sponsored links
TEDxUSC

David Logan: Tribal leadership

デビッド・ローガン:集団のリーダーシップ

March 23, 2009

TEDxUSCでは、経営学の教授であるデビッド・ローガンが、学校や職場、そして運転免許センターなどで人間が自然と形成する、5種類の集団についてお話しします。私達が共有する集団の傾向を理解することで、よりよい個人へとお互いを導く一助となるでしょう。

David Logan - Professor of management
David Logan is a USC faculty member, best-selling author, and management consultant. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What we're really here to talk about is the "how."
ここでお話するのは「どのように」についてです
00:12
Okay, so how exactly do we create this
実際どのようにすれば
00:15
world-shattering, if you will, innovation?
世界をゆるがす革新は生みだせるのでしょうか
00:18
Now, I want to tell you a quick story.
短いエピソードを紹介します
00:21
We'll go back a little more than a year.
一年と少し前のことです
00:23
In fact, the date -- I'm curious to know
実はこの日ですが 誰か
00:25
if any of you know what happened on this momentous date?
この特別な日の出来事を
覚えている方はいませんか?
00:27
It was February 3rd, 2008.
2008年の2月3日です
00:30
Anyone remember what happened,
どなたか、覚えていませんか?
00:33
February 3rd, 2008?
2008年2月3日ですよ
スーパーボウルです
00:35
Super Bowl. I heard it over here. It was the date of the Super Bowl.
そちらから聞こえました
そうスーパーボウルの日でした
00:38
And the reason that this date was so momentous
その日が非常に重要だった理由はこうです
00:41
is that what my colleagues, John King
同僚のジョン・キングと
00:44
and Halee Fischer-Wright, and I noticed
ヘイリー・フィッシャー・ライトと私が
00:46
as we began to debrief various Super Bowl parties,
多様なスーパーボウル・パーティーの様子を
00:49
is that it seemed to us
調査したところ アメリカ中で
00:52
that across the United States,
諸集団の理事会が
00:54
if you will, tribal councils had convened.
行われたようなものだと気づきました
00:56
And they had discussed things of great national importance.
まさに国民的に重要なことを話していました
00:59
Like, "Do we like the Budweiser commercial?"
「今年のバドワイザーのCMはどうか」
01:03
and, "Do we like the nachos?" and, "Who is going to win?"
「ナッチョの味はどうだ」「どちらが勝つか」などです
01:06
But they also talked about which candidate they were going to support.
でも「どの候補者が良いか」なんていう
話もしていたのです
01:09
And if you go back in time to February 3rd,
2月3日の時点では
01:13
it looked like Hilary Clinton was going to get the Democratic nomination.
ヒラリー・クリントンが民主党から
大統領候補に指名される見込みでした
01:16
And there were even some polls that were saying she was going to go all the way.
最終的に大統領になるという調査結果もありました
01:20
But when we talked to people,
でも私たちが聞いた話では
01:23
it appeared that a funnel effect had happened
アメリカ中の集団で
01:25
in these tribes all across the United States.
候補者の絞り込みも進んだようでした
01:27
Now what is a tribe? A tribe is a group of
では 集団とは何でしょう
01:30
about 20 -- so kind of more than a team --
集団はチームと呼ぶよりは大きく
01:32
20 to about 150 people.
20人から150人ほどの集まりです
01:35
And it's within these tribes that all of our work gets done.
このような集団内で
いろいろな仕事が行われています
01:38
But not just work. It's within these tribes
仕事にとどまらず
01:41
that societies get built,
集団内に社会が形成され
01:43
that important things happen.
大切なことが起こるのです
01:45
And so as we surveyed the, if you will, representatives
そこで私たちは
スーパーボウル・パーティの
01:47
from various tribal councils that met,
主催者たちを諸集団の代表者とみなし
01:50
also known as Super Bowl parties,
アンケートを取りました
01:52
we sent the following email off to 40 newspaper editors the following day.
結果を40紙の編集部にメールしました
01:54
February 4th, we posted it on our website. This was before Super Tuesday.
2月4日 予備選挙の始まる前に
私達のウェブサイトにも載せました
01:57
We said, "The tribes that we're in
「私たちが調査した
02:01
are saying it's going to be Obama."
集団の見解ではオバマが当選する」
02:03
Now, the reason we knew that
さて なぜ分かったかというと
02:05
was because we spent the previous 10 years
それまでの10年間
02:07
studying tribes, studying these naturally occurring groups.
