sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2009

Steve Truglia: A leap from the edge of space

スティーブ・トルグリア: スカイダイビング世界記録への挑戦

July 22, 2009

スティーブ・トルグリアは本業で、車をひっくり返したり、火の中を歩いたり、建物から落ちたりします。そこで、スタントをより激しくかつ安全に、そして素晴らしいものにするために、最新技術を推進しています。TEDGlobal 2009では、次に挑戦するスリル満点のスタント、これまでで最も高い成層圏からのスカイダイビングについて、順を追って説明しています。

Steve Truglia - Stuntman
Stuntman and record-setter Steve Truglia is planning perhaps the ultimate high dive: a parachute jump from the edge of space, 120,000 feet (36.5 kilometers) up. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm extremely excited to be given the opportunity
ここでお話しができて
とてもうれしく思います
00:18
to come and speak to you today
今日 皆さまにご紹介するのは
00:21
about what I consider to be
おそらく地球上で最大のスタント
00:23
the biggest stunt on Earth.
おそらく地球上で最大のスタント
00:25
Or perhaps not quite on Earth.
いや 地球上というより
00:28
A parachute jump from the very edge of space.
ほとんど宇宙という所からの
パラシュート降下です
00:30
More about that a bit later on.
詳しくは後ほどにして
00:34
What I'd like to do first is take you through
まず初めに非常に簡潔に
00:36
a very brief helicopter ride of stunts
映画やテレビで使われる
スタントの世界をご案内します
00:38
and the stunts industry in the movies and in television,
映画やテレビで使われる
スタントの世界をご案内します
00:41
and show you how technology
そして 科学技術がいかに
00:44
has started to interface with the physical skills
スタントを行う人の身体能力と
00:46
of the stunt performer
結びつき始めたのか説明します
00:48
in a way that makes the stunts bigger
科学技術はスタントを
より迫力あるものとし
00:50
and actually makes them safer than they've ever been before.
その一方 これまで以上に
安全なものにしました
00:53
I've been a professional stunt man for 13 years.
私は13年間
プロのスタントマンをしています
00:57
I'm a stunt coordinator. And as well as perform stunts
スタント・コーディネーターでもあり
01:00
I often design them.
自らスタントを行なう上
演出も手がけています
01:02
During that time, health and safety has become everything about my job.
仕事中は 常に健康と安全を考えています
01:04
It's critical now that when a car crash happens
現在 カークラッシュの
スタントを行なう場合
01:07
it isn't just the stunt person we make safe, it's the crew.
スタントを行う人に加え
スタッフの安全確保も必須です
01:11
We can't be killing camera men. We can't be killing stunt men.
カメラマンもスタントマンも
死なせられませんし
01:14
We can't be killing anybody or hurting anybody on set,
撮影現場で誰も死なせたり
怪我をさせられません
01:16
or any passerby. So, safety is everything.
通行人もです
だから安全が全てなんです
01:18
But it wasn't always that way.
しかし そうでない時代もありました
01:21
In the old days of the silent movies --
サイレント映画だった昔
01:24
Harold Lloyd here, hanging famously from the clock hands --
時計の針にぶら下がるシーンで有名な
ハロルド・ロイドをはじめ
01:26
a lot of these guys did their own stunts. They were quite remarkable.
多くがスタントを自ら行い
目覚ましいものがありましたが
01:30
They had no safety, no real technology.
安全対策も 技術と呼べるものも
ありませんでした
01:32
What safety they had was very scant.
とても危険な環境でした
01:35
This is the first stunt woman,
こちらは最初のスタートウーマン
01:38
Rosie Venger, an amazing woman.
ロージー・ヴェンガーです
驚くべき女性です
01:40
You can see from the slide, very very strong.
スライドからわかるように
とても強靭な方です
01:42
She really paved the way
彼女はまさに道を開きました
01:44
at a time when nobody was doing stunts, let alone women.
女性はおろか
誰もスタントをやらなかった時代にです
01:46
My favorite and a real hero of mine is Yakima Canutt.
私が憧れ 尊敬するのは
ヤキマ・カヌート
01:48
Yakima Canutt really formed the stunt fight.
