sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2009

Jonathan Zittrain: The Web as random acts of kindness

ジョナサン・ジットレイン 「親切に支えられたWeb」

July 22, 2009

世界がどんどん不親切になっていると感じていますか? 社会理論家のジョナサン・ジットレインはそう思っていません。インターネットは親切と好奇心と信頼に基づく何百万という無私の行動によって作られているのだと彼は語ります。

Jonathan Zittrain - Net watchdog
Jonathan Zittrain wants to make sure the electronic frontier stays open -- and he's looking to the Internet's millions of users for its salvation. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
My name is Jonathan Zittrain,
私はジョナサン ジットレインです
00:12
and in my recent work I've been a bit of a pessimist.
最近の仕事で私はずっと悲観的だったので
00:14
So I thought this morning I would try to be the optimist,
今朝は楽観的になろうと試みたい
00:17
and give reason to hope
そして将来のインターネットに
00:21
for the future of the Internet
希望が持てる理由を
00:23
by drawing upon its present.
現在の状況から説明したいと思います
00:25
Now, it may seem like there is less hope today than there was before.
現在は昔よりも希望が少なくなっているように見えます
00:28
People are less kind. There is less trust around.
みんな親切でなくなり
00:32
I don't know. As a simple example,
人を信じなくなっています 例として
00:34
we could run a test here.
ちょっとテストをしてみましょう
00:38
How many people have ever hitchhiked?
今までにヒッチハイクをしたことのある人はどれくらいいますか?
00:40
I know. How many people have hitchhiked
たくさんいますね ではこの10 年間に
00:47
within the past 10 years?
ヒッチハイクをしたという人は?
00:50
Right. So what has changed?
そうでしょう 何が変わったのでしょうか?
00:55
It's not better public transportation.
公共交通機関が良くなったからではないですよね
00:58
So that's one reason to think that we might be
1つの見方は 世の中が下り坂にあり
01:01
declensionists, going in the wrong direction.
悪い方向に向かっているというものです
01:04
But I want to give you three examples
しかし私は3 つの例を通して
01:07
to try to say that the trend line
トレンドラインが別な方向を向いており
01:10
is in fact in the other direction,
そしてインターネットが
01:13
and it's the Internet helping it along.
その力になっていることを示したいと思います
01:15
So example number one: the Internet itself.
第一の例は インターネット自体です
01:18
These are three of the founders of the Internet.
この3 人はインターネットの創始者たちです
01:21
They were actually high school classmates together
彼らは1960 年代に
01:25
at the same high school in suburban Los Angles in the 1960s.
ロサンゼルス郊外の同じ高校に通っていたクラスメートです
01:27
You might have had a French club or a Debate club.
フランス語クラブとか弁論クラブとかありますよね
01:31
They had a "Let's build a global network" club,
彼らは「グローバルネットワークを作ろう」クラブで
01:34
and it worked out very well.
それはすごくうまくいきました
01:36
They are pictured here for their 25th anniversary
この写真はニューズウィーク誌の
01:39
Newsweek retrospective on the Internet.
インターネット25 周年記念号のために撮られたものです
01:42
And as you can tell,
見ての通り
01:45
they are basically goof balls.
彼らは基本的に変わり者でした
01:47
They had one great limitation
彼らにはグローバルネットワークを考え出す上で
01:50
and one great freedom
1 つ大きな制限と
01:53
as they tried to conceive of a global network.
1 つ大きな自由がありました
01:55
The limitation was that they didn't have any money.
制限は 彼らにはお金が全然なかったということです
01:58
No particular amount of capital to invest,
彼らには物理的なネットワークに投資すべき資金が
02:02
of the sort that for a physical network
これといってありませんでした
02:05
you might need for trucks and people
夜通し荷物を運ぼうと思ったら
02:07
and a hub to move packages around overnight.
トラックや人やハブが必要です
02:09
They had none of that.
彼らには何もありません
02:12
But they had an amazing freedom,
しかし彼らには驚くほどの自由がありました
02:14
which was they didn't have to make any money from it.
そこから収益を得る必要がなかったのです
02:16
The Internet has no business plan, never did.
インターネットには ビジネスプランなどあったためしがありません
02:20
No CEO,
CEO もいません
02:24
no firm responsible, singly, for building it.
構築に責任を持つ会社もありません
02:26
Instead, it's folks getting together
かわりにいたのは
02:30
to do something for fun,
何か面白いものを一緒に作ろうという連中です
02:32
rather than because they were told to,
それで大儲けできるぞと
02:35
or because they were expecting to make a mint off of it.
