cultural commentary is now widely imitated, she remains the master of the form. Her play, Let Me Down Easy, premiered this year at the Long Wharf Theater.

Deavere Smith is perhaps best known for her examination of race relations, having written and performed Fires in the Mirror, a raw view of those affected by the Crown Heights riots of 1991, and Twilight: Los Angeles, which tackled the 1992 Los Angeles riots. Along the way, she's earned two Obies, a MacArthur "genius" grant, and several Tony nominations, while also teaching at Stanford and NYU, and roles on such shows as The West Wing and HBO's Life Support. Her most recent book is Letters to a Young Artist: Straight Up Advice on Making a Life in the Arts, and she is the founding director of the Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue, a group that brings together artists to make works about social change.

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