10:05
TEDGlobal 2009

Rachel Armstrong: Architecture that repairs itself?

レイチェル・アームストロング:「自己修復する建築?」

Filmed:

イタリアのベネチアは沈みかかっています。レイチェル・アームストロングは、それを救うには、不活性素材での建築から脱却し、自分で成長する構造物を作らなくてはならないと言います。彼女は、生物とまでは言えないが、自己修復し、炭素も吸収分離する素材を提案します。

- Applied scientist, innovator
TED Fellow Rachel Armstrong is a sustainability innovator who creates new materials that possess some of the properties of living systems, and can be manipulated to "grow" architecture. Full bio

All buildings today have something in common.
今日に建物に共通していることがあります
00:15
They're made using Victorian technologies.
ビクトリア時代の技術で建てられているのです
00:19
This involves blueprints,
青写真があり、
00:22
industrial manufacturing
工業的製造があり
00:25
and construction using teams of workers.
作業員のチームが建設します
00:27
All of this effort results in an inert object.
出来上がるのは不活性の物体です
00:30
And that means that there is a one-way transfer of energy
それはつまりエネルギーが一方向に、自然界から
00:33
from our environment into our homes and cities.
私達の家や都市へ移転される事を意味しています
00:36
This is not sustainable.
この方法は持続可能ではありません
00:40
I believe that the only way that it is possible for us
私達が、真に持続可能な家や
00:42
to construct genuinely sustainable homes and cities
都市を建設する唯一の方法は
00:45
is by connecting them to nature,
それらを自然とつなげることで
00:48
not insulating them from it.
切り離す事ではありません
00:50
Now, in order to do this, we need the right kind of language.
それを成し遂げるためには、正しい言語が必要です
00:53
Living systems are in constant conversation
生きているシステムは
00:57
with the natural world,
代謝と呼ばれる化学反応を通じて
00:59
through sets of chemical reactions called metabolism.
常に自然界と会話していています
01:01
And this is the conversion of one group of substances
エネルギーの産出や吸収によって
01:05
into another, either through
ある物質が
01:08
the production or the absorption of energy.
他の物質に変化するのです
01:10
And this is the way in which living materials
そしてこれが、生きている物質が
01:13
make the most of their local resources
持続可能な形で、周辺の資源を
01:15
in a sustainable way.
利用する方法です
01:18
So, I'm interested in the use of
そこで私は、代謝する物質を
01:21
metabolic materials for the practice of architecture.
建築に使う事に興味を持ちました
01:23
But they don't exist. So I'm having to make them.
でもそんなものは存在しません 作らなくてはなりませんでした
01:28
I'm working with architect Neil Spiller
わたしはバートレット建築学校で
01:30
at the Bartlett School of Architecture,
建築家ニールスピラーと仕事をしています
01:32
and we're collaborating with international scientists
そして国際的に、科学者たちと共同作業を行い
01:34
in order to generate these new materials
ボトムアップ方式で、このような新素材を
01:36
from a bottom up approach.
作っています
01:38
That means we're generating them from scratch.
つまり全くゼロからものを作っているという事です
01:40
One of our collaborators is chemist Martin Hanczyc,
協同メンバーの一人は化学者のマーチンハンザックで、
01:42
and he's really interested in the transition from
彼は、不活性物質が活性化する過程に
01:46
inert to living matter.
とても興味を持っていました
01:49
Now, that's exactly the kind of process that I'm interested in,
それは、持続可能な素材を考える時、
01:51
when we're thinking about sustainable materials.
私が一番興味を持った行程です
01:54
So, Martin, he works with a system called the protocell.
マーチンは「プロトセル」というシステムを扱っています
01:56
Now all this is -- and it's magic --
これらすべて、とそのマジックは
02:01
is a little fatty bag. And it's got a chemical battery in it.
小さな脂肪性の袋と、その中身の化学メカニズムによります
02:04
And it has no DNA.
DNAはありません
02:07
This little bag is able to conduct itself
この小さな袋は、まさしく生きているとしか
02:10
in a way that can only be described as living.
言いようのない振舞いをすることができます
02:12
It is able to move around its environment.
環境内を動き回ることができます
02:15
It can follow chemical gradients.
化学的な濃度勾配に沿って移動できます
02:18
It can undergo complex reactions,
複雑な反応を行うことができ、
02:20
some of which are happily architectural.
その一部は実に建築的です
02:23
So here we are. These are protocells,
これがそのプロトセルです
02:27
patterning their environment.
環境をデザインしています
02:29
We don't know how they do that yet.
どうやってこれを作っているか、まだわかっていません
02:31
Here, this is a protocell, and it's vigorously shedding this skin.
ここにもプロトセルがあり、盛んに脱皮しています
02:34
Now, this looks like a chemical kind of birth.
これは化学物質の「誕生」のようです
02:38
This is a violent process.
これは暴力的なプロセスです
02:40
Here, we've got a protocell to extract carbon dioxide
こちらは、大気から二酸化炭素を取り出し
02:43
out of the atmosphere
炭酸塩に変える
02:46
and turn it into carbonate.
プロトセルです
02:48
And that's the shell around that globular fat.
これが、脂肪の袋の周りの殻です
02:50
They are quite brittle. So you've only got a part of one there.
とてももろいので一部しかありませんが
02:52
