18:19
TEDGlobal 2009

Cary Fowler: One seed at a time, protecting the future of food

キャリー・フォウラー: 種を通じて食料の未来を守る

Filmed:

私たちが現在生産している小麦、トウモロコシ、そして米の種類は地球気候変動のため、将来が危ぶまれています。凍える山々に囲まれたノルウェーにある、未来のためのさまざまな種類の食料を蓄えている国際種子バンクをキャリー・フォウラーが紹介します。

- Biodiversity archivist
Biodiversity warrior Cary Fowler wants to save the world from agricultural collapse, one seed at a time. Full bio

I've been fascinated with crop diversity for about 35 years from now,
私が農産物多様性に魅了され始め、もう35年が経ちます。
00:19
ever since I stumbled across a fairly obscure academic article
ジャック ハルラン という人が書いた、目立たないない学術論文に
00:23
by a guy named Jack Harlan.
出会ったのがきっかけでした。
00:28
And he described the diversity within crops --
彼はいろんな種類の小麦やお米など
00:30
all the different kinds of wheat and rice and such --
農産物の多様性は遺伝資源だと
00:33
as a genetic resource.
説明していたんです。
00:36
And he said, "This genetic resource," --
「遺伝子の資源が
00:38
and I'll never forget the words --
私たちと、想像を絶するような
00:41
"stands between us and catastrophic starvation
破滅的飢餓との間に立ちはだかっている」
00:43
on a scale we cannot imagine."
と記されていたのをよく覚えています。
00:46
I figured he was either really on to something,
なんて事いってるんだこの人はと思って、
00:49
or he was one of these academic nutcases.
ちょっとおかしい人なのかなと思ってしまいました。
00:52
So, I looked a little further,
だけど、もっと詳しく調べてみるにつれて
00:54
and what I figured out was that he wasn't a nutcase.
彼がおかしいのではないと気づいたのです。
00:56
He was the most respected scientist in the field.
彼はこの分野では最も著名な科学者でした。
00:59
What he understood was that biological diversity -- crop diversity --
彼によると農産物多様性は、
01:03
is the biological foundation of agriculture.
農業を行う上での生物学的基礎なのだそうです。
01:09
It's the raw material, the stuff, of evolution in our agricultural crops.
農業品種の進化を可能にする素材です。
01:12
Not a trivial matter.
とても大切なことですよ。
01:17
And he also understood that that foundation was crumbling,
さらに彼は、農産物多様性、つまり基礎になるものが壊れだしていると
01:19
literally crumbling.
警告しました。
01:24
That indeed, a mass extinction was underway
実際それは、私たちの畑で大規模な絶滅が起こり、
01:26
in our fields, in our agricultural system.
農業の未来さえ危ないと言うことだったのです。
01:30
And that this mass extinction was taking place
大規模な絶滅が起こり始めていたのに、
01:34
with very few people noticing
それに気づいている人はほとんどいなくて、
01:37
and even fewer caring.
それを心配してる人など、なおさらいなかったのです。
01:39
Now, I know that many of you don't stop
皆さんの多くは農業システムの
01:42
to think about diversity in agricultural systems
多様性について理論的にはご承知と思いますが、
01:44
and, let's face it, that's logical.
実態を見てみましょう。
01:47
You don't see it in the newspaper every day.
でも新聞で毎日見かけるわけでもありません。
01:49
And when you go into the supermarket, you certainly don't see a lot of choices there.
スーパーに行くとそんなに選択肢もないですよね。
01:52
You see apples that are red, yellow, and green and that's about it.
りんごにしても赤いもの、黄色のもの、緑のものが置いてあるだけです。
01:55
So, let me show you a picture of one form of diversity.
多様性の一例を示す写真です。
02:00
Here's some beans,
これは豆ですが、
02:04
and there are about 35 or 40 different
35から40種類もの豆が
02:06
varieties of beans on this picture.
この写真に載っています。
02:10
Now, imagine each one of these varieties as being distinct from another
このひとつひとつ全く違う種で、例えばプードルとグレートデールぐらいに
02:14
about the same way as a poodle from a Great Dane.