集団 ―なかでも自然に形成される集団を
研究してきたからです
02:10
All of you are members of tribes.
誰もが 集団の一員です
02:14
In walking around at the break,
講演の合間に 歩き回った皆さんは
02:16
many of you had met members of your tribe. And you were talking to them.
自分の仲間に会って
言葉を交わしたことでしょう
02:19
And many of you were doing what great, if you will, tribal leaders do,
リーダーとして望ましい行動をしていた方も
大勢いました
02:22
which is to find someone
自分の集団のメンバーと
02:26
who is a member of a tribe,
自分の集団のメンバーと
02:28
and to find someone else who is another member of a different tribe,
他の集団のメンバーを引き合わせていました
02:30
and make introductions.
他の集団のメンバーを引き合わせていました
02:33
That is in fact what great tribal leaders do.
集団の良いリーダーはそうするものですね
02:35
So here is the bottom line.
さてここからがポイントです
02:38
If you focus in on a group like this --
例えばこんな集団を考えましょう
02:40
this happens to be a USC game --
USCのフットボールの試合です
02:43
and you zoom in with one of those super satellite cameras
スーパーサテライトカメラで
02:45
and do magnification factors so you could see individual people,
一人ひとりを見ることができるよう拡大すると
02:48
you would in fact see not a single crowd,
実はひとつの大きな集団ではなく
02:52
just like there is not a single crowd here,
小さな集団の集まりであるのが
わかります
02:54
but you would see these tribes that are then coming together.
この会場でもそうですね
02:56
And from a distance it appears that it's a single group.
でも離れて見ると
単一の集団に見えるのです
02:59
And so people form tribes.
このように 人は集団を形成します
03:03
They always have. They always will.
いつもそうしてきました
今後も変わらないでしょう
03:05
Just as fish swim and birds fly,
魚が泳ぎ 鳥が飛ぶのと同じく 人々は
03:08
people form tribes. It's just what we do.
集団を形成するようにできているのです
03:10
But here's the rub.
さて 困ったことに
03:12
Not all tribes are the same,
全ての集団が同じわけではありません
03:14
and what makes the difference is the culture.
文化によって異なります
03:16
Now here is the net out of this.
ここから導かれる結果として
03:18
You're all a member of tribes.
誰もが 集団に属しています
03:20
If you can find a way to take the tribes that you're in
自分の属する集団に働きかけて
03:22
and nudge them forward,
集団の段階を進めて行けるでしょうか
03:25
along these tribal stages
ここではステージを5つに分け
03:27
to what we call Stage Five, which is the top of the mountain.
最高位をステージ5と名付けました
03:29
But we're going to start with what we call Stage One.
まずはステージ1と呼ばれるところから始めましょう
03:32
Now, this is the lowest of the stages.
一番下のステージです
03:35
You don't want this. Okay?
こんなのは望んでないですね
03:37
This is a bit of a difficult image to put up on the screen.
スクリーンに映すのも はばかられる画像ですが
03:39
But it's one that I think we need to learn from.
ここから学ぶ必要があります
03:42
Stage One produces people
ステージ1のメンバーは
(人生は最悪)
03:44
who do horrible things.
ひどいことをします
(人生は最悪)
03:46
This is the kid who shot up Virginia Tech.
バージニア工大の乱射犯です
03:48
Stage One is a group where people
ステージ1のグループは
03:50
systematically sever relationships from functional tribes,
機能する集団から
組織的に人を切り離し
03:52
and then pool together
似たような考えの人ばかりを
03:55
with people who think like they do.
集めます
03:57
Stage One is literally the culture of gangs
ステージ1はまさに非行集団の文化で
03:59
and it is the culture of prisons.
監獄の文化です
04:02
Now, again, we don't often deal with Stage One.
ステージ1に関わることはめったにないでしょう
04:04
And I want to make the point
ただ社会の一員としては
ステージ1にも
04:06
that as members of society, we need to.
関わらなければならない
と指摘しておきます
04:08
It's not enough to simply write people off.
人を見捨てては いけないのです
04:10
But let's move on to Stage Two.
先に進みましょう
04:13
Now, Stage One, you'll notice, says, in effect, "Life Sucks."
