sponsored links
TED2006

Robert Wright: Progress is not a zero-sum game

ロバート・ライト: 人間社会の進歩はゼロ・サムゲームではない

February 2, 2006

作家のロバート・ライトが 「ノン・ゼロ・サム」 を解説します。他者と相互に関連した運命と協力のネットワークが人類の社会的進化を現在に至るまで導いてきました。「ノン・ゼロ・サム」の考え方を活かすことで現代の人間性をいかに救えるかについて語ります。

Robert Wright - Journalist, philosopher
The best-selling author of "Nonzero," "The Moral Animal" and "The Evolution of God," Robert Wright draws on his wide-ranging knowledge of science, religion, psychology, history and politics to figure out what makes humanity tick -- and what makes us moral. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
どうやら私には18分しかありません
00:25
I've got apparently 18 minutes
00:27
to convince you that history has a direction, an arrow;
歴史には向きがあって
後戻りしない矢のようのものであり
00:30
that in some fundamental sense, it's good;
ある意味 基本的には良いことであり
その矢の方向は何かポシティブな方向を指しているのだ
ということを皆さんに納得していただく時間がです
00:33
that the arrow points to something positive.
最初にTEDの人から連絡があり
この明るい話題を話してほしいと依頼された時のことですが
00:36
Now, when the TED people first approached me about giving this upbeat talk --
00:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:41
-- that was before the cartoon of Muhammad had triggered global rioting.
それはムハンマド風刺漫画が
世界規模の暴動を引き起こす以前で
鳥インフルエンザがヨーロッパに到達する前でした
00:47
It was before the avian flu had reached Europe.
00:49
It was before Hamas had won the Palestinian election,
パレスチナの選挙においてハマスが勝ち
00:51
eliciting various counter-measures by Israel.
イスラエルによる様々な対抗処置が
引き起こされる前でもありました
正直なところ 楽観的な話をして欲しいと言われる前に
それを知っていたとしても
00:55
And to be honest, if I had known when I was asked to give this upbeat talk
00:59
that even as I was giving the upbeat talk,
楽観的な話をしていたその間でさえも
01:02
the apocalypse would be unfolding --
災いは起きていたことでしょう
(笑)
01:05
(Laughter)
01:06
-- I might have said, "Is it okay if I talk about something else?"
もしかしたら 「何か他のことを話していいですか」
と聞いたかもしれません
しかし そうしませんでした
ですから今日ここで 私にできる話をします
01:10
But I didn't, OK. So we're here. I'll do what I can. I'll do what I can.
しかし そうしませんでした
ですから今日ここで 私にできる話をします
私は皆様に警告しなければなりません
01:16
I've got to warn you:
私の世界観が明るいというのは
常に微妙なものです
01:18
the sense in which my worldview is upbeat has always been kind of subtle,
もしかしたら とらえどころがない とも言えます
01:25
sometimes even elusive.
01:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:28
The sense in which I can be uplifting and inspiring --
私の話が皆さんを楽観的にし
その気にさせるようなものであることは
01:31
I mean, there's always been a kind of a certain grim dimension
悲観的な自分の裏返しとして
楽観的に振舞おうとしているのです
01:34
to the way I try to uplift, so if grim inspiration --
そして「憂鬱な激励」
01:38
(Laughter)
この 「憂鬱な激励」 という言葉が
矛盾していなければ ではありますけど
01:39
-- if grim inspiration is not a contradiction in terms, that is, I'm afraid,
うまくいったとして、それが今日皆さんに
ご提供できる最大限の希望です
01:43
the most you can hope for. OK, today -- that's if I succeed.
うまくいったとして、それが今日皆さんに
ご提供できる最大限の希望です
01:47
I'll see what I can do. OK?
うまくいったとして、それが今日皆さんに
ご提供できる最大限の希望です
01:49
Now, in one sense,
ある意味で 歴史は方向性を持っているという主張は
さほど議論を招くようなものではありません
01:51
the claim that history has a direction is not that controversial.
01:54
If you're just talking about social structure,
例えば社会構造は
01:57
OK, clearly that's gotten more complex
1万年強の間にどんどん高いレベルに達し
複雑な形態になったことは明らかです
01:59
a little over the last 10,000 years -- has reached higher and higher levels.
1万年強の間にどんどん高いレベルに達し
複雑な形態になったことは明らかです
02:02
And in fact, that's actually sustaining
実際 生物学的進化の作用により人類登場以前から
社会構造の進化の傾向が持続しているのです
02:04
a long-standing trend that predates human beings, OK,
02:08
that biological evolution was doing for us.
実際 生物学的進化の作用により人類登場以前から
社会構造の進化の傾向が持続しているのです
02:11
Because what happened in the beginning, this stuff encases itself in a cell,
なぜなら まず最初に起きたのは
これらの組織が一つの細胞に閉じ込められ
いくつかの細胞が社会を形成し
02:16
then cells start hanging out together in societies.
ついにあまりに近く寄り添ったために 多細胞生物になり
02:19
Eventually they get so close, they form multicellular organisms,
02:22
then you get complex multicellular organisms; they form societies.