違うものと考えてみてください。
02:18
If I wanted to show you a picture of all the dog breeds in the world,
もし世界中のすべての違う種の犬の写真を見せようとしたら、
02:20
and I put 30 or 40 of them on a slide, it would take about 10 slides
ひとつのスライドに30から40種載せたとして、合計スライド10枚くらいかかります。
02:25
because there about 400 breeds of dogs in the world.
だって、だいたい400種類もの犬が世界中にいるんですよ。
02:29
But there are 35 to 40,000 different varieties of beans.
豆だと、3万5千から4万もの違う種類があります。
02:33
So if I were to going to show you all the beans in the world,
だから世界中すべての豆を見せようとして、
02:37
and I had a slide like this, and I switched it every second,
スライドを用意するなら、毎秒違うスライドを見せたとしても、
02:40
it would take up my entire TED talk,
私のTEDスピーチのすべてかかってしまうでしょう。
02:44
and I wouldn't have to say anything.
わたしは何も言わなくって済みますね。
02:46
But the interesting thing is that this diversity -- and the tragic thing is --
恐ろしいことにこの多様性が失われつつあることに
02:50
that this diversity is being lost.
注目してください。
02:55
We have about 200,000 different varieties of wheat,
20万種もの小麦があって、
02:58
and we have about 2 to 400,000 different varieties of rice,
20万から40万種もの米があるのに、
03:02
but it's being lost.
それが減ってきているのです。
03:07
And I want to give you an example of that.
ここで例を挙げましょう。
03:09
It's a bit of a personal example, in fact.
個人的な物になってしまいますけれど。
03:11
In the United States, in the 1800s -- that's where we have the best data --
アメリカでは1880年代の一番いいデータがあるのですが、
03:13
farmers and gardeners were growing 7,100
農家や園芸家の人々は7,100種類の名前つきの
03:18
named varieties of apples.
りんごを育てていました。
03:23
Imagine that. 7,100 apples with names.
7,100もの名前がりんごについていたのですよ。
03:26
Today, 6,800 of those are extinct,
今では、そのうち6,800種類は絶滅してしまって、
03:30
no longer to be seen again.
もう二度とお目にかかることができません。
03:35
I used to have a list of these extinct apples,
りんごの絶滅種についての講演をするときには
03:38
and when I would go out and give a presentation,
絶滅種のリストを持参して
03:40
I would pass the list out in the audience.
会場に回したものでした
03:42
I wouldn't tell them what it was, but it was in alphabetical order,
そこでアルファベット順に書かれているリストの中から、
03:44
and I would tell them to look for their names, their family names,
苗字や旧姓、お母さんの旧姓などを
03:47
their mother's maiden name.
探してごらんと聞くんです。
03:50
And at the end of the speech, I would ask, "How many people have found a name?"
スピーチの終わりに、「名前が見つかった人、何人います?」と聞くと、
03:52
And I never had fewer than two-thirds of an audience hold up their hand.
必ずその場にいる3分の2は手をあげていたものです。
03:56
And I said, "You know what? These apples come from your ancestors,
そうして、「知ってる?このりんごはあなたの先祖から伝わってきて、
04:01
and your ancestors gave them the greatest honor they could give them.
先祖は与えられる最高の名誉として
04:07
They gave them their name.
りんごに自分の名前を与えたのです。
04:12
The bad news is they're extinct.
残念なことに、絶滅してしまいましたけどね。
04:15
The good news is a third of you didn't hold up your hand. Your apple's still out there.
幸いなことに手を上げなかった3分の1の人のりんごはまだ残っています。
04:17
Find it. Make sure it doesn't join the list."
見つけなさい。そしてリストに載らないよう、守りなさい。」と伝えました。
04:22
So, I want to tell you that the piece of the good news is
そして、うれしいニュースなんですが、
04:27
that the Fowler apple is still out there.
フォウラーのりんごは健在なのです。
04:30
And there's an old book back here,
この古い本の
04:35
and I want to read a piece from it.
一節を読みます
04:37
This book was published in 1904.
1904年に出版された本です。
04:44
It's called "The Apples of New York" and this is the second volume.
