sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2009

Tim Brown: Designers -- think big!

ティム・ブラウン:デザイナーはもっと大きく考えるべきだ

July 22, 2009

職業デザイナ達は、小ぎれいでスタイリッシュなものを作ることだけで頭がいっぱいになっているとティム・ブラウンは警告しています。 清潔な水の提供という緊急の課題においても デザイナーはもっと大きな役割を果たすことができます。彼が訴えるのは、地域に根ざし、共同作業による、参加方式の「デザイン思考」です。

Tim Brown - Designer
Tim Brown is the CEO of the "innovation and design" firm IDEO -- taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'd like to talk a little bit this morning
今日、もし我々がデザインそのものから
00:12
about what happens if we move from design
デザイン思考という考え方に移行したときに
00:14
to design thinking.
一体何が起こるのかについて少しお話ししたいと思います
00:17
Now this rather old photo up there
これは少し古い写真ですが
00:20
is actually the first project I was ever hired to do,
私が初めて関わったプロジェクトです
00:22
something like 25 years ago.
だいたい25年ぐらい前でしょうか
00:25
It's a woodworking machine, or at least a piece of one,
これは木工用の機械か何かですが
00:27
and my task was to
私のタスクはこの機械を
00:29
make this thing a little bit more modern,
少しモダンにして
00:31
a little bit easier to use.
すこし使い易くすることでした
00:33
I thought, at the time, I did a pretty good job.
その当時、私はいい仕事ができたと思っていました
00:35
Unfortunately, not very long afterwards
しかし、実際は間もなく
00:38
the company went out of business.
その会社は潰れてしまったのです
00:40
This is the second project that I did. It's a fax machine.
これは私が関わった2つ目のプロジェクトでFAX機です
00:43
I put an attractive shell around some new technology.
私は、この新しいテクノロジーにかっこいい外観を与えました
00:46
Again, 18 months later,
しかし、この場合もまた、18ヶ月後には
00:49
the product was obsolete.
この製品は生産中止となったのです
00:51
And now, of course, the whole technology is obsolete.
そして今ではこのテクノロジーそのものが無くなりかけています
00:53
Now, I'm a fairly slow learner,
私は学ぶのに時間のかかるたちですが
00:58
but eventually it occurred to me that
しかし、後々分かってきたのは
01:00
maybe what passed for design
おそらくデザインに求められてきたことが
01:02
wasn't all that important --
そんなに重要でなかったのかもしれないということでした
01:04
making things more attractive,
ものをよりかっこ良く見せることだったり
01:06
making them a bit easier to use,
ほんの少しだけ使い易くする
01:08
making them more marketable.
売りやすいものにすることなどです
01:10
By focusing on a design,
デザインに焦点をあてて
01:13
maybe just a single product,
あるいは一つの製品に焦点を当てて
01:15
I was being incremental
少しずつの改良を進めましたが
01:17
and not having much of an impact.
そんなに大きな影響を与えてはいませんでした
01:19
But I think this small view of design
しかし、私が思うにこのデザインの小さい見方は
01:23
is a relatively recent phenomenon,
比較的最近の現象で
01:25
and in fact really emerged
実はデザインが消費者主義の
01:27
in the latter half of the 20th century
道具として使われ始めた
01:29
as design became a tool of consumerism.
この20世紀後半に生まれた考え方なのです
01:31
So when we talk about design today,
我々が、今日デザインに関して話をするとき
01:35
and particularly when we read about it in the popular press,
特に、人気のあるマスメディアでそれを読むとき
01:37
we're often talking about products like these.
私たちはよく、このような製品についてのことを話します
01:40
Amusing? Yes. Desirable? Maybe.
面白そうでしょ?欲しくなってくるでしょ?
01:42
Important? Not so very.
だからといって重要ですか?そんなにですよね
01:45
But this wasn't always the way.