より複雑な多細胞生物となり
社会を作り出したのです
02:27
But then at some point, one of these multicellular organisms
しかしある時点で この多細胞生物の一つに
02:30
does something completely amazing with this stuff, which is
驚くべきことが起こるのです
02:33
it launches a whole second kind of evolution: cultural evolution.
まったく新しいタイプの第二の進化を起こすのです
文化的な進化です
02:38
And amazingly, that evolution sustains the trajectory
さらに驚くべきことには 進化は軌道に乗り
02:41
that biological evolution had established toward greater complexity.
生物学的進化が 更なる複雑性へと
成し遂げていったのです
02:46
By cultural evolution we mean the evolution of ideas.
文化的な進化というのは 概念の進化という意味です
02:49
A lot of you have heard the term "memes." The evolution of technology,
多くの方が「ミーム」という用語に聞き覚えあるでしょう
テクノロジーの進化です
02:52
I pay a lot of attention to, so, you know,
私が たいへん注目しているものです たとえば-
02:54
one of the first things you got was a little hand axe.
最初は小さな手斧だったものが
世代が移り そうある人が言ったんです
「この石を棒の先につけてみないか」って
02:58
Generations go by, somebody says, hey, why don't we put it on a stick?
03:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:06
Just absolutely delights the little ones.
子供たちを本当に喜ばせます
03:09
Next best thing to a video game.
テレビゲームほどではありませんけどね
03:11
This may not seem to impress,
これは感心することではありませんが
テクノロジーの進化は進み
03:13
but technological evolution is progressive, so another 10, 20,000 years,
更に 一、二万年経って今あるような兵器が開発されました
03:17
and armaments technology takes you here.
03:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
感銘を受けますね
03:20
Impressive. And the rate of technological evolution speeds up,
そしてテクノロジー進化のスピードは加速し
03:24
so a mere quarter of a century after this, you get this, OK.
ここから たった四半世紀で ここまで到達します
(笑)
03:28
(Laughter)
03:30
And this.
それと これです
(笑)
03:32
(Laughter)
すいません これは安っぽい冗談でした
03:33
I'm sorry -- it was a cheap laugh, but I wanted to find a way
でも 冒頭にお話しした大災禍の発生に
話を何とか戻してみたかったんです
03:36
to transition back to this idea of the unfolding apocalypse,
きっとうまくいくと思ったんです
03:39
and I thought that might do it.
(拍手)
03:41
(Applause)
大災禍を起こらしめる原因は
03:48
So, what threatens to happen with this unfolding apocalypse
大災禍を起こらしめる原因は
03:53
is the collapse of global social organization.
世界規模の社会組織の崩壊なのです
03:57
Now, first let me remind you how much work it took to get us where we are,
まず最初に 思い出してください
今ある社会形態に至るまでどれだけの時間がかかったか
04:00
to be on the brink of true global social organization.
真に地球規模の社会組織を形成するまであと少し
というところまで来ているのです
04:03
Originally, you had the most complex societies, the hunter-gatherer village.
もともと 私たちは最も複雑な組織をもっていました
狩猟採集をベースとした村落です
ストーンヘンジは首長社会の遺物 -
04:09
Stonehenge is the remnant of a chiefdom,
04:11
which is what you get with the invention of agriculture: multi-village polity
それは農業の発明により発生した
複数の村落からなる
04:14
with centralized rule.
中央集権型の政治形態です
04:17
With the invention of writing, you start getting cities. This is blurry. I kind of like that
文字の発明に伴い 都市が生まれはじめます
少々ぼやけていますが なんとなく私はそれが好きです
04:22
because it makes it look like a one-celled organism and reminds you
なぜなら これはまるで単細胞生物のように見え
有機的組織が幾多の段階を得て
此処に及ぶに至ったのかを思い出させるからです
04:25
how many levels organic organization has already moved through
04:29
to get to this point. And then you get to, you know, you get empires.
そして ついにはご存知の通り 帝国が発生したのです
04:35
I want to stress, you know, social organization can transcend political bounds.
強調したいのは 社会的組織は
政治的な境界を超越できるのです
04:39
This is the Silk Road connecting the Chinese Empire and the Roman Empire.
これは 中国帝国とローマ帝国を結んだシルクロードです
04:43
So you had social complexity spanning the whole continent,
政治的類似性が無かったのにもかかわらず複合社会が
大陸を横断する形で存在していたのです
04:46
even if no polity did similarly. Today, you've got nation states.
今日では国家というものが存在します
肝心なのは 国境を越えた協調や組織が
明らかに存在しているということです
04:51
Point is: there's obviously collaboration and organization going on
04:54
beyond national bounds.
04:56
This is actually just a picture of the earth at night,
この写真は 実は ただ夜に撮った地球の写真です
04:59
and I'm just putting it up because I think it's pretty.
綺麗だと思ったのでお見せしました
05:01
Does kind of convey the sense that this is an integrated system.
