22:06
TED2006

David Pogue: Simplicity sells

デビッド・ポーグ 「シンプルなものは売れる」

Filmed:

ニューヨークタイムズのコラムニストであるデビッド・ポーグが、テクノロジー分野におけるひどいユーザインタフェースをこき下ろし、良くデザインされた製品の例を示します。彼の歌う愉快で痛烈な歌をお聞き逃しなく!

- Technology columnist
David Pogue is the personal technology columnist for the New York Times and a tech correspondent for CBS News. He's also one of the world's bestselling how-to authors, with titles in the For Dummies series and his own line of "Missing Manual" books. Full bio

00:25
(Music: "The Sound of Silence,"
Simon & Garfunkel)
(♪「サウンドオブサイレンス」の節で) やあボイスメール 懐かしき友よ
00:28
Hello voice mail, my old friend.
(笑)
00:30
(Laughter)
またテクニカルサポートに電話した
00:32
I've called for tech support again.
上司の忠告を聞かず 月曜の朝に電話した
00:36
I ignored my boss's warning.
00:39
I called on a Monday morning.
今はもう夜中 晩ご飯ははじめ冷たく それから固くなった
00:43
Now it's evening, and my dinner
first grew cold, and then grew mold.
まだ受話器を握ったまま 沈黙に耳を傾けている
00:49
I'm still on hold.
00:51
I'm listening to the sounds of silence.
分かっているとは思わない 電話の向こうにはきっと誰もいない
00:57
I don't think you understand.
01:00
I think your phone lines are unmanned.
言われた通りにボタンを全部押したけど
01:04
I punched every touch tone I was told,
01:07
but I've still spent 18 hours on hold.
18時間も待たされたまま
01:10
It's not enough your software
crashed my Mac,
やつらのソフトでMacがクラッシュしただけでなく
絶えずハングし 爆弾マーク ROMさえ消えた!
01:13
and it constantly hangs and bombs --
01:17
it erased my ROMs!
01:19
Now the Mac makes the sounds of silence.
今や沈黙するMacに耳を傾けている
復讐の夢に
01:24
In my dreams I fantasize
思いを巡らせる
01:28
of wreaking vengeance on you guys.
彼らがバイク事故を起こし
01:31
Say your motorcycle crashes.
傷からは血が流れ出し 薄れゆく意識の中で
01:35
Blood comes gushing from your gashes.
01:38
With your fading strength, you call 9-1-1
and you pray for a trained MD.
119 番をダイヤルし 医師が来るのを待つが やってくるのは俺だ
01:45
But you get me.
(笑)
01:46
(Laughter)
01:48
And you listen to the sounds of silence.
そしてやつらは沈黙に耳を傾ける
01:52
(Music)
01:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
どうもありがとう こんばんは
01:57
Thank you.
01:58
Good evening and welcome to:
「ブロードウェーの伴奏者だったTED講演者を当てろ」 のコーナーにようこそ
02:00
"Spot the TED Presenter Who Used
to Be a Broadway Accompanist."
(笑)
02:03
(Laughter)
6年前にニューヨークタイムズのコラムを依頼されたとき
02:04
When I was offered the Times
column six years ago,
契約はこういうものでした 「最高にクールでかっこいい最新のガジェットを受け取る
02:07
the deal was like this:
02:09
you'll be sent the coolest, hottest,
slickest new gadgets.
毎週家に送り届けられる
02:12
Every week, it'll arrive at your door.
それを目新しさが無くなるまで
02:14
You get to try them out,
play with them, evaluate them
02:17
until the novelty wears out,
before you have to send them back,
試し 遊び 評価してから送り返す
それにより報酬を受け取る」 ちょっと考えてみてください
02:20
and you'll get paid for it.
02:21
You can think about it, if you want.
昔からテクノロジーおたくだった私は この仕事がすごく気に入りました
02:24
So, I've always been a technology nut,
and I absolutely love it.
しかしこの仕事には ちょっとした問題がありました
02:28
The job, though, came with one
small downside, and that is,
コラムの末尾にいつも私の メールアドレスがついていたことです
02:31
they intended to publish my email address
at the end of every column.
そのため 膨大なメールを受け取ることになりました
02:37
And what I've noticed is -- first of all,
you get an incredible amount of email.
もし孤独に悩んでいるなら
02:42
If you ever are feeling lonely,
02:44
get a New York Times column,
ニューヨークタイムズにコラムを書くといいですよ
02:45
because you will get hundreds
and hundreds and hundreds of emails.
何百通というメールを受け取ることになります
02:48
And the email I'm getting a lot
today is about frustration.
最近受け取るメールの多くは 不満に関するものです
人々が感じているのは…おっと
02:52
People are feeling like things --
02:55
Ok, I just had an alarm
come up on my screen.
警告のポップアップが出ていました プロジェクターに映してなくて良かった
02:58
Lucky you can't see it.
みんな圧倒されています テクノロジーが多すぎ 変化が早すぎるとみんな感じています
02:59
People are feeling overwhelmed.
03:01
They're feeling like
it's too much technology, too fast.