聞いたわけでも 考えたわけでもありません
02:37
That ethos led to a network architecture,
その精神は ネットワークアーキテクチャを
02:41
a structure that was unlike
それ以前 あるいはそれ以降の
02:44
other digital networks then or since.
どんなデジタルネットワークとも違ったものにしました
02:46
So unusual, in fact,
あまりに変わっていたため
02:50
that it was said that it's not clear the Internet could work.
インターネットがうまく機能するかどうか分らないとさえ言われてきました
02:52
As late as 1992, IBM was known to say
1992 年になっても IBM は言っていたのです
02:56
you couldn't possibly build a corporate network
インターネットプロトコルを使って
02:59
using Internet Protocol.
企業ネットワークを構築することは不可能だと
03:02
And even some Internet engineers today say
今日のインターネットエンジニアの中にさえ
03:05
the whole thing is a pilot project and the jury is still out.
インターネット自体試験プロジェクトであり まだ結果は出ていない
03:07
(Laughter)
そう言う人がいます (笑)
03:11
That's why the mascot of Internet engineering,
インターネット技術のマスコットがあるとしたら
03:12
if it had one, is said to be the bumblebee.
それはクマバチだと言われるゆえんです
03:16
Because the fur-to-wingspan ratio of the bumblebee
クマバチの体は 飛べるためには
03:19
is far too large for it to be able to fly.
羽の長さに対して大きすぎるのです
03:22
And yet, mysteriously, somehow the bee flies.
それがどういうわけか クマバチは飛ぶことができます
03:24
I'm pleased to say that, thanks to massive government funding,
うれしいことに 政府の多額の資金を使って
03:29
about three years ago we finally figured out
3年ほど前に ハチがどうやって飛んでいるのかが
03:32
how bees fly.
ついに解明されました
03:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:37
It's very complicated, but it turns out they
非常に難しい話なのですが どうやら―
03:39
flap their wings very quickly.
羽をすごく速く動かしているかららしいです
03:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:44
So what is this bizarre architecture configuration
ではインターネットを動かしているアーキテクチャというのは
03:47
that makes the network sing and be so unusual?
どう変わっているのでしょうか?
03:51
Well, to move data around
データをある場所から別な場所へ
03:54
from one place to another -- again, it's not like a package courier.
動かすのに 運送会社みたいにはやりません
03:56
It's more like a mosh pit.
それよりは観客席に近い
03:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:02
Imagine, you being part of a network
ご自分がネットワークの一部だと思ってください
04:03
where, you're maybe at a sporting event,
何かスポーツを観戦しています
04:05
and you're sitting in rows like this,
このような座席に座っていて
04:08
and somebody asks for a beer,
誰かがビールを注文します
04:10
and it gets handed at the aisle.
それは通路で手渡され
04:12
And your neighborly duty
あなた方は隣席の責務として
04:15
is to pass the beer along,
自分のズボンを汚すリスクを冒しながら
04:17
at risk to your own trousers,
ビールを目的地へと
04:19
to get it to the destination.
受け渡していくのです
04:22
No one pays you to do this.
そのためにお金を払う人はいません
04:24
It's just part of your neighborly duty.
隣の席にいる者の努めというだけです
04:26
And, in a way, that's exactly how packets move around the Internet,
そしてこれは インターネットをパケットが動いている仕組みでもあるのです
04:29
sometimes in as many as 25 or 30 hops,
ときには25 回から30 回も中継されます
04:33
with the intervening entities
間でデータを受け渡す組織には
04:35
that are passing the data around
契約上あるいは法律上の
04:37
having no particular contractual or legal obligation
義務は何もありません
04:39
to the original sender
送信者に対しても
04:43
or to the receiver.
受信者に対しても
04:45
Now, of course, in a mosh pit it's hard to specify a destination.
観客席にいて目的地を指定するのはもちろん困難です
04:48
You need a lot of trust,
大きな信頼が必要ですが
04:52
but it's not like, "I'm trying to get to Pensacola, please."
「ペンサコラまでお願いします」というわけにはいきません
04:54
So the Internet needs addressing and directions.
インターネットにはアドレスと指示が必要です
04:57
It turns out there is no one overall map of the Internet.
実はインターネットには全体の地図というのは存在しないことが分ります
05:01
Instead, again, it is as if we are all sitting together in a theater,
みんな劇場の中に座っているようなものなのですが
05:05
but we can only see amidst the fog
霧が立ちこめていて
05:08
the people immediately around us.