しかし、ずっとこんな感じだったわけではないのです
01:48
And I'd like to suggest that if we take
私が提案したいのは
01:50
a different view of design,
もし私たちがデザインの見方を変え
01:52
and focus less on the object
もの自体に焦点を当てるのではなく
01:54
and more on design thinking as an approach,
デザイン思考という手法に注目すれば
01:57
that we actually might see the result in a bigger impact.
大きなインパクトのある結果を得られることです
02:00
Now this gentleman, Isambard Kingdom Brunel,
この男性、イザムバード・キングダム・ブルネルは
02:05
designed many great things in his career in the 19th century,
19世紀に多くの偉大なものをデザインしました
02:07
including the Clifton suspension bridge in Bristol
例えば、ブリストルのクリフトン吊橋や
02:11
and the Thames tunnel at Rotherhithe.
ローザハイトのテムズ・トンネルなど様々です
02:15
Both great designs and actually very innovative too.
どちらもすばらしいデザインで実際たいへん革新的でもあります
02:17
His greatest creation
彼の偉大なデザインは
02:22
runs actually right through here in Oxford.
ここオックスフォードも走り抜けています
02:25
It's called the Great Western Railway.
そうグレート・ウェスタン鉄道です
02:27
And as a kid I grew up very close to here,
子供のとき、私はここ近辺で育ちました
02:30
and one of my favorite things to do
轟音を立てて走り去る
02:33
was to cycle along by the side of the railway
特急列車を待ちながら線路沿いを
02:35
waiting for the great big express trains to roar past.
自転車で走ることが大好きでした
02:38
You can see it represented here in J.M.W. Turner's painting,
ターナーの “雨、蒸気、速度” において
02:41
"Rain, Steam and Speed".
表現されている通りです
02:43
Now, what Brunel said that he wanted to achieve for his passengers
ブルネルが乗客に体験してもらいたかったことは
02:46
was the experience of floating across the countryside.
浮かぶように田舎を駆け抜ける体験でした
02:50
Now, this was back in the 19th century.
これは19世紀の頃の話です
02:55
And to do that meant creating the flattest gradients
それを達成するには
02:57
that had ever yet been made,
それまでないほど平坦な勾配にすることが必要で
02:59
which meant building long viaducts across river valleys --
それは渓谷にかかる長い架橋を意味しました
03:01
this is actually the viaduct across the Thames at Maidenhead --
これはテムズ川のメイデンヘッドにかかる架橋ですが
03:04
and long tunnels such as the one at Box, in Wiltshire.
さらにウィルトシャーのボックストンネルなどの長いトンネルが必要でした
03:08
But he didn't stop there. He didn't stop
彼はそこで終わりにしませんでした。
03:14
with just trying to design the best railway journey.
最高の鉄道の旅をデザインする試みには終わりがありませんでした
03:16
He imagined an integrated transportation system
彼は乗客がロンドンで列車に乗って
03:19
in which it would be possible for a passenger to embark
船でニューヨークにおりるという
03:23
on a train in London
統合された交通を
03:26
and disembark from a ship in New York.
考えだしたのです
03:29
One journey from London to New York.
ロンドンからニューヨークまでが一つの旅です
03:32
This is the S.S. Great Western that he built
これは彼がその壮大な旅の後半の
03:36
to take care of the second half of that journey.
成し遂げるためにつくった造った蒸気船グレートウェスタン号です
03:38
Now, Brunel was working 100 years before
ブルネルはデザインの職業が生まれる
03:42
the emergence of the design profession,
100年も前にこのように活躍していた人です
03:44
but I think he was using design thinking
しかし彼は、問題解決のためや世界を変える革新のために
03:47
to solve problems and to create world-changing innovations.
デザイン思考を用いていたように思います
03:50
Now, design thinking begins with what Roger Martin,
デザイン思考はトロント大学ビジネススクールの教授である
03:55
the business school professor at the University of Toronto,
ロジャー・マーティンの言う
03:57
calls integrative thinking.
統合的思考から始まっています
04:00
And that's the ability to exploit opposing ideas
それは、新しい解決策を見いだすために
04:02
and opposing constraints
ぶつかり合うアイデアや制約を
04:05
to create new solutions.