統合されたシステムである感じも見て取れると思います
05:06
Now, I explained this growth of complexity by reference to something
統合されたシステムである感じも見て取れると思います
この複雑性が増すことについて 私は「ノン・ゼロ・サム」
というものに言及して説明をしたことがあります
05:12
called "non-zero sumness."
05:16
Assuming that a few of you did not do the assigned reading, very quickly,
事前に読んでいない方もいらっしゃると思うので
ごく簡単に -
ゼロ・サム・ゲームとは要は
05:21
the key idea is the distinction between zero-sum games, in which correlations
勝者に対して必ず敗者がいるというような
負の相関関係があるゲームのことです
05:26
are inverse: always a winner and a loser.
一方ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームでは
相関関係がポジティブになりえます
05:29
Non-zero-sum games in which correlations can be positive, OK.
05:33
So like in tennis, usually it's win-lose;
たとえば テニス 通常これは 勝者-敗者の関係で
つまるところ必ずゼロ・ゼロ・サムになります
05:37
it always adds up to zero-zero-sum. But if you're playing doubles,
しかし ダブルスでは 貴方と同じネット側にいる人は
貴方と運命を共にしています
05:40
the person on your side of the net, they're in the same boat as you,
05:42
so you're playing a non-zero-sum game with them.
良い結果であっても悪い結果であっても二人にとっては
ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームなのです いいですね?
05:44
It's either for the better or for the worse, OK.
ノン・ゼロ・サムの形態は
経済分野など 日常生活において多くみられ
05:47
A lot of forms of non-zero-sum behavior in the realm of economics and so on
05:52
in everyday life often leads to cooperation.
しばしば協力につながります
05:56
The argument I make is basically that, well,
私が論じているのは つまり ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームは
私たちの生活の一部であるということです
05:58
non-zero-sum games have always been part of life.
06:00
You have them in hunter-gatherer societies,
それは狩猟採取社会でも見られましたが
06:02
but then through technological evolution, new forms of technology arise
しかし それは技術的な進化に伴って
新しい形の技術が生まれ
06:07
that facilitate or encourage the playing of non-zero-sum games,
ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームの利点をうまく利用したり
もしくは関与を促しています
それも 更に多くの人々を よりに大きな領域に渡って
06:12
involving more people over larger territory.
06:15
Social structure adapts to accommodate this possibility and
社会構造はこれを受け入れ 潜在的な生産性を
活かすように順応し 都市となるのです
06:19
to harness this productive potential, so you get cities, you know,
そして 無意識のうちに あらゆるノン・ゼロ・サムゲームが
世界中で繰り広げられているのです
06:22
and you get all the non-zero-sum games you don't think about
06:25
that are being played across the world.
06:26
Like, have you ever thought when you buy a car,
たとえば 皆様が 車を買おうと思った時に
06:29
how many people on how many different continents contributed
どれだけの人々が または 幾つの大陸が
その車の製造に関与したかを考えたことがありますか
06:31
to the manufacture of that car? Those are people in effect
これらの人々は結果的には 皆様方と
ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームをしているのです
06:36
you're playing a non-zero-sum game with.
当然 そのような事が周囲に沢山あるのです
06:38
I mean, there are certainly plenty of them around.
さて
06:45
Now, this sounds like an intrinsically upbeat worldview in a way,
これは本質的には明るい世界像だとある意味では言えます
06:48
because when you think of non-zero, you think win-win, you know,
なぜなら ノン・ゼロを考える際には
両者両得を考えるからです
06:51
that's good. Well, there are a few reasons
それは良いことです
ただ あるいくつかの理由から 実際のところ
それほど本質的に楽観的ではないのです
06:53
that actually it's not intrinsically upbeat.
06:56
First of all, it can accommodate; it doesn't deny the existence
まず第一に 恣意的に都合よく利用されてしまいますし
不平等な搾取戦争の存在を否定しません
07:00
of inequality exploitation war.
07:03
But there's a more fundamental reason
しかし 本質的楽観的ではないという
もっと根本的な理由があるのです
07:05
that it's not intrinsically upbeat, because a non-zero-sum game,
なぜなら
ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームの結果
07:08
all it tells you for sure is that the fortunes will be correlated for better or worse.
運命が良きにも悪しきにもどちらにも
成りえることは確かなのです
07:12
It doesn't necessarily predict a win-win outcome.
必ずしも両者両得の結果を予見するものではないのです
ですので ある意味 出てくる疑問というのは
07:18
So, in a way, the question is: on what grounds
私の歴史観が 何をもって一体 楽観的なのか
ということです
07:20
am I upbeat at all about history? And the answer is,
答えは まず最初に
07:24
first of all, on balance I would say people have played their games
いわばですが 結局のところ
人々は両損となるよりも両者両得となるように
振舞ってきたということです
07:28
to more win-win outcomes than lose-lose outcomes. On balance,
結果的に 歴史は ノン・ゼロ・サム・ゲームの分野に
おいては最終的にはプラスであると思うのです
07:32
I think history is a net positive in the non-zero-sum game department.