いいテクノロジーなのかもしれませんが
03:03
It may be good technology,
十分なサポート体制があるとは言い難い
03:05
but I feel like there's not enough
of a support structure.
デザインを使いやすく―
03:08
There's not enough help.
03:10
There's not enough thought
put into the design of it
使うのが楽しくなるようにするための考慮が 十分払われていません
03:12
to make it easy and enjoyable to use.
Dellのテクニカルサポートと連絡を取ろうと
03:14
One time I wrote a column about my efforts
to reach Dell Technical Support,
苦労した話をコラムに書いたら 12時間の内に700件も 読者のメッセージが
03:18
and within 12 hours,
there were 700 messages
ニューヨークタイムズのサイトの コメント欄に 寄せられました
03:22
from readers on the feedback boards
on the Times website,
「私もそうだった」 「私なんかこうだった」
03:25
from users saying,
03:27
""Me too, and here's my tale of woe."
私はこれを「ソフトへの怒り」と呼んでいます
03:30
I call it "software rage."
この怒りをお金に変える方法を
03:32
And man, let me tell you,
03:33
whoever figures out how to make money
off of this frustration will --
見つけた人間は…
03:38
Oh, how did that
get up there? Just kidding.
どうしてこんなのが出ているんだろう? 冗談です
(笑)
03:40
(Laughter)
どうして悪化しているのでしょう?
03:41
Ok, so why is the problem accelerating?
03:44
And part of the problem is, ironically,
皮肉なことに 業界がソフトを使いやすくしようと
03:46
because the industry
has put so much thought
力を注いだためなのです
03:48
into making things easier to use.
説明しましょう
03:50
I'll show you what I mean.
03:52
This is what the computer
interface used to look like, DOS.
これが かつてのコンピュータ DOSです
年を経てコンピュータは使いやすくなっていきました
03:56
Over the years, it's gotten easier to use.
これが初代のMacオペレーティングシステム
03:59
This is the original Mac operating system.
04:02
Reagan was President.
Madonna was still a brunette.
レーガンが大統領で マドンナがまだブルネットだった頃のものです
04:05
And the entire operating system --
オペレーティングシステム全体が
04:07
this is the good part -- the entire
operating system fit in 211 k.
211KBに収まりました
04:12
You couldn't put
the Mac OS X logo in 211 k!
Mac OS Xなんてロゴだけで211KB以上あるでしょう
(笑)
04:15
(Laughter)
皮肉なことに コンピュータが使いやすく
04:17
So the irony is, that as these
things became easier to use,
非技術系の人でも使えるようになったことで より幅広い人々が
04:20
a less technical, broader audience
was coming into contact
初めてコンピュータに触れることになりました
04:24
with this equipment for the first time.
私は以前 特別な計らいで Appleのコールセンターで1 日過ごしたことがあります
04:26
I once had the distinct privilege
of sitting in on the Apple call center
04:32
for a day.
予備のヘッドセットで 会話を聞かせてもらいました
04:33
The guy had a duplicate headset
for me to listen to.
「この電話での会話は 品質保証のため 録音されることがあります」
04:36
And the calls that --
you know how they say,
彼らがそう言っているのはご存じですか?
04:40
"Your call may be recorded
for quality assurance?"
いえいえ 彼らが録音するのは
04:42
Uh-uh.
04:44
Your call may be recorded
バカなユーザのおかしな話を集めて
04:45
so that they can collect
the funniest dumb user stories
CDを作るためです
04:48
and pass them around on a CD.
(笑)
04:49
(Laughter)
それが彼らのやっていることです
04:50
Which they do.
(笑)
04:52
(Laughter)
私もコピーをもらいました
04:54
And I have a copy.
04:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:56
It's in your gift bag. No, no.
あなたのカンファレンスバッグにも入ってます (笑) 嘘です
あなたの声が入っています!
04:58
With your voices on it!
すごく典型的で 理解できるような話もあります
05:00
So, some of the stories are just
so classic, and yet so understandable.
マウスがキーキー鳴ると ある女性が
05:05
A woman called Apple to complain
that her mouse was squeaking.
Appleに電話で苦情を言ってきました
05:09
Making a squeaking noise.
「マウスがキーキー鳴るとはどういうことですか?」 と担当者が尋ねると
05:10
And the technician said,
05:11
"Well, ma'am, what do you mean
your mouse is squeaking?"
「とにかく
05:14
She says, "All I can tell you
is that it squeaks louder,
速く動かすほど 画面が酷い音を出すのよ」 と答えました
05:17
the faster I move it across the screen."
(笑)
05:19
(Laughter)
担当者が驚いて 「画面の上でマウスを動かしているんですか?」と聞くと
05:21
And the technician's like,
05:23
"Ma'am, you've got the mouse
up against the screen?"
05:26
She goes, "Well, the message said,
'Click here to continue.'"
「ここをクリックしてくださいって出てましたもの」
(笑)
05:29
(Laughter)
05:32
Well, if you like that one --
how much time have we got?
こんな話がお好きなんですか? 時間はあるかな?
05:36
Another one, a guy called --
this is absolutely true --
ある男が電話してきました 本当の話ですよ!