うまく利用する能力です
04:07
In the case of design, that means
デザインの場合それは
04:09
balancing desirability, what humans need,
人間が必要とする望ましい状態を
04:12
with technical feasibility,
技術的な実現可能性や
04:16
and economic viability.
経済的な実行可能性と均衡させることです
04:18
With innovations like the Great Western,
グレートウェスタンのような革新によって
04:21
we can stretch that balance to the absolute limit.
私たちはその均衡を絶対的な限界まで引き伸ばしました
04:23
So somehow, we went from this to this.
どういうわけか私たちは、この状態からこんな感じになってしまいました
04:27
Systems thinkers who were reinventing the world,
つまり、世界を変えるようなシステムごと考えていた人が
04:34
to a priesthood of folks in black turtlenecks and designer glasses
小さいものに取り組む、黒いタートルネックとデザイナーメガネを身に付けた
04:37
working on small things.
聖職者みたいになってしまったのです
04:42
As our industrial society matured,
我々の社会の工業化が進むにつれて
04:44
so design became a profession
デザインの分野が専門化され
04:48
and it focused on an ever smaller canvas
より小さな分野に集中して
04:50
until it came to stand for aesthetics,
デザインは美やイメージ
04:53
image and fashion.
ファッションを意味するようになります
04:55
Now I'm not trying to throw stones here.
ここで私はこれを非難しているわけでありません
04:57
I'm a fully paid-up member of that priesthood,
私もれっきとしたその聖職者たちの一員で
05:00
and somewhere in here I have my designer glasses.
ご覧の通り私もそのデザイナーメガネをここに持っていますしね
05:02
There we go.
ほらね
05:04
But I do think that perhaps design
しかし、私が思うにおそらくデザインは
05:07
is getting big again.
もう一度大きくなり始めています
05:09
And that's happening through
そして、それはデザイン思考を
05:11
the application of design thinking
新しい種類の問題に
05:14
to new kinds of problems --
応用することで生まれています
05:16
to global warming, to education,
地球温暖化や教育
05:18
healthcare, security, clean water, whatever.
ヘルスケア、安全保障、水質改善など様々です。
05:20
And as we see this reemergence of design thinking
このデザイン思考が再度登場して
05:24
and we see it beginning to tackle new kinds of problems,
様々な新しい問題に取り組むことで
05:27
there are some basic ideas that I think we can observe that are useful.
基本的な考え方が実用的だとわかります
05:30
And I'd like to talk about some of those
次の数分間でそれのいくつかを
05:33
just for the next few minutes.
お話したいと思います
05:35
The first of those is that design is
一つ目はデザインは
05:37
human-centered.
人を中心に考えられているものです
05:39
It may integrate technology and economics,
技術や経済と統合するかもしれませんが
05:42
but it starts with what humans need, or might need.
でも、人間が必要とするもの、必要とするだろうものから始まります
05:44
What makes life easier, more enjoyable?
どうしたら生活がより便利になり、楽しくなるか?
05:48
What makes technology useful and usable?
どうしたらテクノロジーが実用的で使いやすくなるか?等と言った疑問です
05:50
But that is more than simply good ergonomics,
しかし、これは単なる人間工学や
05:54
putting the buttons in the right place.
ボタンを正しい場所に置くといったこと以上のものです
05:57
It's often about understanding culture and context
多くの場合それは、文化やその背景を理解することから始まり
06:00
before we even know where to start to have ideas.
どこからアイデアを生み出すかという以前の話です
06:03
So when a team was working on a new vision screening program in India,
チームがインドで新しい視力検査プログラムに携わっているとき
06:06
they wanted to understand what the aspirations
彼らはまず、学校の子どもたちのあこがれや
06:10
and motivations were of these school children
やる気はどうなっているかを理解しようとしました
06:12
to understand how they might play a role
それが彼らの親を検査するとき
06:15
in screening their parents.