彼はスタントにおける
喧嘩のシーンの型を作りました
01:52
He worked with John Wayne and most of those old punch-ups you see
ジョン・ウェインと仕事をし
西部劇の殴り合いシーンでは
01:56
in the Westerns. Yakima was either there or he stunt coordinated.
ヤキマが演出か演技で
必ずスタントに関わっていました
01:59
This is a screen capture from "Stagecoach,"
これは『駅馬車』の
ワンシーンです
02:02
where Yakima Canutt is doing one of the most dangerous stunts I've ever seen.
ヤキマ・カヌートのこのような
危険なスタントは他に類を見ません
02:04
There is no safety, no back support,
本当に危険です
後ろからのサポートや
02:08
no pads, no crash mats, no sand pits in the ground.
パッドや衝撃を吸収するマットも
砂場もありません
02:10
That's one of the most dangerous horse stunts, certainly.
馬を使ったものとしては
最も危険なスタントとも言えるでしょう
02:13
Talking of dangerous stunts and bringing things slightly up to date,
危険なスタントと言えば
もっと最近を見てみると
02:16
some of the most dangerous stunts we do as stunt people are fire stunts.
最も危険な部類に
火を使うスタントがあります
02:19
We couldn't do them without technology.
これは技術の進歩なしにはできません
02:23
These are particularly dangerous
特に危険なのは このような
02:25
because there is no mask on my face.
顔にマスクをつけないものです
02:27
They were done for a photo shoot. One for the Sun newspaper,
『ザ・サン』紙と
『FHM』マガジンのために
02:29
one for FHM magazine.
撮影されたものです
02:31
Highly dangerous, but also you'll notice
非常に危険ですが 皆さんには
02:33
it doesn't look as though I'm wearing anything underneath the suit.
私が服の下に何か着ているようには
見えないでしょう
02:35
The fire suits of old, the bulky suits, the thick woolen suits,
過去の防火スーツはかさばる
厚手のウール製でしたが
02:37
have been replaced with modern materials
最新の原料に取って代わりました
02:40
like Nomex or, more recently, Carbonex --
ノーメックスや
より最近のものではカーボネックスといった
02:43
fantastic materials that enable us as stunt professionals
素晴らしい素材により
スタントマンが安全を確保して
02:46
to burn for longer, look more spectacular, and in pure safety.
より長時間燃え続け
より派手に見せられるようになりました
02:48
Here's a bit more.
もう少し続けます
02:52
There's a guy with a flame thrower there, giving me what for.
火炎放射器で
やられているところです
02:56
One of the things that a stuntman often does,
私たちがよくやるスタントに
02:59
and you'll see it every time in the big movies,
アクション映画では必ずある
03:01
is be blown through the air.
勢いよく吹き飛ばされるシーンがあります
03:03
Well, we used to use trampettes. In the old days, that's all they had.
以前はミニトランポリンを使いました
それしかなかったので
03:05
And that's a ramp. Spring off the thing and fly through the air,
それに傾斜です
そこから空中にジャンプします
03:08
and hopefully you make it look good.
うまくいけばそれらしく見えます
03:10
Now we've got technology. This thing is called an air ram.
今は技術を使います
これはエアラムと呼ばれるものです
03:12
It's a frightening piece of equipment for the novice stunt performer,
スタントを行う初心者にとっては
恐ろしい装置です
03:15
because it will break your legs very, very quickly
乗り方を誤ると ものすごい勢いで
03:18
if you land on it wrong.
脚が折れてしまうからです
03:20
Having said that, it works with compressed nitrogen.
それはさて置き
この装置は圧縮酸素を使用します
03:22
And that's in the up position. When you step on it,
上向きになっていますが
これに乗って
03:25
either by remote control or with the pressure of your foot,
リモコンか自分自身の足の力で
03:27
it will fire you, depending on the gas pressure,
発射します
ガスの圧力に応じて
03:29
anything from five feet to 30 feet.
人間を10メートル近くも 飛ばすことができます
03:31
I could, quite literally, fire myself into the gallery.
実際ここなら
バルコニーまで飛ぶことができます
03:34
Which I'm sure you wouldn't want.
皆さんのご迷惑になるので
03:38
Not today.