’’'Apple of New York'’ という本の第二巻です。
04:47
See, we used to have a lot of apples.
言ったとおり、昔はたくさんりんごがあったのです。
04:50
And the Fowler apple is described in here --
フォウラーのりんごがこの本に出てきます。
04:53
I hope this doesn't surprise you --
驚くなかれ、
04:57
as, "a beautiful fruit."
「美しい果物」と記されているんです。
05:01
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
05:03
I don't know if we named the apple or if the apple named us, but ...
僕たちがりんごに名前をつけたのか、りんごが名前をくれたのかわかりませんが、
05:09
but, to be honest, the description goes on
実は続きがあって、
05:13
and it says that it "doesn't rank high in quality, however."
「高品質のりんごではありません」と書かれてしまってるんです。
05:17
And then he has to go even further.
それだけじゃないんです。
05:21
It sounds like it was written by an old school teacher of mine.
なんと、この本は私の古い先生によって書かれたようなのです。
05:23
"As grown in New York, the fruit usually fails to develop properly in size and quality
「ニューヨークで育てられる果物はだいたい形や品質がよくありませんし、
05:26
and is, on the whole, unsatisfactory."
満足できるようなものではない」そうです。
05:32
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
05:34
And I guess there's a lesson to be learned here,
さてここから学ぶべきことがあります
05:42
and the lesson is: so why save it?
それはなぜ守るべきなのか?ということ。
05:44
I get this question all the time. Why don't we just save the best one?
よくこの質問をされます。一番いいのだけを残せばいいじゃない?って。
05:47
And there are a couple of answers to that question.
答えはいくつかあります。
05:51
One thing is that there is no such thing as a best one.
まず一つ目は、一番いいものなどないのです。
05:53
Today's best variety is tomorrow's lunch for insects or pests or disease.
今日最高の種も 虫や病害虫の餌食になれば終わりです
05:57
The other thing is that maybe that Fowler apple
別の答えとして、フォウラーのりんごや
06:02
or maybe a variety of wheat that's not economical right now
今は経済的でない小麦の種でも
06:05
has disease or pest resistance
気候変動とともに生じる病害や虫害に
06:10
or some quality that we're going to need for climate change that the others don't.
他の品種よりも強いかもしれません。
06:12
So it's not necessary, thank God,
そこで フォウラーのりんごは
06:16
that the Fowler apple is the best apple in the world.
世界一でなくてもいいのです。よかった
06:20
It's just necessary or interesting that it might have one good, unique trait.
大切なのはひとつでもユニークな特徴があるということです。
06:23
And for that reason, we ought to be saving it.
というわけで、守っていかなければならないのです。
06:29
Why? As a raw material, as a trait we can use in the future.
理由は?素材として、将来使える特性として
06:32
Think of diversity as giving us options.
多様性は私達に選択肢を与えます。
06:38
And options, of course, are exactly what we need in an era of climate change.
その選択肢はこれから気候変動の時代で、すごく大切になってきますからね。
06:46
I want to show you two slides,
2枚のスライドを見てほしいんですが、
06:53
but first, I want to tell you that we've been working at the Global Crop Diversity Trust
まず世界作物多様性財団で、スタンフォード大学やワシントン大学などの
06:55
with a number of scientists -- particularly at Stanford and University of Washington --
科学者とともに働いているんですが、
06:59
to ask the question: What's going to happen to agriculture in an era of climate change
「気候変動が進む時代、これから農業がどうなっていくのか、
07:03
and what kind of traits and characteristics do we need in our agricultural crops
そしてうまく適応するためにどのような特徴や性質が必要なのか」
07:07
to be able to adapt to this?
という問題に取り組んでいます。
07:11
In short, the answer is that in the future, in many countries,
簡単に言えば、将来的にたくさんの国々で
07:14
the coldest growing seasons are going to be hotter
農作物にとって、今まで一番寒かった季節が
07:18
than anything those crops have seen in the past.
これまでにないほど暖かくなってしまうでしょう。
07:22
The coldest growing seasons of the future,
未来の一番寒い生育期は、
07:25
hotter than the hottest of the past.