子供たちがどんな役を果たすか見極めるためです
06:17
Conversion Sound has developed a high quality,
Conversion Sound社は高品質かつ
06:22
ultra-low-cost digital hearing aid
非常に低価格の補聴器を
06:24
for the developing world.
途上国向けに開発しました
06:27
Now, in the West we rely on highly trained technicians
先進国では高度に訓練された専門家しか
06:29
to fit these hearing aids.
このような補聴器の調整はできません
06:33
In places like India, those technicians simply don't exist.
しかしインドなどの国々では、まずこのような専門家すら存在しません
06:35
So it took a team working in India
そのため、このチームはインドで
06:39
with patients and community health workers
患者とコミュニティの医療従事者を巻き込んで
06:41
to understand how a PDA
このPDAとそのアプリケーションで
06:43
and an application on a PDA
耳を診断し、それを取り付ける専門家に
06:45
might replace those technicians
取って代わることができないか
06:47
in a fitting and diagnostic service.
と考えました
06:49
Instead of starting with technology,
テクノロジーから始める代わりに
06:52
the team started with people and culture.
チームは人や文化から手をつけました
06:54
So if human need is the place to start,
人々のニーズを出発点としたとき
06:57
then design thinking rapidly moves on to
デザイン思考に従えば すぐに
07:00
learning by making.
作ることから学ぼうとします
07:02
Instead of thinking about what to build,
何を作るかを考えるのではなく
07:04
building in order to think.
考えるために作るのです
07:07
Now, prototypes speed up the process of innovation,
ここで、プロトタイプはイノベーションの過程を加速させます
07:10
because it is only when we put our ideas out into the world
なぜなら、アイデアを現実の中で働かせてみないと
07:13
that we really start to understand their strengths and weaknesses.
そのアイデアの良い点と悪い点を深く理解出来ないからです
07:16
And the faster we do that,
それをするのが早ければ早いほど
07:19
the faster our ideas evolve.
そのアイデアは早く進化するのです
07:21
Now, much has been said and written about
インドのアラビンド眼科病院については
07:24
the Aravind Eye Institute in Madurai, India.
広く語られ、記事にもなっていますが
07:26
They do an incredible job of serving very poor patients
そこではお金を払える人からの歳入を
07:29
by taking the revenues from those who can afford to pay
貧しく支払能力がない非常に貧しい人々への補填とすることで
07:33
to cross-subsidize those who cannot.
彼らに医療を提供しています
07:35
Now, they are very efficient,
そこのシステムは非常に効率的で
07:39
but they are also very innovative.
かつ、とても革新的です
07:42
When I visited them a few years ago,
私が2、3年前に訪れたとき
07:45
what really impressed me was their willingness
私が感銘を受けたのは、早い段階から
07:48
to prototype their ideas very early.
アイデアをすぐにプロトタイプにしようとする彼らの意欲でした
07:50
This is the manufacturing facility
これは彼らの製造工場で
07:52
for one of their biggest cost breakthroughs.
これがひとつの大きなコスト削減の要因となっています
07:54
They make their own intraocular lenses.
彼らはここで自ら眼内レンズを製造し
07:56
These are the lenses that replace those
白内障で悪くなった水晶体の
07:59
that are damaged by cataracts.
代わりに治療に使われます
08:01
And I think it's partly their prototyping mentality
このブレイクスルーを達成できたのは
08:03
that really allowed them to achieve the breakthrough.
プロトタイピング重視の発想の寄与が大きいでしょう
08:07
Because they brought the cost down
なぜなら彼らは一組200ドルだったレンズを
08:09
from $200 a pair,
なんと一組
08:11
down to just $4 a pair.
4ドルにまでコストダウンしたのです
08:12
Partly they did this by instead of building
新しく見栄えのいい工場を作る代わりに
08:17
a fancy new factory,
病院の施設の地下室を
08:19
they used the basement of one of their hospitals.