すぐ近くにいる人しか見えません
05:11
So what do we do to figure out who is where?
では誰がどこにいるのか どうやって分るのでしょう?
05:13
We turn to the person on the right,
右にいる人に向かって
05:16
and we tell that person what we see on our left,
左に見えるものを伝えるのです
05:18
and vice versa.
逆方向にも同じことをします
05:21
And they can lather, rinse, repeat. And before you know it,
これをずっと繰り返して行くのです
05:23
you have a general sense of where everything is.
そうすると どこに何があるかおおよそ分るようになります
05:25
This is how Internet addressing and routing actually work.
これがインターネットのアドレッシングとルーティングの仕組みです
05:28
This is a system that relies on kindness and trust,
これは親切と信頼に依存したシステムであり
05:33
which also makes it very delicate and vulnerable.
とてもデリケートで脆弱な面があります
05:37
In rare but striking instances,
まれではありますが
05:40
a single lie told by just one entity
ハチの巣の中の1 匹がついた 1 つの嘘によって
05:42
in this honeycomb
大きな混乱が
05:45
can lead to real trouble.
引き起こされることがあります
05:47
So, for example, last year,
たとえば去年のことですが
05:49
the government of Pakistan
パキスタン政府が
05:52
asked its Internet service providers there
国内のインターネットサービスプロバイダに
05:54
to prevent citizens of Pakistan from seeing YouTube.
パキスタン国民がYouTube を見られなくするよう求めました
05:57
There was a video there that the government did not like
政府の気に入らないビデオがあって
06:01
and they wanted to make sure it was blocked.
確実にブロックしたかったのです
06:03
This is a common occurrence. Governments everywhere
これは良くあることで 至る所の政府が
06:05
are often trying to block
インターネットのコンテンツをブロックしたり
06:07
and filter and censor content on the Internet.
フィルタリングしたり 検閲したりしています
06:09
Well this one ISP in Pakistan
あるISP が
06:12
chose to effectuate the block for its subscribers
加入者の視聴をブロックするために
06:14
in a rather unusual way.
ちょっと変わった手段を選びました
06:17
It advertised --
突然言い始めたのです
06:20
the way that you might be asked, if you were part of the Internet,
インターネットで問い合わせが来たら答える仕方で
06:22
to declare what you see near you -- it advertised
周りに対して
06:25
that near it, in fact, it had suddenly awakened to find
突然気づいたかのように 言い始めたのです
06:27
that it was YouTube.
自分がYouTube であると
06:32
"That's right," it said, "I am YouTube."
「その通り 私がYouTube である」
06:34
Which meant that packets of data
この結果 YouTube へ向かう
06:37
from subscribers going to YouTube
加入者のパケットは
06:39
stopped at the ISP, since they thought they were already there,
このISP を目的地と勘違いして留まり
06:41
and the ISP threw them away unopened
ISP は中身を見ずに捨て
06:44
because the point was to block it.
ブロックの目的を達します
06:46
But it didn't stop there.
しかしそれだけでは終わりませんでした
06:48
You see, that announcement
この告知は
06:50
went one click out,
一歩先へと送られ
06:52
which got reverberated, one click out.
広まっていったのです
06:54
And it turns out that as you look
この事後分析資料を
06:57
at the postmortem of this event,
見ていただけばわかりますが
06:59
you have at one moment
最初の時点では
07:01
perfectly working YouTube.
YouTube が見られました
07:03
Then, at moment number two,
その次の時点で
07:05
you have the fake announcement go out.
偽の告知が行われます
07:07
And within two minutes,
そして2分のうちに
07:10
it reverberates around
それは広まっていき
07:12
and YouTube is blocked everywhere in the world.
世界中でYouTube がブロックされることになりました
07:14
If you were sitting in Oxford, England, trying to get to YouTube,
イギリスのオックスフォードにいても YouTube を見ようとすると
07:17
your packets were going to Pakistan
パケットがパキスタンに行ったきり
07:20
and they weren't coming back.
戻ってこなくなりました
07:22
Now just think about that.
考えてみてください
07:25
One of the most popular websites in the world,
これは世界で最も力のある企業による
07:27
run by the most powerful company in the world,
世界で最も人気のあるサイトです
07:29
and there was nothing that YouTube or Google
YouTube やGoogle には何ら
07:31
were particularly privileged to do about it.
これに関して特権がないのです
07:35
And yet, somehow, within about two hours,
それでも どうやってか 問題は
07:38
the problem was fixed.
