sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2009

Evgeny Morozov: How the Net aids dictatorships

エフゲニー・モロゾフ: インターネットこそオーウェルが恐れていたものではなかろうか?

July 23, 2009

TEDフェローでありジャーナリストでもあるエフゲニー・モロゾフは、彼の言う「iPod自由主義」を鋭く批判する。「iPod自由主義」とは、技術革新が人々に自由と民主主義をもたらすという思想である。抑圧的な政権が反体制勢力を抑止する際に、インターネットがいかに役立つか、ぞっとする実例を交えて、モロゾフは訴えている。

Evgeny Morozov - Internet scientist
Evgeny Morozov wants to know how the Internet has changed the conduct of global affairs, because it certainly has ... but perhaps not in all the ways we think. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Good morning. I think, as a grumpy Eastern European,
おはようございます
気難しい東ヨーロッパの者として
00:12
I was brought in to play the pessimist this morning. So bear with me.
悲観的な意見を述べたいと思います
ご辛抱ください
00:17
Well, I come from the former Soviet Republic of Belarus,
私は旧ソ連のベラルーシ出身です
00:21
which, as some of you may know,
ご存知の方もいると思いますが
00:24
is not exactly an oasis of liberal democracy.
とても自由民主主義の楽園と
呼べるようなところではありません
00:27
So that's why I've always been fascinated
ですから私はいつも
テクノロジーがどのように
00:30
with how technology could actually reshape
独裁国家を再生し―
00:34
and open up authoritarian societies like ours.
開放することができるか
興味がありました
00:37
So, I'm graduating college
大学を卒業後
00:40
and, feeling very idealistic,
理想に満ち溢れていた私は
00:42
I decided to join the NGO
NGOで働くことにしました
00:44
which actually was using new media
そこでは新しいメディアを使って
00:46
to promote democracy and media reform
民主化とメディア革新を
00:48
in much of the former Soviet Union.
旧ソ連で広めることを
試みていました
00:50
However, to my surprise,
しかし 驚いたのは
00:53
I discovered that dictatorships
独裁体制はそんなに簡単に
00:55
do not crumble so easily.
崩壊しないということです
00:57
In fact, some of them actually
中にはインターネットでの―
00:59
survived the Internet challenge,
反抗に揺らぐことなく
01:02
and some got even more repressive.
より抑圧的になった
政府もありました
01:04
So this is when I ran out of my idealism and
私の理想は見事に砕け散り
01:07
decided to quit my NGO job
NGOの仕事を辞めて
01:10
and actually study how the Internet could impede democratization.
インターネットがいかに
民主化を阻止するか研究することにしました
01:12
Now, I must tell you that this was never
さて このような視点はあまり―
01:17
a very popular argument,
一般的ではありません
01:19
and it's probably not very popular yet
この会場にいる方にも
01:22
with some of you sitting in this audience.
馴染みのない考え方
かもしれません
01:24
It was never popular with many political leaders,
多くの政治指導者たちにとっても
一般的ではありません
01:26
especially those in the United States
特にアメリカの政治家たちは
01:29
who somehow thought that new media
ニューメディアが
01:31
would be able to do what missiles couldn't.
武力行使よりも有効な手段
だと思うかもしれません
01:33
That is, promote democracy in difficult places
つまり ニューメディアが 
政治混乱の末―
01:37
where everything else has already been tried and failed.
困窮した地域に 
民主主義をもたらすということです
01:40
And I think by 2009,
2009年までには
01:44
this news has finally reached Britain,
この考え方は
イギリスにも広まったので
01:46
so I should probably add Gordon Brown to this list as well.
ゴードン・ブラウンも
そのような政治家の一人ですね
01:49
However, there is an underlying argument about logistics,
しかし この論理には
落とし穴があるのです
01:52
which has driven so much of this debate. Right?
だからこそこうやって
議論するんですけどね
01:57
So if you look at it close enough,
よく考えてみれば
02:00
you'll actually see that much of this
この論理の焦点は
02:02
is about economics.
物理的なコストなんです
02:04
The cybertopians say, much like fax machines
サイバー空想家たちは
こんなことを言うでしょう
02:07
and Xerox machines did in the '80s,
80年代のファックスや
コピー機と同様に
02:10
blogs and social networks
ブログやソーシャルネットワークが
02:13
have radically transformed the economics of protest,
抗議活動の物理的なコストを
根本的に変えたことで
02:15
so people would inevitably rebel.
人々は必ず
抗議するようになったのだと
02:18
To put it very simply,
言い換えると
02:21
the assumption so far has been
これまでの考え方では
02:23
that if you give people enough connectivity,
国民のつながりを十分に作り
02:25
if you give them enough devices,
そのための道具を与えれば
02:28
democracy will inevitably follow.
民主主義は必ず
訪れるということになります
02:31
