sponsored links
TEDIndia 2009

Shashi Tharoor: Why nations should pursue soft power

シャシ・タルール: なぜ国家はソフト・パワーを追及すべきか

November 7, 2009

シャシ・タルールはインドが急速に超大国なりつつあり、それも貿易や政治を通してだけでなく、ソフト・パワー、すなわち己の文化を食、音楽、技術、ボリウッドを通して世界と分かち合う力を通してであると語ります。長期的には軍事力ばかりでなく世界中の想いや心を動かす能力の方が大事だと論じます。

Shashi Tharoor - Politician and writer
After a long career at the UN, and a parallel life as a novelist, Shashi Tharoor became a member of India's Parliament. He spent 10 months as India's Minister for External Affairs, building connections between India and the world. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
As an Indian, and now as a politician
インド人として また現在は政治家
00:15
and a government minister,
そして閣僚として
00:17
I've become rather concerned about
インドに対する過大評価である
00:19
the hype we're hearing about our own country,
「インドが世界のリーダーになる」という話や
00:21
all this talk about India becoming a world leader,
ましてや「我々が次の超大国になる」という話が
00:23
even the next superpower.
気がかりになっています
00:25
In fact, the American publishers of my book,
実際 私の著書
『The Elephant, The Tiger and the Cellphone』も
00:27
"The Elephant, The Tiger and the Cell Phone,"
実際 私の著書
『The Elephant, The Tiger and the Cellphone』も
00:29
added a gratuitous subtitle saying,
アメリカでは よけいな副題が付きました
00:31
"India: The next 21st-century power."
「インド:次の21世紀大国」
00:33
And I just don't think that's what India's all about,
しかし それがインドだとは思いませんし
00:35
or should be all about.
それだけであるべきではないと思います
00:37
Indeed, what worries me is the entire notion of world leadership
実は世界のリーダという
概念自体に悩まされます
00:39
seems to me terribly archaic.
ひどく古風に思えるんです
00:43
It's redolent of James Bond movies
ジェームズ・ボンド映画や
00:45
and Kipling ballads.
キプリングのバラードを思わせます
00:47
After all, what constitutes a world leader?
そもそも 世界リーダーの条件は何でしょう?
00:49
If it's population, we're on course to top the charts.
人口だとすれば我々はトップに向かっています
00:51
We will overtake China by 2034.
2034年までには 中国を追い越します
00:54
Is it military strength? Well, we have the world's fourth largest army.
軍事力でしょうか?
我々の軍隊の規模は世界第4位です
00:58
Is it nuclear capacity? We know we have that.
核の保有なら?
きちんと持っています
01:01
The Americans have even recognized it,
アメリカだって認めてますから
01:03
in an agreement.
協定ではね
01:05
Is it the economy? Well, we have now
では経済力でしょうか?今やインドは
01:07
the fifth-largest economy in the world
購買力平価説に基づけば
01:09
in purchasing power parity terms.
世界で5番目に大きな経済大国であり
01:11
And we continue to grow. When the rest of the world took a beating last year,
更に成長を続けています 
去年 世界中が打撃を受けたのに対して
01:13
we grew at 6.7 percent.
6.7%の成長を遂げました
01:16
But, somehow, none of that adds up to me,
しかし これ以外にも この21世紀に
01:19
to what I think India really can aim to contribute in the world,
インドが世界に貢献するべきものは
01:23
in this part of the 21st century.
もっと何かあると思うんです
01:28
And so I wondered, could
そこで私は考えました もしかしたら
01:30
what the future beckons for India to be all about
世界がインドに対して望むものは
01:33
be a combination of these things allied to something else,
今述べたものと共にさらに
01:36
the power of example,
理想となるようなパワー
01:39
the attraction of India's culture,
インド文化の魅力
01:41
what, in other words, people like to call "soft power."
俗に言う「ソフト・パワー」なんじゃないかと
01:44
Soft power is a concept invented by a Harvard academic,
「ソフト・パワー」は 私の友人でもあるハーバード学者
01:49
Joseph Nye, a friend of mine.
ジョセフ・ナイが発案した概念で
01:52
And, very simply, and I'm really cutting it short because of the time limits here,
時間がないので簡潔に言うと
01:54
it's essentially the ability of a country to attract others
基本的には 国の持つ文化や政治的価値
01:58
because of its culture, its political values,
外交政策などが
02:01
its foreign policies.
他国を引きつける力です
02:03
And, you know, lots of countries do this. He was writing initially about the States,
いろんな国が使っています
ナイは最初アメリカについて書いたのですが
02:05
but we know the Alliance Francaise
アリアンス・フランセーズなんかは
02:08
is all about French soft power, the British Council.