お気づきになるでしょうが 言うなれば
ステージ1は「人生は最悪だ」というものです
04:15
So, this other book that Steve mentioned,
「パフォーマンスの3つの法則」という
04:19
that just came out, called "The Three Laws of Performance,"
出版されたばかりの本で
04:22
my colleague, Steve Zaffron and I,
同僚のスティーブ・ザフロンと私はこう論じました
04:24
argue that as people see the world, so they behave.
「人は、自分が見ている世界の通りに行動する」
04:27
Well, if people see the world in such a way that life sucks,
人生は最悪という見方をしていれば
04:31
then their behavior will follow automatically from that.
無意識のうちに
そういう振る舞いをするようになります
04:35
It will be despairing hostility.
絶望的な敵意をむき出し
04:38
They'll do whatever it takes to survive,
生き残るためには
04:40
even if that means undermining other people.
他人を攻撃することも
いとわないのです
04:42
Now, my birthday is coming up shortly,
ところで 私の誕生日が近づいており
04:45
and my driver's license expires.
運転免許が切れます
04:48
And the reason that that's relevant is that very soon
この話とどう関係があるかというと
04:50
I will be walking into what we call
近いうちに
04:52
a Stage Two tribe,
ステージ2と呼ばれる集団に
04:54
which looks like this.
出くわすことになります
(自分の人生は最悪)
04:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:58
Now, am I saying that in every Department of Motor Vehicles
全国の運転免許センターのどこでも
04:59
across the land, you find a Stage Two culture?
ステージ2の文化が見られる と言うわけではありません
05:01
No. But in the one near me,
違います
でも家の近くのセンターに
05:04
where I have to go in just a few days,
数日後に行くと
05:06
what I will say when I'm standing in line is,
順番待ちの列でこう毒づいてしまうでしょう
05:08
"How can people be so dumb, and yet live?"
「こんなにばかな奴らが生きてるなんて」
05:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:13
Now, am I saying that there are dumb people working here?
ここで働いている人の頭が悪いと
05:16
Actually, no, I'm not.
言っているのではありません
05:19
But I'm saying the culture makes people dumb.
人がバカになるような文化を問題にしています
05:21
So in a Stage Two culture --
ステージ2の文化は
05:25
and we find these in all sorts of different places --
あらゆる場所で見られます
05:27
you find them, in fact, in the best organizations in the world.
世界で最も優れた組織にも見られます
05:29
You find them in all places in society.
社会のいたるところで見られます
05:32
I've come across them at the organizations
その階級で最高だと
05:34
that everybody raves about as being best in class.
誰もが絶賛する組織でも見つかります
05:37
But here is the point. If you believe and you say
ここがポイントです
もしあなたの考えを
05:39
to people in your tribe, in effect,
こんな風に仲間に向かって口にするとどうなるか
05:41
"My life sucks.
「私の人生は最悪だ
05:43
I mean, if I got to go to TEDx USC
TEDxUSCに行くチャンスが
あればましだけど
05:45
my life wouldn't suck. But I don't. So it does."
でも行けないから ああ最悪」
05:47
If that's how you talked, imagine what kind of work would get done.
こんなことを言っていたら
何を成し遂げられるというのでしょう
05:49
What kind of innovation would get done?
どんな種類の革新を?
05:53
The amount of world-changing behavior that would happen?
世界を変える行動は少しでも起きるでしょうか?
05:55
In fact it would be basically nil.
実質ゼロでしょう
05:58
Now when we go on to Stage Three: this is the one
では ステージ3に移りましょう
06:01
that hits closest to home for many of us.
皆さんの多くはこれに近いことでしょう
06:03
Because it is in Stage Three that many of us move.
多くの人はステージ3に入ってくると
06:06
And we park. And we stay.
車を止め ここに滞在します
06:09
Stage Three says, "I'm great. And you're not."
ステージ3は「自分は最高 周りは違うけど」というものです
06:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:16
I'm great and you're not.
自分は最高 周りは違うけど
06:17
Now imagine having a whole room of people
想像してください
06:20
saying, in effect, "I'm great and you're not."
「自分は最高 みんなは違うけど」とか
06:22
Or, "I'm going to find some way to compete with you
「みんなと競争して
一番になるんだ」
06:24
and come out on top as a result of that."
と言っている人だらけの部屋を
06:27
A whole group of people communicating that way, talking that way.
そんなふうにコミュニケーションや話をする人ばかりの
グループです
06:29
I know this sounds like a joke. Three doctors walk into a bar.
