sponsored links
TED2005

Bjorn Lomborg: Global priorities bigger than climate change

ビヨルン ロンボルグは世界の問題に優先順位をつける

February 2, 2005

500 億ドルを費やすとしたら、どの問題から解決すべきなのでしょうか。エイズ、それとも地球温暖化の問題?デンマークの政治科学者であるビヨルン ロンボルグの答えには驚かされることでしょう。

Bjorn Lomborg - Global prioritizer
Danish political scientist Bjorn Lomborg heads the Copenhagen Consensus, which has prioritized the world's greatest problems -- global warming, world poverty, disease -- based on how effective our solutions might be. It's a thought-provoking, even provocative list. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What I'd like to talk about is really the biggest problems in the world.
私の話は 世界最大の難問についてです
00:24
I'm not going to talk about "The Skeptical Environmentalist" --
「環境論者の懐疑論」については話さないつもりです
00:28
probably that's also a good choice.
それもまた良い話だったでしょうけれど
00:30
(Laughter)
(笑い) しかし
00:32
But I am going talk about: what are the big problems in the world?
世界の重大な問題とは何か について話します
00:33
And I must say, before I go on, I should ask every one of you
その話を始める前にお願いがひとつあります
00:36
to try and get out pen and paper
ペンと紙を出してください
00:39
because I'm actually going to ask you to help me to look at how we do that.
我々のやり方を知っていただきたいと思うのです
00:41
So get out your pen and paper.
ペンと紙のご用意を
00:44
Bottom line is, there is a lot of problems out there in the world.
要するに 世界にはたくさんの問題があります
00:46
I'm just going to list some of them.
そのうち幾つかをリストアップします
00:48
There are 800 million people starving.
8億人の人たちが飢えています
00:50
There's a billion people without clean drinking water.
清潔な飲料水が飲めない人が10億人います
00:52
Two billion people without sanitation.
20億人の人は 衛生施設なしで生活しています
00:54
There are several million people dying of HIV and AIDS.
数百万人がHIVとエイズで亡くなっています
00:56
The lists go on and on.
リストはまだまだ続きます
00:59
There's two billions of people who will be severely affected by climate change -- so on.
20億の人々が気候変動で深刻な影響を受けます ― など
01:01
There are many, many problems out there.
実に多くの問題が山積みです 理想的な世界なら
01:06
In an ideal world, we would solve them all, but we don't.
全ての問題が解決されますが 実際は違います
01:08
We don't actually solve all problems.
問題の全ては解決できません
01:12
And if we do not, the question I think we need to ask ourselves --
となると よく考えなければならない事があります
01:14
and that's why it's on the economy session -- is to say,
この経済セッションで話している理由でもあるのですが
01:18
if we don't do all things, we really have to start asking ourselves,
全部ができないとき どの問題を最初に解決すべきか
01:21
which ones should we solve first?
という問いです
01:24
And that's the question I'd like to ask you.
これが 皆さんに伺いたかった問いかけです
01:26
If we had say, 50 billion dollars over the next four years to spend
仮に 今後4年で500億ドルの費用をかけて
01:28
to do good in this world, where should we spend it?
世界の役に立てるとしたら どこに使うべきなのか
01:33
We identified 10 of the biggest challenges in the world,
ここに世界の重要な問題を10件選びました
01:36
and I will just briefly read them:
これから読み上げていきます
01:39
climate change, communicable diseases, conflicts, education,
地球温暖化 伝染病 紛争 教育
01:41
financial instability, governance and corruption,
金融不安 統治と汚職
01:43
malnutrition and hunger, population migration,
栄養不良と飢餓 移民
01:45
sanitation and water, and subsidies and trade barriers.
衛生と水 補助金と貿易障壁です
01:48
We believe that these in many ways
これらはいろいろな意味で世界の
01:51
encompass the biggest problems in the world.
重要な問題をカバーしていると思います
01:53
The obvious question would be to ask,
自然に生じる質問があります
01:55
what do you think are the biggest things?
最重要な問題は何だと思いますか?
01:57
Where should we start on solving these problems?
どこから これらの問題解決にあたればよいでしょうか?
01:59
But that's a wrong problem to ask.
しかし その問いは間違っています
02:02
That was actually the problem that was asked in Davos in January.
1月のダボス会議でも 実際にそういう事が問われてましたが
02:04
But of course, there's a problem in asking people to focus on problems.
その欠点は 問題にフォーカスさせてしまう事なのです
02:07
Because we can't solve problems.
なぜなら これらの問題は解決できないからです
02:10
Surely the biggest problem we have in the world is that we all die.