過去で一番暑かったときよりも暑くなるでしょう。
07:28
Is agriculture adapted to that?
農業はそれに適応していけるのか?
07:31
I don't know. Can fish play the piano?
わかりません。魚がピアノをひけますか?
07:33
If agriculture hasn't experienced that, how could it be adapted?
もし農業がそれを経験したことがないなら、どう対応したらよいでしょう?
07:36
Now, the highest concentration of poor and hungry people in the world,
現在、世界中で最も貧困と飢餓の密度が高くて、
07:41
and the place where climate change, ironically, is going to be the worst
皮肉にも気候変動の影響がおそらく最悪なのも、
07:45
is in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.
南アジアとサハラ以南のアフリカです。
07:48
So I've picked two examples here, and I want to show you.
ここで2つの例をお見せしましょう。
07:51
In the histogram before you now,
このヒストグラムでは、
07:54
the blue bars represent the historical range of temperatures,
青のバーはこれまでの温度の範囲を示します。
07:56
going back about far as we have temperature data.
データがある限り遡ったものです。
08:00
And you can see that there's some difference
周年ごとに変動があることがわかります。
08:02
between one growing season and another.
違いがあるのがわかりますよね。
08:05
Some are colder, some are hotter and it's a bell shaped curve.
寒い年や暖かい年があって 正規分散の型になっています。
08:07
The tallest bar is the average temperature for the most number of growing seasons.
一番高いところが平均の温度にあたります。
08:10
In the future, later this century, it's going to look like the red,
将来、今世紀後半には、
08:16
totally out of bounds.
今の変動範囲を飛び出します。
08:20
The agricultural system and, more importantly, the crops in the field in India
農業のシステムやさらにはインドの畑の作物が
08:22
have never experienced this before.
このような経験をしたことがないのです。
08:26
Here's South Africa. The same story.
これは南アフリカ。同じ展開です。
08:29
But the most interesting thing about South Africa is
実は南アフリカでは、
08:33
we don't have to wait for 2070 for there to be trouble.
2070年より前に問題は生じます。
08:35
By 2030, if the maize, or corn, varieties, which is the dominant crop --
2030年には南アフリカの食糧の 50 パーセントを支える
08:39
50 percent of the nutrition in Southern Africa are still in the field --
主要作物のとうもろこしは、
08:43
in 2030, we'll have a 30 percent decrease in production of maize
生産量が30パーセントも下がることになります。
08:47
because of the climate change already in 2030.
2030年にはすでに気候が変動しているからです。
08:52
30 percent decrease of production in the context of increasing population,
人口が増え続ける中で、生産量が30パーセント下がるということは
08:56
that's a food crisis. It's global in nature.
食糧危機になるいうことです。世界的にね。
09:00
We will watch children starve to death on TV.
子供たちが飢餓で死んでいくのをテレビで目にするようになるのです。
09:03
Now, you may say that 20 years is a long way off.
今の時点では20年なんてまだまだ先じゃないかと思うでしょう。
09:06
It's two breeding cycles for maize.
とうもろこしの新しい品種を作るのに10年かかるので、
09:09
We have two rolls of the dice to get this right.
修正のチャンス 2 回分ということです。
09:11
We have to get climate-ready crops in the field,
気候に合った作物を植え始めなければいけないし、
09:14
and we have to do that rather quickly.
なるべく急ぐ必要があります。
09:17
Now, the good news is that we have conserved.
いいニュースといえば、保存をちゃんとしてきたことです。
09:21
We have collected and conserved a great deal of biological diversity,
今まで私たちは生物多様性や農業多様性を
09:24
agricultural diversity, mostly in the form of seed,
たくさん保存してきました。
09:26
and we put it in seed banks, which is a fancy way of saying a freezer.
それらを種子バンクに預けて、冷凍保存してきたのです。
09:30
If you want to conserve seed for a long term
もし種を長く保存して、
09:35
and you want to make it available to plant breeders and researchers,
種畜者や研究者の役に立たせたいのなら、
09:38
you dry it and then you freeze it.