「3人の医師がバーに行って」と言うと
ジョークみたいですが
06:33
But, in this case, three doctors walk into an elevator.
3人の医者がエレベータに乗ってきました
06:36
I happened to be in the elevator collecting data for this book.
私は本のためにデータを収集中で
たまたま居合せました
06:38
And one doctor said to the others, "Did you see my article
一人が言います「ニュー・イングランド・
ジャーナルオブ・メディスン誌に論文が出ましてね」
06:41
in the New England Journal of Medicine?"
一人が言います「ニュー・イングランド・
ジャーナルオブ・メディスン誌に論文が出ましてね」
06:43
And the other said, "No. That's great. Congratulations!"
一人が答えます
「知りませんでした 立派ですね おめでとう」
06:45
The next one got kind of a wry smile on his face and said,
もう一人の医者は 苦笑いを浮かべて言いました
06:48
"Well while you were, you know, doing your research," --
「あなたが研究にいそしまれている間に」
06:51
notice the condescending tone --
見下す口調でしたね
06:54
"While you were off doing your research, I was off doing more surgeries
「研究にいそしまれている間に
たくさん手術ができました
06:56
than anyone else in the department of surgery at this institution."
うちの外科で一番しましたね」
06:59
And the third one got the same wry smile and said,
すると 3人目の医者は
同じく苦笑いを浮かべて言ったのです
07:02
"Well, while you were off doing your research,
「あなたは研究でお忙しく
07:04
and you were off doing your monkey meatball surgery,
あなたは応急処置の手術でお忙しい
07:07
that eventually we'll train monkeys to do,
手術なんてのはいずれはヒトの仕事じゃなくなるでしょう
07:09
or cells or robots, or maybe not even need to do it at all,
そもそも要らなくなるかもしれない
07:12
I was off running the future of the residency program,
私は研修医プログラムを運営してましたが
07:15
which is really the future of medicine."
これこそ医学の将来ですね」
07:17
And they all kind of laughed and they patted him on the back.
笑顔を浮かべてほめ合いながら
07:19
And the elevator door opened, and they all walked out.
ちょうど開いたエレベータから降りて行きました
07:21
That is a meeting of a Stage Three tribe.
これがステージ3の集団の会合です
07:23
Now, we find these in places
こういう話は
07:25
where really smart, successful people show up.
頭が切れて
成功している人々が集まるところで見られます
07:29
Like, oh, I don't know, TEDx USC.
例えばTEDxUSCみたいな所で
07:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:36
Here is the greatest challenge we face in innovation.
この次が 革新の場で直面する最大の難関です
07:37
It is moving from Stage Three
ステージ3から
07:40
to Stage Four.
ステージ4へと移るところです
07:42
Let's take a look at a quick video snippet.
短いビデオを見てください
07:44
This is from a company called Zappos, located outside Las Vegas.
ラスベガス郊外にあるザッポスという会社です
07:47
And my question on the other side is just going to be,
質問ですが
07:50
"What do you think they value?"
「あなたは 彼らが何に価値を置いていると思いますか?」
07:53
It was not Christmas time. There was a Christmas tree.
クリスマスシーズンではないのに
クリスマスツリーがあります
07:55
This is their lobby.
ロビーでは
07:59
Employees volunteer time in the advice booth.
従業員が アドバイスブースでボランティア活動をしています
08:07
Notice it looks like something out of a Peanuts cartoon.
『ピーナッツ』の漫画に出てくるブースですね
08:09
Okay, we're going through the hallway here at Zappos.
玄関ホールを抜けて入ってきたのは―
08:12
This is a call center. Notice how it's decorated.
コールセンターです
なんというデコレーション
08:15
Notice people are applauding for us.
我々は拍手で迎えられました
08:17
They don't know who we are and they don't care. And if they did
誰だか知らなくても気にもしません
08:20
they probably wouldn't applaud.
気にしてたら拍手しないでしょう
08:22
But you'll notice the level of excitement.
盛り上がり方も見てください
08:26
Notice, again, how they decorate their office.
オフイスをどう飾っていたでしょう
08:28
Now, what's important to people at Zappos,
ザッポスの人にとって重要なことは
08:30
these may not be the things that are important to you.
皆さんが重要なこととは違うかもしれません
08:32
But they value things like fun. And they value creativity.
楽しむことや創造性は大事にされます
08:34
One of their stated values is, "Be a little bit weird."