And to tell you the truth,
しかし はっきり言って
02:33
I never really bought into this argument,
この議論には納得出来ません
02:35
in part because I never saw three American presidents
一つには 
3人のアメリカ大統領が今まで―
02:38
agree on anything else in the past.
合意に達したことなんて
ないからです
02:41
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:43
But, you know, even beyond that,
しかしそれだけではなく
02:47
if you think about the logic underlying it,
根本的な論理を考えると
02:49
is something I call iPod liberalism,
私はiPodリベラリズムと
呼んでいるんですが
02:51
where we assume that every single Iranian or Chinese
iPodを愛用している
1人ひとりの
02:54
who happens to have and love his iPod
イラン人や中国人が 
民主主義にも―
02:58
will also love liberal democracy.
情熱を注ぐだろうと
仮定しています
03:00
And again, I think this is kind of false.
もう一度言いますが 
これは間違いだと思います
03:04
But I think a much bigger problem with this
さらに重大な盲点は
03:08
is that this logic --
この論理が つまり―
03:10
that we should be dropping iPods not bombs --
爆弾ではなくiPodを 
という論理が
03:12
I mean, it would make a fascinating title
まあ トーマス・フリードマンの新作には―
03:15
for Thomas Friedman's new book.
いいタイトルになるでしょうけど
03:18
(Laughter)
(笑い)
03:20
But this is rarely a good sign. Right?
別にいいことではないでしょう?
03:21
So, the bigger problem with this logic
さらに重大な盲点というのは
03:25
is that it confuses the intended
実際のテクノロジー使用法が
03:29
versus the actual uses of technology.
意図された使い方と
混同されていることです
03:31
For those of you who think that
インターネットによる
ニューメディアが
03:35
new media of the Internet
大量虐殺を阻止
できるとお考えの方は
03:37
could somehow help us avert genocide,
ルワンダの情勢を振り返れば
03:39
should look no further than Rwanda,
間違いにお気づきになるでしょう
03:42
where in the '90s it was actually two radio stations
90年代 そもそも2つのラジオ局が
03:44
which were responsible for fueling much of the ethnic hatred in the first place.
民族間の憎しみに
拍車をかけた原因なんですから
03:47
But even beyond that, coming back to the Internet,
インターネットに話を戻しますと
03:51
what you can actually see
実際に起きているのは
03:54
is that certain governments
政府自らが
03:56
have mastered the use of cyberspace
サイバースペースを
プロパガンダに
03:58
for propaganda purposes. Right?
利用しているということです
04:01
And they are building what I call the Spinternet.
私はスピンターネット
と呼んでいるんですが
04:03
The combination of spin, on the one hand,
スピン つまり情報操作と
04:05
and the Internet on the other.
インターネットとの造語です
04:08
So governments from Russia to China to Iran
ロシアや中国 
イランなどの政府は
04:10
are actually hiring, training and paying bloggers
ブロガーを雇用 養成し
04:13
in order to leave ideological comments
イデオロギー的な
コメントを残したり
04:16
and create a lot of ideological blog posts
デリケートな政治問題に触れる
04:19
to comment on sensitive political issues. Right?
イデオロギー的な大量の投稿をさせます
04:21
So you may wonder, why on Earth are they doing it?
なぜそんなことをするんだ
とお思いでしょう?
04:24
Why are they engaging with cyberspace?
なぜ サイバースペースに
関与するんでしょう?
04:28
Well my theory is that
私の考えでは
04:30
it's happening because censorship actually
実際 ネットでの検閲は
04:32
is less effective than you think it is in many of those places.
あまり意味がないと思うんです
04:35
The moment you put something critical in a blog,
ブログに批判的な内容が
載ったとして
04:38
even if you manage to ban it immediately,
すぐに排除することが
できたとしても
04:42
it will still spread around thousands and thousands of other blogs.
同じ内容が
何千ものほかのブログで広がります
04:45
So the more you block it,
ですから妨害すればするほど
04:49
the more it emboldens people to actually avoid the censorship
検閲された内容は
隠れて広がり
04:51
and thus win in this cat-and-mouse game.
イタチごっこは
止まるところを知りません
04:54
So the only way to control this message
本当に反体制的内容を
規制したければ
04:57
is actually to try to spin it
情報に手を加え
05:01
and accuse anyone who has written something critical
それを書いた人を
非難するのです
05:03
of being, for example, a CIA agent.
例えば あいつはCIA捜査官だってね
05:06
And, again, this is happening quite often.
これはよくあることなんですよ
05:08
Just to give you an example of how it works in China, for example.
中国で起こった例を
紹介しましょう
05:11
There was a big case in February 2009
2009年2月に
こんなことがありました