この世で最大の問題といえば 誰もがみな死ぬという事です
02:13
But we don't have a technology to solve that, right?
それを解決するだけの技術はありませんよね
02:16
So the point is not to prioritize problems,
大事な事は 問題に順位をつけないで
02:18
but the point is to prioritize solutions to problems.
問題の解決策に優先順位をつける事です
02:21
And that would be -- of course that gets a little more complicated.
そうすると 少し複雑な話になってきます
02:25
To climate change that would be like Kyoto.
地球温暖化であれば 京都議定書が解決策でしょう
02:28
To communicable diseases, it might be health clinics or mosquito nets.
伝染病に対しては 診療所や蚊よけネットです
02:30
To conflicts, it would be U.N.'s peacekeeping forces, and so on.
紛争に対しては 国連の平和維持軍です
02:33
The point that I would like to ask you to try to do,
みなさんにチャレンジしていただきたいのは
02:36
is just in 30 seconds -- and I know this is in a sense
ある意味では 非常に困難なお願いなのですが
02:41
an impossible task -- write down what you think
30秒の間に
02:44
is probably some of the top priorities.
最優先と思う事を書き出してください
02:46
And also -- and that's, of course, where economics gets evil --
そして経済学の不愉快な面ですが
02:48
to put down what are the things we should not do, first.
最初にやるべきではない事を書いてください
02:51
What should be at the bottom of the list?
リストの一番下に来るのは 何でしょうか
02:54
Please, just take 30 seconds, perhaps talk to your neighbor,
30秒です 隣の方とお話して頂いても結構です
02:56
and just figure out what should be the top priorities
何を最優先とすべきか決めてください
02:59
and the bottom priorities of the solutions that we have
世界の重要課題に対する解決策の中で
03:01
to the world's biggest issues.
一番優先順位が低い事も決めてください
03:03
The amazing part of this process -- and of course, I mean,
このプロセスで驚くべきところは --- 実際のところ
03:05
I would love to -- I only have 18 minutes,
18 分しかないので…よろしいでしょうか
03:08
I've already given you quite a substantial amount of my time, right?
考えていただく時間は十分でしょうか
03:10
I'd love to go into, and get you to think about this process,
このプロセスの詳細について 一緒に見て行きましょう
03:12
and that's actually what we did.
これがまさに 我々の実施した事なのです
03:16
And I also strongly encourage you,
我々が実際どうやって優先順位をつけるか
03:18
and I'm sure we'll also have these discussions afterwards,
という事に思いを巡らせて頂きたいし
03:20
to think about, how do we actually prioritize?
今後も議論を続けるつもりです
03:22
Of course, you have to ask yourself,
考えてみれば
03:24
why on Earth was such a list never done before?
この種のリストがこれまで無かったのはなぜでしょうか
03:26
And one reason is that prioritization is incredibly uncomfortable.
ひとつの理由は 優先順位付けは実に不愉快だからです
03:28
Nobody wants to do this.
誰だってやりたくないのです
03:33
Of course, every organization would love to be on the top of such a list.
どの組織も リストの1番になりたいし
03:35
But every organization would also hate to be not on the top of the list.
リストの1番以外にはなりたくないのです
03:38
And since there are many more not-number-one spots on the list
リストには1番以外の順位が沢山あるので
03:41
than there is number ones, it makes perfect sense
こんなリストを作りたくないのも
03:45
not to want to do such a list.
無理はありません
03:48
We've had the U.N. for almost 60 years,
国連の設立後60年ほどたちますが
03:50
yet we've never actually made a fundamental list
我々が世界でできる大事業のすべてを並べ
03:52
of all the big things that we can do in the world,
最初にどれから始めるべきかを示す
03:55
and said, which of them should we do first?
重要なリストが作られた事はありません
03:57
So it doesn't mean that we are not prioritizing --
優先順位をつけていない訳ではありません
04:00
any decision is a prioritization, so of course we are still prioritizing,
全ての決定は何かを優先し 暗黙のうちに
04:03
if only implicitly -- and that's unlikely to be as good
我々は優先順位をつけているわけです
04:07
as if we actually did the prioritization,
我々が行ったように優先順位を付けて 各々を議論した場合ほど
04:10
and went in and talked about it.
よい順位づけになっているとは考えにくいですが
04:12
So what I'm proposing is really to say that we have,
私の提案が明らかにした事があります
04:14
for a very long time, had a situation when we've had a menu of choices.
選択すべきメニューは長い事提示されているのです
04:16
There are many, many things we can do out there,
我々ができる事は メニューにたくさん載っていますが
04:20
but we've not had the prices, nor the sizes.
しかし 値段もサイズも書いてないのです
04:22
We have not had an idea.