種を乾かしてから冷凍するのです。
09:41
Unfortunately, these seed banks are located around the world in buildings
困ったことにこれらの種子バンクは世界のあちこちの脆弱な建物に設置されています。
09:44
and they're vulnerable.
とても価値が高いのです。
09:47
Disasters have happened. In recent years we lost the gene bank,
災害は起こるもの。
09:49
the seed bank in Iraq and Afghanistan. You can guess why.
最近では遺伝子バンク、種子バンクがイラクとアフガニスタンで失われています。理由はお察しのとおり。
09:52
In Rwanda, in the Solomon Islands.
ルワンダ、そしてソロモン島。
09:56
And then there are just daily disasters that take place in these buildings,
種子バンクのビルが通常の災害に見舞われることもあります。
09:58
financial problems and mismanagement and equipment failures,
金銭的な問題や経営の失敗、そして装置の故障と
10:01
and all kinds of things, and every time something like this happens,
いろんなことが起こって、その度に
10:05
it means extinction. We lose diversity.
絶滅が起こるのです。多様性を失ってしまうのです。
10:08
And I'm not talking about losing diversity in the same way that you lose your car keys.
車の鍵を無くすのとは訳が違います。
10:11
I'm talking about losing it in the same way that we lost the dinosaurs:
恐竜の絶滅と同じで、
10:16
actually losing it, never to be seen again.
失われたら最後 二度と戻りません。
10:20
So, a number of us got together and decided that, you know, enough is enough
そこで我々は何人かで集まって、もうたくさんだ
10:22
and we need to do something about that and we need to have a facility
どうにかしなければならないと思い、どこか本当に
10:26
that can really offer protection for our biological diversity of --
生物多様性をしっかり守れる施設が必要だと
10:30
maybe not the most charismatic diversity.
確認しました。
10:35
You don't look in the eyes of a carrot seed quite in the way you do a panda bear,
絶滅に瀕するパンダの方が、絶滅に瀕するニンジンよりも心配かもしれませんが、
10:37
but it's very important diversity.
とても大切な多様性の一部なのです。
10:43
So we needed a really safe place, and we went quite far north to find it.
なので、本当に安全な場所を探すためにかなり北のほうへと行きました。
10:46
To Svalbard, in fact.
実はスバルバードのあたりまで行きました。
10:55
This is above mainland Norway. You can see Greenland there.
ノルウェー本島の北に位置していて、グリーンランドの隣です。
10:57
That's at 78 degrees north.
北緯78度のところにあります。
11:00
It's as far as you can fly on a regularly scheduled airplane.
定期便で行ける最北端の場所なのです。
11:02
It's a remarkably beautiful landscape. I can't even begin to describe it to you.
風景は、とても言葉では言いあらわせないくらいに美しいところです。
11:07
It's otherworldly, beautiful.
まるで別世界で、ただ美しいのです。
11:11
We worked with the Norwegian government
ノルウェーの政府や
11:13
and with the NorGen, the Norwegian Genetic Resources Program,
ノルウェー遺伝子資源プログラム(NorGen)と協力し、
11:16
to design this facility.
この施設を作り上げました。
11:20
What you see is an artist's conception of this facility,
この図は スバルバードの山に建てた施設の
11:22
which is built in a mountain in Svalbard.
概観図です。
11:25
The idea of Svalbard was that it's cold,
寒い場所としてスバルバードを選び
11:28
so we get natural freezing temperatures.
天然の冷凍庫が実現しました。
11:31
But it's remote. It's remote and accessible
人里離れた場所ですが、交通は確保され、
11:34
so it's safe and we don't depend on mechanical refrigeration.
安全で、機械によって凍らせなくてもいいというわけです。
11:38
This is more than just an artist's dream, it's now a reality.
夢のような話ですが、夢ではなくこれが現実なのです。
11:43
And this next picture shows it in context, in Svalbard.
この写真で スバルバードの様子がわかりますね。
11:49
And here's the front door of this facility.
これが施設の正面玄関です。
11:54
When you open up the front door,
この正面のドアを開けると、
11:59
this is what you're looking at. It's pretty simple. It's a hole in the ground.