フランスのソフト・パワーの例ですし
ブリティッシュ・カウンシルもそう
02:10
The Beijing Olympics were an exercise in Chinese soft power.
北京オリンピックは
中国のソフト・パワーの行使でしたね
02:13
Americans have the Voice of America and the Fulbright scholarships.
アメリカは国営放送ボイス・オブ・アメリカや
フルブライト奨学金がありますね
02:16
But, the fact is, in fact,
しかし 現実には
02:20
that probably Hollywood and MTV and McDonalds
ハリウッド MTV マクドナルドの方が
02:22
have done more for American soft power
政府による活動よりも
02:25
around the world than any specifically government activity.
世界中で アメリカのソフト・パワーを広めているんです
02:27
So soft power is something that really emerges
つまりソフト・パワーは
02:30
partly because of governments,
政府による働きかけでもありますが
02:33
but partly despite governments.
政府以外のものからも生じるんです
02:35
And in the information era we all live in today,
今日のような 情報社会時代では
02:37
what we might call the TED age,
TED時代とも呼べますが
02:40
I'd say that countries are increasingly being judged
国々はますますグローバル社会に
02:43
by a global public that's been fed
評価されています
02:46
on an incessant diet of Internet news,
社会はインターネットニュースや
02:49
of televised images,
テレビから流れるイメージ
02:52
of cellphone videos, of email gossip.
携帯ビデオやゴシップメールで溢れています
02:54
In other words, all sorts of communication devices
言いかえれば 様々なコミュニケーションツールが
02:57
are telling us the stories of countries,
その国の意図に関わらず
03:00
whether or not the countries concerned want people to hear those stories.
国々の物語を私達に伝えているんです
03:02
Now, in this age, again, countries with access
さて この時代では
03:07
to multiple channels of communication
多様なコミュニケーション手段
03:09
and information have a particular advantage.
情報手段を持つ国は特に有利です
03:11
And of course they have more influence, sometimes, about how they're seen.
時にはどう見られるかに対して
影響力もあるでしょう
03:13
India has more all-news TV channels
インドには世界のどの国よりも
03:17
than any country in the world,
多くのニュースチャンネルがあり
03:19
in fact in most of the countries in this part of the world put together.
この地域の国すべてを合わせた
ものを上回ります
03:21
But, the fact still is that it's not just that.
しかし それだけではありません
03:25
In order to have soft power, you have to be connected.
ソフト・パワーを持つには
「つながり」も大切です
03:27
One might argue that India has become
現在のインドのつながり方は
03:30
an astonishingly connected country.
ものすごいと思われるでしょう
03:32
I think you've already heard the figures.
すでに数字を聞かれたと思いますが
03:34
We've been selling 15 million cellphones a month.
今や毎月1500万台の携帯を売り上げており
03:36
Currently there are 509 million cellphones
5億と9百万台の携帯電話が
03:40
in Indian hands, in India.
インド人の手にあるのです
03:43
And that makes us larger than the U.S. as a telephone market.
つまり 電話マーケットの規模としては
アメリカを超えています
03:45
In fact, those 15 million cellphones
実はこの1500万台という数字は
03:49
are the most connections that any country,
電気通信の歴史上
03:52
including the U.S. and China,
アメリカや中国を含め
03:54
has ever established in the history of telecommunications.
どの国よりも速く つながっているのを示します
03:56
But, what perhaps some of you don't realize
しかし 皆さんは我々がここに至った
03:59
is how far we've come to get there.
長い道のりを ご存知でしょうか?
04:01
You know, when I grew up in India,
私がインドで育った頃は
04:03
telephones were a rarity.
電話なんて非常に珍しいものでした
04:05
In fact, they were so rare that elected members of Parliament
珍しいあまり 国会議員たちは
04:07
had the right to allocate 15 telephone lines
15本の電話回線の割り当てを
彼らの選ぶ人たちに
04:09
as a favor to those they deemed worthy.
とりはからう 権利を持っていました
04:12
If you were lucky enough to be a wealthy businessman
幸運にも裕福なビジネスマンであったり
04:14
or an influential journalist, or a doctor or something, you might have a telephone.
影響力のあるジャーナリストや
医者であれば電話を持てたのです
04:17
But sometimes it just sat there.
しかし 持っているだけだったりします
04:20
I went to high school in Calcutta.
私はカルカッタの高校に通っていたのですが
04:22
And we would look at this instrument sitting in the front foyer.