07:38
And a testament to this is the thing that most amazes me,
そして
この証拠ですが 最も私を驚かせ
最も感動させ 最も気持ちを明るいものに
させるものであり
07:43
most impresses me, and most uplifts me,
07:45
which is that there is a moral dimension to history;
それは 歴史には倫理的側面があるということです
倫理的な矢があるのです
07:50
there is a moral arrow. We have seen moral progress over time.
私たちは時がたつにつれて
モラルが向上していくのを見てきました
07:53
2,500 years ago, members of one Greek city-state
2千5百年前 あるギリシャ都市国家の一つは
07:57
considered members of another Greek city-state subhuman
他のギリシャ都市国家のメンバーを人間以下と考え
08:00
and treated them that way. And then this moral revolution arrived,
そして そのように扱いました
そして このモラル革命がやってきて
08:05
and they decided that actually, no, Greeks are human beings.
彼らは確信に至ります
いや 実際のところ ギリシャ人は人間である
08:09
It's just the Persians who aren't fully human
完全に人間ではないのは ペルシャ人だけだ
08:12
and don't deserve to be treated very nicely.
良い扱いを受けるにはふさわしくない と考えたのです
08:14
But this was progress -- you know, give them credit. And now today,
しかし これは進歩なのです 認めてあげましょう
今日までに 更に多くの進歩があったと思います
08:17
we've seen more progress. I think -- I hope -- most people here would say
ここに居る皆様の多くはそう思っていると
願うところですが
08:20
that all people everywhere are human beings,
いずこの人も 種や宗教の違いに関わらず
まともな扱いを受けるに値する人間であると
考えるようになったということです
08:23
deserve to be treated decently,
08:26
unless they do something horrendous, regardless of race or religion.
何かひどいことでもしない限りですが
古代史を読むことによって革命によって何が
進歩してきたか理解できるのです
08:30
And you have to read your ancient history to realize what a revolution that has been,
08:34
OK. This was not a prevalent view,
これは幾千年前までは一般的な観点では
ありませんでしたけれども
08:36
few thousand years ago, and I attribute it to this non-zero-sum dynamic.
(人間観の)進歩は
ノン・ゼロ・サム・ダイナミックのためであると考えます
(人間観の)進歩は
ノン・ゼロ・サム・ダイナミックのためであると考えます
08:41
I think that's the reason there is as much tolerance toward nationalities,
私が思うに それが今日あるような国籍 民族性 宗教の違いに対する寛容性の理由なのです
私が思うに それが今日あるような国籍 民族性 宗教の違いに対する寛容性の理由なのです
08:45
ethnicities, religions as there is today. If you asked me,
なぜ私が日本を爆破することに賛成しない理由と聞かれ
なぜ私が日本を爆破することに賛成しない理由と聞かれ
08:50
you know, why am I not in favor of bombing Japan,
私の車が日本製だからと答えてもそれは半分冗談なのです
08:52
well, I'm only half-joking when I say they built my car.
彼らとはこのノン・ゼロ・サム関係があり
08:55
We have this non-zero-sum relationship,
08:57
and I think that does lead to a kind of a tolerance to the extent that you realize
他人の富が自分にプラスの相関性があると
認識する範囲において
09:03
that someone else's welfare is positively correlated with yours --
ある種の寛容性が導かれるのです
09:07
you're more likely to cut them a break.
皆さんは どちらかというと 切り離したいかもしれません
09:09
I kind of think this is a kind of a business-class morality.
私が思うに それはある種のビジネス・クラスの
倫理観だと思います
残念ながら 私は大西洋横断フライトの
ビジネスクラスだとか
09:14
Unfortunately, I don't fly trans-Atlantic business class often enough
そのてのビジネスクラスに頻繁に乗っているわけでは
ありませんが
09:18
to know, or any other kind of business class really,
ビジネス・クラスに乗っている人たちが
ビジネス・クラスに乗っている人たちが
09:21
but I assume that in business class, you don't hear many expressions of, you know,
人種や民族グループに対する偏狭を意味するような
話をしてはいないでしょう
09:25
bigotry about racial groups or ethnic groups,
09:28
because the people who are flying trans-Atlantic business class
なぜなら 大西洋横断ビジネスクラスを飛ぶような人々は
それらの人々と仕事をし
それらの人々からお金を稼いでからです
09:31
are doing business with all these people; they're making money
09:33
off all these people. And I really do think that, in that sense at least,
私は本当に思うのですが 少なくともその意味では
資本主義は建設的な力であったし もっと根本的には
09:37
capitalism has been a constructive force,
09:40
and more fundamentally, it's a non-zero-sumness
人々の道徳意識の範疇を発展させる建設的な力として
ノン・ゼロ・サムそのものであったのです
09:42
that has been a constructive force in expanding people's realm
09:46
of moral awareness. I think the non-zero-sum dynamic,
思うに ノン・ゼロ・サムのダイナミクスは 経済的な
ことだけでは決してなく また商取引上のことだけでもなく
09:51
which is not only economic by any means -- it's not always commerce --
倫理的な真実のほど近くまで私たちを導き
09:55
but it has driven us to the verge of a moral truth,
10:00
which is the fundamental equality of everyone. It has done that.
