21:12
TED2004

Eve Ensler: Happiness in body and soul

イヴ・エンスラー: 心と体に宿る幸せ

Filmed:

演劇 ヴァギナモノローグの創作者であるイヴ・エンスラーが、閉経にまつわる友人との談話をきっかけに、性生活を題材とした演劇を作り上げた経緯を話します。そして、それが暴力防止の世界的キャンペーンや彼女自身の幸福探求につながった話を語ります。

- Playwright, activist
Eve Ensler created the ground-breaking "Vagina Monologues," whose success propelled her to found V-Day -- a movement to end violence against women and girls everywhere. Full bio

I bet you're worried.
皆さん心配でしょう
00:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:27
I was worried. That's why I began this piece.
私が心配だったから この芝居を始めました
00:29
I was worried about vaginas. I was worried what we think about vaginas,
私たちがヴァギナ(膣)をどう考えるか心配で
00:33
and even more worried that we don't think about them.
ヴァギナを考えないことがもっと心配だったのです
00:39
I was worried about my own vagina.
自分のヴァギナが心配でした
00:43
It needed a context, a culture, a community of other vaginas.
他のヴァギナの内容や文化や仲間が必要でした
00:45
There is so much darkness and secrecy surrounding them.
ヴァギナに関する暗闇や秘密が多すぎます
00:50
Like the Bermuda Triangle, nobody ever reports back from there.
バミューダトライアングルのごとく 誰も報告はしてくれません
00:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:59
In the first place, it's not so easy to even find your vagina.
第一に 自分のヴァギナを知ることさえ 容易じゃありません
01:00
Women go days, weeks, months, without looking at it.
女性がヴァギナを見ることなく時間が過ぎて行きます
01:04
I interviewed a high-powered businesswoman;
私がインタビューしたキャリアウーマンは
01:07
she told me she didn't have time.
ヴァギナを見る時間はないと言いました
01:09
"Looking at your vagina," she said, "is a full day's work."
彼女曰く “ヴァギナを見るのは一日がかり”
01:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:15
"You've got to get down there on your back, in front of a mirror,
“等身大の鏡の前で仰向けにならないとだめ
01:16
full-length preferred. You've got to get in the perfect position,
完璧な姿勢で完璧な照明があっても
01:19
with the perfect light, which then becomes shadowed by the angle you're at.
自分の影ができてしまう
01:22
You're twisting your head up, arching your back, it's exhausting."
顔をあげて背中を丸めクタクタよ”
01:26
She was busy; she didn't have time.
彼女は忙しくて時間がありませんでした
01:29
So I decided to talk to women about their vaginas.
だから私はヴァギナについて話すことにしました
01:32
They began as casual vagina interviews,
形式ばらないインタビューから始まり
01:35
and they turned into vagina monologues.
ヴァギナモノローグへと発展したのです
01:38
I talked with over 200 women. I talked to older women,
話した女性は200人以上 年配女性
01:41
younger women, married women, lesbians, single women;
若い女性 既婚女性 レズビアン 独身女性
01:45
I talked to corporate professionals, college professors, actors, sex workers;
会社役員 大学教授 女優 娼婦
01:48
I talked to African-American women, Asian-American women,
アフリカ系米国人女性 アジア系米国人女性
01:53
Native-American women, Caucasian women, Jewish women.
ネイティブアメリカン女性 白人女性 ユダヤ人女性
01:57
OK, at first women were a little shy, a little reluctant to talk.
みんな最初はちょっとシャイで気遅れしていたけど
02:01
Once they got going, you couldn't stop them.
話し始めると止められない
02:06
Women love to talk about their vaginas -- they do.
女性は自分のヴァギナについて話すのが大好き
02:09
Mainly because no one's ever asked them before.
そもそも そんな質問をされたことがないからです
02:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:16
Let's just start with the word "vagina" -- vagina, vagina.
ヴァギナという言葉から始めましょう
02:17
It sounds like an infection at best. Maybe a medical instrument.
良くても伝染病か医療用具のような響き
02:22
"Hurry, nurse, bring the vagina."
“看護師さん 急いでヴァギナを”
02:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:29
Vagina, vagina, vagina. It doesn't matter how many times
ヴァギナって何度言っても
02:30
you say the word, it never sounds like a word you want to say.
適切な言葉には絶対聞こえない
02:33
It's a completely ridiculous, totally un-sexy word.
へんてこりんで 全然セクシーな言葉じゃない
02:36
If you use it during sex, trying to be politically correct,
卑猥な言葉を避けようとエッチの最中に
02:41
"Darling, would you stroke my vagina," you kill the act right there.