「少し変わっていること」も挙げられています
08:37
And you'll notice they are a little bit weird.
少し変わった会社だと思いませんか
08:40
So when individuals come together
一人ひとりが寄り集まって
08:44
and find something that unites them
互いを結びつける何かを見出したとき
08:46
that's greater than their individual competence,
一人ひとりの能力を超えた力となり
08:48
then something very important happens.
重要な何かが起こるのです
08:51
The group gels. And it changes
グループは融けあいます
08:53
from a group of highly motivated
とても意欲的ではあっても
08:56
but fairly individually-centric people
極めて自己中心な人の集まりだったものが
08:58
into something larger,
より大きな存在―
09:01
into a tribe that becomes aware of its own existence.
自らの存在を自覚している集団へと変化します
09:03
Stage Four tribes can do remarkable things.
ステージ4の集団は優れたことができます
09:06
But you'll notice we're not at the top of the mountain yet.
でもまだ最上位ではないのです
09:09
There is, in fact, another stage.
さらにもう一つのステージ
09:12
Now, some of you may not recognize the scene that's up here.
ここがどこか わからない方もいるでしょう
09:14
And if you take a look at the headline of Stage Five, which is "Life is Great,"
ステージ5 のキャッチフレーズは
「人生は最高だ」です
09:17
this may seem a little incongruous.
少し矛盾して見えるかもしれませんが
09:21
This is a scene or snippet
この写真は
09:23
from the Truth and Reconciliation process in South Africa
南アフリカの真実和解委員会です
09:25
for which Desmond Tutu won the Nobel Prize.
この功績で デズモンド・ツツ氏はノーベル賞を受賞しました
09:28
Now think about that. South Africa,
考えてみてください 南アフリカといえば
09:31
terrible atrocities had happened in the society.
ひどい残虐行為があった社会です
09:33
And people came together
人々は集まって
09:36
focused only on those two values: truth and reconciliation.
2つの価値だけを考えました
真実と和解です
09:38
There was no road map. No one had ever done
手引きもなければ
これまでこのようなことを―
09:42
anything like this before.
成し遂げた先人もいません
09:44
And in this atmosphere, where the only guidance
唯一の道しるべが
09:46
was people's values and their noble cause,
人々の価値観と崇高な大義だけという
この状況で
09:49
what this group accomplished was historic.
この集団は歴史的な成果を上げました
09:52
And people, at the time, feared that South Africa
当時 人々は南アフリカが
ルワンダと同じ
09:55
would end up going the way that Rwanda has gone,
末路をたどることを恐れていました
09:58
descending into one skirmish after another
絶え間ない戦闘の続く
10:00
in a civil war that seems to have no end.
終わりの見えない内乱です
10:03
In fact, South Africa has not gone down that road.
でも 南アフリカは違いました
10:05
Largely because people like Desmond Tutu
デズモンド・ツツのような人たちが
10:08
set up a Stage Five process
ステージ5のプロセスを作り上げた
のが大きな理由です
10:11
to involve the thousands and perhaps millions
誰もが関わるように
10:14
of tribes in the country, to bring everyone together.
何千 いや 何百万もの集団を
巻き込みました
10:16
So, people hear this and they conclude the following,
聞いていただいたここまでの話から
得られる結論です
10:19
as did we in doing the study.
我々の研究結果も同様です
10:22
Okay, got it. I don't want to talk Stage One.
私はステージ1について話したくはありません
10:24
That's like, you know, "Life sucks." Who wants to talk that way?
「人生は最悪」
こんなのいやです
10:27
I don't want to talk like they do
近所の免許センターの話し方も
10:29
at the particular DMV that's close to where Dave lives.
ごめんです
10:31
I really don't want to just say "I'm great,"
「自分だけが最高」も良くないです
10:33
because that kind of sounds narcissistic, and then I won't have any friends.
自己中心的で友達もできないでしょう
10:35
Saying, "We're great" -- that sounds pretty good.
「私たちは最高」
いい感じです
10:38
But I should really talk Stage Five, right? "Life is great."
でもステージ5がいいですよね
「人生は最高」
10:40
Well, in fact, there are three somewhat counter-intuitive findings
実のところ 幾分しっくりこないことが
10:44
that come out of all this.
3つあります
10:48
The first one, if you look at the Declaration of Independence
一点目 アメリカ独立宣言を
10:50
and actually read it,
よく読んでみると
10:52
the phrase that sticks in many of our minds
多くの人が気にする一節があります
10:54
is things about inalienable rights.