それについて見当も付かなかったのです
04:25
Imagine going into a restaurant and getting this big menu card,
レストランに入って大きなメニューを渡されるのですが
04:27
but you have no idea what the price is.
値段の見当が付かない状況を考えてみて下さい
04:30
You know, you have a pizza; you've no idea what the price is.
ピザはありますが 値段の見当もつかないのです
04:32
It could be at one dollar; it could be 1,000 dollars.
1ドルかもしれませんし 1000ドルかもしれません
04:34
It could be a family-size pizza;
家族サイズかもしれませんし
04:36
it could be a very individual-size pizza, right?
小さな一人向けピザかもしれないのです
04:38
We'd like to know these things.
ここのところを知りたいのです
04:40
And that is what the Copenhagen Consensus is really trying to do --
コペンハーゲン コンセンサスの試みでは
04:42
to try to put prices on these issues.
これらの課題に値段をつけようとしています
04:44
And so basically, this has been the Copenhagen Consensus' process.
そこで基本的に こんな手順で進めました
04:47
We got 30 of the world's best economists, three in each area.
世界で最高の経済学者を30人選びました 各領域に3人です
04:50
So we have three of world's top economists write about climate change.
そして 3人の経済学者が地球温暖化についてレポートします
04:54
What can we do? What will be the cost
何ができるか 費用はいくらか
04:57
and what will be the benefit of that?
そのメリットはなにか
05:00
Likewise in communicable diseases.
伝染病についても同様です
05:01
Three of the world's top experts saying, what can we do?
世界のトップエキスパート3人がまとめます
05:03
What would be the price?
何ができて 費用がいくらで
05:06
What should we do about it, and what will be the outcome?
どう行動すべきか そして結果はどうなるか
05:07
And so on.
それぞれの問題についてです
05:10
Then we had some of the world's top economists,
引き続いて また世界最高の経済学者たちの中から
05:11
eight of the world's top economists, including three Nobel Laureates,
3人のノーベル賞受賞者を含んで8人の経済学者が
05:13
meet in Copenhagen in May 2004.
2004年の5月にコペンハーゲンに集まりました
05:17
We called them the "dream team."
いわばドリームチームです
05:20
The Cambridge University prefects decided to call them
ケンブリッジ大学の連中は
05:22
the Real Madrid of economics.
経済学のレアル マドリッドと呼んでいます
05:25
That works very well in Europe, but it doesn't really work over here.
ヨーロッパでは通じますが アメリカではダメですね
05:27
And what they basically did was come out with a prioritized list.
さて 経済学者たちは 優先順位のリストを作り上げました
05:29
And then you ask, why economists?
なぜ経済学者がやるのかと思われるでしょう
05:33
And of course, I'm very happy you asked that question -- (Laughter) --
よくぞ聞いてくれました (笑)
05:35
because that's a very good question.
実にいい質問で誠に喜ばしい
05:37
The point is, of course, if you want to know about malaria,
まず マラリアについて知りたければ もちろん
05:39
you ask a malaria expert.
マラリアの専門家に話を聞くでしょう
05:42
If you want to know about climate, you ask a climatologist.
気候の問題については 気象学者に聞きます
05:44
But if you want to know which of the two you should deal with first,
しかしこれらの問題のどちらを先に取り組むべきか
05:46
you can't ask either of them, because that's not what they do.
という事をどちらに聞いてもわかりません
05:49
That is what economists do.
彼らの仕事ではなく 経済学者の仕事だから
05:52
They prioritize.
優先順位をつける事
05:54
They make that in some ways disgusting task of saying, which one should we do first,
何を先に着手して 何が後かを示すという
05:55
and which one should we do afterwards?
うんざりするような仕事が経済学者の仕事です
06:00
So this is the list, and this is the one I'd like to share with you.
さあ これがそのリストです 皆さんと共有したいと思います
06:02
Of course, you can also see it on the website,
もちろん ウェブサイトでも見られます
06:05
and we'll also talk about it more, I'm sure, as the day goes on.
このリストについてはこれからお話ししていきます
06:07
They basically came up with a list where they said
基本的にこういうリストを作り上げました
06:10
there were bad projects -- basically, projects
中には 「不可」のプロジェクトがあります
06:12
where if you invest a dollar, you get less than a dollar back.
それは投資した1ドルが 返ってこないプロジェクトの事です
06:15
Then there's fair projects, good projects and very good projects.
それから「可」と「良」の そして「優」のプロジェクトがあります
06:18
And of course, it's the very good projects we should start doing.
もちろん「優」のプロジェクトから着手すべきです
06:22
I'm going to go from backwards
さてここでは 下位から進めて
06:24
so that we end up with the best projects.