今日はやめておきます
03:40
Car stunts are another area
カースタントも技術工学の進歩で
03:42
where technology and engineering
カースタントも技術工学の進歩で
03:44
advances have made life easier for us, and safer.
より楽に安全になりました
03:46
We can do bigger car stunts than ever before now.
以前よりさらに派手な
カースタントも行えます
03:49
Being run over is never easy.
はねられるのは
今でも大変です
03:51
That's an old-fashioned, hard, gritty, physical stunt.
これは昔からある厳しく
勇気のいる荒っぽいスタントです
03:53
But we have padding, and fantastic shock-absorbing things like Sorbothane --
しかしパッドや ソルボセインのような
素晴らしい衝撃吸収材のおかげで
03:56
the materials that help us, when we're hit like this,
こんな風にぶつかっても
04:00
not to hurt ourselves too much.
それほど怪我をすることはありません
04:03
The picture in the bottom right-hand corner there
下側右の写真は 私が行った
04:05
is of some crash test dummy work that I was doing.
ある衝突実験の様子です
04:08
Showing how stunts work in different areas, really.
いろいろなスタントがあるのがわかります
04:10
And testing breakaway signpost pillars.
これは標識柱に突進する実験です
04:13
A company makes a Lattix pillar, which is a network,
Lattix製の支柱を使っています
04:16
a lattice-type pillar that collapses when it's hit.
これは格子状に編まれた柱で
ぶつかると崩れます
04:18
The car on the left drove into the steel pillar.
左側の車は鋼鉄製の柱に突入しました
04:21
And you can't see it from there, but the engine was in the driver's lap.
良く見えませんが
エンジンが運転席まで来ていました
04:24
They did it by remote control.
操作はリモコンで行いました
04:27
I drove the other one at 60 miles an hour, exactly the same speed,
もう一台の車は同じ時速100キロで
私が運転しました
04:29
and clearly walked away from it.
無事 怪我もしませんでした
04:32
Rolling a car over is another area where we use technology.
車の横転にも技術が使われています
04:35
We used to have to drive up a ramp, and we still do sometimes.
従来の方法は 傾斜に乗り上げるもので
これは現在も使います
04:38
But now we have a compressed nitrogen cannon.
しかし今は 圧縮窒素を用いた
カノン砲があります
04:41
You can just see, underneath the car, there is a black rod on the floor
車体下
もう一方の車の車輪の傍に
04:44
by the wheel of the other car.
黒い棒が見えると思います
04:46
That's the piston that was fired out of the floor.
あれは地面から発射されたピストンです
04:48
We can flip lorries, coaches, buses, anything over
大型トラックや客車やバスなど
何でもひっくり返すことができます
04:50
with a nitrogen cannon with enough power. (Laughs)
窒素カノン砲の威力次第です(笑)
04:53
It's a great job, really. (Laughter)
いい仕事なんです 本当に(笑)
04:57
It's such fun!
とても楽しいんです!
05:00
You should hear
店で買い物中に
05:02
some of the phone conversations that I have with people
Bluetoothで
こんな電話をすることもあります
05:04
on my Bluetooth in the shop.
Bluetoothで
こんな電話をすることもあります
05:06
"Well, we can flip the bus over, we can have it burst into flames,
「えーと バスを吹っ飛ばして燃え上がらせて
05:08
and how about someone, you know, big explosion."
誰か爆発させようか」
05:10
And people are looking like this ...
すると周りの人にこんな顔をされます
05:12
(Laughs)
(笑)
05:14
I sort of forget how bizarre some of those conversations are.
こんな会話が異様だなんて
自分では感じなくなっているようです
05:15
The next thing that I'd like to show you is something that
次にお見せしたいのは
05:18
Dunlop asked me to do earlier this year
ダンロップから今年初めに依頼された
05:20
with our Channel Five's "Fifth Gear Show."
Channel 5の『フィフス・ギア』での
スタントです
05:22
A loop-the-loop, biggest in the world.
それは世界最大の宙返りです
05:24
Only one person had ever done it before.
かつて成功した人は一人しかいません
05:26
Now, the stuntman solution to this in the old days would be,
さて 昔ならスタントマンの解決法は
05:28
"Let's hit this as fast as possible. 60 miles an hour.