このようになっています。シンプルでしょ。地面に穴が開いてます。
12:02
It's a tunnel, and you go into the tunnel,
これはトンネルで、中に入ると
12:05
chiseled in solid rock, about 130 meters.
固い岩に 130 メートルのトンネルが穿たれています。
12:08
There are now a couple of security doors, so you won't see it quite like this.
今では安全用のドアがいくつかあり、少し見た目は違います。
12:11
Again, when you get to the back, you get into an area that's really my favorite place.
そして後ろに行くと、私のお気に入りの場所にたどり着きます。
12:15
I think of it as sort of a cathedral.
私にはこれが大聖堂のように見えるんです。
12:20
And I know that this tags me as a bit of a nerd, but ...
これを言うとオタクのように聞こえるかもしれませんが、
12:22
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
12:26
Some of the happiest days of my life have been spent ...
私の人生の最上の日々は
12:29
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
12:32
in this place there.
ここで過ごしました。
12:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:36
If you were to walk into one of these rooms, you would see this.
部屋のひとつに入ると、こんなふうになっています。
12:42
It's not very exciting, but if you know what's there, it's pretty emotional.
地味ですが ここにある物を知る人にとっては感動的です。
12:50
We have now about 425,000
今では約42万5千種類の
12:55
samples of unique crop varieties.
農産物のサンプルが置かれています。
12:59
There's 70,000 samples of different varieties of rice
7万もの違う米の種類が、
13:03
in this facility right now.
この施設には置かれています。
13:07
About a year from now, we'll have over half a million samples.
今から1年すると50万種類のサンプルが増える予定です。
13:10
We're going up to over a million, and someday we'll basically have samples --
そのうち100万に達して、いつの日か
13:13
about 500 seeds --
約500個の種を
13:17
of every variety of agricultural crop that can be stored in a frozen state
それぞれの農産物の種類のために、この施設で冷凍して
13:19
in this facility.
保管する事になるでしょう。
13:24
This is a backup system for world agriculture.
これは世界の農業のためのバックアップシステムです。
13:26
It's a backup system for all the seed banks. Storage is free.
種銀行にとってもバックアップシステムであり、保管は無料です。
13:29
It operates like a safety deposit box.
安全保管庫のような働きを担っているのです。
13:33
Norway owns the mountain and the facility, but the depositors own the seed.
ノルウェイは山と施設を保有していますが、種は預ける者の保有物なのです。
13:36
And if anything happens, then they can come back and get it.
もし何か起こった場合、ここに帰ってきて種を手に入れられるのです。
13:42
This particular picture that you see shows the national collection of the United States,
写真に写っているのは アメリカとカナダの国立の種コレクションと
13:46
of Canada, and an international institution from Syria.
シリアにある国際組織の種コレクションです。
13:50
I think it's interesting in that this facility, I think,
私が興味深いと思うのは、この施設が
13:54
is almost the only thing I can think of these days where countries,
唯一、いろいろな国々が
13:58
literally, every country in the world --
本当にすべての国々が
14:02
because we have seeds from every country in the world --
この施設に種を預けている訳ですから、
14:05
all the countries of the world have gotten together
世界中の国々が一つとなって、
14:07
to do something that's both long term, sustainable and positive.
長期的で、持続可能で、ポジテブな事をやろうとしている場所なのです。
14:10
I can't think of anything else that's happened in my lifetime that way.
私の知る限り他には思い当たりません。
14:16
I can't look you in the eyes and tell you that I have a solution
気候変動や水問題の解決策があるなんて
14:19
for climate change, for the water crisis.
自信を持って口にすることはできません。
14:24
Agriculture takes 70 percent of fresh water supplies on earth.
農業は地球上の70パーセントの淡水を必要とします。
14:29
I can't look you in the eyes and tell you that there is such a solution
エネルギー問題、世界の飢餓、紛争の和平について
14:33
for those things, or the energy crisis, or world hunger, or peace in conflict.
自信を持って口にすることはできません。
14:36
I can't look you in the eyes and tell you that I have a simple solution for that,
ひとつの簡潔な解決法があるとは言えないけれど、
14:41
but I can look you in the eyes and tell you that we can't solve any of those problems
ひとつ言えるのは、このような問題すべては生産物の多様化がなければ
14:44
if we don't have crop diversity.