So what we're trying to do is, we're trying to push these technologies
つまり私達はこの技術を押し進めて
02:55
towards creating bottom-up construction approaches
ボトムアップ的な建築アプローチを
02:58
for architecture,
行い、
03:00
which contrast the current, Victorian, top-down methods
ビクトリア時代的な、トップダウンの、物質に構造を
03:02
which impose structure upon matter.
押し付ける方法に対峙しようとしているのです
03:05
That can't be energetically sensible.
ビクトリア型はエネルギー的に良識がない
03:08
So, bottom-up materials
ボトムアップ型素材は
03:11
actually exist today.
既に存在します
03:13
They've been in use, in architecture, since ancient times.
古代から建築に使われているのです
03:15
If you walk around the city of Oxford, where we are today,
今いるオックスフォオードの街を歩き
03:18
and have a look at the brickwork,
れんが造りを見てください
03:21
which I've enjoyed doing in the last couple of days,
私はここ数日そうして過ごしましたが、そうすると
03:23
you'll actually see that a lot of it is made of limestone.
多くは石灰石で作られている事がわかります
03:25
And if you look even closer,
もっとよく見ると
03:27
you'll see, in that limestone, there are little shells
石灰石の中に、小さな貝殻や小さな骨が
03:29
and little skeletons that are piled upon each other.
折り重なっている事がわかるでしょう
03:31
And then they are fossilized over millions of years.
それらは何百万年もの間に化石化したものです
03:34
Now a block of limestone, in itself,
それで石灰石の塊自体は
03:37
isn't particularly that interesting.
別に興味深いものではありません
03:39
It looks beautiful.
きれいですけどね
03:42
But imagine what the properties of this limestone block might be
しかし、もしもその石灰岩の表面が
03:44
if the surfaces were actually
実際は、大気と会話していたら
03:48
in conversation with the atmosphere.
どうでしょう
03:50
Maybe they could extract carbon dioxide.
二酸化炭素を吸収できるかもしれない
03:53
Would it give this block of limestone new properties?
それは石灰岩に新しい特質を与えるか?
03:56
Well, most likely it would. It might be able to grow.
たぶんそうでしょう それは成長するかもしれない
03:59
It might be able to self-repair, and even respond
自己修復し、周辺環境の劇的な変化に
04:02
to dramatic changes
対応する事が
04:04
in the immediate environment.
できるかもしれません
04:06
So, architects are never happy
建築家は興味深い素材が
04:08
with just one block of an interesting material.
一つでは満足しません
04:11
They think big. Okay?
大きく考える でしょ?
04:14
So when we think about scaling up metabolic materials,
そこで代謝する素材をスケールアップすることを考えると
04:16
we can start thinking about ecological interventions
珊瑚礁の修復や
04:19
like repair of atolls,
水によって傷んだ街の再生を
04:21
or reclamation of parts of a city
エコロジカルに進める方法を
04:23
that are damaged by water.
考え始める事ができます
04:26
So, one of these examples
その一例は、
04:28
would of course be the historic city of Venice.
もちろん歴史の街、ベネチアです
04:30
Now, Venice, as you know, has a tempestuous relationship with the sea,
さて、ベネチアは、海との激しい関係性にあり、
04:33
and is built upon wooden piles.
木の杭の上に建設されています
04:37
So we've devised a way by which it may be possible
そこで我々は、今作業中のプロトセル技術を使って
04:39
for the protocell technology that we're working with
ベネチアを、持続可能な形で
04:42
to sustainably reclaim Venice.
修復できるかもしれない方法を開発しました
04:44
And architect Christian Kerrigan
建築家クリスチャンカリガンが
04:47
has come up with a series of designs that show us
一連のデザインを考えだし、それによって
04:49
how it may be possible to actually grow a limestone reef
街の下部に石灰岩の堆積層を生成する可能性を
04:51
underneath the city.
示しました
04:54
So, here is the technology we have today.
それが今日お見せするテクノロジーです
04:56
This is our protocell technology,
これが我々のプロトセル技術で
04:59
effectively making a shell, like its limestone forefathers,
石灰岩の祖先となる殻を効率的に作り出し
05:01
and depositing it in a very complex environment,
非常に複雑な環境下で、自然素材に
05:05
against natural materials.
堆積させます
05:08
We're looking at crystal lattices to see the bonding process in this.
お見せしているのは、これが結合する過程での結晶性の格子です
05:10
Now, this is the very interesting part.
さて、ここがとても面白いのです
05:13
We don't just want limestone dumped everywhere in all the pretty canals.
美しい運河に石灰石がただぶちまけられるのでなく
05:15
What we need it to do is to be
それが木の杭の周りに
05:18
creatively crafted around the wooden piles.
創造的かつ巧みに積み上がる必要があります
05:20
So, you can see from these diagrams that the protocell is actually
そこで、ご覧に入れているのは、プロトセルが光から遠ざかり、
05:24
moving away from the light,
暗い基礎部分に向かって
05:26
toward the dark foundations.
移動しているところです
05:28
We've observed this in the laboratory.
これは研究室で観察されています
05:30
The protocells can actually move away from the light.
プロトセルは光から遠ざかるのです
05:32
They can actually also move towards the light. You have to just choose your species.
光に寄ってくるものもあります 種を選べばいいのです
05:35
So that these don't just exist as one entity,
つまり単に一種族だけではなく
05:38