“ヴァギナをなでて” なんて言ったら そこで大なし
02:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:50
I'm worried what we call them and don't call them.
ヴァギナの呼び方も心配です
02:51
In Great Neck, New York, they call it a "pussy-cat."
ニューヨークのグレイトネックでの呼び方は“猫ちゃん”
02:55
A woman told me there, her mother used to tell her,
ある女性は母親に言われたそう
02:58
"Don't wear panties, dear, underneath your pajamas.
“パジャマの中は何も穿かないでね
03:00
You need to air out your pussy-cat."
猫ちゃんを風にさらさなくちゃ”
03:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:04
In Westchester they call it a "pooky," in New Jersey a "twat."
ウェストチェスターではプーキー ニュージャージーではトワット
03:08
There's powder-box, derriere, a pooky, a poochy, a poopy,
パウダーボックス デリエア プーキー プーチー プーピー
03:13
a poopaloo, a pooninana, a padepachetchki, a pow, and a peach.
プパルー プニナナ パデパチェチキ パウ ピーシュ
03:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:22
There's toadie, dee dee, nishi, dignity, coochie snorcher, cooter,
トーディ ディディ ニシ ディグニティ クーチースノーチャー クーター
03:24
labi, gladis siegelman, va, wee-wee, whore-spot, nappy dugout,
ラビ グラディスシーグルマン ヴァ ウィウィ ホアスポット ナッピーダグアウト
03:29
mungo, ghoulie, powder-box, a "mimi" in Miami,
マンゴ グーリー パウダーボックス マイアミではミミ
03:38
a "split knish" in Philadelphia, and a "schmende" in the Bronx.
フィラデルフィアではスプリットクニッシュ ブロンクスではシュマンディ
03:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:50
I am worried about vaginas.
私はヴァギナが心配です
03:51
This is how the "Vagina Monologues" begins.
このようにヴァギナモノローグが始まりますが
03:53
But it really didn't begin there; it began with a conversation with a woman.
元々は ある女性との会話から始まりました
03:56
We were having a conversation about menopause,
私たちは閉経について話していて
04:02
and we got onto the subject of her vagina --
彼女のヴァギナに話題が移りました
04:05
which you'll do if you're talking about menopause.
閉経の話になれば 自然な成り行きです
04:07
And she said things that really shocked me about her vagina --
彼女は自分のヴァギナが乾き切って
04:09
that it was dried-up and finished and dead -- and I was kind of shocked.
死んでいると言ったので 私は驚きました
04:12
And so I said to a friend casually, "Well, what do you think about your vagina?"
それで 私はヴァギナの質問を友人にすると
04:16
And that woman said something more amazing,
彼女はもっと驚くことを言い
04:19
and then the next woman said something more amazing,
別の女性がさらに驚くことを言い
04:22
and before I knew it, every woman was telling me
ヴァギナの驚く話を
04:24
I had to talk to somebody about their vagina because they had an amazing story,
女性なら誰でも持っていることに気づき
04:26
and I was sucked down the vagina trail.
私はヴァギナの道に引きずり込まれたのです
04:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:32
And I really haven't gotten off it. I think if you had told me
私の活動はまだ続いていますが
04:34
when I was younger that I was going to grow up, and be in shoe stores,
もし幼いころに 将来 買い物中に
04:37
and people were going to scream out, "There she is, the Vagina Lady!"
“ヴァギナの人だ!” なんて言われるとわかってたら
04:40
I don't know that that would have been my life ambition.
それが人生の目標になってたかはわかりません
04:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:46
But I want to talk a little bit about happiness and the relationship
でも 幸せと 8年前に始まった素晴らしい―
04:47
to this whole vagina journey because
ヴァギナの旅との関係を
04:50
it has been an extraordinary journey that began eight years ago.
少し話したいと思います
04:52
I think before I did the "Vagina Monologues"
私は この芝居を始める前
04:55
I didn't really believe in happiness.
幸せの存在を信じていませんでした
04:58
I thought that only idiots were happy, to be honest.
幸せなのはバカだけだと思っていました
05:01
I remember when I started practicing Buddhism 14 years ago,
14年前に仏教徒になったときに
05:04
and I was told that the end of this practice was to be happy,
修行の目標は幸せになることだと言われ
05:08
I said, "How could you be happy and live in this world of suffering
私は言いました “この痛み 苦しみの世界で
05:11
and live in this world of pain?" I mistook happiness for a lot of other things,
いかに幸せになれると?” 私は幸せを無感覚や
05:14
like numbness or decadence or selfishness.
堕落や わがままと取り違えていました
05:20
And what happened through the course of the "Vagina Monologues"
ヴァギナモノローグと この旅から
05:24
and this journey is I think I have come to understand
私は少しだけ 幸せとは何か
05:26
a little bit more about happiness.