万民の根本的な平等にまで推し進めるのです
そう 成し遂げたのです
10:03
As it has moved global, moved us toward a global level of social organization,
それが世界規模の社会的組織にまでなるにつれ
10:08
it has driven us toward moral truth.
私たちを道徳的な真実まで推し進めてきたのです
素晴らしいことだと思います
10:10
I think that's wonderful.
さて 大災禍が引き起こされることについて話を戻しましょう
10:13
Now, back to the unfolding apocalypse.
10:16
And you may wonder, OK, that's all fine,
皆さんは疑問に思うでしょう
こういうことです
10:18
sounds great -- moral direction in history --
歴史における倫理的な進化
聞こえがいいですね
10:20
but what about this so-called clash of civilizations? Well, first of all,
でも いわゆる「文明の衝突」というのはどうなのか
まず 第一に
10:29
I would emphasize that it fits into the non-zero-sum framework,
強調したいのは それは
ノン・ゼロ・サムの枠組みに当てはまるのです
10:32
OK. If you look at the relationship
いわゆるムスリム社会と西側諸国の間の
関係性について見てみますと
10:34
between the so-called Muslim world and Western world --
これは私が嫌いな二つの言葉ですが
避けることができません
10:37
two terms I don't like, but can't really avoid;
10:40
in such a short span of time, they're efficient if nothing else --
この限られた時間のトークでは
他のどんな言葉よりも効率的です
10:44
it is non-zero-sum. And by that I mean,
それらは ノン・ゼロ・サムなのです
私が述べたいのはつまり ムスリム世界の人々が
10:47
if people in the Muslim world get more hateful, more resentful,
より憎悪を感じ より憤慨し
自分たちの居る世界が幸せでなくなることは
10:51
less happy with their place in the world,
10:52
it'll be bad for the West. If they get more happy, it'll be good for the West.
西側諸国とっても悪いことなのです
彼らがより幸せな方が 西側諸国にも良いことなのです
10:56
So that is a non-zero-sum dynamic.
ですから それはノン・ゼロ・サムのダイナミクスなのです
11:01
And I would say the non-zero-sum dynamic is only going to grow more intense over time
そして ノン・ゼロ・サムのパワーは時がたつにつれ
より強くなっていくと言えるでしょう
11:05
because of technological trends, but more intense in a kind of negative way.
なぜならば 技術の傾向のためです
ただし 負の方向で強くなっているのです
11:10
It's the downside correlation of their fortunes that will become more and more possible.
負の相関関係を伴う運命がより起こりそうなのです
11:16
And one reason is because of something I call the "growing lethality of hatred."
一つの理由は 「致死的な憎悪の成長」 と
私が呼ぶものによります
ますます 草の根の憎悪がアメリカの国土における
組織的暴力の形で現れるでしょう
11:21
More and more, it's possible for grassroots hatred abroad
11:25
to manifest itself in the form of organized violence on American soil.
それは かなり新しい動向であり
11:30
And that's pretty new, and I think it's probably going to get a lot worse
私が思うに 更に状況は悪化するでしょう
暴力が引き起こしえる被害の程度がひどくなるのです
11:33
-- this capacity -- because of
私が思うに 更に状況は悪化するでしょう
暴力が引き起こしえる被害の程度がひどくなるのです
なぜならば現代的な技術である情報工学
11:36
trends in information technology, in technologies that can be used
武器への転用が可能な生命工学とか
ナノテクノロジーといった技術があるからです
11:40
for purposes of munitions like biotechnology and nanotechnology.
武器への転用が可能な生命工学とか
ナノテクノロジーといった技術があるからです
11:46
We may be hearing more about that today.
技術の転用についてもっとお聞きのことが
あるかもしれません
11:48
And there's something I worry about especially, which is that
そして私が特に心配しているのは
このダイナミクスが我々を危険の淵に立たせるような
負のスパイラルに陥れることなのです
11:51
this dynamic will lead to a kind of a feedback cycle that puts us on a slippery slope.
このダイナミクスが我々を危険の淵に立たせるような
負のスパイラルに陥れることなのです
11:57
What I have in mind is: terrorism happens here; we overreact to it.
私が恐れるのは テロ行為が起き
私たちが大袈裟に反応し
12:00
That, you know, we're not sufficiently surgical in our retaliation
賢明でない報復行為によって
12:04
leads to more hatred abroad, more terrorism.
憎悪が更に世界的に拡散し より多くのテロ行為が
引き起こされることです
12:06
We overreact because being human, we feel like retaliating,
我々は人間であるが故に 報復の本性があるために
過度に反応し
12:10
and it gets worse and worse and worse.
事態はどんどん悪化していくのです
12:12
You could call this the positive feedback of negative vibes,
負の感情に対する正のフィードバックと呼べるでしょう
しかし これはちょっと不気味です
12:16
but I think in something so spooky,
12:18
we really shouldn't have the word positive there at all, even in a technical sense.