we kind of chemically engineer them.
化学的に操作できるのです
05:40
And so here the protocells are depositing their limestone
ここではプロトセルが石灰質を
05:43
very specifically, around the foundations of Venice,
非常に特異的に、ベネチアの基礎部分に堆積させ
05:46
effectively petrifying it.
効果的に石化させています
05:49
Now, this isn't going to happen tomorrow. It's going to take a while.
これは明日すぐ起きるわけではありません 時間がかかります
05:51
It's going to take years of tuning and monitoring this technology
この技術をチューニングし、モニタしながら
05:55
in order for us to become ready
ベネチアの街の、もっとも傷んだ
05:59
to test it out in a case-by-case basis
ストレスのかかった建物に、個別に
06:01
on the most damaged and stressed buildings within the city of Venice.
テストする準備ができるまでにはまだ何年もかかります
06:03
But gradually, as the buildings are repaired,
しかし、徐々に、建物が修復されるにつれて
06:06
we will see the accretion of a limestone reef beneath the city.
その街の下に石灰質の珊瑚が堆積していくことになるでしょう
06:09
An accretion itself is a huge sink of carbon dioxide.
堆積自体は、二酸化炭素の巨大な「流し」になります
06:12
Also it will attract the local marine ecology,
それはまた、周辺の海洋性生態系を引き寄せ
06:16
who will find their own ecological niches within this architecture.
建築物の間に生息する場所を見つけるでしょう
06:19
So, this is really interesting. Now we have an architecture
非常に面白い事です 自然界と、そのまま、じかに
06:23
that connects a city to the natural world
つながる都市を
06:26
in a very direct and immediate way.
建築できるのです
06:29
But perhaps the most exciting thing about it
しかしこのことの、おそらく最も刺激的な点は
06:31
is that the driver of this technology is available everywhere.
この技術の応用先がどこにでもあるという事です
06:34
This is terrestrial chemistry. We've all got it,
これは大地の化学です 我々は皆それと関係がある
06:37
which means that this technology is just as appropriate
つまりこの技術が、先進工業国にだけでなく
06:40
for developing countries as it is
開発途上国にも
06:43
for First World countries.
応用可能だという事です
06:45
So, in summary, I'm generating metabolic materials
まとめると、私はビクトリア型技術と対抗する
06:47
as a counterpoise to Victorian technologies,
代謝性資材を生み出していて
06:50
and building architectures from a bottom-up approach.
ボトムアップ方式の建築をしようとしています
06:53
Secondly, these metabolic materials
二つ目に、この代謝性素材は
06:56
have some of the properties of living systems,
生体システムと類似の特質を備えており
06:58
which means they can perform in similar ways.
同様の方法で振る舞うということです
07:00
They can expect to have a lot of forms and functions
建築上、多くの形や機能を
07:03
within the practice of architecture.
提供する事が期待されます
07:06
And finally, an observer in the future
最後に、未来の観察者は
07:08
marveling at a beautiful structure in the environment
環境の美しい構造物に驚嘆しながら
07:11
may find it almost impossible to tell
それが自然のプロセスでできたのか、
07:14
whether this structure
それとも人工的なプロセスで
07:17
has been created by a natural process
できたのか、ほとんど区別が
07:19
or an artificial one.
つけられないだろうという事です
07:21
Thank you.
どうもありがとう
07:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:25
Translated by Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewed by Kayo Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Rachel Armstrong - Applied scientist, innovator
TED Fellow Rachel Armstrong is a sustainability innovator who creates new materials that possess some of the properties of living systems, and can be manipulated to "grow" architecture.

Why you should listen

Rachel Armstrong innovates and designs sustainable solutions for the built and natural environment using advanced new technologies such as, Synthetic Biology – the rational engineering of living systems - and smart chemistry. Her research prompts a reevaluation of how we think about our homes and cities and raises questions about sustainable development of the built environment. She creates open innovation platforms for academia and industry to address environmental challenges such as carbon capture & recycling, smart ‘living’ materials and sustainable design.

Her award winning research underpins her bold approach to the way that she challenges perceptions, presumptions and established principles related to scientific concepts and the building blocks of life and society. She embodies and promotes new transferrable ways of thinking ‘outside of the box’ and enables others to also develop innovative environmental solutions. Her innovative approaches are outlined in her forthcoming TED Book on Living Architecture.

Watch Rachel Armstrong's TED Fellows talk, "Creating Carbon-Negative Architecture" >>

More profile about the speaker
Rachel Armstrong | Speaker | TED.com