最後にベストのプロジェクトを見ましょう
06:26
These were the bad projects.
ここに示すのが 「不可」のプロジェクトです
06:28
As you might see the bottom of the list was climate change.
最下位に地球温暖化があります。
06:30
This offends a lot of people, and that's probably one of the things
これには多くの人が気分を害しました
06:34
where people will say I shouldn't come back, either.
私にこの話はしないほうがよいと多くの人が言います
06:38
And I'd like to talk about that, because that's really curious.
でも私はこの話がしたい おかしいと思いませんか
06:40
Why is it it came up?
どうしてこれが問題となったのか
06:42
And I'll actually also try to get back to this
おそらく皆さんに作っていただいたリストと
06:44
because it's probably one of the things
一致しない点だとも思いますので
06:46
that we'll disagree with on the list that you wrote down.
あとでまたこの点にふれます
06:48
The reason why they came up with saying that Kyoto --
京都議定書やその後の提案が
06:50
or doing something more than Kyoto -- is a bad deal
割に合わないという結論になった理由は
06:53
is simply because it's very inefficient.
効率的ではないからです
06:55
It's not saying that global warming is not happening.
地球温暖化が起きていないなどとは申しません
06:57
It's not saying that it's not a big problem.
それが重大な問題ではない というのでもありません
06:59
But it's saying that what we can do about it
これに対してできる事があまりにもわずかで
07:01
is very little, at a very high cost.
そのコストがとても高いという事を述べています
07:03
What they basically show us, the average of all macroeconomic models,
全てのマクロ経済モデルの平均によれば
07:06
is that Kyoto, if everyone agreed, would cost about 150 billion dollars a year.
京都議定書に全ての国が同意したとして 費用は年間1500億ドルです
07:10
That's a substantial amount of money.
実に巨額です
07:15
That's two to three times the global development aid
発展途上国に対する国際的な
07:17
that we give the Third World every year.
開発支援の2倍から3倍になります
07:19
Yet it would do very little good.
それでも ほとんど役にたたないのです どのモデルも
07:21
All models show it will postpone warming for about six years in 2100.
2100年の温暖化の進展を6年遅らせるというのです
07:23
So the guy in Bangladesh who gets a flood in 2100 can wait until 2106.
バングラデシュを襲う2100年の洪水を2106年まで遅らせます
07:27
Which is a little good, but not very much good.
わずかに改善しますが それほど効果的ではありません
07:31
So the idea here really is to say, well, we've spent a lot of money doing a little good.
わずかな改善に 巨額の費用を投入するわけです
07:33
And just to give you a sense of reference,
比較のために言うと
07:38
the U.N. actually estimate that for half that amount,
国連の推計によれば この半額にあたる
07:40
for about 75 billion dollars a year,
年間750億ドルあれば
07:42
we could solve all major basic problems in the world.
世界の主要問題は解決できるとされています
07:44
We could give clean drinking water, sanitation, basic healthcare
清潔な飲料水や 衛生施設 基本的な医療施設
07:47
and education to every single human being on the planet.
教育を地球上で全ての人に提供できるのです
07:50
So we have to ask ourselves, do we want to spend twice the amount
もう一度考えてみてください その2倍のお金を
07:53
on doing very little good?
わずかな効果のために投入するのですか?
07:57
Or half the amount on doing an amazing amount of good?
それとも 半額で 問題解決を驚異的に進めますか?
07:58
And that is really why it becomes a bad project.
そういうわけで「不可」のプロジェクトとしたのです
08:01
It's not to say that if we had all the money in the world, we wouldn't want to do it.
必要なお金が十分あってもやらないと言うのではありません
08:04
But it's to say, when we don't, it's just simply not our first priority.
お金に限りがあるので 優先順位の一番にはなりません
08:07
The fair projects -- notice I'm not going to comment on all these --
ここの全てにコメントはしませんが 伝染病は「可」としました
08:11
but communicable diseases, scale of basic health services -- just made it,
基本的な医療サービスの規模が理由です
08:14
simply because, yes, scale of basic health services is a great thing.
単純に規模の問題です 基本的医療サービスは大掛かりになります
08:18
It would do a lot of good, but it's also very, very costly.
非常に有用ですが また非常に費用がかかります
08:21
Again, what it tells us is suddenly
再度になりますが 方程式の両辺について
08:24
we start thinking about both sides of the equation.
考慮し始めたという事なのです
08:26
If you look at the good projects, a lot of sanitation and water projects came in.
「良」のプロジェクトには 衛生施設と水とが入っています
08:28
Again, sanitation and water is incredibly important,
衛生施設と水も実に重要ですが
08:32
but it also costs a lot of infrastructure.