理解できるようになりました
05:29
There're three qualities I want to talk about.
3つの本質について話したいと思います
05:31
One is seeing what's right in front of you, and talking about it,
一つは 目の前にあるものを見て 話して 述べること
05:34
and stating it. I think what I learned from talking about the vagina,
ヴァギナの話をする事から学んだのは
05:39
and speaking about the vagina, is it was the most obvious thing --
ヴァギナが体や世界の中心であるのは
05:43
it was right in the center of my body and the center of the world --
明らかなのに
05:46
and yet it was the one thing nobody talked about.
その話には誰も触れないこと
05:49
The second thing is that what talking about the vagina did
二つめはヴァギナの話をすることで
05:52
is it opened this door which allowed me to see
ドアが開いて 世界を向上させる―
05:56
that there was a way to serve the world to make it better.
方法があると気づいたこと
05:59
And that's where the deepest happiness has actually come from.
そこから心からの幸せがもたらされます
06:02
And the third principle of happiness, which I've realized recently.
三つめは最近気がついた幸せの法則です
06:06
Eight years ago, this momentum and this energy, this "V-wave" started --
8年前に “Vウェーブ” という動きが始まりました
06:10
and I can only describe it as a "V-wave" because, to be honest,
正直な話 私も完全に理解していないので
06:14
I really don't understand it completely; I feel at the service of it.
“Vウェーブ” としか描写できませんが 奉仕しているような気分です
06:17
But this wave started, and if I question the wave,
この波に疑問をもったり止めようとしたり
06:21
or try to stop the wave or look back at the wave,
振り返ろうとすると
06:24
I often have the experience of whiplash
首を痛めてしまうけれど
06:27
or the potential of my neck breaking. But if I go with the wave,
波に乗って 身を任せると
06:30
and I trust the wave and I move with the wave, I go to the next place,
前進できるのです
06:34
and it happens logically and organically and truthfully.
必然的で根本的で正直な流れです
06:37
And I started this piece, particularly with stories and narratives,
特にこの芝居は「語り」として始めました
06:40
and I was talking to one woman and that led to another woman
次々に たくさんの女性へと導かれ
06:46
and that led to another woman, and then I wrote those stories down
彼女たちから聴いた話を書きだし
06:49
and I put them out in front of other people.
観客の前で披露しました
06:53
And every single time I did the show at the beginning,
最初は どの公演でも
06:55
women would literally line up after the show
私に伝えたいことがあると
06:57
because they wanted to tell me their stories.
女性が列を作りました
07:00
And at first I thought, "Oh great, I'll hear about wonderful orgasms,
彼らの素晴らしい性生活や
07:03
and great sex lives, and how women love their vaginas."
ヴァギナへの愛着を伝えに来たのだと思いましたが
07:05
But in fact, that's not what women lined up to tell me.
そんなことではありませんでした
07:09
What women lined up to tell me was how they were raped,
彼らの強姦された体験
07:12
and how they were battered, and how they were beaten,
殴られた体験 駐車場で輪姦された体験
07:15
and how they were gang-raped in parking lots,
叔父に犯された体験を
07:18
and how they were incested by their uncles.
伝えに来たのでした
07:20
And I wanted to stop doing the "Vagina Monologues"
ヴァギナモノローグをやめたくなりました
07:22
because it felt too daunting. I felt like a war photographer
恐ろしい光景を写しながら
07:25
who takes pictures of terrible events, but doesn't intervene on their behalf.
介入はしない戦場写真家のような気がしたのです
07:28
And so in 1997, I said, "Let's get women together.
それで1997年に 女性たちが虐げられているという―
07:32
What could we do with this information that all these women are being violated?"
この情報で何ができるのかと考え
07:36
And it turned out, after thinking and investigating,
思案や調査を重ねた結果
07:41
that I discovered -- and the UN has actually said this recently --
国連が最近 発表した内容に行きつきました
07:45
that one out of every three women on this planet
世界中で女性3人のうち1人は
07:48
will be beaten or raped in her lifetime.
一生のうちに殴られるか強姦されるそうです
07:51
That's essentially a gender; that's essentially a resource of the planet, which is women.
本質上 この地球を支えている女性を指しています
07:54
So in 1997 we got all these incredible women together and we said,
それで1997年に 心強い女性たちが集まり
07:59
"How can we use the play, this energy, to stop violence against women?"
演劇と 我々の気力を女性虐待防止に どう利用できるか話し合いました
08:02
And we put on one event in New York City, in the theater,
そしてニューヨークの劇場で
08:07
and all these great actors came -- from Susan Sarandon,
スーザンサランドンやグレンクロース
08:09
to Glenn Close, to Whoopi Goldberg -- and we did one performance
ウーピーゴールドバーグといった大物女優と
08:12
on one evening, and that catalyzed this wave, this energy.