05:15
called "Elude the Cat."
「猫から逃げろ」という事件です
05:19
And for those of you who didn't know, I'll just give a little summary.
ご存知でない方のために
簡単にご説明します
05:21
So what happened is that a 24-year-old man,
ある24歳の男性が
05:25
a Chinese man, died in prison custody.
刑務所で亡くなりました
05:28
And police said that it happened
警察によると
05:31
because he was playing hide and seek,
男性がかくれんぼ 中国でいう―
05:34
which is "elude the cat" in Chinese slang,
「猫から逃げろ」をしていた際
05:36
with other inmates and hit his head
頭を壁に打って
05:39
against the wall,
亡くなったそうです
05:41
which was not an explanation which sat well with many Chinese bloggers.
多くの中国人ブロガーは
これを信じることなく
05:43
So they immediately began posting a lot of critical comments.
批判的なコメントを
残していきました
05:50
In fact, QQ.com, which is a popular Chinese website,
QQ.comという
中国で人気のウェブサイトでは
05:54
had 35,000 comments
この事件の直後
05:58
on this issue within hours.
3万5千件ものコメントが
寄せられました
06:00
But then authorities did something very smart.
そこで中国政府は
とても賢いことをしました
06:02
Instead of trying to purge these comments,
これらのコメントを
一掃するのではなく
06:05
they instead went and reached out to the bloggers.
ブロガーたち本人に
呼びかけたのです
06:08
And they basically said, "Look guys. We'd like you to become netizen investigators."
「ネット調査員になってみませんか」と
06:11
So 500 people applied,
すると500人の応募がありました
06:16
and four were selected to actually go and tour the facility in question,
そのうち4人は 
刑務所内を調査して回り
06:19
and thus inspect it and then blog about it.
そのことをブログに
投稿したのです
06:23
Within days the entire incident was forgotten,
数日後 事件は
世論から消え去りました
06:27
which would have never happened if they simply tried to block the content.
単に検閲をしたら
こんな結果にはならず
06:30
People would keep talking about it for weeks.
事件は何週間もネット上に
残り続けたでしょう
06:33
And this actually fits with another interesting theory
興味深いことに 
この現象はまさに
06:36
about what's happening in authoritarian states
権威主義国家のサイバースペースで
06:40
and in their cyberspace.
起こっていることなんです
06:43
This is what political scientists call authoritarian deliberation,
政治学者の間では
「協議型権威主義」と呼ばれていますが
06:45
and it happens when governments are actually reaching out to their critics
政府自らが
批判的な勢力に呼びかけ
06:48
and letting them engage with each other online.
ネット上で交流させるのです
06:53
We tend to think
私たちはこれで―
06:55
that somehow this is going to harm these dictatorships,
独裁体制が揺らぐのではないかと
考えがちですが
06:57
but in many cases it only strengthens them.
実際は より
強固なものにしてしまうんです
07:00
And you may wonder why.
なぜでしょうか
07:03
I'll just give you a very short list of reasons
いくつか理由を
申し上げましょう
07:05
why authoritarian deliberation
なぜ協議型権威主義が
07:07
may actually help the dictators.
独裁者のためになるのか
07:10
And first it's quite simple.
実に単純な話です
07:12
Most of them operate in a complete information vacuum.
ほとんどの独裁政権は
情報の真空の中で運営されています
07:14
They don't really have the data they need
政権への危機を特定するための
07:17
in order to identify emerging threats facing the regime.
データが得られないのです
07:20
So encouraging people to actually go online
国民がネットを使い
07:23
and share information and data
ブログやウィキで情報やデータを
07:26
on blogs and wikis is great
やり取りするのは好都合です
07:28
because otherwise, low level apparatchiks and bureaucrats
さもなければ下級の政府関係者は
07:30
will continue concealing what's actually happening in the country, right?
国内で起きていることを隠し続けるからです
07:33
So from this perspective, having blogs and wikis
こう考えると 
ブログやウィキなんかが
07:37
produce knowledge has been great.
情報提供してくれるのは
万々歳なんです
07:39
Secondly, involving public in any decision making
また 国民を政治決定に
関与させるのも
07:41
is also great
政府にとって有利になります
07:44
because it helps you to share the blame
なぜなら 政策が失敗したら
07:46
for the policies which eventually fail.
責任を共有できるからです
07:48
Because they say, "Well look, we asked you,
政府は「でもみなさんから意見を聴き―
07:50
we consulted you, you voted on it.
協議した上で 投票を行いましたよね」
07:52
You put it on the front page of your blog.
「ブログに書いたあなた方にも-
07:54
Well, great. You are the one who is to blame."