コンピュータがクラッシュして
05:39
his computer had crashed,
and he told the technician
何度11 をタイプしても再起動しないと言いました
05:41
he couldn't restart it, no matter
how many times he typed "11."
「どうして11 をタイプしたんですか?」と聞くと
05:45
And the technician said,
"What? Why are you typing 11?"
「“エラー タイプ: 11”とメッセージが出たので」
05:48
He said, "The message says,
'Error Type 11.'"
(笑)
05:52
(Laughter)
だから 率直に言って ユーザの問題である場合もあります
05:56
So, we must admit
05:59
that some of the blame falls squarely
at the feet of the users.
しかし どうしてテクノロジー過剰の危機
06:05
But why is the technical overload crisis,
複雑化の危機が今押し寄せているのでしょう? ハードウェアの世界では―
06:07
the complexity crisis, accelerating now?
06:10
In the hardware world, it's because
we the consumers want
消費者は何でも より小さいものを望みます
06:12
everything to be smaller,
smaller, smaller.
だからガジェットは どんどん小さくなっていきますが
06:15
So the gadgets are getting
tinier and tinier,
指の方は基本的に同じサイズのままです
06:17
but our fingers are essentially
staying the same size.
だからどんどん難しくなっていくのです
06:20
So it gets to be more and more
of a challenge.
ソフトウェアには別な力が働きます
06:22
Software is subject
to another primal force:
次々と新バージョンを出す要請があるのです
06:24
the mandate to release
more and more versions.
06:27
When you buy a piece of software,
ソフトウェアは 花瓶やキャンディーのように
06:28
it's not like buying a vase
or a candy bar, where you own it.
買って所有するわけではありません
それは毎年会費を支払う クラブに入るようなものです
06:31
It's more like joining a club,
where you pay dues every year,
毎年ソフト会社は言ってきます
06:35
and every year, they say,
06:36
"We've added more features,
and we'll sell it to you for $99."
「機能を追加しました 99ドルです」
Photoshopだけで いつの間にか 4,000ドルも払った人を知っています
06:40
I know one guy who's spent $4,000
just on Photoshop over the years.
ソフト会社は収入の35パーセントを
06:45
And software companies make
35 percent of their revenue
アップグレードから得ています
06:48
from just these software upgrades.
私はこれを「アップグレードのパラドックス」 と呼んでいるのですが
06:50
I call it the Software Upgrade Paradox --
ソフトウェアというのは改善し続けていると
06:53
which is that if you improve
a piece of software enough times,
そのうち駄目にしてしまうものなのです
06:56
you eventually ruin it.
06:58
I mean, Microsoft Word was last
just a word processor in, you know,
Microsoft Wordが単なるワープロだったのは
アイゼンハワー大統領の時代(50年代) にまでさかのぼります
07:02
the Eisenhower administration.
07:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:05
But what's the alternative?
しかし代わりに何があるでしょう? Microsoft は実際試したことがあります
07:06
Microsoft actually did this experiment.
07:08
They said, "Well, wait a minute.
「みんな機能を追加しすぎだと不平を言っている
07:10
Everyone complains that
we're adding so many features.
ワープロだけのソフトを作ってやろうじゃないか
07:12
Let's create a word processor
that's just a word processor:
シンプルで 純粋な Webページ作成やデータベースのないやつを」
07:15
Simple, pure; does not do web pages,
is not a database."
それが現れました Microsoft Writeです
07:18
And it came out,
and it was called Microsoft Write.
07:22
And none of you are nodding
in acknowledgment, because it died.
みなさんご存じないでしょう
大失敗でした 誰も買いませんでした
07:25
It tanked. No one ever bought it.
私はこれを「SUVの原理」と呼んでいます
07:27
I call this the Sport Utility Principle.
07:29
People like to surround themselves
with unnecessary power, right?
みんな必要もないパワーに 取り囲まれているのが好きなんです
07:34
They don't need the database
and the website, but they're like,
データベースやWebページ作成機能なんて 必要ないのに こう言うのです
「アップグレードしておこう そのうち必要になるかもしれないからね!」
07:37
"Well, I'll upgrade, because, I might,
you know, I might need that someday."
問題は 機能を追加していくと どうなってしまうかということです
07:41
So the problem is: as you add more
features, where are they going to go?
どこに付けたらいいかもわからないツールが やたらたくさんあります
07:45
Where are you going to stick them?
You only have so many design tools.
07:49
You can do buttons, you can do
sliders, pop-up menus, sub-menus.
ボタンがあり スライダーがあり ポップアップメニューにサブメニュー
07:53
But if you're not careful
about how you choose,
しかし注意して選ぶようにしないと こんなことになってしまいます
07:56
you wind up with this.
(笑)
07:57
(Laughter)
07:59
This is an un-retouched --
this is not a joke --
細工なんてしてませんよ ジョークじゃなく 正真正銘Microsoft Wordの写真です
08:02
un-retouched photo of Microsoft Word,
08:04
the copy that you have,
with all the toolbars open.
皆さんのWordでも ツールバーを全部出してやるとこうなります
08:07
You've obviously never
opened all the toolbars,
そんなことは しないだろうと思いますが
これじゃ このちっちゃなところで タイプすることになります
08:10
but all you have to type in
is this little, teeny window down here.
08:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
今やインタフェースのマトリックスの時代です
08:17
And we've arrived at the age
of interface matrices,
08:21
where there are so many
features and options,
あまりに多くの機能やオプションがあり 2 次元が必要です
08:23
you have to do two dimensions, you know:
縦に横 Microsoft Wordが 点を箇条書きに変えたり
08:25
a vertical and a horizontal.
08:26
You guys all complain
08:28
about how Microsoft Word
is always bulleting your lists
URLに勝手に下線を付けたりするのに みんな文句を言いますが
08:30
and underlining your links automatically.
それをオフにするスイッチがあるのです
08:32
The off switch is in there somewhere.
本当に どっかにはあるんです!
08:36
I'm telling you -- it's there.
シンプルで良いインタフェースをデザインするコツは 機能のどれを どこで使うべきか
08:37
Part of the art of designing
a simple, good interface,
08:41
is knowing when to use
which one of these features.
分かっているということです
これはWindows 2000の ログオフ ダイアログです
08:44
So, here is the log-off
dialogue box for Windows 2000.
選択肢が4つしかないのに
08:48
There are only four choices,
どうしてプルダウンを使うんでしょうね?
08:50
so why are they in a pop-up menu?
他にいろいろコンポーネントがあって
08:53
It's not like the rest of the screen
is so full of other components
スペースを切り詰めなきゃいけないわけでもなし
08:57
that you need to collapse the choices.
全部見えるようにだってできたのです
08:59
They could have put them all out in view.
Appleなら同じダイアログボックスをこう作ります
09:01
Here's Apple's take
on the exact same dialogue box.
(拍手)
09:04
(Applause)
ありがとう ええ 私がデザインしました 嘘です
09:05
Thank you -- yes, I designed
the dialogue box. No, no.
AppleとMicrosoftでは
09:09
Already, we can see
that Apple and Microsoft
デザインに対するアプローチに 大きな違いがあります
09:12
have a severely divergent
approach to software design.
Microsoftのシンプルにするためのアプローチは
09:16
Microsoft's approach
to simplicity tends to be:
分解してステップを踏むようにする というものです
09:19
let's break it down;
let's just make it more steps.
こういうウィザードが 至るところにあります
09:22
There are these "wizards" everywhere.
この秋にWindowsの新バージョンが出てきますが
09:24
And you know, there's a new version
of Windows coming out this fall.
彼らがこの調子で続けていくなら
09:27
If they continue at this pace,
there's absolutely no telling
いったいどんなことになるのか 予想も付きません
09:30
where they might wind up.
09:33
[Welcome to the Type a Word Wizard]
(「単語入力ウィザード」) (笑)
09:35
(Laughter)
09:36
(Applause)
単語入力ウィザードへようこそ 試してみましょう 「次へ」をクリックすると
09:39
"Welcome to the Type a Word Wizard."
09:41
Ok, I'll bite.
09:42
Let's click "Next" to continue.
(拍手)
09:45
(Laughter)
09:47
(Applause)
タイプしたい最初の文字を プルダウンメニューから選んでください
09:49
From the drop-down menu, choose
the first letter you want to type. Ok.
(笑)
09:53
(Laughter)
09:55
So there is a limit
that we don't want to cross.
だから超えるべきでない線というのがあるのです 答えは何なのでしょう?
09:57
So what is the answer?
どうやったらこれらの機能を シンプルで知的な仕方で 詰め込むことが出来るのでしょう?
09:59
How do you pack in all these features
in a simple, intelligent way?
10:03
I believe in consistency, when possible,
私の考えでは 可能な限り一貫性を保ち
可能な限り ゴミ箱のような実世界のメタファを使い 多くのものにラベルを付けておくことです
10:05
real-world equivalents,
10:07
trash can folder, when possible,
label things, mostly.
しかしデザイナの皆さんには 知的にするという―
10:10
But I beg of the designers here
10:12
to break all those rules
if they violate the biggest rule of all,
最重要のルールのために 時には 他のルールを全て破って頂きたいのです
10:16
which is intelligence.
それはどういうことでしょうか?
10:17
Now what do I mean by that?
一貫性には欠けても 知識を生かすことで
10:18
I'm going to give you some examples
10:20
where intelligence makes something
not consistent, but it's better.
改善される実例を示しましょう
Webで何か買い物をするとき 住所を入れますが
10:23
If you are buying something on the web,
10:26
you're supposed to put in your address,
そのとき国を選びますよね?
10:28
and you're supposed to choose
what country you're from, ok?
世界には国が200くらいあります インターネットは地球村だと思いたいところですが
10:31
There are 200 countries in the world.
10:32
We like to think of the Internet
as a global village.
残念ながら まだそうなってはいません
10:35
I'm sorry; it's not one yet.
インターネットは 主として アメリカと ヨーロッパと 日本です
10:36
It's mainly like, the United States,
Europe, and Japan.
だったらどうしてアメリカ (United States)を “U”のところに置くんでしょう?
10:39
So why is "United States" in the "U"s?
(笑)
10:41
(Laughter)
10:43
You have to scroll, like,
seven screensful to get to it.