正面玄関に電話が設置されていました
04:24
But half the time we would pick it up
しかし期待して受話器を手にしても
04:26
with an expectant look on our faces,
大半の場合は
04:28
there would be no dial tone.
発信音はありませんでした
04:30
If there was a dial tone and you dialed a number,
仮に発信音があってダイアルを回したとしても
04:32
the odds were two in three you wouldn't get the number you were intending to reach.
3回に2回は間違った相手につながってしまい
04:34
In fact the words "wrong number" were more popular than the word "Hello."
「お間違えです」という受け答えが
「もしもし」より一般的だったようです
04:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:41
If you then wanted to connect to another city,
また 市外にかけようならば
04:42
let's say from Calcutta you wanted to call Delhi,
例えばカルカッタからデリーに電話したいとすると
04:44
you'd have to book something called a trunk call,
長距離電話の呼び出しを予約し
04:46
and then sit by the phone all day, waiting for it to come through.
一日中電話のそばで
繋がるのを待たなければなりませんでした
04:48
Or you could pay eight times the going rate
もしくは8倍の料金を払って
04:51
for something called a lightning call.
「稲妻コール」というものを使えたのですが
04:54
But, lightning struck rather slowly in our country in those days,
当時 わが国では稲妻が落ちるのが遅くて
04:56
so, it was like about a half an hour for a lightning call to come through.
稲妻コールが繋がるのに30分はかかっていました
04:58
In fact, so woeful was our telephone service
電話サービスのあまりの悲惨さに
05:02
that a Member of Parliament stood up in 1984 and complained about this.
1984年に国会議員が
そのことについて抗議したのですが
05:05
And the Then-Communications Minister replied in a lordly manner
当時の通信大臣は横柄にこう答えました
05:09
that in a developing country
「途上国では
05:12
communications are a luxury, not a right,
通信は権利ではなくぜいたくであり
05:14
that the government had no obligation to provide better service,
よりよいサービスを提供するのは政府の責任ではない
05:16
and if the honorable Member wasn't satisfied with his telephone,
むしろ議員が自分の電話に不満があるのなら
05:20
could he please return it, since there was an eight-year-long waiting list
8年のウェーティングリストがあるのだから
05:22
for telephones in India.
返していただけないか?」とね
05:25
Now, fast-forward to today and this is what you see:
現代に飛び 周囲を見回すと
05:28
the 15 million cell phones a month.
月に1500万台の携帯が売られています
05:30
But what is most striking is who is carrying those cell phones.
そこで印象的なのは
誰が携帯を持っているか です
05:32
You know, if you visit friends in the suburbs of Delhi,
例えば デリーの郊外を訪ねると
05:36
on the side streets you will find a fellow with a cart
道端で16世紀にデザインされたような
05:39
that looks like it was designed in the 16th century,
カートを引いた人を見かけます
05:42
wielding a coal-fired steam iron
18世紀に発明されたであろう
05:45
that might have been invented in the 18th century.
石炭で熱したアイロンを巧みに使う彼は
05:48
He's called an isthri wala. But he's carrying a 21st-century instrument.
「アイロンかけ屋さん」ですが
21世紀の道具を持っています
05:50
He's carrying a cell phone because most incoming calls are free,
なぜ携帯を持っているかというと
大概受信料がタダなので
05:53
and that's how he gets orders from the neighborhood,
携帯で近所からの注文を受け
05:56
to know where to collect clothes to get them ironed.
アイロンをかける服を集めるわけです
05:58
The other day I was in Kerala, my home state,
先日 私は故郷のケーララ州にいたのですが
06:02
at the country farm of a friend,
都会から20キロ離れた
06:05
about 20 kilometers away from any place you'd consider urban.
友人の畑に行きましてね
06:07
And it was a hot day and he said, "Hey, would you like some fresh coconut water?"
暑い日だったので
「ココナッツジュースでも飲むかい?」と聞かれ
06:11
And it's the best thing and the most nutritious and refreshing thing you can drink
熱帯地方の暑い日に
こんな体によく 美味しいものはないので
06:14
on a hot day in the tropics, so I said sure.
「もちろん」と答えました
06:17
And he whipped out his cellphone, dialed the number,
彼が携帯をスッと取り出しダイアルすると
06:20
and a voice said, "I'm up here."
「今上にいるよ」と声がしました
06:22
And right on top of the nearest coconut tree,
すぐ傍のココナツの木のてっぺんにいたのは
06:24
with a hatchet in one hand and a cell phone in the other,
片手に斧 もう片手には携帯を持つ
06:26
was a local toddy tapper,
地元の樹液採取者で
06:29
who proceeded to bring down the coconuts for us to drink.