この波と気力を引き起こしたのです
08:15
And within five years, this extraordinary thing began to happen.
5年もしないうちに 驚くべき事が起こり始めました
08:21
One woman took that energy and she said, "I want to bring this wave,
ある女性が “この波と気力を大学に
08:25
this energy, to college campuses," and so she took the play
もたらしたい” と この演劇を大学で広め
08:29
and she said, "Let's use the play and have performances of the play
“年に一度これを上演して 世界中に蔓延する―
08:33
once a year, where we can raise money to stop violence against women
女性に対する暴力を阻止するために
08:36
in local communities all around the world."
お金を集めよう” と言ったのです
08:39
And in one year, it went to 50 colleges, and then it expanded.
その一年後には 50の大学まで広がり
08:42
And over the course of the last six years, it's spread
6年経過するうちに世界中にまで
08:45
and it's spread and it's spread and it's spread around the world.
どんどん広がっていきました
08:48
What I have learned is two things. One: that the epidemic
私が学んだ事は二つあります
08:51
of violence towards women is shocking; it's global;
女性に対する暴力は酷くて 世界中に存在するということ
08:57
it is so profound and it is so devastating,
あまりにも根深くて破壊的で
09:01
and it is so in every little pocket of every little crater,
どの社会でも気づかない場所で行われています
09:03
of every little society, that we don't even recognize it
普通になってしまったがゆえに
09:06
because it's become ordinary. This journey has taken me to Afghanistan,
気がつきもしません この旅で私はアフガニスタンの
09:08
where I had the extraordinary honor and privilege to go into
タリバン政権下にある場所へ行く機会に恵まれ
09:14
parts of Afghanistan under the Taliban -- I was dressed in a burqa --
私はブルカをかぶり アフガニスタン女性革命協会と呼ばれる
09:19
and I went in with an extraordinary group called the
素晴らしい団体と共に
09:22
Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan,
どのように現地の女性が あらゆる権利を
09:25
and I saw firsthand how women had been stripped
剥奪されているか 直接見て来ました
09:28
of every single right that was possible to strip women of --
教育や雇用の機会を奪われ
09:31
from being educated, to being employed, to being
アイスクリームを食べることさえ
09:35
actually allowed to eat ice cream.
認められていません
09:39
For those of you who don't know it, it was illegal to eat ice cream under the Taliban.
タリバン政権下で アイスクリームを食べるのは違法です
09:41
And I actually saw and met women who had been flogged
実際にバニラアイスを食べて捕まり
09:44
by being caught eating vanilla ice cream.
ムチ打ちの刑になった女性と会いました
09:48
And I was taken to the secret ice cream-eating place in a little town,
私は小さな町の秘密のアイスクリーム屋さんに連れて行かれ
09:51
where we went to a back room, and women were seated
奥の部屋に入り 席に着くと カーテンが閉められ
09:55
and a curtain was pulled around us, and they were served vanilla ice cream.
アイスクリームが出されました 女性たちは
09:58
And women lifted their burqas and ate this ice cream,
ブルカを脱いでアイスクリームを食べたのです
10:02
and I don't think I ever understood pleasure until that moment,
女性にとって喜びが いかに得がたい貴重なものか
10:05
and how women have found a way to keep their pleasure alive.
私はそれまで理解していなかったと思います
10:08
It has taken me, this journey, to Islamabad, where I have
この旅で私はイスラマバードへ行き
10:12
witnessed and met women with their faces melted off.
顔を溶かされた女性たちと会いました
10:15
It has taken me to Juarez, Mexico, where I was a week ago,
1週間前はメキシコのフアレスへ行き
10:18
where I have literally been there in parking lots
ある駐車場に流れ着いた女性の骨や
10:22
where bones of women have washed up and been dumped
コーラ瓶の隣に捨てられた―
10:25
next to Coca-Cola bottles.
女性の骨を見ました
10:28
It has taken me to universities
全米の大学へ行き
10:31
all over this country where girls are date-raped and drugged.
デートで薬を飲まされ強姦された女の子たちに会いました
10:33
I have seen terrible, terrible, terrible violence.
あまりにも酷すぎる暴力を見てきました
10:36
But I have also recognized, in the course of seeing that violence,
でも そのような暴力を見る中で気がついたのは
10:40
that being in the face of things and seeing actually
目の前にある事実と向き合うことで
10:44
what's in front of us is the antidote to depression and to a feeling
落ち込んだ気分や自尊心の欠如から
10:47
that one is worthless and has no value.