たどり着くのに7画面分も スクロールしなきゃなりません
10:46
Now, it would be inconsistent
to put "United States" first,
アメリカを一番上に置くのは 一貫性は欠きますが
知的なやり方です これは前にも話したことがありますが
10:49
but it would be intelligent.
10:50
This one's been touched on before,
Windowsをシャットダウンするときに 押すボタンが
10:53
but why in God's name do you
shut down a Windows PC
何で「スタート」なんでしょうね?
10:57
by clicking a button called "Start?"
10:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
もう1つ挙げると 印刷があります
11:04
Here's another pet one of mine:
you have a printer.
ほとんどの場合 やりたいのは 1 部だけ
11:07
Most of the time, you want to print
one copy of your document,
11:11
in page order, on that printer.
ページ順に いつものプリンタに出す ということです
じゃあ何で毎回印刷するたびに こんなのが出てくるんでしょう?
11:13
So why in God's name do you see
this every time you print?
11:18
It's like a 747 shuttle cockpit.
ジャンボジェットのコクピット並みです
(笑)
11:20
(Laughter)
11:22
And one of the buttons at the bottom,
you'll notice, is not "Print."
しかも一番下のボタンが 「印刷」ですらない
(笑)
11:26
(Laughter)
(拍手)
11:30
(Applause)
シンプルさを信条に掲げる会社は
11:33
Now, I'm not saying that Apple
is the only company who has embraced
Appleだけではありません
11:37
the cult of simplicity.
11:40
Palm is also, especially in the old days,
wonderful about this.
Palmも 特に昔は この点で素晴しかったです
11:43
I actually got to speak to Palm
when they were flying high in the '90s,
Palmが絶好調だった90年代に
講演しに行って 社員の人と話したことがあります
11:46
and after the talk,
I met one of the employees.
「あなたはここでどんな仕事をしているんですか?」 と聞くと
11:48
He says, "Nice talk." And I said,
"Thank you. What do you do here?"
「タップ数を数えています」 と言います
11:52
He said, "I'm a tap counter."
I'm like, "You're a what?"
「何ですか それ?」と聞くと 彼は 「CEOのジェフ ホーキンスが言うんですよ
11:54
He goes, "Well Jeff Hawkins,
the CEO, says,
“Palm Pilotで3回より多くタップしなきゃいけない タスクはデザインし直しだぞ”って
11:56
'If any task on the Palm Pilot
takes more than three taps of the stylus,
それでタップ数を数えているわけです」
12:01
it's too long,
and it has to be redesigned.'
12:04
So I'm the tap counter."
タップ数を数えていない会社の例を
12:05
So, I'm going to show you an example
12:07
of a company that does not
have a tap counter.
お見せしましょう
12:10
(Laughter)
Wordで新しい白紙の文書を作るとしましょう
12:11
This is Microsoft Word.
12:13
Ok, when you want to create
a new blank document in Word --
…そういうことだってあるかもしれないでしょう?
12:17
it could happen.
(笑)
12:18
(Laughter)
まずファイルメニューに行って 「新規作成」を選びます
12:23
You go up to the "File" menu
and you choose "New."
12:27
Now, what happens when you choose "New?"
「新規作成」を選ぶと何が起きるのでしょう? 新しい白紙の文書が出来るのでしょうか?
12:29
Do you get a new blank document?
違います
12:31
You do not.
画面の反対側にタスクバーが現れて そのどこかに…
12:32
On the opposite side of the monitor,
a task bar appears,
12:37
and somewhere in those links --
by the way, not at the top --
ちなみに一番上ではありませんよ…たくさんあるリンクのどれかが
12:41
somewhere in those links is a button
that makes you a new document.
新しい文書を作るためのボタンになっています
タップ数を数えていない会社ということです
12:45
Ok, so that is a company
not counting taps.
Microsoftをコケにしても 話だけじゃつまらないですよね…
12:48
You know, I don't want to just stand
here and make fun of Microsoft ...
観客: やってやって!
喜んで!
12:52
Yes, I do.
(笑)
12:54
(Laughter)
(拍手)
12:55
(Applause)
ビル ゲイツの歌です!
12:59
The Bill Gates song!
13:00
(Piano music)
(♪「歌の贈りもの」の節で) 僕はずっとギークで 最初のDOS を書いた
13:01
I've been a geek forever
13:05
and I wrote the very first DOS.
IBM と一緒に僕のソフトを売った
13:09
I put my software and IBM together;
13:13
I got profit and they got the loss.
僕が利益を取って 彼らは損失をかぶった
(笑)
13:16
(Laughter)
僕は世界中が使うソフトを作った
13:19
I write the code
that makes the whole world run.
みんなからロイヤリティを取っている
13:23
I'm getting royalties from everyone.
くずみたいなところもあるけれど メディアはだまされる
13:28
Sometimes it's garbage,
but the press is snowed.
コンピュータを買ったの じゃあソフトを買いな
13:32
You buy the box; I'll sell the code.
ソフト会社はみんな Microsoftのために研究開発している
13:38
Every software company
is doing Microsoft's R&D.