工場代わりに使ったり
08:21
And instead of installing the large-scale machines
先進国で使われている大規模な機械を
08:25
used by western producers,
導入する代わりに
08:28
they used low-cost CAD/CAM prototyping technology.
低価格なCAD/CAM を用いたプロトタイプを実現しています
08:30
They are now the biggest manufacturer of these lenses in the developing world
彼らは途上国におけるレンズ製造の最大手となり
08:34
and have recently moved into a custom factory.
最近自社の工場へと移転しました
08:38
So if human need is the place to start,
つまり、我々が本当に必要としているものをスタート地点とし
08:42
and prototyping, a vehicle for progress,
プロトタイプを作り、プロセスを加速することで
08:44
then there are also some questions to ask about the destination.
ゴール地点についてのいくつかの疑問も生まれてきます
08:46
Instead of seeing its primary objective as consumption,
主要なゴールを消費とするのではなく
08:50
design thinking is beginning to explore the potential of participation --
デザイン思考は参加型の中に可能性を見いだしつつあります
08:55
the shift from a passive relationship
消費者と生産者の
08:58
between consumer and producer
受動的な関係から
09:01
to the active engagement of everyone
人々の能動的な関わりへのシフトは
09:03
in experiences that are meaningful,
非常に意味あることであり、
09:05
productive and profitable.
同時に生産性が高く、有益なのです
09:07
So I'd like to take the idea that Rory Sutherland talked about,
ローリー・サザーランドが話していたアイデアを使わせていただくと
09:11
this notion that intangible things are worth perhaps more than physical things,
目に見えるものより、目に見えないもののほうが価値があるという概念を
09:14
and take that a little bit further and say that
ほんの少しだけ拡大して言えば
09:17
I think the design of participatory systems,
様々な形で単なるお金以上の
09:19
in which many more forms of value
価値が生まれ、評価される
09:22
beyond simply cash
参加型システムのデザインは
09:25
are both created and measured,
デザインだけに限らず
09:27
is going to be the major theme, not only for design,
私たちの経済全体における
09:30
but also for our economy as we go forward.
大きなテーマになることでしょう
09:33
So William Beveridge, when he wrote the first of his famous reports in 1942,
ウィリアム・ベヴァリッジが1942年に
09:37
created what became Britain's welfare state
彼の有名な論文を書いたときに
09:41
in which he hoped that every citizen
彼は全市民が社会の利益のために
09:45
would be an active participant
積極的な参加者となるような
09:48
in their own social well-being.
イギリスの福祉制度を作りました
09:50
By the time he wrote his third report,
彼が第三の報告書を書いたときには
09:52
he confessed that he had failed
彼は失敗を認めました
09:55
and instead had created a society of welfare consumers.
福祉を消費する者の社会ができてしまったのです
09:57
Hilary Cottam, Charlie Leadbeater,
そしてPariciple社のヒラリー・コッタム
10:03
and Hugo Manassei of Participle
チャーリー・レッドベターとヒューゴ・マナッセイは
10:05
have taken this idea of participation,
参加型の考え方を取り入れて
10:07
and in their manifesto entitled Beveridge 4.0,
ベヴァリッジ 4.0 というマニフェストを掲げました
10:10
they are suggesting a framework
社会保障制度改革の
10:13
for reinventing the welfare state.
枠組みの提案です
10:15
So in one of their projects called Southwark Circle,
彼らのプロジェクトの一つであるサウスワーク・サークルでは
10:18
they worked with residents in Southwark, South London
ロンドン南部のサウスワークの居住者とともに
10:20
and a small team of designers
小さなデザイナーのチームが
10:23
to develop a new membership organization
高齢者の家事手伝いをする
10:25
to help the elderly with household tasks.
新しい会員制の組織を作りました
10:29
Designs were refined and developed
150人の老人とその家族とともに
10:32
with 150 older people and their families
デザインを改良して開発した後で
10:34
before the service was launched earlier this year.