解決する事はできないと言う事です。
14:50
Because I challenge you to think of an effective, efficient, sustainable
なぜなら、効果的かつ効率的で、持続可能な解決方法が
14:52
solution to climate change if we don't have crop diversity.
生産物多様性もなしにあなたには思いつきますか。
15:00
Because, quite literally, if agriculture doesn't adapt to climate change,
なぜなら、本当に農業が気候変動に対応できなければ
15:04
neither will we.
私達も対応できません
15:10
And if crops don't adapt to climate change, neither will agriculture,
もしも農作物が気候変動に対応できなければ、農業だってできません。
15:12
neither will we.
私たちも。
15:17
So, this is not something pretty and nice to do.
そう、こうする事はかわいらしくも楽しくもない事です。
15:19
There are a lot of people who would love to have this diversity exist
多くの人は、多様性をそのものの価値のために
15:22
just for the existence value of it.
保存したいと考えたりします。
15:25
It is, I agree, a nice thing to do.
それは私も同意できる、やってて楽しい事ですね。
15:27
But it's a necessary thing to do.
だけど、これは必要な事なのです。
15:30
So, in a very real sense, I believe that we, as an international community,
なので実際には、私はみんなが国際コミュニティーとして
15:32
should get organized to complete the task.
一緒になりこの義務を果たすべきだと思うのです。
15:38
The Svalbard Global Seed Vault is a wonderful gift
スバルバード国際種貯蔵庫は素敵な贈り物として
15:41
that Norway and others have given us,
ノルウェーなどから私たちに与えられたのです。
15:44
but it's not the complete answer.
でも完璧な答えではありません。
15:46
We need to collect the remaining diversity that's out there.
まだ収集していない多様な種を集めなければなりません
15:48
We need to put it into good seed banks
そして種銀行に預けて、
15:51
that can offer those seeds to researchers in the future.
将来、研究者に渡せるようにしなければなりません。
15:54
We need to catalog it. It's a library of life,
カタログも作る必要があります。生命の図書館であり、
15:58
but right now I would say we don't have a card catalog for it.
今はカードカタログが整っていません。
16:00
And we need to support it financially.
金銭的サポートもしなければなりません。
16:04
My big idea would be that while we think of it as commonplace
わたしのアイデアとして普通に見られる
16:07
to endow an art museum or endow a chair at a university,
美術館や学校設備の基金と同じように
16:12
we really ought to be thinking about endowing wheat.
小麦のための基金を作ることは意義があると考えています。
16:17
30 million dollars in an endowment would take care
3000万ドルの寄付さえあれば、
16:21
of preserving all the diversity in wheat forever.
小麦のすべての種類を永遠に保存することが可能です。
16:25
So we need to be thinking a little bit in those terms.
そのことを真剣に考えてみてください。
16:29
And my final thought is that we, of course, by conserving wheat,
そして最後に、もちろん、小麦や
16:32
rice, potatoes, and the other crops,
米、芋、そしてほかの種類を保存する事で
16:40
we may, quite simply, end up saving ourselves.
私たち自身を救う事につながるかもしれません。
16:43
Thank you.
ありがとう。
16:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:49
Translated by Hikari Fukuda
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Cary Fowler - Biodiversity archivist
Biodiversity warrior Cary Fowler wants to save the world from agricultural collapse, one seed at a time.

Why you should listen

Tucked away under the snows of the Arctic Circle is the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. Sometimes called the doomsday vault, it's nothing less than a backup of the world's biological diversity in a horticultural world fast becoming homogenous in the wake of a flood of genetically identical GMOs.

For Cary Fowler, a self-described Tennessee farm boy, this vault is the fulfillment of a long fight against shortsighted governments, big business and potential disaster. Inside the seed vault, Fowler and his team work on preserving wheat, rice and hundreds of other crops that have nurtured humanity since our ancestors began tending crops -- and ensuring that the world's food supply has the diversity needed to stand against the omnipresent threats of disease, climate change and famine.

More profile about the speaker
Cary Fowler | Speaker | TED.com