莫大なインフラ投資が必要になります
08:34
So I'd like to show you the top four priorities
さて トップ4をご紹介します
08:37
which should be at least the first ones that we deal with
これらこそが世界の問題に取り組む事を論ずるときに
08:39
when we talk about how we should deal with the problems in the world.
最初にとりくむべき問題です
08:42
The fourth best problem is malaria -- dealing with malaria.
4位の問題はマラリアです マラリア対策です
08:45
The incidence of malaria is about a couple of [million] people get infected every year.
毎年 [2-3億人] がマラリアにかかります
08:49
It might even cost up towards a percentage point of GDP
感染国では毎年GDPの
08:53
every year for affected nations.
1パーセントにも達する費用が生じています
08:57
If we invested about 13 billion dollars over the next four years,
今後4年間に130億ドルを投資する事で
08:59
we could bring that incidence down to half.
罹患数を半減する事ができます
09:03
We could avoid about 500,000 people dying,
死者を50万人減らせますし もっと重要なのは
09:05
but perhaps more importantly, we could avoid about a [million] people
マラリアの罹患数を1年あたり [1億人]
09:08
getting infected every year.
減らす事ができます
09:11
We would significantly increase their ability
これらの人たちの能力は直面する他の問題に
09:12
to deal with many of the other problems that they have to deal with --
取り組む事ができるようになるわけです
09:14
of course, in the long run, also to deal with global warming.
もちろん いずれは地球温暖化にも取り組むでしょう
09:17
This third best one was free trade.
3位は自由貿易です
09:21
Basically, the model showed that if we could get free trade,
基本的に モデルによれば 自由貿易を維持して
09:24
and especially cut subsidies in the U.S. and Europe,
アメリカとヨーロッパでの補助金を削減できれば
09:27
we could basically enliven the global economy
世界経済を活発化させる事ができ
09:30
to an astounding number of about 2,400 billion dollars a year,
年間2兆4000億ドルという驚異的な数字が達成され
09:34
half of which would accrue to the Third World.
その半分が第三世界の利益となります
09:38
Again, the point is to say that we could actually pull
大事な事は 2-3億人の人を
09:40
two to three hundred million people out of poverty,
2年から5年というすばらしい速さで
09:43
very radically fast, in about two to five years.
貧困から脱却させる事ができます
09:46
That would be the third best thing we could do.
これができる最良の事 第3位です
09:49
The second best thing would be to focus on malnutrition.
2番目は 栄養失調の問題にフォーカスします
09:51
Not just malnutrition in general, but there's a very cheap way
栄養失調の中でも 特に微量栄養素の不足については
09:55
of dealing with malnutrition, namely, the lack of micronutrients.
非常に安価な対処が可能です
09:58
Basically, about half of the world's population is lacking in
基本的に 世界の人口の半数は
10:01
iron, zinc, iodine and vitamin A.
鉄とヨウ素とビタミンAの欠乏に見舞われています
10:04
If we invest about 12 billion dollars,
120億ドルを投資すると
10:06
we could make a severe inroad into that problem.
この問題に対して 効果的な対策が打てます
10:08
That would be the second best investment that we could do.
我々にできる効果的な投資の第2位です
10:11
And the very best project would be to focus on HIV/AIDS.
最良のプロジェクトは HIV/エイズにフォーカスします
10:14
Basically, if we invest 27 billion dollars over the next eight years,
今後8年間に270億ドルを投資する事で
10:19
we could avoid 28 new million cases of HIV/AIDS.
2800万人の新たな HIV/エイズ患者を減らします
10:23
Again, what this does and what it focuses on is saying
ここでも注目してフォーカスすべき事として
10:27
there are two very different ways that we can deal with HIV/AIDS.
HIV/エイズの取組みには二つの異なった方法があります
10:31
One is treatment; the other one is prevention.
一つは治療であり もう一つは予防です
10:34
And again, in an ideal world, we would do both.
そして 理想的な世界であれば両方を行うのですが
10:37
But in a world where we don't do either, or don't do it very well,
両方をできない あるいは十分にはできないときに
10:40
we have to at least ask ourselves where should we invest first.
どちらから投資を始めるのか よく考えなければなりません
10:43
And treatment is much, much more expensive than prevention.
治療には 予防と比べてはるかに費用がかかります
10:47
So basically, what this focuses on is saying, we can do a lot more
そこで 予防に投資する事でより多くを成し遂げられる
10:50
by investing in prevention.