最近はいいアイデアを 押さえておくことなんて出来やしない
13:43
You can't keep a good idea
down these days.
Windowsでさえパクリだ Macを元にした
13:47
Even Windows is a hack.
13:49
We're kind of based loosely on the Mac.
13:52
So it's big, so it's slow.
You've got nowhere to go.
だから大きくて遅いんだ 君たちはどこへも行けやしない ほめられたくてやってるんじゃない
13:54
I'm not doing this for praise.
僕は今日の世界に合うソフトを作る
13:58
I write the code
that fits the world today.
あらゆるところが月並み
14:02
Big mediocrity in every way.
僕らは世界支配態勢に入った
14:07
We've entered planet domination mode.
君たちに選択肢はない 僕のソフトを買うんだ
14:11
You'll have no choice; you'll buy my code.
14:17
I am Bill Gates and I write the code.
僕はビル ゲイツ このソフトを書いている
14:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
しかし私は2つのMicrosoftがあると思います
14:32
But actually, I believe
there are really two Microsofts.
14:35
There's the old one, responsible
for Windows and Office.
WindowsとOfficeを作っている 古い方のMicrosoftは
14:38
They're dying to throw the whole thing
out and start fresh, but they can't.
すべてを投げ出して はじめからやり直したいのにできない
あまりに多くのアドオンや他の会社のものが
14:42
They're locked in, because so many add-ons
and other company stuff
1982年の筐体に 閉じ込められているからです
14:46
locks into the old 1982 chassis.
しかし新しいMicrosoftというのもあって
14:48
But there's also a new Microsoft,
14:50
that's really doing good,
simple interface designs.
素敵でシンプルな インタフェースデザインをしています
私はMedia Center PCが好きでした Microsoft SPOT Watchが好きでした
14:53
I liked the Media Center PC.
14:55
I liked the Microsoft SPOT Watch.
このワイヤレス腕時計は 市場では見事に失敗しましたが
14:57
The Wireless Watch
flopped miserably in the market,
それはシンプルで美しいデザイン でなかったからではありません
15:00
but it wasn't because it wasn't
simply and beautifully designed.
なぜかといえば
15:03
But let's put it this way:
携帯みたいに毎晩充電しなければならず 局番が違うところに行くと
15:04
would you pay $10 a month to have a watch
15:07
that has to be recharged
every night like your cell phone,
動かなくなるような腕時計に 月10 ドル払う人なんているでしょうか?
15:10
and stops working
when you leave your area code?
15:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
複雑化の危機は悪くなる一方のように見えます
15:15
So, the signs might indicate
15:18
that the complexity crunch
is only going to get worse.
希望はないのでしょうか? 画面は小さくなっていきます
15:20
So is there any hope?
15:22
The screens are getting smaller,
people are illuminating,
みんなマニュアルも読まずに使おうとします
15:25
putting manuals in the boxes,
新しいものが早いペースで現れます
15:26
things are coming out at a faster pace.
スティーブ ジョブズが1997年に 12年ぶりで
15:29
It's funny -- when Steve Jobs
came back to Apple in 1997,
Appleに復帰したのは MacWorld Expoのときでした
15:32
after 12 years away,
it was the MacWorld Expo --
黒のタートルネックと ジーンズという姿で現れて
15:35
he came to the stage
in that black turtleneck and jeans,
何かこんな風にしました 聴衆は大喜びしましたが
15:38
and he sort of did this.
15:40
The crowd went wild,
but I had just seen --
私はどこかで見たことがある気がしました マドンナの映画「エビータ」を見たばかりだったのです
15:42
I'm like, where have I seen this before?
15:44
I had just seen the movie "Evita" --
15:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:49
with Madonna,
スティーブ ジョブズのもやらなきゃ 不公平ですよね
15:50
and I'm like, you know what?
15:52
I've got to do one about Steve Jobs.
15:55
(Music)
(♪「アルゼンチンよ泣かないで」の節で) 簡単じゃないだろう みんな私を変だと思っている
15:56
It won't be easy.
You'll think I'm strange.
15:59
(Laughter)
Appleの未来は暗いと言った後に
16:00
When I try to explain why I'm back,
なぜ戻ったのか説明しようとした
16:03
after telling the press
Apple's future is black.
信じないかもしれないけど
16:06
You won't believe me.
あなた方が目にしているのは ガレージで唯一の友である
16:08
All that you see is a kid in his teens
who started out in a garage
ウォズとともにやり始めた10代の子供だ
16:13
with only a buddy named Woz.
(笑)
16:16
(Laughter)
ガレージとウォズは韻を踏んでいる?
16:18
You try rhyming with garage!
(笑)
16:19
(Laughter)
16:22
Don't cry for me, Cupertino.
私のために泣かないで クパチーノ
(笑)
16:25
(Laughter)
本当に 君を捨てたことはないんだ
16:26
The truth is, I never left you.
(笑)
今や どうすればいいか分かる 仕掛けが分かった
16:29
I know the ropes now,
know what the tricks are.
Pixarでは大儲けした
16:33
I made a fortune over at Pixar.
(笑)
16:36
(Laughter)
私のために泣かないで クパチーノ 今でもやる気とビジョンを持っている
16:37
Don't cry for me, Cupertino.