「スピードを上げられるだけ上げ
時速100キロで
05:30
Let's just go for it. Foot flat to the floor."
思いっきりいこう
アクセルを床まで踏み込んで」
05:33
Well, you'd die if you did that.
まあ それでは死んでしまうでしょう
05:35
We went to Cambridge University, the other university,
そこで あちらの
ケンブリッジ大学に行き
05:37
and spoke to a Doctor of Mechanical Engineering there,
機械工学博士の物理学者と話をしました
05:39
a physicist who taught us that it had to be 37 miles an hour.
彼の計算によると
時速60キロが必要とのことでした
05:43
Even then, I caught seven G
それでも 7Gの重力がかかり
05:46
and lost a bit of consciousness on the way in.
途中でいくらか意識を失いました
05:48
That's a long way to fall, if you get it wrong. That was just about right.
やり損ねて 落ちるには
結構高さがあります
05:51
So again, science helps us, and with the engineering too --
そこでまた科学の出番です
工学もです
05:54
the modifications to the car and the wheel.
車体と車輪を改良しました
05:57
High falls, they're old fashioned stunts.
高所からの落下は
昔ながらのスタントです
05:59
What's interesting about high falls
面白いのは
06:01
is that although we use airbags,
エアバッグを使うのですが
06:03
and some airbags are quite advanced,
いくつかは非常に先進的で
以前とは違い
06:05
they're designed so you don't slip off the side like you used to,
少し着地を誤っても
横に滑り落ちないよう
06:08
if you land a bit wrong. So, they're a much safer proposition.
設計された非常に安全なものです
06:10
Just basically though, it is a basic piece of equipment.
でも根本的には
基本的な機材で
06:12
It's a bouncy castle
空気で膨らませる エア遊具と同じです
06:16
with slats in the side to allow the air to escape.
横のスラットが空気を逃がします
06:18
That's all it is, a bouncy castle.
後はエア遊具と同じです
06:20
That's the only reason we do it. See, it's all fun, this job.
だからやるんです
この仕事は楽しいことだらけです
06:22
What's interesting is we still use cardboard boxes.
面白いのは いまだにダンボール箱を
使っていることです
06:25
They used to use cardboard boxes years ago and we still use them.
何年も前から使われていて
今も使っています
06:28
And that's interesting because they are almost retrospective.
レトロっぽいところが面白いのです
06:31
They're great for catching you, up to certain heights.
ある程度までの高さからなら
その上に飛び降りられます
06:33
And on the other side of the fence,
その一方
06:36
that physical art, the physical performance of the stuntman,
体を使った芸術とも言える
スタントマンの演技が
06:38
has interfaced with the very highest
ITとソフトウェアといった
非常に高度な技術と
06:42
technology in I.T. and in software.
結びつきました
06:45
Not the cardboard box, but the green screen.
ダンボール箱ではなく
グリーンスクリーンを使うジャンプです
06:49
This is a shot of "Terminator," the movie.
これは映画『ターミネーター』の
ワンシーンです
06:52
Two stunt guys doing what I consider to be a rather benign stunt.
2人のスタントマンが
たいしたことないスタントをしています
06:55
It's 30 feet. It's water. It's very simple.
9メートル程の高さから水に
とてもシンプルです
06:58
With the green screen we can put any background in the world on it,
グリーンスクリーンがあれば
あらゆるものを背景にできます
07:00
moving or still,
動いているものでも
止まっているものでも
07:03
and I can assure you, nowadays you can't see the joint.
近頃はつなぎ目など
わかりません
07:05
This is a parachutist with another parachutist doing exactly the same thing.
これは二人のパラシューティストですが
全く同じ事をしています
07:09
Completely in the safety of a studio,
スタジオ内で全く安全です
07:11
and yet with the green screen we can have some moving image that a skydiver took,
あとでスカイダイビングをして
撮影した動画を使って
07:14
and put in the sky moving and the clouds whizzing by.
動く空や飛んで行く雲を合成します
07:17
Decelerator rigs and wires, we use them a lot.
減速装置とワイヤーもよく使用します
07:21
We fly people on wires, like this.