という事にフォーカスしました
10:54
Basically for the amount of money that we spend,
ある金額を使ったときに
10:56
we can do X amount of good in treatment,
治療によってXという効果が得られるときに
10:58
and 10 times as much good in prevention.
予防の効果はその 10 倍です
11:01
So again, what we focus on is prevention rather than treatment,
したがって まず最初にすべき事は
11:04
at first rate.
治療よりも予防に集中する事です
11:07
What this really does is that it makes us think about our priorities.
リストは 我々の優先順位について考えさせるものでした
11:08
I'd like to have you look at your priority list and say,
皆さんにも ご自分の優先順位を見ていただきたいのです
11:12
did you get it right?
同じ結果になっていますか?
11:16
Or did you get close to what we came up with here?
我々のリストと近いリストになっていますか?
11:18
Well, of course, one of the things is climate change again.
もちろん 気候変動がひとつの論点となるでしょう
11:20
I find a lot of people find it very, very unlikely that we should do that.
見込みがわずかでも 温暖化対策は必要と考える人が多いはずです
11:24
We should also do climate change,
地球温暖化にも取り組むべきです
11:27
if for no other reason, simply because it's such a big problem.
これが大変大きな問題だから というだけで理由は十分
11:29
But of course, we don't do all problems.
それでも 全ての問題に取り組めるわけではありません
11:32
There are many problems out there in the world.
世界には実に多くの問題があります
11:35
And what I want to make sure of is, if we actually focus on problems,
お伝えしたい事は ある問題に集中するならば
11:37
that we focus on the right ones.
適切な問題に集中するべきではないか という事です
11:41
The ones where we can do a lot of good rather than a little good.
わずかな改善よりは 多くの成果が得られる問題に集中しましょう
11:43
And I think, actually -- Thomas Schelling,
ドリームチームに参加したトーマス シェリングは
11:46
one of the participants in the dream team, he put it very, very well.
次のように 実にうまい事を言っています
11:49
One of things that people forget, is that in 100 years,
100年後の気候変動のインパクトを論じるときに
11:53
when we're talking about most of the climate change impacts will be,
その時代の人々は今よりもずっと豊かになっているだろう
11:56
people will be much, much richer.
という事が よく忘れられている事の一つです
11:59
Even the most pessimistic impact scenarios of the U.N.
国連のもっとも悲観的な見通しによっても
12:01
estimate that the average person in the developing world in 2100
発展途上国の平均的な国民は 2100年には
12:05
will be about as rich as we are today.
今日の我々と同じ程度には豊かになっているます
12:08
Much more likely, they will be two to four times richer than we are.
今の我々の2から4倍ほど豊かになっているかもしれません
12:10
And of course, we'll be even richer than that.
もちろん 我々はそれ以上に豊かになっているはずです
12:14
But the point is to say, when we talk about saving people,
しかしポイントは 人々を助けるというときに
12:16
or helping people in Bangladesh in 2100,
2100年のバングラデシュの人たちを助けるというときに
12:20
we're not talking about a poor Bangladeshi.
今の貧しいバングラデシュの人の話ではないのです
12:23
We're actually talking about a fairly rich Dutch guy.
かなり裕福な「オランダ人」を助けるのだという事
12:25
And so the real point, of course, is to say,
すなわち 本当のところ
12:27
do we want to spend a lot of money helping a little,
我々は大金を費やして 少々の支援を100年後の
12:29
100 years from now, a fairly rich Dutch guy?
かなり裕福な「オランダ人」に与えたいのでしょうか?
12:33
Or do we want to help real poor people, right now, in Bangladesh,
それとも 今のバングラデシュの本当に貧しく 援助が必要で
12:35
who really need the help, and whom we can help very, very cheaply?
ほとんどお金をかけないで援助できる人々を助けたいのでしょうか?
12:40
Or as Schelling put it, imagine if you were a rich -- as you will be --
あるいは シェリングが述べているのですが あなたが
12:43
a rich Chinese, a rich Bolivian, a rich Congolese, in 2100,
2100年の裕福な中国人やボリビア人 コンゴ人だとして
12:48
thinking back on 2005, and saying, "How odd that they cared so much
2005年の事を振り返って言うのです 「奇妙な事がある
12:53
about helping me a little bit through climate change,
当時の人々は気候変動を心配して 少し支援してくれた
12:59
and cared so fairly little about helping my grandfather
しかし もっと助けを必要としていた我々のじいさんや
13:03
and my great grandfather, whom they could have helped so much more,
ひいじいさんを支援する事もできたのに
13:07
and who needed the help so much more?"
なにもしてくれなかったのだ」
13:10
So I think that really does tell us why it is
この事から 優先順位を正さないと
13:13
we need to get our priorities straight.