2 時間後には解決していました
07:42
How did this happen?
何が行われたのでしょう?
07:44
Well, for a big clue, we turn to NANOG.
手がかりとして NANOG に目を向けましょう
07:46
The North American Network Operators Group,
北米ネットワーク オペレーターズ グループです
07:49
a group of people who,
そこでは人々が
07:52
on a beautiful day outside,
外は晴れているというのに
07:54
enter into a windowless room,
窓のない部屋に籠もり
07:56
at their terminals
端末に向かって
07:58
reading email and messages
メールやメッセージを読んでいます
08:00
in fixed proportion font, like this,
ちょうどこのような等副フォントで
08:03
and they talk about networks.
そしてネットワークの話をしています
08:07
And some of them are mid-level employees at Internet service providers
彼らの中には世界中のISP の
08:09
around the world.
中堅社員がいます
08:11
And here is the message where one of them says,
その1 人がこのようなメッセージを送ります
08:13
"Looks like we've got a live one. We have a hijacking of YouTube!
「おかしなやつが現れたようだ YouTube が乗っ取られた!
08:15
This is not a drill. It's not just the cluelessness
これは訓練ではない YouTube のエンジニアが
08:18
of YouTube engineers. I promise.
へまをしたわけでもない
08:21
Something is up in Pakistan."
パキスタンで何かが起こっている」
08:23
And they came together to help find the problem and fix it.
そしてこの問題を解決するために彼らは力を合わせます
08:25
So it's kind of like if your house catches on fire.
だからこれは火事のようなものです
08:29
The bad news is there is no fire brigade.
悪いニュースは 消防隊はいないということです
08:32
The good news is random people apparate from nowhere,
いいニュースは いろんな人がどこらかともなく姿を現し
08:36
put out the fire and leave without expecting payment or praise.
火を消し止め そしてお金も賞賛も求めることなく
08:39
(Applause)
立ち去っていくということです (拍手)
08:43
I was trying to think of the right model to describe
このような形態の
08:48
this form of random acts of kindness
見知らぬギークによる親切を表す
08:50
by geeky strangers.
適切なモデルは何かと考えていました
08:52
(Laughter)
(バットシグナルを背景にたたずむバットマンのシルエット―笑)
08:54
You know, it's just like the hail goes out
合図が出ると
08:59
and people are ready to help.
人々が助けに現れるのです
09:02
And it turns out this model is everywhere, once you start looking for it.
このモデルは 探してみると至る所にあるのが分ります
09:04
Example number two: Wikipedia.
第二の例 Wikipedia
09:08
If a man named Jimbo came up to you in 2001
ジンボ(ジミー・ウェールズ)という男が2001年に現れて言いました
09:11
and said, "I've got a great idea! We start with seven articles
「いいこと思いついた! 7 つの記事から出発して
09:14
that anybody can edit anything, at any time,
誰でも いつでも 何でも編集できるようにしたら
09:17
and we'll get a great encyclopedia! Eh?"
すごい百科事典ができるぞ! どうだい?」
09:19
Right. Dumbest idea ever.
確かに これ以上ないくらい間抜けなアイデアです
09:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:26
In fact, Wikipedia is an idea so profoundly stupid
実際 Wikipedia はあまりに間抜けなアイデアなので
09:27
that even Jimbo never had it.
ジンボ自身考えてはいませんでした
09:32
Jimbo's idea was for Nupedia.
ジンボが考えていたのはNupedia です
09:35
It was going to be totally traditional. He would pay people money
これはまったく従来的なものになるはずでした
09:37
because he was feeling like a good guy,
彼は気前よくお金を払い
09:39
and the money would go to the people
そのお金で人々に
09:41
and they would write the articles.
記事を書いてもらうのです
09:43
The wiki was introduced
Wiki は 他の人が修正案を書けるよう
09:45
so others could make suggestions on edits --
後から導入された
09:47
as almost an afterthought, a back room.
裏部屋のようなものでした
09:49
And then it turns out the back room grew
それがプロジェクト全体を占めるくらいに
09:51
to encompass the entire project.
成長したのです
09:54
And today, Wikipedia is so ubiquitous
今日では Wikipedia はすごく普及し
09:56
that you can now find it on Chinese restaurant menus.
中国のレストランのメニューにまで顔を出すようになりました
09:59
(Laughter)
("Stir-fried wikipedia"などの料理名が並んでいるメニュー) (笑)
10:03
I am not making this up.