このようにワイヤーで吊って人を飛ばせます
07:24
This guy is not skydiving. He's being flown like a kite,
この人はスカイダイビングをせず
凧のように飛ばされているのです
07:26
or moved around like a kite.
あるいは凧のように動かされています
07:28
And this is a Guinness World Record attempt.
そしてこれは
ギネス世界記録への試みです
07:31
They asked me to open their 50th anniversary show in 2004.
2004年に 50周年記念の
ショーのオープニングに頼まれました
07:34
And again, technology meant that I could do the fastest abseil over 100 meters,
再び技術のおかげで
100メートルを超える最速の懸垂下降をし
07:38
and stop within a couple of feet of the ground
地面から1メートル弱のところで
07:42
without melting the rope with the friction,
ロープを摩擦で溶かさず
止まることができました
07:44
because of the alloys I used in the descender device.
下降用装置に特殊な合金を使ったからです
07:46
And that's Centre Point in London.
ロンドンのセンターポイント・ビルで
行なわれ
07:49
We brought Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road to a standstill.
すぐ傍の交差点は
立ち止まる人で溢れました
07:51
Helicopter stunts are always fun,
ヘリコプターでのスタントは
いつも楽しいものです
07:54
hanging out of them, whatever.
外に吊るされても何でも
07:56
And aerial stunts. No aerial stunt would be the same without skydiving.
あと空中スタントです
スカイダイビングは必須です
07:59
Which brings us quite nicely to why I'm really here today:
ここでうまく本題に戻ります
08:03
Project Space Jump.
プロジェクト・スペース・ジャンプです
08:06
In 1960, Joseph Kittenger of the United States Air Force
1960年 米国空軍の
ジョセフ・キッティンジャーが
08:08
did the most spectacular thing.
すごい事を行いました
08:11
He did a jump from 100,000 feet, 102,000 to be precise,
高度3万メートル 正確には
3万1千メートルから降下です
08:14
and he did it to test high altitude systems
それは2万5千メートルほどの
高度まで上昇する
08:17
for military pilots
新たな航空機で
軍のパイロットが使用する
08:20
in the new range of aircraft that were going up to 80,000 feet or so.
高高度システムの実験として
行いました
08:22
And I'd just like to show you a little footage
それでは 彼が行った当時の映像を
08:25
of what he did back then.
少しお見せしたいと思います
08:27
And just how brave he was in 1960, bear in mind.
1960年 そんな時代に
まったく勇敢でしたね
08:29
Project Excelsior, it was called.
プロジェクト・エクセルシオです
08:34
There were three jumps.
3つのジャンプからなります
08:35
They first dropped some dummies.
まず初めに
ダミー人形をいくつか落とします
08:37
So that's the balloon, big gas balloon.
そしてあれが巨大なガス気球です
08:41
It's that shape because the helium has to expand.
ヘリウムが広がる必要があるため
あの形になっています
08:43
My balloon will expand to 500 times
私の気球は500倍までふくらみ
08:46
and look like a big pumpkin when it's at the top.
限界までふくらますと
大きなカボチャのように見えます
08:49
These are the dummies being dropped from 100,000 feet,
これらは上空3万メートルから
落とされたダミー人形で
08:51
and there is the camera that's strapped to them.
カメラが装着されています
08:53
You can clearly see the curvature of the Earth at that kind of altitude.
あそこまでの高度になると
地球の湾曲がはっきり見えます
08:55
And I'm planning to go from 120,000 feet,
私はというと 3万6千メートルからの
降下を計画しています
08:59
which is about 22 miles.
つまり約36キロです
09:02
You're in a near vacuum in that environment,
ほとんど真空の
09:04
which is in minus 50 degrees.
マイナス50度の環境になります
09:06
So it's an extremely hostile place to be.
極めて過酷な場所です
09:09
This is Joe Kittenger himself.
こちらはジョセフ・キッティンジャーです
09:11
Bear in mind, ladies and gents, this was 1960.
皆さん1960年ですよ
09:13
He didn't know if he would live or die. This is an extremely brave man.
彼は助かるか分かりませんでした
極めて勇敢な男です
09:15
I spoke with him on the phone a few months ago.
数か月前 彼と電話で話をしました
09:18
He's a very humble and wonderful human being.