今年初めにサービスがスタートしました
10:37
We can take this idea of participation
私たちはこの参加型の考え方を
10:42
perhaps to its logical conclusion
論理的な結論まで詰めると
10:46
and say that design may have its greatest impact
デザインがデザイナーの手から離れて
10:48
when it's taken out of the hands of designers
一般の人々みなに渡ったとき
10:50
and put into the hands of everyone.
デザインが最も影響を与えると言えるでしょう
10:53
Nurses and practitioners at U.S. healthcare system
アメリカの医療機関であるカイザー・パーマネンテの
10:56
Kaiser Permanente
看護士や医療従事者は
10:59
study the topic of improving the patient experience,
患者の体験を向上させようという課題を研究していました
11:01
and particularly focused on the way that they exchange knowledge
特に注目したのは 情報交換の方法と
11:06
and change shift.
シフト交替です
11:11
Through a program of observational research,
観察調査プログラムを通して
11:14
brainstorming new solutions and rapid prototyping,
新しい解決策をブレインストーミングしたり、すぐに試作品に取り組んでいました
11:16
they've developed a completely new way to change shift.
そして、彼らは全く新しい勤務シフト引継ぎの方法を生み出したのです
11:19
They went from retreating to the nurse's station
彼らはナースステーションで患者の状態や要求などを
11:22
to discuss the various states and needs of patients,
話しあっていた従来の方法から
11:26
to developing a system that happened on the ward
シンプルなソフトを用いて、患者のいるその病室で
11:28
in front of patients, using a simple software tool.
引継ぎができるシステム
11:31
By doing this they brought the time that they were away from patients
このシステムによって 患者から眼を離す時間が
11:34
down from 40 minutes to 12 minutes, on average.
平均で 40 分から 12 分にまで短縮されました
11:36
They increased patient confidence and nurse happiness.
これによって、患者の安心感、看護士の満足度ともに上昇しました
11:40
When you multiply that by all the nurses
これが、このシステム内の40の病院で
11:44
in all the wards in 40 hospitals in the system,
全ての病棟にいる全ての看護士にもたらされることで
11:46
it resulted, actually, in a pretty big impact.
とてつもない効果が生まれました
11:49
And this is just one of thousands
そして、このケースは医療分野における
11:51
of opportunities in healthcare alone.
何千もの病院のうちの一つの事例でしかないのです
11:53
So these are just some of the kind of basic ideas
これらが、デザイン思考における
11:59
around design thinking
基本的な考え方で
12:02
and some of the new kinds of projects
その考え方が、上手く応用されている
12:04
that they're being applied to.
いくつかのプロジェクトの例でした
12:06
But I'd like to go back to Brunel here,
しかし、私はここでブルネルの話に戻りたいと思います
12:09
and suggest a connection that might explain why this is happening now,
そして、なぜこれが現在起こっているのかという関連性
12:11
and maybe why design thinking is a useful tool.
そして、なぜデザイン思考が有益なツールとなるのかということについて話したいと思います
12:15
And that connection is change.
その関連性とは"変化"です
12:20
In times of change we need
変化の時には私たちは
12:23
new alternatives, new ideas.
新しい代替物や考え方を必要とします
12:25
Now, Brunel worked at the height of the Industrial Revolution,
そして、ブルネルは産業革命の絶頂期に活躍しており
12:29
when all of life and our economy
全てのライフスタイルや経済が
12:31
was being reinvented.
再発明されていました
12:33
Now the industrial systems of Brunel's time have run their course,
ブルネル時代の産業システムは現在では行くところまで行き着き
12:35
and indeed they are part of the problem today.
今日の様々な問題の一部となっています
12:39
But, again, we are in the midst of massive change.
しかし、私たちは大規模な変化の真っ只中にいます
12:41
And that change is forcing us to question
その変化によって我々の社会の根本的な見方に対して
12:45
quite fundamental aspects of our society --
質問をしてきます
12:48
how we keep ourselves healthy, how we govern ourselves,
どのようにして健康を維持するか、どのように我々自身を統制するか
12:50
how we educate ourselves, how we keep ourselves secure.