でっち上げてなんかいませんよ
10:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:11
I have a theory I can explain later.
これについては ご説明できますが 今のところは―
10:13
Suffice it to say for now that I prefer my Wikipedia
こうとだけ言っておきましょう
10:16
stir-fried with pimentos.
Wikipedia は唐辛子と炒めたのが
10:18
(Laughter)
おすすめです (笑)
10:20
But now, Wikipedia doesn't just spontaneously work.
でもWikipedia は何もせずに機能するわけではありません
10:22
How does it really work? It turns out
どうなっているのでしょうか?
10:25
there is a back room that is kind of windowless,
ここにも窓のない奥まった
10:27
metaphorically speaking.
部屋があるのがわかります
10:29
And there are a bunch of people who, on a sunny day,
たくさんの人が 晴れた日に
10:31
would rather be inside
部屋の中に籠もって
10:33
and monitoring this, the administrator's notice board,
管理者用掲示板を見つめています
10:36
itself a wiki page that anyone can edit.
これ自体 誰でも編集できるWikipedia のページになっています
10:38
And you just bring your problems to the page.
問題があればここに報告するようになっています
10:41
It's reminiscent of the description of history
ここに記録されているのは
10:44
as "one damn thing after another," right?
「ひどいことの連続としての歴史」です
10:47
Number one: "Tendentious editing by user Andyvphil."
1番は「ユーザAndyvphil による甚だしく偏向した編集」とあります
10:50
Apologies, Andyvphil, if you're here today.
Andyvphil 氏がここにいたらごめんなさい
10:54
I'm not taking sides.
相手の肩を持つわけではありません
10:57
"Anon attacking me for reverting."
お次は「Anon が取り消し攻撃してくる」と
10:59
Here is my favorite: "A long story."
私が好きなのは「長い話になる」
11:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:04
It turns out there are more people checking this page for problems
このページに上がってくる問題の数よりも
11:05
and wanting to solve them
このページをチェックし
11:09
than there are problems arising on the page.
問題を解決しようという人たちの方がたくさんいるのです
11:11
And that's what keeps Wikipedia afloat.
それがWikipedia を沈まずにいさせているのです
11:14
At all times, Wikipedia is approximately
Wikipedia はいつでも
11:17
45 minutes away from utter destruction. Right?
崩壊の45 分前という状態にあります
11:20
There are spambots crawling it, trying to turn every article
スパムボットが徘徊し すべての記事を
11:25
into an ad for a Rolex watch.
ロレックスの広告に変えようとしています
11:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:29
It's this thin geeky line
この細いギークの防衛線で
11:30
that keeps it going.
守られているのです
11:33
Not because it's a job,
彼らがやっているのは
11:35
not because it's a career,
仕事だからではありません
11:37
but because it's a calling.
使命感によってです
11:39
It's something they feel impelled to do
彼らは大事なことを気にかけており
11:41
because they care about it.
それ故に行動に駆り立てられるのです
11:44
They even gather together in such groups
彼らは「対荒らし部隊」という
11:46
as the Counter-Vandalism Unit --
グループまで作り
11:48
"Civility, Maturity, Responsibility" --
「礼儀 成熟 責任」という標語の元
11:50
to just clean up the pages.
ページを掃除し続けています
11:53
It does make you wonder if there were, for instance,
もし週末に
11:55
a massive, extremely popular Star Trek convention one weekend,
大人気のスタートレックの集まりか何かがあったとしたら
11:58
who would be minding the store?
誰が番をするのかと気になります
12:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:04
So what we see --
ここで目にしているのは…
12:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:11
what we see in this phenomenon
ここで目にしている現象は
12:14
is something that the crazed, late traffic engineer
交通工学者ハンス モンデルマンが
12:18
Hans Monderman discovered in the Netherlands,
オランダで発見したことを思わせます
12:22
and here in South Kensington, that sometimes
ここ南ケンジントンでも見られますが
12:24
if you remove some of the external rules and signs and everything else,
外的な規則や信号といったものを取り除くと
12:26
you can actually end up
より安全で 人々が機能でき
12:31
with a safer environment in which people can function,
互いにより人間的に接するような
12:33
and one in which they are more human with each other.
環境ができるのです
12:36
They're realizing that they
自分の行動に対する責任を
12:39
have to take responsibility for what they do.
人々が自覚するからです
12:41
And Wikipedia has embraced this.