木を下りて我々が飲む
ココナツを持ってきてくれました
06:31
Fishermen are going out to sea and carrying their cell phones.
漁師も海に出るときは携帯を持ち
06:34
When they catch the fish they call all the market towns along the coast
魚を捕まえると港の市場に電話し
06:37
to find out where they get the best possible prices.
どこで最高の価格で売れるか探します
06:40
Farmers now, who used to have to spend half a day of backbreaking labor
農場主もかつては 半日がかりで
06:42
to find out if the market town was open,
市場が開いているのかを
06:46
if the market was on,
苦労して調べたり
06:48
whether the product they'd harvested could be sold, what price they'd fetch.
収穫したものが売れるか どの価格で下ろせるか
06:50
They'd often send an eight year old boy all the way on this trudge
このような情報を得るために
8歳の男の子を町に送り
06:53
to the market town to get that information and come back,
のこのこと行って戻ってくるのを待って
06:56
then they'd load the cart.
それから荷車を積んでいました
06:58
Today they're saving half a day's labor with a two minute phone call.
今はこの半日労働を
2分の電話で済ませてます
07:00
So this empowerment of the underclass
ですから 社会の底辺の人々の
力を引き出せたことが
07:04
is the real result of India being connected.
インド全体がつながった真の成果なのです
07:07
And that transformation is part of where India is heading today.
この変革はインドが現在向かっている方向の一部ですが
07:10
But, of course that's not the only thing about India that's spreading.
インドが広めているのはそれだけではありません
07:15
You've got Bollywood. My attitude to Bollywood is best summarized
ボリウッドがあります 
私のボリウッドに対する考えは
07:18
in the tale of the two goats at a Bollywood garbage dump --
ボリウッドのゴミ捨て場にいる
2匹のヤギの話でまとめられます-
07:21
Mr. Shekhar Kapur, forgive me --
シェーカル・カプール監督ごめんなさいね-
07:24
and they're chewing away on cans of celluloid discarded by a Bollywood studio.
ヤギたちはボリウッドのスタジオが捨てた
フイルムを食べていて
07:28
And the first goat, chewing away, says, "You know, this film is not bad."
1匹が噛みながら 「この映画悪くないよ」と言うと
07:32
And the second goat says, "No, the book was better."
もう1匹が 「いやー、 本のほうが良かったよ」と言うのです
07:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:39
I usually tend to think that the book is usually better,
私は大抵 本のほうが良いと思っているのですが
07:45
but, having said that,
それでもやはり
07:48
the fact is that Bollywood is now
ボリウッドは今や
07:50
taking a certain aspect of Indian-ness and Indian culture around the globe,
特定のインドらしさや
インド文化を世界に広めています
07:52
not just in the Indian diaspora in the U.S. and the U.K.,
それもアメリカやイギリス在住の
インド系移民の間だけでなく
07:56
but to the screens of Arabs and Africans, of Senegalese and Syrians.
アラブ諸国やアフリカ
セネガルやシリアでも上映されています
07:59
I've met a young man in New York whose illiterate mother
ニューヨークで読み書きのできない
母を持つ男性に会いました
08:03
in a village in Senegal
彼の母はセネガルの村に住んでいるのですが
08:06
takes a bus once a month to the capital city of Dakar,
わざわざボリウッド映画を見るためだけに
08:08
just to watch a Bollywood movie.
毎月一度バスで首都ダカールまで行くそうです
08:11
She can't understand the dialogue.
会話も理解出来なければ
08:13
She's illiterate, so she can't read the French subtitles.
彼女はフランス語字幕を読むこともできません
08:15
But these movies are made to be understood despite such handicaps,
しかし これらの映画は
そんなハンデがあっても楽しめるように作られ
08:18
and she has a great time in the song and the dance and the action.
彼女は歌やダンスにアクションを大いに楽しみ
08:21
She goes away with stars in her eyes about India, as a result.
結果 インドについて目をキラキラさせて帰るのです
08:24
And this is happening more and more.
こんな現象がどんどん増えています
08:28
Afghanistan, we know what a serious security problem
アフガニスタンは世界各国にとって
08:30
Afghanistan is for so many of us in the world.
重要な安全保障の問題です
08:33
India doesn't have a military mission there.
インドはアフガニスタンに
軍隊を送っていませんが
08:36
You know what was India's biggest asset in Afghanistan in the last seven years?
過去7年間 アフガニスタンで
インドが最も威力を発したものは?