技術的にはそういう意味であったとしても
”正の”という言葉を使うべきではありません
12:21
So let's call it the death spiral of negativity.
ですので 「負の死のスパイラル」と呼びましょう
(笑)
12:24
(Laughter)
私は断言できます
12:26
I assure you if it happens, at the end, both the West
最後には 西側諸国もムスリム社会も苦しむことになります
12:28
and the Muslim world will have suffered.
12:31
So, what do we do? Well, first of all, we can do a lot more with arms control,
では どうすればいのでしょうか
まず最初に 軍縮についてもっと出来ることがあります
12:37
the international regulation of dangerous technologies.
危険な技術についての世界規制です
12:39
I have a whole global governance sermon
今ここで 世界レベルの統治について
私が一席ぶつことも可能です
12:41
that I will spare you right now,
それは本質的ではあるのですが
どのみち 十分には喋られませんから
12:43
because I don't think that's going to be enough anyway, although it's essential.
世界規模の大きな道徳の進化について
お話をしようと思うのです
12:46
I think we're going to have to have a major round
12:48
of moral progress in the world.
12:50
I think you're just going to have to see less hatred among groups,
グループ間の憎悪と偏見が
だんだん減り
12:55
less bigotry, and, you know, racial groups, religious groups, whatever.
人種グループや宗教グループといった偏見が
減らなければなりません
13:01
I've got to admit I feel silly saying that.
そう述べる事が 馬鹿馬鹿しいと認めざるをえません
あまりに楽観主義的に聞こえます
13:03
It sounds so kind of Pollyannaish. I feel like Rodney King, you know,
ロドニー・キング氏のように 「なぜ一緒にやっていけないの」
と言っているかに感じられます
13:06
saying, why can't we all just get along?
13:08
But hey, I don't really see any alternative, given the way I read the situation.
でもこの状況を見る限り他に選択肢が
見当たらないのです
倫理的な進化がおきなくてはなりません
13:14
There's going to have to be moral progress.
13:17
There's going to have to be a lessening of the amount of hatred in the world,
非常に危険な状況が訪れているので
世界の憎悪の量を減少させなくてはなりません
非常に危険な状況が訪れているので
世界の憎悪の量が減少させなくてはなりません
13:21
given how dangerous it's becoming.
13:25
In my defense, I'd say, as naive as this may sound,
自分を擁護しますが ナイーブに聞こえるかもしれませんが
13:28
it's ultimately grounded in cynicism.
これは究極的には皮肉に基づいているのです
それはつまり
13:31
That is to say --
13:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:33
-- thank you, thank you. That is to say, remember: my whole view
ありがとうございます
覚えておいてください つまり
私の倫理についての観点は
結局のところ自己利益に尽きるのです
13:38
of morality is that it boils down to self-interest.
人々の運命に相関性があって
13:41
It's when people's fortunes are correlated.
13:43
It's when your welfare conduces to mine, that I decide, oh yeah,
皆さんの幸福が 私に幸福をもたらすのならば
皆さんの幸福を願おうって そう決意できるのです
13:46
I'm all in favor of your welfare. That's what's responsible
それが この倫理的進化の発展に寄与しているのです
13:50
for this growth of this moral progress so far,
13:53
and I'm saying we once again have a correlation of fortunes,
もう一度言いますが 私たちの運命には相関関係があり
13:56
and if people respond to it intelligently, we will see
人々がそれに対して知的に対応するならば
寛容性など そう私たちが必要としている規範の
発達を見ることになるでしょう
14:00
the development of tolerance and so on --
14:03
the norms that we need, you know.
寛容性など そう私たちが必要としている規範の
発達を見ることになるでしょう
14:06
We will see the further evolution of this kind of business-class morality.
私たちは このビジネス・クラスの倫理観の
更なる進化を見ることになるでしょう
14:10
So, these two things, you know, if they get people's attention
二つのこと つまり人々の注目を得て
正の相関を機能させること
そして自分の利益のために行動することによって -
14:16
and drive home the positive correlation and people do what's in their self-interests,
14:19
which is further the moral evolution,
それこそが更なる倫理の進化なのですが -
14:23
then they could actually have a constructive effect.
本当に建設的な効果をもたらすことができるのです
14:26
And that's why I lump growing lethality of hatred
だからこそ「致死的な憎悪の成長」と
「負の死のスパイラル」を
14:29
and death spiral of negativity under the general rubric,
一緒にして一般的なお題目にしていながらも
笑顔でいられるんです
14:32
reasons to be cheerful.
14:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
最善を尽くしているのですよ
でしょ?
14:36
Doing the best I can, OK.
(笑)
14:38
(Laughter)
私は 自分のことをミスター楽観主義者
だなんて言ってませんよ
14:39
I never called myself Mr. Uplift.
14:41
I'm just doing what I can here.
ただいまここで最善を尽くしているだけです
14:44
(Laughter)
さて 倫理革命を引き起こすのは難しいに
違いありません ですよね?
14:45
Now, launching a moral revolution has got to be hard, right?
14:48
I mean, what do you do?