Wikipedia はこの原理を活用しているのです
12:43
Some of you may remember Star Wars Kid,
スターウォーズキッドを覚えている人もいるでしょう
12:46
the poor teenager who filmed himself with a golf ball retriever,
哀れな10 代の少年が ゴルフボール拾い器をライトセーバーみたいに
12:49
acting as if it were a light saber.
振り回しているビデオです
12:53
The film, without his permission or even knowledge at first,
このビデオは本人の了承なしに 本人が知ることもなく
12:55
found its way onto the Internet.
インターネットで公開され
12:58
Hugely viral video. Extremely popular.
瞬く間に広まり すごい人気になったのです
13:00
Totally mortifying to him.
本人は ひどく恥をかくことになりました
13:03
Now, it being encyclopedic and all,
百科事典として Wikipedia には
13:06
Wikipedia had to do an article about Star Wars Kid.
スターウォーズキッドの項目があります
13:08
Every article on Wikipedia has a corresponding discussion page,
Wikipedia の各項目には
13:11
and on the discussion page
議論のためのページがあるのですが
13:13
they had extensive argument among the Wikipedians
そこでWikipedian たちが徹底した議論をしました
13:15
as to whether to have his real name
本人の名前を記事に載せるべきか
13:18
featured in the article.
ということについてです
13:22
You could see arguments on both sides.
両方の意見があるのが分ります
13:24
Here is just a snapshot of some of them.
これはそのほんの一部です
13:26
They eventually decided --
異論もありましたが
13:28
not unanimously by any means --
彼らは最終的には
13:30
not to include his real name,
本名を載せないことに決めました
13:32
despite the fact that nearly all media reports did.
一般のメディアのほとんどが載せていたにもかかわらずです
13:34
They just didn't think it was the right thing to do.
彼らはそれが正しいことだとは思わなかったのです
13:37
It was an act of kindness.
善意のなせる技です
13:40
And to this day, the page for Star Wars Kid
スターウォーズキッドのページの一番上には
13:42
has a warning right at the top
本人の氏名を書き込まないことという
13:44
that says you are not to put his real name on the page.
警告が今でもあります
13:46
If you do, it will be removed immediately,
書き込んだら即座に削除されます
13:49
removed by people who may have disagreed with the original decision,
あの決定に同意しなかった人たちでさえ
13:51
but respect the outcome
決定を尊重し
13:55
and work to make it stay
それを守るべく行動します
13:58
because they believe in something bigger than their own opinion.
自分の意見よりも大きなものを信じているからです
14:00
As a lawyer, I've got to say these guys are inventing the law
法律家として言わせてもらうと 彼らは法や
14:04
and stare decisis and stuff like that as they go along.
先例拘束の原則といったものを 運営する中で作り出しているのです
14:07
Now, this isn't just limited to Wikipedia.
これはWikipedia に限った話ではありません
14:11
We see it on blogs all over the place.
様々なブログにも見られます
14:14
I mean, this is a 2005 Business Week cover.
これは2005 年のビジネスウィーク誌の表紙です
14:16
Wow. Blogs are going to change your business.
ワオ! ブログがあなたのビジネスを変える!
14:19
I know they look silly. And sure they look silly.
これが馬鹿げて見えるのは分ります
14:21
They start off on all sorts of goofy projects.
あらゆるおかしなプロジェクトが行われていますから
14:24
This is my favorite goofy blog:
これは私のお気に入りのブログです
14:26
Catsthatlooklikehitler.com.
CatsThatLookLikeHitler.com
14:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:31
You send in a picture of your cat
自分の猫はヒットラーに似ているという人たちが
14:32
if it looks like Hitler.
写真を投稿します
14:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:37
Yeah, I know. Number four, it's like, can you imagine
分ります 4 番目のやつ 毎日家に帰ると
14:44
coming home to that cat everyday?
あれが出迎えるところを想像してみてください
14:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:48
But then, you can see the same kind of whimsy
同じようなことは人を対象としても
14:49
applied to people.
行われています
14:53
So this is a blog devoted to unfortunate portraiture.
これは失敗した肖像写真を集めたサイトです
14:55
This one says, "Bucolic meadow with split-rail fence.
こうあります 「丸太の柵のある牧歌的な草地
14:59
Is that an animal carcass behind her?"
後ろにあるの 動物の死骸じゃない?」
15:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:04
You're like, "You know? I think that's an animal carcass
「あれはどう見ても
15:05
behind her."
動物の死骸だよ」
15:07
And it's one after the other.
こういうのがずっと並んでいます
15:09
But then you hit this one. Image removed at request of owner.