とても謙虚で素晴らしい人物でした
09:21
He sent me an email, saying, "If you get this thing off the ground
彼からのメールには
「計画が軌道に乗るよう幸運を祈ります」と
09:23
I wish you all the best." And he signed it, "Happy landings,"
書いてありました
「いってらっしゃい」とのサインとともに
09:27
which I thought was quite lovely.
それを見てとても素敵だと思いました
09:30
He's in his 80s and he lives in Florida. He's a tremendous guy.
彼は80代でフロリダに住んでいます
彼はとても素敵な人です
09:32
This is him in a pressure suit.
これは与圧服を着た姿です
09:34
Now one of the challenges of going up to altitude is
さて 高度を上げる挑戦の一つは
09:36
when you get to 30,000 feet -- it's great, isn't it? --
1万メートル近くなると --
すごいですよね?
09:39
When you get to 30,000 feet you can really only use oxygen.
1万メートルになると
酸素に頼るしかありません
09:42
Above 30,000 feet up to nearly 50,000 feet,
1万メートルを超えて
1万5千メートル近くまで上昇すると
09:46
you need pressure breathing, which is where you're wearing a G suit.
補助呼吸が必要になり
耐Gスーツを着用します
09:49
This is him in his old rock-and-roll jeans there,
これは古いロックンロールジーンズを
はいた彼で
09:52
pushing him in, those turned up jeans.
折り返しのあるジーンズをはいています
09:55
You need a pressure suit.
与圧服も必要です
09:57
You need a pressure breathing system
陽圧呼吸システムと
09:59
with a G suit that squeezes you, that helps you to breathe in
締めつけの強い耐Gスーツが必要です
10:01
and helps you to exhale.
それらは呼吸を助けてくれます
10:03
Above 50,000 feet you need a space suit, a pressure suit.
1万5千メートルを超えると
宇宙服のような与圧服が必要になります
10:05
Certainly at 100,000 feet no aircraft will fly.
3万メートルに達すると
航空機など飛べません
10:09
Not even a jet engine.
ジェットエンジン装備のものでも
不可能です
10:13
It needs to be rocket-powered or one of these things,
ロケット動力や非常に巨大な
10:15
a great big gas balloon.
ガス気球のようなものが必要になります
10:17
It took me a while; it took me years to find the right balloon team
この役割を果たす気球をつくるチームを
探すのには苦労し
10:20
to build the balloon that would do this job.
何年もかかりました
10:23
I've found that team in America now.
そのチームは
やっとアメリカで見つけました
10:25
And it's made of polyethylene, so it's very thin.
気球はポリエチレン製で
非常に薄いものです
10:28
We will have two balloons for each of my test jumps,
テスト降下用に2つ気球を用意し
10:30
and two balloons for the main jump, because they
実際の降下用にもう2つ用意します
10:33
notoriously tear on takeoff.
離陸時に破れることは
周知の事実だからです
10:35
They're just so, so delicate.
本当にとても破れやすいです
10:37
This is the step off. He's written on that thing,
これは飛び降りるところです
彼はこのことについて
10:39
"The highest step in the world."
「世界最高度での一歩」と書きました
10:41
And what must that feel like?
それはどんな気分でしょうか?
10:43
I'm excited and I'm scared,
私は興奮と恐怖を同時に
同じ分だけ
10:45
both at the same time in equal measures.
感じています
10:48
And this is the camera that he had on him as he tumbled
これは回転する彼に
取り付けられたカメラの映像で
10:50
before his drogue chute opened to stabilize him.
姿勢を安定させる減速用の
ドローグシュートが開く前の様子です
10:53
A drogue chute is just a smaller chute which helps to keep your face down.
ドローグシュートは顔を下にした姿勢の
維持に役立つ小さなパラシュートです
10:56
You can just see them there, popping open.
ポンと開くのが見られます
10:59
Those are the drogue chutes. He had three of them.
あれらがドローグシュートです
彼は三つ用意しました
11:01
I did quite a lot of research.
私はかなり調査しました
11:04
And you'll see in a second there, he comes back down to the floor.
間もなく地上に戻ってくる姿が見えます
11:07
Now just to give you some perspective of this balloon,
さて気球の大きさを分かっていただきたいのですが
11:11
the little black dots are people.