08:38
One simple fact:
実はこれです
08:42
you couldn't try to call an Afghan at 8:30 in the evening.
夜8時半にアフガン人が
電話に出なくなったこと
08:44
Why? Because that was the moment
それはなぜか?その時刻は
08:47
when the Indian television soap opera,
インドのメロドラマが
08:49
"Kyunki Saas Bhi Kabhi Bahu Thi," dubbed into Dari, was telecast on Tolo T.V.
放映される時間だからです
Todo TVにてダリー語に吹きかえられ
08:51
And it was the most popular television show in Afghan history.
アフガンの歴史上
最も人気のあるテレビ番組になりました
08:57
Every Afghan family wanted to watch it.
どのアフガン家庭もこの番組を見るために
09:00
They had to suspend functions at 8:30.
8時半には やってることをやめてしまいます
09:02
Weddings were reported to be interrupted
聞くところでは 結婚式さえも
09:04
so guests could cluster around the T.V. set,
ゲストがテレビの前に集まれるよう中断され
09:07
and then turn their attention back to the bride and groom.
終わってから花嫁と花婿の元に戻った
という話もありました
09:09
Crime went up at 8:30. I have read a Reuters dispatch --
8時半には犯罪が増えました
ロイターのレポートなので
09:12
so this is not Indian propaganda, a British news agency --
インドのプロパガンダではなく
イギリス通信社の報道ですが
09:15
about how robbers in the town of Musarri Sharif*
マザーリシャリーフの町では泥棒が
09:18
stripped a vehicle of its windshield wipers,
車のワイパー
09:21
its hubcaps, its sideview mirrors,
ホイールキャップ サイドミラー
09:24
any moving part they could find, at 8:30,
取れるもの全てを
8時半に盗んだと伝えています
09:27
because the watchmen were busy watching the T.V. rather than minding the store.
なぜならその時間 警備員が
テレビに気をとられていたからです
09:30
And they scrawled on the windshield in a reference to the show's heroine,
更にドラマのヒロインにちなんで
「トゥルシ・ジンダバード:
09:33
"Tulsi Zindabad": "Long live Tulsi."
トゥルシ 万歳」と窓に落書きまでされたのです
09:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:40
That's soft power. And that is what India is developing
これぞソフト・パワーであり それこそインドが
09:41
through the "E" part of TED:
TEDのEの部分
自国のエンターテイメント産業を通して
09:45
its own entertainment industry.
発展させているものです
09:47
The same is true, of course -- we don't have time for too many more examples --
あまり多くの例を出す時間はありませんが
09:49
but it's true of our music, of our dance,
我々の音楽やダンス
09:52
of our art, yoga, ayurveda, even Indian cuisine.
アート、ヨガ、アーユルヴェーダ医学
インド料理だってそうです
09:55
I mean, the proliferation of Indian restaurants
私が70年代に留学生として初めて海外へ渡ったときから
09:59
since I first went abroad as a student, in the mid '70s,
現代までのインド料理店の急増ぶりといったら!
10:02
and what I see today, you can't go to a mid-size town in Europe or North America
今やヨーロッパや北米の中規模の町で
インド料理店のない町なんて
10:05
and not find an Indian restaurant. It may not be a very good one.
ないくらいですよね 
おいしくないかもしれませんが
10:09
But, today in Britain, for example,
例えばイギリスでは
10:12
Indian restaurants in Britain
インド料理店のほうが
10:14
employ more people than the coal mining,
炭鉱業、造船業、鉄鋼業界を合わせたより
10:17
ship building and iron and steel industries combined.
より多くの人材を雇っています
10:19
So the empire can strike back.
そう 帝国は逆襲できるのです
10:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:24
But, with this increasing awareness of India,
さて アフガニスタンの話や
10:31
with you and with I, and so on,
私やあなた方を通して
10:33
with tales like Afghanistan,
インドに対する意識が上がるほど
10:35
comes something vital in the information era,
現在の情報社会に重要なことが
10:37
the sense that in today's world
何だかわかってきます
10:40
it's not the side of the bigger army that wins,
それは現代では
軍の大きい側が勝つのではなく
10:43
it's the country that tells a better story that prevails.
より良い物語を語れる国こそが優勢ということです
10:46
And India is, and must remain, in my view, the land of the better story.
私の見解ではインドこそがより良い物語を持つ国であり
あり続けなければなりません
10:49
Stereotypes are changing. I mean, again, having gone to the U.S.
ステレオタイプは変わりつつあります
10:54
as a student in the mid '70s,
留学生として滞在した70年代アメリカでの
10:57
I knew what the image of India was then, if there was an image at all.