しかしこんなのも―所有者の要求により画像は削除されました
15:11
That's it. Image removed at request of owner.
そう 所有者の求めで削除されたのです
15:15
It turns out that somebody lampooned here
ここで風刺された人が
15:17
wrote to the snarky guy that does the site,
このサイトをやっている人にメールを送り
15:19
not with a legal threat, not with an offer of payment,
法的な脅しではなく 金銭によるのでもなく
15:22
but just said, "Hey, would you mind?"
ただ「あれ削除してもらえない?」と言い
15:25
The person said, "No, that's fine."
「ああ いいよ」と
15:27
I believe we can build architectures online
私たちはオンラインアーキテクチャを作れると思います
15:29
to make such human requests
そのような人間的な要求をずっと
15:33
that much easier to do,
簡単に行えるようなものを
15:36
to make it possible for all of us to see
ここで実現したいのは
15:38
that the data we encounter online
私たちが出会うデータは
15:40
is just stuff on which to click and paste and copy and forward
クリックし 貼り付け コピーし 転送する対象であっても
15:42
that actually represents human emotion
実際は人の感情や努力や影響を
15:46
and endeavor and impact,
表しているのであり
15:49
and to be able to have an ethical moment
それをどう扱うか
15:51
where we decide how we want to treat it.
倫理的な判断ができるようにするということです
15:53
I even think it can go into the real world.
それは現実世界へも拡がるだろうと思います
15:56
We can end up, as we get in a world with more censors --
もっと検閲のある世界になり
15:59
everywhere there is something filming you, maybe putting it online --
至る所にカメラがあり ネットにも上げられるとき
16:02
to be able to have a little clip you could wear
「私は写真を公開されたくない」
16:05
that says, "You know, I'd rather not."
そう書いた服を着た写真に対し
16:07
And then have technology
テクノロジーは
16:09
that the person taking the photo will know later,
写真を撮った人に
16:12
this person requested to be contacted
その人は公開される前に
16:14
before this goes anywhere big,
連絡を求めていることを
16:16
if you don't mind.
わかるようにでき
16:18
And that person taking the photo can make a decision
写真を撮った人は
16:20
about how and whether to respect it.
それをどう尊重するか決められます
16:22
In the real world, we see filtering of this sort
現実の世界では そういうフィルタリングが
16:26
taking place in Pakistan.
パキスタンで行われているのを見ました
16:28
And we now have means that we can build, like this system,
そして私たちにはこのようなシステムを作る手段があり
16:30
so that people can report the filtering as they encounter it.
人々が出会ったフィルタリングを報告することができます
16:34
And it's no longer just a "I don't know. I couldn't get there. I guess I'll move on,"
それはもはや「分らないけど行けないみたいだ 他へ行こう」というのではなく
16:37
but suddenly a collective consciousness
ネットワークのどこで何がブロックされ
16:41
about what is blocked and censored
検閲されているのかについての
16:43
where online.
集合的意識が突然生み出されるのです
16:46
In fact, talk about technology imitating life
テクノロジーを模倣した生物を
16:48
imitating tech, or maybe it's the other way around.
模倣したテクノロジーの話をしましょう 逆かもしれませんが
16:52
An NYU researcher here took little cardboard robots
ニューヨーク大学の研究者が笑顔の描かれた
16:55
with smiley faces on them,
厚紙の小さなロボットを作りました
16:58
and a motor that just drove them forward
モーターがついていて真っ直ぐにだけ進めます
17:00
and a flag sticking out the back
旗が立っていて行きたい先が書かれており
17:03
with a desired destination.
「ここに行くのを助けてください」
17:05
It said, "Can you help me get there?"
と言っています
17:07
Released it on the streets of Manhattan.
これをマンハッタンの通りで放しました
17:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:13
They'll fund anything these days.
最近では何にでも資金が出るものです
17:15
Here is the chart of over 43 people
ここに図示されているのは
17:18
helping to steer the robot that could not steer
この曲がれないロボットの方向を変えるために
17:20
and get it on its way, from one corner
43人の人が手助けし
17:23
from one corner of Washington Square Park
ワシントンスクエアパークの一方の端から
17:25
to another.
別な端へと進んだ道のりです
17:27
That leads to example number three: hitchhiking.
これは第三の例であるヒッチハイクに繋がります
17:29
I'm not so sure hitchhiking is dead.
私はヒッチハイクが死に絶えたとは思いません
17:33
Why? There is the Craigslist rideshare board.