解放されるということです
10:53
Because before the "Vagina Monologues,"
と言うのも ヴァギナモノローグを始める前
10:55
I will say that 80 percent of my consciousness was closed off
自分の意識の8割は この現実で起こっていることを
10:57
to what was really going on in this reality.
受けつけていませんでした
11:00
And that closing-off closed off my vitality and my life energy.
せき止めることで 自分の活力や生命力をせき止めていました
11:03
What has also happened is in the course of these travels --
このような素晴らしい旅の中で起こったことは
11:08
and it's been an extraordinary thing -- is that every single place
旅した世界中の どの場所でも
11:10
that I have gone to in the world, I have met a new species.
新しい人間に出会ったということです
11:14
And I really love hearing about all these species at the bottom of the sea.
海にも様々な生き物がいるように
11:17
And I was thinking about how being with these
このパネルにいる素晴らしい人たちと
11:21
extraordinary people on this particular panel
一緒にいることを考えていたら
11:23
that it's beneath, beyond, and between,
ヴァギナがすべてのカテゴリーに
11:26
and the vagina kind of fits into all those categories.
あてはまることに気づきました
11:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:32
But one of the things I've seen is this species --
私が見たものの一つは
11:33
and it is a species, and it is a new paradigm,
この人達は新しい模範だということです
11:36
and it doesn't get reported in the press or in the media
良いニュースはニュースになりにくく
11:39
because I don't think good news ever is news,
マスコミで報道されることはありません
11:41
and I don't think people who are transforming the planet
また 地球を変えている人たちが
11:45
are what gets the ratings on TV shows.
テレビで高い視聴率を得ている人だとは思いません
11:47
But every single country I have been to -- and in the last six years
過去6年に 小さな村や町や市と
11:50
I've been to about 45 countries, and many tiny little villages and cities and towns --
約45カ国回りましたが どの国でも
11:53
I have seen something what I've come to call "vagina warriors."
私が“ヴァギナ勇士” と呼ぶようになった人たちと出会いました
11:58
A "vagina warrior" is a woman, or a vagina-friendly man,
ヴァギナ勇士とは信じ難い暴力を目撃 または経験した女性
12:02
who has witnessed incredible violence or suffered it,
もしくはヴァギナに理解のある男性を指し
12:06
and rather than getting an AK-47 or a weapon of mass destruction
ライフルや大量破壊兵器や山刀を使うのではなく
12:10
or a machete, they hold the violence in their bodies;
むしろ暴力を体の中に抑え 悲しみ 体験して
12:14
they grieve it; they experience it; and then they go out and devote
他の人には同じことが起こらないように
12:19
their lives to making sure it doesn't happen to anybody else.
自らの人生をかける人たちです
12:24
I have met these women everywhere on the planet.
そんな女性たちに世界中で会いました
12:28
And I want to tell a few stories because I believe that
情報を伝達することで
12:31
stories are the way that we transmit information,
物語は体内に入り込みます
12:33
where it goes into our bodies. And I think that one of the things
TEDに参加する興味深いことの一つは
12:36
about being at TED that's been very interesting
私は体の中に生きていて
12:39
is that I live in my body a lot, and I don't live in my head very much anymore.
もう頭の中に住んでいませんが
12:42
And this is a very heady place.
ここは刺激があって
12:46
And it's been really interesting to be in my head
頭を使う面白さが感じられます
12:48
for the last two days; I've been very disoriented --
この二日間 とっても混乱した状態です
12:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:53
because I think the world, the V-world, is very much in your body.
と言うのも Vワールドは 人間の体の中にあるからです
12:54
It's a body world, and the species really exists in the body,
肉体の世界に この人達はいるのです
12:58
and I think there's a real significance in us
真の重要性は
13:02
attaching our bodies to our heads -- that that separation
体と頭のシンクロにあると思います
13:04
has created a divide that is often separating purpose from intent.
そこに隔たりがあると 意志と目的が分断されますが
13:07
And the connection between body and head often brings those things into union.
体と頭がつながると その二つは たいてい結合します
13:13
I want to talk about three particular people
3人の女性について話をしたいと思います
13:19
that I've met, vagina warriors, who really transformed my understanding
私が会ったヴァギナ勇士たちで 彼らは私の
13:21
of this whole principle and species,
本質や人間に関する理解を変えました
13:25
and one is a woman named Marsha Lopez.
その一人はマーシャ ロペス
13:27
Marsha Lopez was a woman I met in Guatemala.