16:40
I've still got the drive and vision.
今もどんな天気だろうと サンダルを履いている
16:44
I still wear sandals in any weather.
16:47
It's just that these days,
今のはGUCCIの革製だけど
16:49
they're Gucci leather.
(笑)
16:51
(Laughter)
(拍手)
16:53
(Applause)
17:00
Thank you.
17:02
So Steve Jobs had always believed
in simplicity and elegance and beauty.
どうもありがとう スティーブ ジョブズは常に
シンプルさ エレガンス 美しさを信奉していました
17:07
And the truth is,
正直言って私はずっと失望していました アメリカ人は明らかにそういったものに価値を置かず
17:08
for years I was a little depressed,
17:11
because Americans
obviously did not value it,
17:13
because the Mac had
three percent market share,
Windowsの95パーセントのシェアに対し
Macは3パーセントのシェアしかありませんでした
17:15
Windows had 95 percent market share --
そういったことに金を払う価値があると 思われてなかったのです
17:17
people did not think it was worth
putting a price on it.
だから失望していたのですが アル ゴアの講演を聞いて
17:20
So I was a little depressed.
17:22
And then I heard Al Gore's talk,
失望の意味を知らなかったことに気づきました
17:23
and I realized I didn't know
the meaning of depressed.
(笑)
17:26
(Laughter)
しかし私は間違っていました iPodが現れて
17:27
But it turns out I was wrong, right?
17:29
Because the iPod came out,
あらゆる常識を覆したのです
17:31
and it violated every bit
of common wisdom.
他の製品はもっと安く もっとたくさんの機能があり
17:33
Other products cost less;
other products had more features,
ボイスレコーダーや FMトランスミッター機能が付いています
17:36
they had voice recorders
and FM transmitters.
17:39
The other products were backed
by Microsoft, with an open standard,
他の製品はMicrosoftに支えられ オープンな標準に従っています
Apple独自の標準ではなく
17:42
not Apple's propriety standard.
17:44
But the iPod won --
this is the one they wanted.
それなのに みんなiPodを欲しがった!
この教訓は シンプルなものは売れる ということです
17:47
The lesson was: simplicity sells.
17:49
And there are signs that the industry
is getting the message.
そして業界はそこから学んでいます
シンプルさとエレガンスの点で とてもうまくやっている小さな会社があります
17:52
This is a little company that's done
very well with simplicity and elegance.
Sonosなんか すごく人気です
17:55
The Sonos thing -- it's catching on.
いくつか例を持ってきました 物として とてもクールな
17:57
I've got just a couple examples.
17:59
Physically, a really cool,
elegant thinking coming along lately.
エレガントで よく考えられた製品が 最近出てきました
18:02
When you have a digital camera,
デジタルカメラで どうやって写真をパソコンに移しますか?
18:04
how do you get the pictures
back to your computer?
USB ケーブルを引っ張り出してくるか メモリカードリーダーを買って 引っ張り出してくるかでしょう
18:08
Well, you either haul around a USB cable,
18:10
or you buy a card reader
and haul that around.
どちらにしても どっか行ってしまいそうです
18:12
Either one, you're going to lose.
18:14
What I do is, I take out the memory card,
私のやつは メモリカードを取り出し 半分に折ると USBコネクタが出てきます
18:16
and I fold it in half,
revealing USB contacts.
18:22
I just stick it in the computer,
offload the pictures,
あとはコンピュータに差し込んで写真を移し またカメラに戻します
18:24
put it right back in the camera.
なくなるようなものはありません
18:26
I never have to lose anything.
18:28
Here's another example.
もう1つ例をお見せしましょう 皆のパワーの大元であるクリスに
18:29
Chris, you're the source of all power.
Will you be my power plug?
コンセント役をお願いしましょう
クリス: ああ いいよ
18:32
Chris Anderson: Oh yeah.
DP: Hold that and don't let go.
しっかり持って離さないで
これはAppleの新しいノートPCです 電源コードをたらしておきます
18:35
You might've seen this,
this is Apple's new laptop.
18:38
This the power cord.
It hooks on like this.
こんな風にやってしまったことありませんか
18:40
And I'm sure every one of you has done
this at some point in your lives,
あるいはお子さんが
18:43
or one of your children.
18:44
You walk along -- and I'm
about to pull this onto the floor.
足を引っかけて 床に落としてしまう 借り物なので私は気にしませんが
18:47
I don't care. It's a loaner.
うわっ! 磁石になっているんです ノートPCは床に落ちません
18:49
Here we go. Whoa!
18:50
It's magnetic -- it doesn't pull
the laptop onto the floor.
18:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
最後の例になりますが 私は多くの作業を
18:57
In my very last example --
18:59
I do a lot of my work
using speech recognition software.
音声認識ソフトを使ってやっています このソフトは敏感なので
19:03
And I'll just --
you have to be kind of quiet
静かにお願いします
19:05
because the software is nervous.
音声認識ソフトは メールを素早く書けて 素晴らしい ピリオド
19:08
Speech recognition
software is really great
19:10
for doing emails very quickly; period.