責任はあるんです」と
言い逃れるわけです
07:56
And finally, the purpose of
最後に申し上げたいのは
07:59
any authoritarian deliberation efforts
協調型権威主義の目的は
08:02
is usually to increase the legitimacy of the regimes, both at home and abroad.
国内外での政権の正当性を
高めることなんです
08:04
So inviting people to all sorts of public forums,
国民討論などに勧誘し
08:07
having them participate in decision making,
政治意思決定に
参加させることも
08:11
it's actually great.
政府に有利になります
08:13
Because what happens is that then
そうすれば
08:15
you can actually point to this initiative and say,
国民討論のことを持ちだして
こう言えばいいんですから
08:17
"Well, we are having a democracy. We are having a forum."
「国民討論の場を設けているんですから
これは民主主義ですよね」と
08:19
Just to give you an example,
一つ例を挙げますと
08:22
one of the Russian regions, for example,
ロシアのある地域では
08:24
now involves its citizens
住民を討論に参加させ
08:26
in planning its strategy up until year 2020.
2020年までの政策を
練っています
08:28
Right? So they can go online
住民はオンラインで
08:32
and contribute ideas on what that region would look like by the year 2020.
2020年までにどんな地域政策を取りたいか
討論するわけです
08:34
I mean, anyone who has been to Russia would know
まあ ロシアに行ったことのある方は
おわかりでしょうが
08:38
that there was no planning in Russia for the next month.
あの国には次の月の
計画すらなかったんです
08:40
So having people involved in planning for 2020
ですからいくら住民が
2020年に向けて発案しても
08:43
is not necessarily going to change anything,
なにも変わらないでしょうね
08:46
because the dictators are still the ones who control the agenda.
結局は独裁者が
政治を動かしていますから
08:48
Just to give you an example from Iran,
イランの例を見てみましょう
08:52
we all heard about the Twitter revolution
ツイッター革命について
08:54
that happened there,
ご存知ですよね
08:56
but if you look close enough, you'll actually see
しかし よく調べてみると
08:58
that many of the networks and blogs
多くのネットワークやブログ
09:00
and Twitter and Facebook were actually operational.
ツイッターやフェイスブックなどは
規制されていたんです
09:02
They may have become slower,
そのため情報普及は
遅くなりましたが
09:05
but the activists could still access it
政治活動家たちも
アクセスできました
09:07
and actually argue that having access to them
しかし 彼らがアクセス
できるということは
09:09
is actually great for many authoritarian states.
独裁国家にとって
好都合なんです
09:11
And it's great simply because
なぜなら 簡単に
09:14
they can gather open source intelligence.
情報収集ができるからです
09:17
In the past it would take you weeks, if not months,
以前は数週間かけて
09:21
to identify how Iranian activists connect to each other.
反体制分子の
接触方法を特定していたのが
09:24
Now you actually know how they connect to each other
今ではフェイスブックを見れば
09:27
by looking at their Facebook page.
すぐにそれが
わかってしまいます
09:29
I mean KGB, and not just KGB,
かつてKGBなんかは
09:31
used to torture in order to actually get this data.
情報入手のために
拷問をしていましたが
09:33
Now it's all available online.
今はオンラインで済むんです
09:36
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:38
But I think the biggest conceptual pitfall
サイバー空想家たちが
09:40
that cybertopians made
最も見落としているのは
09:42
is when it comes to digital natives, people who have grown up online.
インターネットを身近な存在として
育った人たちのことです
09:44
We often hear about cyber activism,
サイバーアクティビズムと言って
09:47
how people are getting more active because of the Internet.
インターネットが政治参加を
促しているということは聞きますが
09:50
Rarely hear about cyber hedonism, for example,
サイバーヘドニズムについては
あまり聞きません
09:53
how people are becoming passive.
人が政治に消極的に
なっているということです
09:55
Why? Because they somehow assume that the Internet
なぜでしょう?
それはインターネットによって―
09:57
is going to be the catalyst of change
若者がどんどん路上に出て行くと―
09:59
that will push young people into the streets,
思い込んでいるからです
10:01
while in fact it may actually be the new opium for the masses
現実には ネット中毒に
なった人たちが
10:03
which will keep the same people in their rooms downloading pornography.
部屋にこもってポルノを
ダウンロードしているんです
10:06
That's not an option being considered too strongly.
あまり好ましくないことですよね
10:09
So for every digital renegade that is revolting in the streets of Tehran,
ネットからテヘランの路上へ出て