インドに対するイメージを知っていますが
10:59
Today, people in Silicon Valley and elsewhere
現在ではシリコンバレーや他の場所でも
11:02
speak of the IITs, the Indian Institutes of Technology
IIT(インド工科大学)に対してかつてMIT
11:05
with the same reverence they used to accord to MIT.
(マサチューセッツ工科大学)に示していたほどの
敬意を示しています
11:08
This can sometimes have unintended consequences. OK.
これは時に予想外の結果をもたらします
11:12
I had a friend, a history major like me,
私と同じく歴史学専攻の友人がいたのですが
11:14
who was accosted at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam,
アムステルダムのスキポール空港にて
11:17
by an anxiously perspiring European saying,
不安で汗だくのヨーロッパ人に呼び止められ
11:20
"You're Indian, you're Indian! Can you help me fix my laptop?"
「あなたインド人 インド人ですよね!
ラップトップを直してもらえませんか?」と
11:22
(Laughter)
頼まれたそうです(笑)
11:25
We've gone from the image of India as
インドのイメージは
11:27
land of fakirs lying on beds of nails,
釘のベッドに横たわる托鉢僧や
11:30
and snake charmers with the Indian rope trick,
縄を操る蛇使いなどのイメージから
11:33
to the image of India as a land of mathematical geniuses,
数学や コンピュータの天才
ソフトウェアのプロの国という
11:36
computer wizards, software gurus.
イメージに変わってきました
11:39
But that too is transforming the Indian story around the world.
これも世界中でインドの物語を変えているのです
11:41
But, there is something more substantive to that.
しかし さらに本質的なものもあります
11:46
The story rests on a fundamental platform
この話は複数政党制度という
11:48
of political pluralism.
基本的な政策基盤の上に成り立っています
11:50
It's a civilizational story to begin with.
もっとも これは 文明の物語でもあります
11:52
Because India has been an open society for millennia.
インドは数千年もの間オープンな社会でしたから
11:54
India gave refuge to the Jews, fleeing the destruction of the first temple
インドは バビロニア人やローマ人による
神殿の破壊から逃れたユダヤ人に
11:59
by the Babylonians, and said thereafter by the Romans.
住む場所を与えました
12:04
In fact, legend has is that when Doubting Thomas, the Apostle, Saint Thomas,
伝説によると 不信のトマス、 使徒 聖トマスが
12:07
landed on the shores of Kerala, my home state,
私の故郷ケーララの海岸にたどり着いた時
12:12
somewhere around 52 A.D.,
紀元52年あたりの話ですが
12:14
he was welcomed on shore by a flute-playing Jewish girl.
彼は海岸で笛を吹くユダヤ人の少女に
迎えられた と伝えられています
12:16
And to this day remains the only Jewish diaspora
未だにユダヤ人の歴史上で
12:19
in the history of the Jewish people, which has never encountered
ユダヤ人移住者が一度も反ユダヤ主義に
12:23
a single incident of anti-semitism.
直面しなかった国がインドです
12:25
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:28
That's the Indian story.
これぞインドの物語です
12:34
Islam came peacefully to the south,
南部にはイスラム教が円満に来ましたし
12:36
slightly more differently complicated history in the north.
北部での歴史はもう少し複雑でしたが
12:38
But all of these religions have found a place and a welcome home in India.
様々な宗教はすべてインドで
迎え入れられ居場所を見つけたのです
12:40
You know, we just celebrated, this year, our general elections,
今年 総選挙がありましたが
12:45
the biggest exercise in democratic franchise in human history.
これは人類史上最大の
民主主義選挙権の行使でした
12:48
And the next one will be even bigger, because our voting population
我々の投票人口は
毎年2000万人ずつ増えているので
12:51
keeps growing by 20 million a year.
次回の選挙は より大きなものになるでしょう
12:53
But, the fact is
しかし 事実として
12:56
that the last elections, five years ago,
5年前行われた前回の選挙は
12:58
gave the world extraordinary phenomenon
世界に驚くべき現象を見せました
13:00
of an election being won by a woman political leader
イタリア系でカトリック教徒のソニア・ガンディー
13:02
of Italian origin and Roman Catholic faith, Sonia Gandhi,
という女性の政治家が選挙に勝ち
13:06
who then made way for a Sikh, Mohan Singh,
シーク教徒のマンモハン・シンを
首相に任命し
13:09
to be sworn in as Prime Minister
彼は宣誓就任をイスラム教徒である―
13:12
by a Muslim, President Abdul Kalam,
アブドゥル・カラーム大統領の前で行いました
13:14
in a country 81 percent Hindu.