私は毎日何百通ものメールを受け取る ピリオド
19:12
Like, I get hundreds of them
a day; period.
19:15
And it's not just what I dictate
that it writes down; period.
これは単に 私が口述したことを 書き出すだけではない ピリオド
ボイスマクロという機能も使っている ピリオド
19:18
I also use this feature
called voice macros; period.
修正「dissuade」を「not just」に
19:23
Correct "dissuade."
19:28
Not "just."
ここはホールで音が反響して
19:31
Ok, this is not an ideal situation,
19:33
because it's getting the echo
from the hall and stuff.
あまり理想的な状況ではありません
短い言葉で長い文章が入力されるようにすれば
19:36
The point is, I can respond to people
very quickly by saying a short word,
メールの返事を 素早く書くことができます
19:40
and having it write out
a much longer thing.
誰かがファンレターをくれたとしましょう
19:42
So if somebody
sends me a fan letter, I'll say,
私は「それはどうも」と言います
19:44
"Thanks for that."
19:45
[Thank you so much
for taking the time to write ...]
(長い感謝の文が現れる) (笑)
19:48
(Laughter)
(拍手)
19:49
(Applause)
逆に何か意地の悪いメールを受け取ったときは …そういうのは毎日来ますが…
19:52
And conversely, if somebody
sends me hate mail --
19:56
which happens daily --
19:59
I say, "Piss off."
「ムカツク」と言います
(長くて慇懃な応答の文章が現れる) (笑)
20:04
(Laughter)
20:05
[I admire your frankness ...]
20:07
(Laughter)
(拍手)
20:09
(Applause)
これは私の秘密ですから どうか内緒にしておいてくださいね
20:14
So that's my dirty little secret.
Don't tell anyone.
(笑)
20:17
(Laughter)
これには面白い話があります
20:18
So the point is --
this is a really interesting story.
このソフトはバージョン8なんですが バージョン8で何が付け加えられたか分かりますか?
20:21
This is version eight of this software,
20:23
and do you know what they put
in version eight?
新機能なし ソフトウェアで かつてそんなことはありませんでした
20:25
No new features. It's never
happened before in software!
彼らは単にこう言ったのです
20:28
The company put no new features.
20:30
They just said, "We'll make
this software work right." Right?
「ソフトウェアが正しく動くようにします」
人々はずっと このソフトを買って試しては
20:34
Because for years, people had bought
this software, tried it out --
精度が95パーセント つまり20語に1語間違うため―
20:37
95 percent accuracy was all they got,
20:39
which means one in 20 words is wrong --
使うのをやめてしまうのです
20:41
and they'd put it in their drawer.
20:42
And the company got sick of that,
この会社はそういうのにうんざりして 「このバージョンでは
20:44
so they said, "This version,
we're not going to do anything,
全く正確にする以外には何もしない」と言い
20:47
but make sure it's darned accurate."
その通りにしたのです 物事を正しくやる信条が広がり始めています
20:48
And so that's what they did.
20:50
This cult of doing things right
is starting to spread.
だからテクノロジーの消費者である人たちへの アドバイスとして
20:52
So, my final advice for those of you
who are consumers of this technology:
何かがうまくいかなくとも それはあなたのせいとは限らない と言いたい
20:56
remember, if it doesn't work,
it's not necessarily you, ok?
その製品のデザインが悪いのかもしれません
21:00
It could be the design
of the thing you're using.
良いデザインと悪いデザインを 見分けられるようになってください
21:02
Be aware in life
of good design and bad design.
そして製品を作る側の人たちに言いたいのは 「やさしいは難しい」ということです
21:05
And if you're among the people
who create this stuff:
21:08
Easy is hard.
使う人のために細部に労力を払ってください タップ数を数えてください
21:09
Pre-sweat the details for your audience.
21:12
Count the taps.
難しいのはどの機能を追加するかではありません
21:13
Remember, the hard part
is not deciding what features to add,
21:16
it's deciding what to leave out.
どれを落とすかということです
21:18
And best of all, your motivation is:
simplicity sells.
そして何よりも シンプルなものは売れるということです
ブラボー
21:22
CA: Bravo. DP: Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
すごく良かったよ!
21:23
CA: Hear, hear!
(拍手)
21:24
(Applause)
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

David Pogue - Technology columnist
David Pogue is the personal technology columnist for the New York Times and a tech correspondent for CBS News. He's also one of the world's bestselling how-to authors, with titles in the For Dummies series and his own line of "Missing Manual" books.

Why you should listen

Which cell phone to choose? What software to buy? Are camera-binoculars a necessity or novelty? As release cycles shorten and ever-shrinking gadgets hit the market with dizzying speed, it's harder and harder to know what's worth the investment. A tireless explorer of everyday technology, David Pogue investigates all the options so we don't have to.

After happily weathering installation nightmares, customer service hiccups, and an overwhelming crush of backups, upgrades and downloads, Pogue reports back with his recommendations via his many columns, TV appearances and how-to books. And he does it all with relatable insight, humor and an unsinkable sense of pun, er, fun. All that, and he sings, too.

More profile about the speaker
David Pogue | Speaker | TED.com