抗議運動をしている人がいる一方
10:13
there may as well be two digital captives
その二倍の人口が
10:16
who are actually rebelling only in the World of Warcraft.
ネットゲームの世界で
戦っているわけです
10:18
And this is realistic. And there is nothing wrong about it
これが現実ですし
別に悪いことではありません
10:21
because the Internet has greatly empowered many of these young people
インターネットが若者に
活力を与えていることは事実ですし
10:23
and it plays a completely different social role for them.
全く異なる社会的役割を
果たしているんですから
10:27
If you look at some of the surveys
ある調査結果を見ると
10:29
on how the young people actually benefit from the Internet,
若者のインターネット活用法が
わかります
10:31
you'll see that the number of teenagers in China, for example,
例えば 中国の十代の若者で
10:34
for whom the Internet actually broadens their sex life,
インターネットが性生活に
役立っているという人は
10:37
is three times more than in the United States.
米国の3倍にも上ります
10:40
So it does play a social role,
このような
社会的役割はありますが
10:43
however it may not necessarily lead to political engagement.
政治参加に役立っている
というわけではなさそうです
10:45
So the way I tend to think of it
そこで私が提唱したいのは
10:48
is like a hierarchy of cyber-needs in space,
サイバー環境の
必要段階説です
10:50
a total rip-off from Abraham Maslow.
マズローの欲求段階説
みたいですけどね
10:52
But the point here is that
私が申し上げたいのは
10:54
when we get the remote Russian village online,
たとえロシアの田舎町に
ネット環境を整えても
10:56
what will get people to the Internet
住民がネットを
利用する理由は
10:59
is not going to be the reports from Human Rights Watch.
ヒューマン・ライツ・ウォッチのような
人権活動ではなく
11:01
It's going to be pornography, "Sex and the City,"
ポルノや『セックス・アンド・ザ・シティ』
11:03
or maybe watching funny videos of cats.
もしくは 猫のおもしろビデオでしょう
11:06
So this is something you have to recognize.
さて これは考えものですよね
11:09
So what should we do about it?
私たちには
なにができるでしょう?
11:11
Well I say we have to stop thinking
私が思うには
11:13
about the number of iPods per capita
一人当たりの
iPodの数を当てにせず
11:15
and start thinking about ways in which
ほかの方法を
考えるべきなんです
11:18
we can empower intellectuals,
学者や反体制勢力 
NGOや―
11:20
dissidents, NGOs and then the members of civil society.
市民社会組織などを
強化しなければなりません
11:23
Because even what has been happening up 'til now
なぜなら
現在まではびこってきた
11:26
with the Spinternet and authoritarian deliberation,
スピンターネットや
協議型権威主義によって
11:29
there is a great chance that those voices will not be heard.
そのような勢力がつぶされてしまう
可能性があるからです
11:31
So I think we should shatter some of our utopian assumptions
ですから 
空想的な考え方で安心せず
11:34
and actually start doing something about it.
なにかもっと有効な手段に
乗り出すべきなのです
11:37
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:41
Translator:Eri Nakamura
Reviewer:nobuyuki umeji

sponsored links

Evgeny Morozov - Internet scientist
Evgeny Morozov wants to know how the Internet has changed the conduct of global affairs, because it certainly has ... but perhaps not in all the ways we think.

Why you should listen

Writer Evgeny Morozov studies the political and social aspects of the Internet. Right now, he's working on a book about the Internet's role in politics -- and especially how the Web influences civic engagement and regime stability in authoritarian, closed societies or in countries "in transition."

Morozov writes the much-quoted Foreign Policy blog Net.Effect, and is known for debunking -- with facts, figures and sound research -- myths and media-bandwagon assumptions about the impact of the Internet and mobile technologies on politics and society. We all want to be cyber-optimists, assuming that free societies necessarily follow from free data. Morozov is careful to say that it's not quite that simple: yes, social change can be empowered by new tech, but so can the policies of repressive regimes. Morozov attended TEDGlobal 2009 as one of 25 TEDGlobal Fellows.

Get the slide deck from his TEDGlobal talk >>

Read his essay in design mind >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.