というより 皆さんはどうしますか
14:50
And I think the answer is a lot of different people
思うに その解は 多くの様々な人々が
多くの様々なことをせねばならない と思うのです
14:52
are going to have to do a lot of different things.
14:55
We all start where we are. Speaking as an American
皆 自分たちが今いるところから始めるのです
アメリカ人であり 子供がおり 彼らの安全を
あと10、20、30年先まで心配する者として
15:00
who has children whose security 10, 20, 30 years down the road
15:04
I worry about -- what I personally want to start out doing
自分として気になっていること
だから個人的に始めようと思っていることは
15:07
is figuring out why so many people around the world hate us, OK.
どうして これほど多くの世界中の人々が
我たちのことを憎悪するのか 理解することです
15:11
I think that's a worthy research project myself.
価値ある調査プロジェクトであると私には思われます
15:15
I also like it because it's an intrinsically kind of morally redeeming exercise.
それを好ましいと思うのは 本質的には
倫理的に回復するための行為だから でもあります
15:20
Because to understand why somebody
なぜならば 全く異なる異文化の誰かが
何故ゆえ何をするのかを理解することは
15:22
in a very different culture does something --
奇妙な文化の中で奇妙なことをする異国人だと
そんな見方をするあなたのような人が
15:24
somebody you're kind of viewing as alien,
15:26
who's doing things you consider strange
奇妙な文化の中で奇妙なことをする異国人だと
そんな見方をするあなたのような人が
15:28
in a culture you consider strange -- to really understand why they do
何故彼らがそうするのかを本当に理解することが
15:32
the things they do is a morally redeeming accomplishment,
倫理的な回復を達成したことになるのです
15:36
because you've got to relate their experience to yours.
なぜなら 彼らの経験をあなたの経験に
結びつけたことになるからです
15:38
To really understand it, you've got to say, "Oh, I get it.
こう言えれば本当に理解したことになるでしょう
「ああ わかった 彼らの憤慨は同じようなことが私に
対して起きた時に 私が憤慨するのと似ていて
15:42
So when they feel resentful, it's kind of like
15:44
the way I feel resentful when this happens,
15:46
and for somewhat the same reasons." That's true understanding.
多少なりとも同じような理由なのだ」なのだと
それこそが真実の理解です
15:50
And I think that is an expansion of your moral compass when you manage to do that.
それを皆さんができるようになったら
皆さんの倫理基準が発展したといえるのです
これは 人々が皆さんを嫌っていたら
特に困難なことなんです
15:56
It's especially hard to do when people hate you, OK,
15:59
because you don't really, in a sense, want
なぜならば 実際には なぜ嫌われているのか
完全に理解したくはないからです
16:02
to completely understand why people hate you.
16:04
I mean, you want to hear the reason, but you don't want to be able to relate to it.
理由は聞きたいのですが それを
受け入れたくないのです
16:06
You don't want it to make sense, right? (Laughter)
そんなばかな ってね?
(笑)
16:08
You don't want to say, "Well, yeah, I can kind of understand
皆さんは言いたくないのです
「そんな状況下では私達の国を嫌いになる
あなた方の気持ちも分るよ」なんてね
16:10
how a human being in those circumstances
16:12
would hate the country I live in." That's not a pleasant thing,
気持ち良いことではありません
16:15
but I think it's something that we're going to have to get used to and
しかし それは私たちが慣れねばならず
努めねばならないことです
16:21
work on. Now, I want to stress that to understand, you know --
さて
皆様にこのことをしっかりと理解して
いただきたいのですが
草の根 つまりなぜ彼らが我々を憎むのかという
16:32
there are people who don't like this whole business of understanding
物事の根本原因を理解すること自体を
受け入れ難い人々もいるのです
16:35
the grassroots, the root causes of things; they don't want to know
私はそういうことを理解したいのです
16:39
why people hate us. I want to understand it.
何故 私たちを嫌いなのかを理解すれば
彼らの嫌悪が収まるからです
16:42
The reason you're trying to understand why they hate us,
16:44
is to get them to quit hating us. The idea
彼らの人間性を正しく認め 彼らを良く
理解するという倫理的な行動が
16:47
when you go through this moral exercise of really coming to appreciate
16:51
their humanity and better understand them, is part of an effort
長い目で見れば 貴方の人間性を彼らに
正しく認めさせる努力の一部となるなのです
16:56
to get them to appreciate your humanity in the long run.
16:58
I think it's the first step toward that. That's the long-term goal.
それが 最初の第一歩だと思うのです
それこそが長期的な目標なのです
17:02
There are people who worry about this, and in fact,
これについて心配する人々がいます
事実 私自身が どうやら 数夜前に
全国テレビで非難されました
17:07
I, myself, apparently, was denounced on national TV
17:12
a couple of nights ago because of an op-ed I'd written.
私が書いた論説のためにです
それは申し上げたような考えに沿っていたのですが
17:16
It was kind of along these lines, and the allegation was
その主張とは 私が「テロリストに対する愛情」を
持っているとするものでした
17:18
that I have, quote, "affection for terrorists."