いけない理由が分かると思います
13:16
Even if it doesn't accord to the typical way we see this problem.
これまで思われていた普通の見方と違っていたとしても
13:18
Of course, that's mainly because climate change has good pictures.
主な理由の一つとして 気候変動は絵になるのです
13:21
We have, you know, "The Day After Tomorrow" -- it looks great, right?
「デイ アフター トゥモロー」という映画もあります
13:26
It's a good film in the sense that
派手な映画ですよね
13:29
I certainly want to see it, right, but don't expect Emmerich
私だってこれは観たいと思います
13:32
to cast Brad Pitt in his next movie
でもエメリッヒ監督の次の映画で 主演のブラッド ピットが
13:35
digging latrines in Tanzania or something. (Laughter)
タンザニアで便所を掘る映画はどうでしょう (笑)
13:38
It just doesn't make for as much of a movie.
なんとも 絵になりません
13:40
So in many ways, I think of the Copenhagen Consensus
いろいろな意味で コペンハーゲン コンセンサスと
13:42
and the whole discussion of priorities
優先順位をめぐる議論は
13:44
as a defense for boring problems.
退屈な問題にとっての防衛策なのだと思います
13:46
To make sure that we realize it's not about making us feel good.
自己満足のためにするのではなく
13:49
It's not about making things that have the most media attention,
メディアの注目を浴びるためにするのでもなく
13:53
but it's about making places where we can actually do the most good.
一番効果的な事業を進めるための場を確保するための議論です
13:58
The other objections, I think, that are important to say,
触れなければならない重要な反論として
14:01
is that I'm somehow -- or we are somehow -- positing a false choice.
間違った選択をしていないかという論点があります
14:04
Of course, we should do all things,
理想的な世界であれば
14:08
in an ideal world -- I would certainly agree.
全てを行うわけです その事には異論はありません
14:10
I think we should do all things, but we don't.
しかし 実際はそうではない
14:12
In 1970, the developed world decided we were going to spend
1970年代には 先進国は今現在している事の
14:14
twice as much as we did, right now, than in 1970, on the developing world.
2倍の事を発展途上国のためにしようと決めました
14:18
Since then our aid has halved.
その後 援助は半分に減ってしまいました
14:24
So it doesn't look like we're actually on the path
ですから すべての大きな問題が直ちに
14:26
of suddenly solving all big problems.
解決へと向かっているとは思えないのです
14:29
Likewise, people are also saying, but what about the Iraq war?
同様に イラクの戦争はどうなのだ という人もいます
14:31
You know, we spend 100 billion dollars --
1000億ドルを使いました
14:34
why don't we spend that on doing good in the world?
どうして 世界をよくするために その額を使えないのか?
14:36
I'm all for that.
私もまったく同感です
14:38
If any one of you guys can talk Bush into doing that, that's fine.
だれか ブッシュ大統領に言ってやってください ぜひ
14:39
But the point, of course, is still to say,
いや それでも さらに
14:41
if you get another 100 billion dollars,
1000億ドルを使うのなら
14:43
we still want to spend that in the best possible way, don't we?
いちばんいい使い方をしたいですよね
14:45
So the real issue here is to get ourselves back
結局 問題は もう一度考え直して
14:48
and think about what are the right priorities.
適切な優先順位をつける事になるのです
14:50
I should just mention briefly, is this really the right list that we got out?
簡単に述べます 私たちが得たこのリストは本当に正しいのでしょうか?
14:52
You know, when you ask the world's best economists,
世界の最高の経済学者に聞いたという事は 必然的に
14:56
you inevitably end up asking old, white American men.
年配のアメリカ白人に聞いた という事です
14:59
And they're not necessarily, you know,
これが必ずしも世界の全体を俯瞰する最高の手段で
15:02
great ways of looking at the entire world.
あるとは限りません
15:04
So we actually invited 80 young people from all over the world
そこで 実は80人の若者を世界中から集めて
15:08
to come and solve the same problem.
同じ問題を解いてもらいました
15:10
The only two requirements were that they were studying at the university,
たった二つだけ求めた事は 大学で勉強している事と
15:12
and they spoke English.
英語を話す事でした
15:16
The majority of them were, first, from developing countries.
メンバーの大半は 開発途上国から来ました
15:18
They had all the same material but they could go vastly
同じ資料を渡しましたが 議論のスコープがここから
15:21
outside the scope of discussion, and they certainly did,
大幅に外れてもよい事とし 実際にそうなりました
15:23
to come up with their own lists.
そして 独自のリストを作りました 驚くべき事に
15:26
And the surprising thing was that the list was very similar --
リストは とても似たものになりました
15:28
with malnutrition and diseases at the top
栄養不良と病気がトップにあって
15:30
and climate change at the bottom.