基本的人権に関するところです
10:56
I mean, that's Stage Five, right? Life is great,
ステージ5の権利ですね 人生は最高で
10:59
oriented only by our values,
我々の価値観によって導かれる
11:01
no other guidance.
他の基準はない とされます
11:03
In fact, most of the document is written at Stage Two.
しかし実際は 文書の多くが
ステージ2のレベルで書かれています
11:05
"My life sucks because I live under a tyrant,
「キング・ジョージという暴君に敷かれて暮らしているから
11:08
also known as King George.
私の人生は最悪だ
11:11
We're great! Who is not great? England!"
私達は最高 そうでないのは?英国だ!」
11:13
Sorry. (Laughter)
失礼 (笑)
11:15
Well, what about other great leaders? What about Gandhi?
他に誰か偉大なリーダーは?ガンジー?
11:19
What about Martin Luther King?
マーティン・ルーサー・キング?
11:21
I mean, surely these were just people who preached, "Life is great," right?
彼らが「人生は最高だ」と人々に説いたのは
疑いないですね
11:23
Just one little bit of happiness and joy after another.
ささやかな幸せと喜びです
11:25
In fact, Martin Luther King's most famous line was at Stage Three.
でも マーティン・ルーサー・キングの
一番有名な言葉はステージ3でした
11:29
He didn't say "We have a dream." He said, "I have a dream."
「我々には夢がある」ではなくて
「私には夢がある」ですね
11:33
Why did he do that? Because most people
なぜそうしたのか
なぜなら 大半の人は
11:36
are not at Stage Five.
ステージ5にはいないからです
11:38
Two percent are at Stage One.
2%がステージ1
11:40
About 25 percent are at Stage Two,
25%が
11:42
saying, in effect, "My life sucks."
「私の人生は最悪だ」というステージ2
11:46
48 percent of working tribes say, these are employed tribes,
ワーキングクラス集団の48%が
被雇用者の集団で こう言います
11:49
say, "I'm great and you're not."
「自分は最高 まわりは違うけど」
11:54
And we have to duke it out every day, so we resort to politics.
そして格闘する毎日 政治に期待したりします
11:56
Only about 22 percent of tribes
集団の約22%が
11:59
are at Stage Four,
ステージ4です
12:01
oriented by our values, saying "We're great.
自分たちの価値観に従います
「自分たちは最高
12:03
And our values are beginning to unite us."
この価値のもとに団結できるのだ」
12:05
Only two percent, only two percent of tribes
2% たった2%だけが
12:07
get to Stage Five.
ステージ5に辿りつけます
12:10
And those are the ones that change the world.
そして彼らが世界を変えます
12:12
So the first little finding from this
このことからわかることは
リーダーは
12:14
is that leaders need to be able to talk all the levels
社会の全ての人に接することができるように
12:16
so that you can touch every person in society.
あらゆるレベルで語れなければならないことです
12:19
But you don't leave them where you found them. Okay?
そして 出会った人をそこに置き去りにしないでください
12:22
Tribes can only hear one level above and below where they are.
集団は 一つ上か下のレベルまでしか
理解することができません
12:25
So we have to have the ability to talk
だからあらゆるレベルに対して
12:29
all the levels, to go to where they are.
そこに合わせて語りかける能力が要るのです
12:31
And then leaders nudge people
そうすればリーダーは 人々を促して
12:33
within their tribes to the next level.
その集団が上のレベルに向かいます
12:35
I'd like to show you some examples of this.
例を話しましょう
12:37
One of the people we interviewed was Frank Jordan,
フランク・ジョーダンという人とインタビューをしました
12:39
former Mayor of San Francisco. Before that
前サンフランシスコ市長です
それ以前は
12:42
he was Chief of Police in San Francisco.
サンフランシスコ市警察本部長でした
12:44
And he grew up essentially in Stage One.
彼は元来ステージ1で育ちました
12:46
And you know what changed his life? It was walking into
彼の人生を変えたのは何か
ボーイズ・アンド・ガールズ・クラブです
12:49
one of these, a Boys and Girls Club.
彼の人生を変えたのは何か
ボーイズ・アンド・ガールズ・クラブです
12:51
Now here is what happened to this person
そこでこんなことが起きて
後には―
12:53
who eventually became Mayor of San Francisco.