グァテマラで会った女性です
13:30
She was 14 years old, and she was in a marriage
14歳の彼女は結婚していて
13:33
and her husband was beating her on a regular basis,
定期的に夫から殴られていたのに
13:36
and she couldn't get out because she was addicted to the relationship
その関係に はまっていたのと お金が無くて
13:39
and she had no money. Her sister was younger than her
抜け出せませんでした 彼女の妹は数年前に
13:43
and she applied -- we had a "stop rape" contest a few years ago in New York --
ニューヨークで行われた “ストップ レイプ”コンテストに姉を応募したのです
13:46
and she applied, hoping that she would become a finalist
決勝戦まで残れば 姉をニューヨークに
13:51
and she could bring her sister.
連れて行けると思ったからです
13:54
She did become a finalist; she brought Marsha to New York.
彼女は決勝戦まで残り ニューヨークに来ました
13:56
And at that time we did this extraordinary V-Day
その時に 通常男ばかりの
14:00
at Madison Square Garden where we sold out the entire testosterone-filled dome,
スタジアムを満席にしてV-Dayを行い 総立ちになった18,000人が
14:02
18,000 people standing up to say
“ヴァギナに賛成!” と言ったのです
14:07
"yes" to vaginas, which was really a pretty incredible transformation.
とても信じられない変容でした
14:09
And she came, and she witnessed this, and she decided
その場にいたマーシャは 国に戻って
14:13
that she would go back and leave her husband,
夫とは別れ V-Day を
14:16
and that she would bring V-Day to Guatemala.
グァテマラに広めようと決意しました
14:18
She was 21 years old. I went to Guatemala and she had sold out
彼女は21歳でした 私がグァテマラに行くと
14:20
the National Theater of Guatemala.
彼女はグァテマラ国立劇場を満席にしていました
14:24
And I watched her walk up on stage in her red short dress, and high heels,
彼女は赤のショートドレスを着てハイヒールを履き
14:27
and she stood there and she said, "My name is Marsha.
檀上で言いました “私はマーシャ
14:32
I was beaten by my husband for five years.
夫に5年間殴られ 殺されかけました
14:34
He almost murdered me. I left and you can too."
夫とは別れました あなたにもできます”
14:38
And the entire 2,000 people went absolutely crazy.
会場にいた2,000人は沸き返りました
14:41
There's a woman named Esther Chavez
メキシコのフアレスで会った―
14:45
who I met in Juarez, Mexico. And Esther Chavez
エスター シャベスという女性がいます
14:47
was a brilliant accountant in Mexico City; she was 72 years old;
72歳の彼女はメキシコシティで会計士をしていて
14:50
and she was planning to retire.
退職を考えていました
14:53
She went to Juarez to take care of an ailing aunt, and over the course of it,
彼女は病気の叔母の看病にフアレスに行き 看病中に
14:55
she began to discover what was happening to the murdered
フアレスで殺されたり失踪した女性に
15:00
and disappeared women of Juarez.
何が起きたのかを知りました
15:02
She gave up her life; she moved to Juarez;
彼女は仕事を辞めて フアレスに引っ越し
15:05
she started to write the stories which documented the disappeared women.
失踪した女性の記録を書き始めました
15:08
300 women have disappeared
300人の女性が肌の色と
15:12
in a border town because they're brown and poor.
貧困のため失踪し
15:14
There has been no response to the disappearance,
失踪に関する反応は何もなく
15:16
and not one person has been held accountable.
逮捕された人もいない状態です
15:18
She began to document it; she opened a center called Casa Amiga;
彼女はこれを文章にし始め 友の家というセンターを開設
15:20
and in six years, she has literally brought this
6年かけて 暴力の存在を
15:25
to the consciousness of the world.
世界に気づかせたのです
15:27
We were there a week ago, when there were 7,000 people on the street,
フアレスの通りに7,000人が集まりました
15:29
and it was truly a miracle. And as we walked through the streets,
それは奇跡と言えるもので 治安の悪さから
15:32
the people of Juarez, who normally don't even come into the streets
普段は通りに出ない地元の人たちが
15:36
because the streets are so dangerous, literally stood there and wept
世界各地から集まった人々を見て
15:39
to see that other people from the world had showed up
通りに立ちすくして
15:42
for that particular community.
涙を流していました
15:45
There's another woman named Agnes. And Agnes, for me,
アグネスという女性は 私にとって
15:48
epitomizes what a vagina warrior is.
ヴァギナ勇士の典型です
15:52
I met her three years ago in Kenya. And Agnes was mutilated as a little girl,
彼女とはケニアで3年前に会いました 彼女は10歳の時に
15:54
she was circumcised against her will
彼女の気持ちに反して
16:00
when she was 10 years old, and she really made a decision
陰核を切除され こんな慣例は地域社会において
16:02
that she didn't want this practice to continue anymore in her community.