小さな黒の点々は人です
11:15
It's hundreds of feet high. It's enormous.
高さは60メートルほどあり
巨大なんです
11:17
That's in New Mexico.
ニューメキシコ州で撮影されました
11:19
That's the U.S. Air Force Museum.
これはアメリカ空軍博物館の写真です
11:21
And they've made a dummy of him. That's exactly what it looked like.
彼のダミー人形もあり
当時の状況そっくりです
11:23
My gondola will be more simple than that.
私のゴンドラはあれより
簡素なものになるでしょう
11:25
It's a three sided box, basically.
基本的には
三つの面を持つボックスです
11:28
So I've had to do quite a lot of training.
準備には訓練も欠かせません
11:30
This is Morocco last year in the Atlas mountains,
これは昨年
アトラス山脈が走るモロッコで
11:32
training in preparation for some high altitude jumps.
高高度降下に備えた
トレーニングの写真です
11:34
This is what the view is going to be like
これが高度2万7千メートルからの眺めです
11:37
at 90,000 feet for me.
これが高度2万7千メートルからの眺めです
11:39
Now you may think this is just
さて 皆さんはこれが
11:41
a thrill-seeking trip, a pleasure ride,
スリルを楽しむ冒険だとか
11:43
just the world's biggest stunt.
ただの派手なスタントだと
思うかもしれません
11:45
Well there's a little bit more to it than that.
いや そんなものではありません
11:48
Trying to find a space suit to do this
このスカイダイビング用の
宇宙服を探す過程で
11:50
has led me to an area of technology
当初は思ってもいなかった
11:53
that I never really expected when I set about doing this.
技術領域に導かれました
11:56
I contacted a company in the States
NASA向けにスーツを製造している
12:00
who make suits for NASA.
米国の企業を訪ねました
12:02
That's a current suit. This was me last year with their chief engineer.
あれは最新のスーツです
これは昨年チーフ・エンジニアと撮った写真です
12:04
That suit would cost me about a million and a half dollars.
約150万ドルもするものでした
12:07
And it weighs 300 pounds and you can't skydive in it.
それに重さ140キロ近くで
スカイダイビングはできません
12:11
So I've been stuck. For the past 15 years I've been trying to find a space suit
なかなか難しいものです
過去15年間
12:14
that would do this job, or someone that will make one.
このためのスーツや
製造者を探していました
12:16
Something revolutionary happened
ところが画期的なことが起こりました
12:19
a little while ago, at the same facility.
ごく最近 同じ施設でです
12:21
That's the prototype of the parachute. I've now had them custom make one,
これはパラシュートの試作品で
現在 発注して製造させています
12:24
the only one of its kind in the world. And that's the only suit of its kind in the world.
世界で唯一のものです
これも世界で唯一のスーツ
12:27
It was made by a Russian that's designed
過去18年 ソ連の使用した
12:30
most of the suits of the past
殆どの宇宙服をデザインした
12:32
18 years for the Soviets.
ロシア人によってつくられました
12:34
He left the company because he saw,
彼がその会社を辞めたのは
12:37
as some other people in the space suit industry,
宇宙服産業の他の人たちと同じく
12:39
an emerging market for space suits for space tourists.
宇宙旅行のための宇宙服市場の
出現を見たからです
12:41
You know if you are in an aircraft at 30,000 feet
もし1万メートル上空の航空機で
12:44
and the cabin depressurizes, you can have oxygen.
機内の気圧が下がっても
酸素があれば助かります
12:46
If you're at 100,000 feet you die.
高度3万メートルになると生きられません
12:48
In six seconds you've lost consciousness. In 10 seconds you're dead.
6秒で意識を失い
10秒で命を失います
12:50
Your blood tries to boil. It's called vaporization.
血液が沸騰しようとします
それを気化と言います
12:53
The body swells up. It's awful.
体が膨れ上がります
恐ろしいです
12:55
And so we expect -- it's not much fun.
あまり 楽しいとは言えませんね
12:57
We expect, and others expect,
私たちや他の人たちはこう予想します
13:01
that perhaps the FAA, the CAA
たぶん連邦航空局や民間航空局は
13:04
might say, "You need to put someone in a suit
「膨らまないスーツを着させて
13:06
that's not inflated, that's connected to the aircraft."