サンフランシスコの市長になったのです
12:56
He went from being alive and passionate
「人生は最悪だ
12:58
at Stage One -- remember, "Life sucks,
敵ばかりだが 何をしてでも生き残ろう」
13:00
despairing hostility, I will do whatever it takes to survive" --
とステージ1で怒っていたところから
13:02
to walking into a Boys and Girls Club,
ボーイズ・アンド・ガールズ・クラブに入り
13:06
folding his arms, sitting down in a chair,
腕を組んで椅子に座って
13:08
and saying, "Wow. My life really sucks.
「ああ 私の人生は本当に最悪だ
13:10
I don't know anybody.
ろくなヤツがいない
13:12
I mean, if I was into boxing, like they were,
みんなみたいに
ボクシングに夢中だったら
13:14
then my life wouldn't suck. But I don't. So it does.
マシだったんだ
俺は最悪なままだ
13:16
So I'm going to sit here in my chair and not do anything."
ここで座っていても 何もする気はないぜ」
13:18
In fact, that's progress.
実際には進歩しています
13:20
We move people from Stage One to Stage Two
新たな集団に入ることで
13:22
by getting them in a new tribe
人はステージ1からステージ2へ移ります
13:25
and then, over time, getting them connected.
そして時を経て つながっていきます
13:27
So, what about moving
ではステージ3からステージ4への
13:30
from Stage Three to Stage Four?
移動はどうでしょう
13:32
I want to argue that we're doing that right here.
まさに今ここで 起きていることです
13:34
TED represents a set of values,
TED の認めるいくつかの価値
13:37
and as we unite around these values,
この価値を認めて繋がることで
13:40
something really interesting begins to emerge.
本当に面白いことが始まっています
13:43
If you want this experience to live on
この経験をいつまでも残る
13:45
as something historic,
貴重なものとしたいなら
13:48
then at the reception tonight I'd like to encourage you to do something
ぜひ今夜のレセプションで
13:50
beyond what people normally do
普段する以上の思い切った
13:53
and call networking.
ネットワーキングをしてください
13:55
Which is not just to meet new people
新しい人に出会い
13:57
and extend your reach, extend your influence,
知り合いや影響を広げるだけでなく
13:59
but instead, find someone you don't know,
今夜は あなたの知らない誰かを
14:02
and find someone else you don't know,
別の知らない誰かに
14:04
and introduce them.
紹介してみてください
14:06
That's called a triadic relationship.
三者の関係になるわけです
14:08
See, people who build world-changing tribes do that.
世界を変えるような集団を作る人の
振る舞いです
14:11
They extend the reach of their tribes
自分の集団がさらに大きくなるように
14:15
by connecting them, not just to myself,
自分と結び付けるだけでなく
14:18
so that my following is greater,
集団相互の関係をつなぎます
14:20
but I connect people who don't know each other
お互い知らないどうしを結びつけるなら
14:22
to something greater than themselves.
もっと大きな何かにつなげましょう
14:24
And ultimately that adds to their values.
それぞれの集団の価値も増します
14:26
But we're not done yet. Because then how do we go from Stage Four,
そして まだ先があります
ステージ4はすばらしいですが
14:29
which is great, to Stage Five?
ステージ4からステージ5へは
どのように行けばよいでしょうか
14:33
The story that I like to end with is this. It comes out of
これをもって今日の話を終えましょう
14:36
a place called the Gallup Organization.
ギャラップ社の話です
14:38
You know they do polls, right?
世論調査をする会社ですね
14:40
So it's Stage Four. We're great. Who is not great?
ステージ4です 私達はすばらしい
他は?
14:42
Pretty much everybody else who does polls.
他の世論調査会社はそうでもないのです
14:44
If Gallup releases a poll on the same day that NBC releases a poll,
ギャラップと同じ日に
エヌ・ビー・シーが調査結果を告知しても
14:47
people will pay attention to the Gallup poll. Okay, we understand that.
ギャラップの方が注目を集めます
ご存じのとおりです
14:50
So, they were bored.
だから 彼らは退屈しているのです
14:53
They wanted to change the world. So here is the question someone asked.
ギャラップは世界を変えたかった
そしてこんなことを聞かれます
14:55
"How could we,
「アジアの人の考えとか
14:58
instead of just polling what Asia thinks
アメリカ人の意見とか
15:00
or what the United States thinks,
オバマ対マケインを誰がどう思っているか
といった調査ではなくて
15:02
or who thinks what about Obama
オバマ対マケインを誰がどう思っているか
といった調査ではなくて
15:04
versus McCain or something like that,
地球全体は何を考えているかという
調査はできないだろうか?」
15:06
what does the entire world think?"