17:22
Now, the good news is that the person who said it was Ann Coulter.
朗報なのは それを言った人が
アン・コールターであるということです
(笑) (拍手)
17:25
(Laughter)
17:27
(Applause)
まぁ もしも敵が必要だと言うならば
アン・コールターにすべきですよね
17:29
I mean, if you've got to have an enemy, do make it Ann Coulter.
17:31
(Laughter)
ですが 馬鹿げた心配でもないのです
17:32
But it's not a crazy concern, OK, because understanding behavior
なぜなら 行動を理解することは
ある種の共感をもたらしえるからです
17:36
can lead to a kind of empathy,
17:38
and it can make it a little harder to deliver tough love, and so on.
そして厳しい態度をとるのが
少し難しくなることもあるからです
17:41
But I think we're a lot closer to erring on the side of not comprehending
しかし どちらかというと 私たちは状況を
明瞭に理解できるというよりは理解できないという
17:48
the situation clearly enough, than in comprehending it so clearly
過ちを犯しがちであるが故に テロリスト殺害のための
出兵はできないということになるのです
17:52
that we just can't, you know, get the army out to kill terrorists.
なので 私はあまり心配しておりません
ですので (笑)
17:55
So I'm not really worried about it. So --
なので 私はあまり心配しておりません
ですので (笑)
17:58
(Laughter)
つまり 私たちは多くの憎悪の最前線で問題に
取り組まねばなりませんが もしも成功すれば
18:00
-- I mean, we're going to have to work on a lot of fronts,
18:05
but if we succeed -- if we succeed -- then once again,
もしも成功すれば 今一度
ノン・ゼロ・サムとノン・ゼロ・サムの
ダイナミクスを認識することが
18:12
non-zero-sumness and the recognition of non-zero-sum dynamics
我々を余儀なくより高い倫理レベルに
向かわせるでしょう
18:16
will have forced us to a higher moral level.
18:20
And a kind of saving higher moral level,
ある種の高い倫理レベルを保つこと
文字通り世界を救う何かです
18:25
something that kind of literally saves the world.
18:27
If you look at the word "salvation" in the Bible --
聖書の中で救世という言葉を見てみますと
18:30
the Christian usage that we're familiar with --
キリスト教徒による一般的な使われ方は
魂を救い 天国へ導くという意味でですが
18:33
saving souls, that people go to heaven -- that's actually a latecomer.
しかしそれは 実際のところ新しい解釈です
本来の救世という言葉の聖書における意味は
社会システムを救うということでした
18:36
The original meaning of the word "salvation" in the Bible is about saving the social system.
18:42
"Yahweh is our Savior" means "He has saved the nation of Israel,"
「ヤハウェは我らの救世主」 というのは
「イスラエルの国を救いたまわれた」 という意味なのです
18:45
which at the time, was a pretty high-level social organization.
その当時 大変レベルの高い社会組織だったのです
18:48
Now, social organization has reached the global level, and I guess,
現在 社会組織は世界規模に達しており
18:52
if there's good news I can say I'm bringing you, it's just that
皆様にお伝えできる良いお知らせがあるとすれば
私が思うに
世界の救世に必要とされているのは それはただ単に
18:56
all the salvation of the world requires is the intelligent pursuit
知的な自己利益の追求を
規律を持って注意深く行うことです
19:02
of self-interests in a disciplined and careful way.
それは難しいものとなるでしょう
でも 挑戦してみましょうと申し上げたいのです
19:08
It's going to be hard. I say we give it a shot anyway
なぜなら 今や 取り返しがつかないところまで
来てしまっているからです
19:11
because we've just come too far to screw it up now.
ありがとうございました
19:14
Thanks.
(拍手)
19:16
(Applause)
Translator:Mio Yamaguchi
Reviewer:Tomoyuki Suzuki

sponsored links

Robert Wright - Journalist, philosopher
The best-selling author of "Nonzero," "The Moral Animal" and "The Evolution of God," Robert Wright draws on his wide-ranging knowledge of science, religion, psychology, history and politics to figure out what makes humanity tick -- and what makes us moral.

Why you should listen

Author Robert Wright thinks the crises the human species now faces are moral in nature, and that our salvation lies in the intelligent pursuit of self-interest. In his book Nonzero, Wright argues that life depends on a non-zero-sum dynamic. While a zero-sum game depends on a winner and loser, all parties in a non-zero-sum game win or lose together, so players will more likely survive if they cooperate. This points to an optimistic future of ultimate cooperation among humans -- if we recognize the game.

Well-respected for his erudition and original thinking (Bill Clinton hailed him as a genius), Wright draws from multiple disciplines -- including science, religion, history and politics -- in his search for big-picture perspectives on today's problems, particularly terrorism, while offering guarded hope for where we might be headed. A Schwartz Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, Wright also hosts an interview series with celebrated thinkers at Meaningoflifetv.com.

Wright's newest book, The Evolution of God, explores the history of the idea of God in the three Abrahamic religions, Judaism, Islam and Christianity.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.