どのように我々は教育すればよいか、どのように安全を保障するかなどです
12:53
And in these times of change, we need these new choices
現在の解決策が徐々に使い物にならなくなってきたので
12:57
because our existing solutions are simply becoming obsolete.
この変化の時代には、私たちは新しい選択肢が必要なのです
13:00
So why design thinking?
そこで、なぜデザイン思考なのか?
13:05
Because it gives us a new way of tackling problems.
なぜなら、新しい問題対処の方法を与えてくれるのです
13:07
Instead of defaulting to our normal convergent approach
利用可能な選択肢の中からベストを選ぶという
13:10
where we make the best choice out of available alternatives,
従来の収束的なアプローチにとどまる代わりに
13:15
it encourages us to take a divergent approach,
デザイン思考は発散的なアプローチをとり
13:19
to explore new alternatives, new solutions,
今までになかった新しい選択肢、新しい解決策
13:22
new ideas that have not existed before.
考え方を探索させてくれます
13:24
But before we go through that process of divergence,
しかし、その発散的なプロセスにいくまえに
13:28
there is actually quite an important first step.
重要なステップが一つ存在します
13:30
And that is, what is the question that we're trying to answer?
それは、私たちが解決しようとしている問題は何かということです
13:33
What's the design brief?
デザインブリーフとは?
13:36
Now Brunel may have asked a question like this,
ブルネルは こんな質問をしたことでしょう
13:38
"How do I take a train from London to New York?"
「どうしたら私はロンドン発ニューヨーク着の列車に乗れるのだろうか?」
13:40
But what are the kinds of questions that we might ask today?
さて、我々が尋ねなくてはならない質問とはなんでしょうか
13:44
So these are some that we've been asked to think about recently.
我々が今日考えなくてはならない質問はいくつかありますが
13:48
And one in particular, is one that we're working on with the Acumen Fund,
一つは、我々がアキュメン基金と取り組んでいることです
13:54
in a project that's been funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
それはビル・メリンダ財団によってサポートされているプロジェクトです
13:57
How might we improve access to safe drinking water
いかにして最貧国の人々が安全な水にアクセスできるか
14:01
for the world's poorest people,
そして同時に
14:04
and at the same time stimulate innovation
どのようにして 地域の水の供給業者をイノベーションに
14:06
amongst local water providers?
導くことができるだろうかという課題です
14:08
So instead of having a bunch of American designers
ふさわしいかどうか分からない新しいアイデアを
14:12
come up with new ideas that may or may not have been appropriate,
たくさんのアメリカのデザイナーだけに考え出してもらう代わりに
14:14
we took a sort of more open, collaborative and participative approach.
私たちはよりオープンで協力的で、かつ参加型のアプローチをとることにしました
14:17
We teamed designers and investment experts up with
私たちはデザイナーと投資のエキスパートと
14:21
11 water organizations across India.
インドの11つの水関連の組織とで チームを作りました
14:24
And through workshops they developed
彼らが作ったワークショップを通して
14:27
innovative new products, services, and business models.
彼らは革新的な新しい製品、サービス、そしてビジネスモデルを生み出しました
14:29
We hosted a competition
我々はコンテストを主催し
14:32
and then funded five of those organizations
彼らのアイデアを開発するためにその中から5つの組織を
14:34
to develop their ideas.
ファンドしました
14:36
So they developed and iterated these ideas.
そして、彼らは何度も反復させ、そのアイデアを発展させていきました
14:38
And then IDEO and Acumen spent several weeks working with them
そしてIDEOとアキュメンは彼らと数週間取り組み
14:40
to help design new social marketing campaigns,
新しいソーシャルマーケティングキャンペーン
14:43
community outreach strategies, business models,
コミュニティの奉仕活動戦略、ビジネスモデル
14:48
new water vessels for storing water
新しい貯水タンク
14:51
and carts for delivering water.
そして水の運搬カートのデザインをサポートしました
14:53
Some of those ideas are just getting launched into the market.