地球全体は何を考えているかという
調査はできないだろうか?」
15:08
And they found a way to do the first-ever world poll.
そうして史上初の世界世論調査の方法を考えました
15:12
They had people involved who were Nobel laureates
経済学分野でのノーベル賞受賞者達を巻き込みました
15:16
in economics, who reported being bored.
暇を持て余していると言っていた人達が
15:18
And suddenly they pulled out sheets of paper
突然 何枚もの紙を引っ張り出し
15:20
and were trying to figure out, "How do we survey the population
「どうやってサハラ砂漠以南のアフリカの人々を調査するか」を
15:22
of Sub-Saharan Africa?
考え始めました
15:25
How do we survey populations that don't have access to technology,
テクノロジーが利用できず
15:27
and speak languages we don't speak,
言語も異なり
それを話せる人すら―
15:30
and we don't know anyone who speaks those languages. Because in order
知らないという人たちへの調査
15:32
to achieve on this great mission,
この重要な任務を果たすためには
15:34
we have to be able to do it.
そんな調査ができなければいけません
15:37
Incidentally, they did pull it off.
ちなみに 彼らは実際に成功しました
15:39
And they released the first-ever world poll.
史上初の世界世論調査を実施しました
15:41
So I'd like to leave you with these thoughts.
では 最後にまとめます
15:44
First of all: we all form tribes, all of us.
まず第一に 私たちは皆 集団を形成します
15:46
You're in tribes here. Hopefully you're extending the reach
ここでも集団の中にいます
15:49
of the tribes that you have.
あなたの集団の輪を広げてください
15:51
But the question on the table is this:
さて 大事な問いはこれです
15:53
What kind of an impact are the tribes
あなたが属している集団は
15:56
that you are in making?
どういう種類の影響を与えていますか
15:58
You're hearing one presentation after another,
次々と登場するプレゼンテーションは
16:00
often representing a group of people, a tribe,
たいていは 所属するグループ・集団を代表して
16:03
about how they have changed the world.
世界をどう変えたかを語るものです
16:05
If you do what we've talked about, you listen
今日お話ししたように
16:08
for how people actually communicate in the tribes that you're in.
あなたが属する集団の人が
どんなやりとりをするのか聞いて
16:10
And you don't leave them where they are. You nudge them forward.
そこに留まらずから前へ進むように促します
16:13
You remember to talk all five culture stages.
5つの文化ステージを説明できるようにしてください
16:16
Because we've got people in all five, around us.
身の回りには あらゆるステージの人がいます
16:19
And the question that I'd like to leave you with is this:
最後にみなさんに質問です
16:22
Will your tribes change the world?
「あなたの集団は、世界を変えますか?」
16:25
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
16:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:29
Translator:Emi Yoshida
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

David Logan - Professor of management
David Logan is a USC faculty member, best-selling author, and management consultant.

Why you should listen

David Logan studies how people communicate within a company -- and how to harness our natural gifts to make change within organizations. He looks at emerging patterns of corporate leadership, organizational transformation, generational differences in the workplace, and team building for high-potential managers and executives.

He's the co-founder and senior partner at CultureSync, a management consulting firm, and works with Fortune 500 companies, governments, and nonprofits. Much of CultureSync's work is derived from a ten-year study of over 24,000 people published at Tribal Leadership (2008), which shows how organizational culture evolves over time and how leaders can nudge it forward.

He teaches management and leadership in the USC Executive MBA, and is also on the faculty at the International Centre for Leadership in Finance (ICLIF), endowed by the former prime minister of Malaysia, and on the Foundation for Medical Excellence in Portland.

From 2001-2004, he served as Associate Dean of Executive Education at USC. During that time, he started the Master of Medical Management (MMM), a business degree for midcareer medical doctors. He also initiated new executive education programs (often, in concert with the USC School of Policy, Planning and Development) with organizations as diverse as the Sierra Health Foundation, Northrop Grumman, and the City of Los Angeles. He continued to oversee many programs, including one of USC's first distance learning education courses for managers in Japan and a senior executive program at Toyota.

Logan is co-author of four books including Tribal Leadership and The Three Laws of Performance.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.