存続させまいと決意したのです
16:06
So when she got older she created this incredible thing:
彼女は大人になってから
16:10
it's an anatomical sculpture of a woman's body; it's half a woman's body.
女性の体半分の解剖彫刻を作って
16:13
And she walked through the Rift Valley, and she had
ケニアのリフトバレーを歩き
16:18
vagina and vagina replacement parts where she would teach
ヴァギナとヴァギナの取り替え部品を持って
16:21
girls and parents and boys and girls what a healthy vagina looks like,
保護者と子どもに健康なヴァギナと切除されたヴァギナの違いを
16:24
and what a mutilated vagina looks like. And in the course of her travel
教えて回ったのです その活動で彼女は
16:28
she walked literally for eight years through the Rift Valley,
砂ぼこりの中 野宿しながらリフトバレーを
16:32
through dust, through sleeping on the ground -- because the Masais are nomads,
8年間歩きました マサイ族は遊牧民なので
16:35
and she would literally have to find them, and they would move,
彼らが移動しては探し出し
16:39
and she would find them again. She saved 1,500 girls from being cut.
彼女は1,500人の少女を切除から救いました
16:43
And in that time she created an alternative ritual which involved
彼女は少女が切除されることなく成人できる―
16:48
girls coming of age without the cut.
新しい慣例を作ったのです
16:51
When we met her three years ago,
3年前 私たちが協力したいと
16:54
we said, "What could V-Day do for you?"
彼女に言うと
16:56
And she said, "Well, if you got me a Jeep, I could get around a lot faster."
“ジープがあれば もっと早く移動できる” と言いました
16:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:01
So we bought her a Jeep. And in the year that she had the Jeep,
それでジープを贈ったら その年に彼女はジープを使って
17:02
she saved 4,500 girls from being cut. So then we said to her,
4,500人の少女を切除から救いました
17:05
"Agnes, well, what else could we do for you?" And she said,
“他に何かできる?” と尋ねたら
17:09
"Well, Eve, you know, if you gave me some money,
“お金がもらえたら 少女たちを
17:11
I could open a house and girls could run away and they could be saved."
保護できる家を作って 彼らを救える” と言いました
17:13
And I want to tell this little story about my own beginnings
幸福とアグネスに関係があるので
17:17
because it's very interrelated to happiness and Agnes.
私の幼少期の話をしたいと思います
17:20
When I was a little girl -- and I grew up
私が育ったのは白人社会で
17:24
in a wealthy community; it was an upper-middle class white community,
中流の上層階級という恵まれた環境でした
17:27
and it had all the trappings
完璧な素晴らしい生活を
17:31
and the looks of a perfectly nice, wonderful, great life.
象徴するものが溢れていました
17:33
And everyone was supposed to be happy in that community
そこでは誰もが幸せであるはずだったのに
17:38
and, in fact, my life was hell. I lived with an alcoholic father
私の生活は地獄で アル中の父親に
17:41
who beat me and molested me, and it was all inside that.
殴られ犯されていたのです
17:44
And always as a child I had this fantasy that somebody would come and rescue me.
子どもだった私は 誰かが助けに来てくれる空想を常に抱いていました
17:47
And I actually made up a little character whose name was Mr. Alligator,
ミスターアリゲーターと名付けたキャラクターを作り上げて
17:52
and I would call him up when things got really bad,
状況が悪化したときは 彼に電話をして
17:55
and I would say it was time to come and pick me up.
迎えに来る時間だと伝えてました
17:58
And I would go and pack a little bag and I would wait for Mr. Alligator to come.
小さなカバンに荷物を詰めて ミスターアリゲーターを待っていたのです
18:00
Now, Mr. Alligator never did come,
ミスターアリゲーターは決して来なかったけれど
18:04
but the idea of Mr. Alligator coming actually saved my sanity
いつか誰かが助けに来てくれると信じていたので
18:06
and made it OK for me to keep going because I believed,
ミスターアリゲーターが現れる考えが
18:11
in the distance, there would be someone coming to rescue me.
実際に私を正気に保ち 頑張れました
18:13
Cut to 40-some-odd years later, we go to Kenya,
40年以上が経ち ケニアに新設された―
18:17
and we're walking, we arrive at the opening of this house --
女性のための隠れ家のオープニングに行くと
18:21
and Agnes hadn't let me come to the house for days
アグネスは儀式の準備をしていたので
18:25
because they were preparing this whole ritual.
数日待つこととなりました
18:27
And I want to tell you a great story. When Agnes first started
アグネスの住む地域社会で彼女が
18:29
fighting to stop female genital mutilation in her community,
女性器切除を止めようと初めて働きかけていたとき
18:32
she had become an outcast, and she was exiled and she was slandered,
彼女は追放され中傷され
18:36
and the whole community turned against her.