地球温暖化が一番下でした
15:33
We've done this many other times.
我々はこれを何度か行いました
15:35
There's been many other seminars and university students, and different things.
セミナーや大学をいろいろと変えて繰り返しても
15:36
They all come out with very much the same list.
いつもほとんど同じようなリストが得られました
15:39
And that gives me great hope, really, in saying that I do believe
ここに大きな希望を見出せます すなわち
15:42
that there is a path ahead to get us to start thinking about priorities,
優先順位を考えれば 前に進む道筋が見えると信じられるのです
15:46
and saying, what is the important thing in the world?
では 世界にとって重要な問題は何でしょう?
15:51
Of course, in an ideal world, again we'd love to do everything.
理想的な世界では 喜んですべてに取り組むのですが
15:53
But if we don't do it, then we can start thinking about where should we start?
そうできないときには 着手する点の検討から始めましょう
15:56
I see the Copenhagen Consensus as a process.
コペンハーゲン コンセンサスではプロセスが重要と考えています
16:00
We did it in 2004,
まず 2004年に行いました
16:02
and we hope to assemble many more people,
そして2008年 2012年には もっと多くの人を集め
16:04
getting much better information for 2008, 2012.
もっとよい情報を集めたいと思います
16:05
Map out the right path for the world --
世界のために正しい道筋を見つけたいのです
16:09
but also to start thinking about political triage.
政治的な緊急度による順位付けも考え始めています
16:11
To start thinking about saying, "Let's do
次のように訴える事を考えてはじめています 「さぁ
16:14
not the things where we can do very little at a very high cost,
ほとんど効果が上がらず 巨額の費用が掛かる事は止めよう
16:16
not the things that we don't know how to do,
どうすればよいか分からない事も止めよう
16:19
but let's do the great things where we can do an enormous
代わりに 世界の役に立つ大切な事で
16:21
amount of good, at very low cost, right now."
費用もかからない事こそを 今すぐ始めよう」
16:24
At the end of the day, you can disagree
最終的に 我々が実際につけた優先順位に対して
16:28
with the discussion of how we actually prioritize these,
同意していただけないかもしれません
16:30
but we have to be honest and frank about saying,
正直かつ率直に言わなければならない事があります
16:32
if there's some things we do, there are other things we don't do.
我々が何かを行ったら 手付かずになる別の事もあります
16:35
If we worry too much about some things,
何か特定の事ばかりを気にしすぎると
16:38
we end by not worrying about other things.
別の事が見えなくなってしまいます
16:40
So I hope this will help us make better priorities,
今日の話が よりより優先順位づけと よりよい世界のために
16:42
and think about how we better work for the world.
何をすべきかを考える事に役立つ事を願います
16:44
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:46
Translator:Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewer:Kayo Mizutani

sponsored links

Bjorn Lomborg - Global prioritizer
Danish political scientist Bjorn Lomborg heads the Copenhagen Consensus, which has prioritized the world's greatest problems -- global warming, world poverty, disease -- based on how effective our solutions might be. It's a thought-provoking, even provocative list.

Why you should listen

Bjorn Lomborg isn't afraid to voice an unpopular opinion. In 2007, he was named one of the 100 Most Influential People by Time magazine after the publication of his controversial book The Skeptical Environmentalist, which challenged widely held beliefs that the environment is getting worse. This year, he was named on of the "50 people who cold save the planet" by the Guardian newspaper. In 2007 he published Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist's Guide to Global Warming, further analyzes what today's science tells us about global warming and its risks. That same year, his next book Solutions for the World's Biggest Problems was released, which provided a summary of the greatest challenges facing humanity. 

In 2004, he convened the Copenhagen Consensus, which tries to prioritize the world's greatest challenges based on the impact we can make, a sort of bang-for-the-buck breakdown for attacking problems such as global warming, world poverty and disease.

It begins from the premise that we can't solve every problem in the world, and asks: Which ones should we fix first?
The Copenhagen Consensus 2004 tapped the expertise of world-leading economists, as well as a diverse forum of young participants; collectively, they determined that control of HIV/AIDS was the best investment -- and mitigating global warming was the worst. Lomborg summarized these findings in How to Spend $50 Billion to Make the World a Better Place. In spring of 2008, Copenhagen Consensus convened again, assembling over 55 international economists, including 4 Nobel laureates, to assess, prioritize and brainstorm solutions for the major global challenges of today, including conflicts, malnutrition, health, education and terrorism. In 2013, he published How to Spend $75 Billion to Make the Wolrd a Better Place.


sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.