81%がヒンズー教徒の国でのことです
13:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:19
This is India, and of course it's all the more striking
これがより衝撃的な理由は
13:28
because it was four years later that we all applauded
その4年後 世界が称賛した出来事ですが
13:31
the U.S., the oldest democracy in the modern world,
220年以上 自由で公平な選挙の歴史を持つ
13:33
more than 220 years of free and fair elections,
世界最古の民主主義国家であるアメリカが
13:37
which took till last year to elect a president or a vice president
白人、男性、クリスチャンでない大統領
または副大統領を
13:40
who wasn't white, male or Christian.
やっと去年になって選出したからです
13:44
So, maybe -- oh sorry, he is Christian, I beg your pardon --
なので--失礼しました 彼はクリスチャンですね
13:46
and he is male, but he isn't white.
それに 男性ですが白人ではありません
13:49
All the others have been all those three.
以前はこの3つが揃った人ばかりだった
13:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:53
All his predecessors have been all those three,
前任の大統領は皆
この3つを兼ね備えていたと
13:55
and that's the point I was trying to make.
言いたかったんです
13:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:59
But, the issue is
しかし
14:00
that when I talked about that example,
この例の核心は
14:02
it's not just about talking about India, it's not propaganda.
インドの宣伝でも
プロパガンダでもありません
14:04
Because ultimately, that electoral outcome
だいたい 選挙の結果は
14:09
had nothing to do with the rest of the world.
インド以外の国には関係なく
14:12
It was essentially India being itself.
本質的にはインドが
インドらしくしていただけです
14:14
And ultimately, it seems to me,
それが結局は
14:16
that always works better than propaganda.
プロパガンダより有効だと思うんです
14:18
Governments aren't very good at telling stories.
政府は物語を語るのが
あまり上手ではありません
14:20
But people see a society for what it is,
けれど 人々はありのままの社会を見ます
14:23
and that, it seems to me, is what ultimately
私はそれが結局
14:25
will make a difference in today's information era,
現代の情報社会の時代 TED時代で
14:27
in today's TED age.
重要なことだと思います
14:31
So India now is no longer
現在のインドの国民が望むことは
14:33
the nationalism of ethnicity or language or religion,
もはや人種・言語・宗教主義ではありません
14:36
because we have every ethnicity known to mankind, practically,
なぜなら ありとあらゆる人種が共存し
14:40
we've every religion know to mankind,
ありとあらゆる宗教が信仰されているからです
14:42
with the possible exception of Shintoism,
まあ 神道は例外ですが
14:44
though that has some Hindu elements somewhere.
あれもヒンドゥー教の要素がどこか少しあります
14:46
We have 23 official languages that are recognized in our Constitution.
憲法に認められた言語が23言語あり
14:49
And those of you who cashed your money here
インドの通貨に両替された方は
14:54
might be surprised to see how many scripts there are
ルピーに書かれた金額を表す
14:56
on the rupee note, spelling out the denominations.
言語の多さに驚かれたのではないでしょうか
14:59
We've got all of that.
これらすべてがあります
15:01
We don't even have geography uniting us,
我々を統一する地理すらないのです
15:03
because the natural geography of the subcontinent
なぜなら山や海で自然に囲まれた
15:05
framed by the mountains and the sea was hacked
亜大陸の地理は1947年の
パキスタンとの分割で
15:08
by the partition with Pakistan in 1947.
変えられてしまったからです
15:10
In fact, you can't even take the name of the country for granted,
実は国名すら考えさせられます
15:13
because the name "India" comes from the river Indus,
「インド」という名はパキスタンに流れている
15:16
which flows in Pakistan.
インダス川から来ているのですからね
15:18
But, the whole point is that India
でも ポイントは インドという国は
15:20
is the nationalism of an idea.
ある考えでまとまった国家だということです
15:23
It's the idea of an ever-ever-land,
古代文明から生まれた
15:25
emerging from an ancient civilization,
エバーランドというアイデアで
15:28
united by a shared history,
ともにした歴史でひとつになり
15:30
but sustained, above all, by pluralist democracy.
何より多元的民主主義により
維持されているのです
15:32
That is a 21st-century story as well as an ancient one.
これは21世紀の話であると同時に
古代からあるものなんです
15:35
And it's the nationalism of an idea that
そして この国を支えているのは
15:39
essentially says you can endure differences of caste, creed,
階級や信念
肌の色、文化、食事
15:42
color, culture, cuisine, custom and costume, consonant, for that matter,
習慣、 服装、 そして言葉の発音まで
違いをすべて許容しながらも
15:46
and still rally around a consensus.