地域全体が彼女を背いたのです
18:39
But, being a vagina warrior, she kept going,
でも 彼女はヴァギナ勇士になり
18:41
and she kept committing herself to transforming consciousness.
慣習を変えてみせると自ら誓い続けて 頑張りました
18:44
And in the Masai community, goats and cows are the most valued possession.
マサイ族の文化では ヤギと牛が一番価値があるとされています
18:47
They're like the Mercedes-Benz of the Rift Valley.
リフトバレーでは ベンツに匹敵します
18:52
And she said, two days before the house opened, two different people
隠れ家オープンの二日前 二人の人が彼女に
18:56
arrived to give her a goat each, and she said to me,
それぞれヤギを持ってきたそうです
19:00
"I knew then that female genital mutilation would end one day in Africa."
彼女は “いつかアフリカで女性器切除が終わるとわかってた” と言いました
19:03
Anyway, we arrived, and when we arrived,
それで 私たちが到着したとき
19:08
there were hundreds of girls dressed in red, homemade dresses --
マサイとV-Dayの色である赤の手作りワンピースを着た―
19:11
which is the color of the Masai and the color of V-Day --
何百人という女の子たちがいて
19:15
and they greeted us, and they had made up these songs
彼らは私たちと挨拶してから 苦しみの終わりや
19:18
that they were singing about the end of suffering,
女性器切除の終わりを歌う―
19:21
and the end of mutilation, and they walked us down the path.
自作の歌と共に 小道を誘導してくれました
19:23
And it was a gorgeous day in the African sun,
アフリカの太陽に照らされ 埃が舞って
19:26
and the dust was flying and the girls were dancing,
少女たちは踊り 素晴らしい日でした
19:28
and there was this house, and it said, "V-Day Safe House for the Girls."
その家には “女性のためのV-Day 隠れ家” と書かれていました
19:31
And it hit me in that moment that it had taken 47 years,
その瞬間 47年かかったけれど ミスターアリゲーターが
19:36
but that Mr. Alligator had finally shown up.
ついに現れたと思いました
19:41
And he'd show up obviously in a form that it took me a long time to understand,
彼は時間をかけて意外な形で現れました
19:44
which is that when we give
と言うのは 我々が一番欲しいと思うものを
19:49
in the world what we want the most, we heal the broken part inside each of us.
世界にもたらした時 心の傷が癒されるのです
19:52
And I feel, in the last eight years,
過去8年間のヴァギナの旅で
19:58
that this journey, this miraculous vagina journey,
学んだのは とてもシンプルなこと
20:01
has taught me this really simple thing, which is that happiness exists in action;
幸福とは 行動したり 真実を語ったり
20:04
it exists in telling the truth and saying what your truth is;
本物の自分を表現する中に存在し
20:11
and it exists in giving away what you want the most.
切望するものを明らかにすると 見出せるのです
20:15
And I feel that knowledge and that journey
そして 貴重な知識と経験を得られ
20:19
has been an extraordinary privilege,
嬉しく思っています
20:23
and I feel really blessed to have been here today to communicate that to you.
皆さんにお話できた事も感謝しています
20:25
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
20:29
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:31
Translated by Takako Sato
Reviewed by Aiko McLean

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About the Speaker:

Eve Ensler - Playwright, activist
Eve Ensler created the ground-breaking "Vagina Monologues," whose success propelled her to found V-Day -- a movement to end violence against women and girls everywhere.

Why you should listen

Inspired by intimate conversations with friends, Eve Ensler wrote The Vagina Monologues. The play recounts tender, funny, gripping and horrifying stories she gathered from hundreds of women about their bodies, their sexual experiences, and yes, their vaginas. Since its first staging in 1996, it has been translated into more than 45 languages, performed in more than 120 countries and re-created as an HBO film.

The Vagina Monologues' success allowed Ensler to create V-Day, a global activist movement to end violence against women and girls, which has so far raised $85 million to prevent violence and protect abused women. In February 2011, Ensler received the Isabelle Stephenson Tony Award for her philanthropic work. Ensler has also drawn praise for The Good Body, a play that cuts to women's obsession with their appearance, and her film What I Want My Words to Do to You, which portrays a writing group she leads at a correctional facility for women. Today, she continues to find new projects and push the envelope. Her latest play, I Am an Emotional Creature: The Secret Life of Girls Around the World, hit the New York Times bestseller list and just wrapped a workshop production in Johannesburg -- nest stop is Paris and then Berkeley in June 2012.

More profile about the speaker
Eve Ensler | Speaker | TED.com