なぜか? Craigslist には相乗りの掲示板があるのです
17:36
If it were called the Craigslist hitchhiking board,
これがヒッチハイク板と呼ばれていたとしたら
17:40
tumbleweeds would be blowing through it.
閑古鳥が鳴いていたでしょう
17:43
But it's the rideshare board, and it's basically the same thing.
しかしこれは相乗り板です 実際は同じことですが
17:45
Now why are people using it?
どうしてみんな ここを見に行くのでしょう?
17:48
I don't know. Maybe they think that, uh, killers don't plan ahead?
わかりません たぶん彼らは
17:50
(Laughter)
殺人者は前もって予定を組んだりしないと思っているのでしょう (笑)
17:53
No. I think the actual answer is
いいえ 本当の答えは
17:59
that once you reframe it,
ひとたび見方を変えたなら
18:01
once you get out of one set of stale expectations
かつては良かったけどなぜか駄目になった
18:03
from a failed project that had its day,
プロジェクトに対する古い考えから離れるなら
18:06
but now, for whatever reason, is tarnished,
Craigslist が示しているように
18:09
you can actually rekindle the kind of human kindness and sharing
人の親切や共有は
18:11
that something like this on Craigslist represents.
再び活気を得るものなのです
18:15
And then you can highlight it
そしてこれは
18:18
into something like,
CouchSurfing.org のようなものにより
18:20
yes, CouchSurfing.org.
際立って示されます
18:22
CouchSurfing: one guy's idea
CouchSurfing はついに2者を結びつけたのです
18:25
to, at last, put together people who are going somewhere far away
遠くへ行って
18:28
and would like to sleep on a stranger's couch for free,
見知らぬ他人の家のカウチにタダで寝泊まりしたい人と
18:31
with people who live far away,
見知らぬ遠くに住む人に
18:36
and would like someone they don't know to sleep on their couch for free.
自分のカウチにタダで寝泊まりしてほしい人をです
18:38
It's a brilliant idea.
素晴らしいアイデアです
18:42
It's a bee that, yes, flies.
このハチは確かに飛びました
18:46
Amazing how many successful couch surfings there have been.
どれほど多くのカウチサーフィンが成功しているかは驚くばかりです
18:48
And if you're wondering, no, there have been no known fatalities
疑問に思っておられるでしょうが これまでCouchSurfing に関わる事故は
18:51
associated with CouchSurfing.
1 件も起きていません
18:55
Although, to be sure, the reputation system, at the moment,
評判システムがあって
18:57
works that you leave your report after the couch surfing experience,
カウチサーフィンをしたあと評価するようになっています
19:00
so there may be some selection bias there.
だから選択の偏りはあるかもしれません
19:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:06
So, my urging, my thought,
だから私が言いたいのは
19:10
is that the Internet isn't just a pile of information.
インターネットは単なる情報の山ではないということです
19:14
It's not a noun. It's a verb.
名詞ではなく 動詞なのです
19:17
And when you go on it,
そして進みつづけ
19:20
if you listen and see carefully and closely enough,
注意して耳を傾けるなら
19:22
what you will discover
気づくはずです
19:26
is that that information
その情報があなたに何か
19:28
is saying something to you.
語りかけているということに
19:30
What it's saying to you is what we heard yesterday,
それが語っているのは 昨日我々が聞いたこと
19:32
Demosthenes was saying to us.
デモステネスが私たちに語っているのです
19:34
It's saying, "Let's march." Thank you very much.
「さあ行進しよう」と言おうではありませんか
19:37
(Applause)
どうもありがとう (拍手)
19:41
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Wataru Narita

sponsored links

Jonathan Zittrain - Net watchdog
Jonathan Zittrain wants to make sure the electronic frontier stays open -- and he's looking to the Internet's millions of users for its salvation.

Why you should listen

The increasing proliferation of "tethered" devices, from iPhones to Xboxes, is only one of countless threats to the freewheeling Internet as we know it. There's also spam, malware, misguided legislation and a drift away from what Internet law expert Jonathan Zittrain calls "generativity" -- a system's receptivity to unanticipated (and innovative) change instigated by myriad users.

Harvard law professor Zittrain, as an investigator for the OpenNet initiative and co-founder of Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, has long studied the legal, technological and world-shaking aspects of quickly morphing virtual terrains. He performed the first large-scale tests of Internet filtering in China and Saudi Arabia in 2002. His initiatives include projects to fight malware (StopBadware) and ChillingEffects, a site designed to support open content by tracking legal threats to individual users.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.