合意の基に話し合えるというアイデアです
15:51
And the consensus is of a very simple principle,
この合意はとてもシンプルな原則で
15:54
that in a diverse plural democracy like India
それはインドのような多元的民主主義では
15:56
you don't really have to agree on everything all the time,
どのように異議を唱えるかという
16:00
so long as you agree on the ground rules
ルールにさえ同意すれば
16:04
of how you will disagree.
すべてに賛成する必要はないというものです
16:06
The great success story of India,
多くの学者やジャーナリストが
16:08
a country that so many learned scholars and journalists
50年代と60年代に崩壊するだろうと
16:10
assumed would disintegrate, in the '50s and '60s,
予測した国である インドの成功の鍵は
16:13
is that it managed to maintain consensus on how to survive without consensus.
合意なしに生き延びるという
合意を保持できたことです
16:16
Now, that is the India that is emerging into the 21st century.
これぞ21世紀に 存在感を増してくるインドです
16:21
And I do want to make the point
ここで要点を述べたいのですが
16:25
that if there is anything worth celebrating about India,
インドについて称賛するに値するものは
16:27
it isn't military muscle, economic power.
軍事力でも経済力でもありません
16:30
All of that is necessary,
それらも 全て必要なんですが
16:32
but we still have huge amounts of problems to overcome.
まだ多大な問題を我々は抱えています
16:34
Somebody said we are super poor, and we are also super power.
インドは「非常に貧しい超大国」だと
言った人がいますが
16:37
We can't really be both of those.
両方であることはあり得ません
16:40
We have to overcome our poverty. We have to deal with the
この貧困に打ち勝たねばなりません
16:42
hardware of development,
港や道路 空港などの
16:44
the ports, the roads, the airports,
発展に伴う機械設備
16:46
all the infrastructural things we need to do,
すべての基幹施設に対処しなければなりません
16:48
and the software of development,
それに
16:50
the human capital, the need for the ordinary person in India
人的資本ですね インドの庶民が
16:52
to be able to have a couple of square meals a day,
1日に最低2食 十分な食事が取れたり
16:56
to be able to send his or her children
子供たちをまともな学校へ
16:59
to a decent school,
送れたり
17:01
and to aspire to work a job
人生に好機をもたらし変化させられる
17:03
that will give them opportunities in their lives
仕事につきたいと願えたり
17:05
that can transform themselves.
出来る必要があります
17:08
But, it's all taking place, this great adventure of conquering those challenges,
我々が無視出来ないチャレンジを克服する
17:10
those real challenges which none of us can pretend don't exist.
偉大な冒険は起きているのです
17:14
But, it's all taking place in an open society,
それも とてもオープンな社会
17:17
in a rich and diverse and plural civilization,
豊かで多様な複合文明で起きているのです
17:20
in one that is determined to liberate and fulfill
この文明は人々の
独創的なエネルギーを解放し
17:23
the creative energies of its people.
期待に応えることでしょう
17:26
That's why India belongs at TED,
だからこそインドはTEDにふさわしく
17:28
and that's why TED belongs in India.
TEDもまたインドにふさわしいのです
17:31
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
17:33
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:35
Translator:Momoko Honda
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Shashi Tharoor - Politician and writer
After a long career at the UN, and a parallel life as a novelist, Shashi Tharoor became a member of India's Parliament. He spent 10 months as India's Minister for External Affairs, building connections between India and the world.

Why you should listen

In May 2009, Shashi Tharoor was elected to Parliament, representing the Thiruvananthapuram constituency in Kerala. For 10 months, he also served as Minister for External Affairs, charged with helping India engage with the world. Follow him on Twitter, @shashitharoor, or his YouTube channel, to get a look in at his whirlwind life of service.

Before entering politics, Tharoor spent almost three decades with the UN as a refugee worker and peace-keeper, working as a senior adviser to the Secretary-General. Meanwhile, he maintained a parallel career as a writer, producing three novels, a biography of Nehru and several collections of essays on literature and global affairs (plus hundreds of articles for magazines and journals). He was the UN Under-Secretary General for Communications and Public Information under Kofi Annan, and was India's candidate in 2006 for the post of Secretary-General. He left the UN in 2007.

His latest book is Shadows Across the Playing Field: 60 Years of India-Pakistan Cricket, written with former Pakistan foreign secretary (and cricket legend) Shaharyar Khan.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.