航空機につなぐ必要がある」と言うでしょう
13:08
Then they're comfortable, they have good vision, like this great big visor.
この巨大なバイザーをつけ
快適で視界も良好となります
13:11
And then if the cabin depressurizes
もし航空機が降下中に
緊急事態が発生して
13:14
while the aircraft is coming back down,
急に機内の気圧が下がっても
13:16
in whatever emergency measures, everyone is okay.
みんな安全です
13:18
I would like to bring Costa on, if he's here,
さて ここで コスタを呼んで
13:20
to show you the only one of its kind in the world.
世界で唯一のスーツをお見せします
13:23
I was going to wear it,
私が着るつもりでしたが
13:26
but I thought I'd get Costa to do it, my lovely assistant.
すばらしいアシスタントの
コスタにお願いしました
13:28
Thank you. He's very hot. Thank you, Costa.
ありがとう とても暑いです
ありがとうコスタ
13:30
This is the communication headset you'll see
これはコミュニケーションをとるための
ヘッドセットで
13:35
on lots of space suits.
多くの宇宙服に見られます
13:38
It's a two-layer suit. NASA suits have got 13 layers.
これは2層のスーツです
NASAのスーツは13層です
13:40
This is a very lightweight suit. It weighs about 15 pounds.
これはとても軽量なスーツです
重さは約15ポンドです
13:44
It's next to nothing. Especially designed for me.
ほとんど重さを感じません
私専用につくられた
13:48
It's a working prototype. I will use it for all the jumps.
実際に使える試作品です
全ての降下で使う予定です
13:50
Would you just give us a little twirl, please, Costa?
コスタ 少し回ってみてくれる?
13:52
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
13:55
And it doesn't look far different when it's inflated,
膨らませても
違いはほとんど見られません
13:57
as you can see from the picture down there.
この下の写真からわかります
13:59
I've even skydived in it in a wind tunnel,
このスーツを着て
風洞でスカイダイビングもしました
14:01
which means that I can practice everything I need to practice, in safety,
つまり 必要な訓練すべてを
安全に行えるということです
14:04
before I ever jump out of anything. Thanks very much, Costa.
実際に降下する前にです
どうもありがとう コスタ
14:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:09
Ladies and gentlemen, that's just about it from me.
みなさん 私からは以上です
14:13
The status of my mission at the moment
ミッションの現状ですが
14:15
is it still needs a major sponsor.
大きいスポンサーがまだ必要です
14:17
I'm confident that we'll find one.
見つけられると確信しています
14:19
I think it's a great challenge.
偉大なチャレンジだと思います
14:21
And I hope that you will agree with me,
これが地球上で最高のスタントであると
お分かりいただけたらと思います
14:23
it is the greatest stunt on Earth.
これが地球上で最高のスタントであると
お分かりいただけたらと思います
14:25
Thank you very much for your time.
どうもありがとう
14:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:30
Translator:Yuji Tomiyama
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Steve Truglia - Stuntman
Stuntman and record-setter Steve Truglia is planning perhaps the ultimate high dive: a parachute jump from the edge of space, 120,000 feet (36.5 kilometers) up.

Why you should listen

Steve Truglia became a professional stuntman in 1996, after two decades as a reservist in the UK Special Forces. Outside of his stunt work in TV and movies, he's developed a nice line in jaw-dropping records. In 2002, he became the UK's deepest freediver, performing a hold-your-breath dive to 76 meters. In 2004, he set the Guinness World Record for the fastest abseil over 100 meters, covering the distance in 8.9 seconds. And (ouch) he holds the unofficial UK Full Body Burn fire record of 2 mins and 5 secs.

But the stunt he's now training for is the most astonishing of all: He's planning to break the record for extreme-high-altitude parachute jump, from a balloon at 120,000 feet (36.5 kilometers).

Truglia will wear multiple parachutes for the many-stage descent, including a minutes-long freefall through the stratosphere at the speed of sound, while clad in a full spacesuit. And the challenges of this modern jump include more earthly issues -- tweaking equipment, getting permissions, securing funding and gambling on the weather.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.