これらのアイデアはもうすぐマーケットに投入されます
14:56
And the same process is just getting underway
同様のプロセスがアフリカ東部のいくつかのNGOと共に
14:58
with NGOs in East Africa.
進行中です
15:00
So for me, this project shows
私にとって、このプロジェクトは
15:03
kind of how far we can go from
私がキャリアの始めのころに
15:06
some of those sort of small things
取り組んでいた小さいモノからどれだけ
15:08
that I was working on
ちがったことが出来るか
15:10
at the beginning of my career.
ということを示してくれます
15:12
That by focusing on the needs of humans
人のニーズに焦点を置き
15:14
and by using prototypes
プロトタイプを用いて
15:18
to move ideas along quickly,
アイデアを発展させ
15:20
by getting the process out of the hands of designers,
デザイナーが使ってきたプロセスを応用し
15:22
and by getting the active participation of the community,
コミュニティの参加を促すことで
15:25
we can tackle bigger and more interesting questions.
私たちはより大きく面白い問題に取り組むことができます
15:28
And just like Brunel, by focusing on systems,
ブルネルと同じように、システムに焦点を当てることで
15:31
we can have a bigger impact.
私たちは大きな影響を与えることができます
15:34
So that's one thing that we've been working on.
これが私たちが取り組んでいる事例の一つです
15:37
I'm actually really quite interested, and perhaps more interested
私がより興味を持っているのはこのコミュニティが
15:40
to know what this community thinks we could work on.
私たちが何に取り組めると思っているのかということです
15:43
What kinds of questions do we think
私たちはデザイン思考を
15:47
design thinking could be used to tackle?
何に応用すべきなのでしょうか?
15:50
And if you've got any ideas
もし、何かいいアイデアをお持ちの場合は
15:53
then feel free, you can post them to Twitter.
ご自由にTwitterにポストしてください
15:55
There is a hash tag there that you can use, #CBDQ.
ハッシュタグは"#CBDQ"です
15:57
And the list looked something like this a little while ago.
少し前ではリストはこんな感じでした
16:00
And of course you can search to find the questions that you're interested in
もちろんあなたもこのハッシュタグで検索をすることで
16:03
by using the same hash code.
興味のある質問を見つけることができます
16:07
So I'd like to believe that design thinking
私はデザイン思考が変化を生み出し
16:09
actually can make a difference,
新しいアイデア、そしてイノベーションを
16:13
that it can help create new ideas
生み出すきっかけとなり
16:15
and new innovations,
最近のスタイリッシュな製品以上の
16:17
beyond the latest High Street products.
インパクトを与えてくれると信じています
16:19
To do that I think we have to take a more expansive view of design,
それを実現するために我々は、プロフェッショナルの殻に閉じこもるのではなく
16:21
more like Brunel, less a domain of a professional priesthood.
ブルネルのようにより広い視野のデザインの観点をもつことが大切なのです
16:25
And the first step is to start asking the right questions.
最初のステップはまず正しい質問を投げかけることです
16:31
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
16:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:36
Translator:Hiroaki Yamane
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Tim Brown - Designer
Tim Brown is the CEO of the "innovation and design" firm IDEO -- taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface.

Why you should listen

Tim Brown is the CEO of innovation and design firm IDEO, taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface. Having taken over from founder David E. Kelley, Tim Brown carries forward the firm's mission of fusing design, business and social studies to come up with deeply researched, deeply understood designs and ideas -- they call it "design thinking."

IDEO is the kind of firm that companies turn to when they want a top-down rethink of a business or product -- from fast food conglomerates to high-tech startups, hospitals to universities.

IDEO has designed and prototyped everything from a life-saving portable defibrillator to the defining details at the groundbreaking Prada shop in Manhattan to corporate processes. And check out the Global Chain Reaction for a sample of how seriously this firm takes play.

Curious about design thinking? Sign up for an IDEO U design thinking course or check out this free toolkit: Design Thinking for Educators.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.