sponsored links
TEDxTC

Dan Buettner: How to live to be 100+

ダン・ベットナー:100歳を超えて生きるには

September 2, 2009

健康と長寿への道を見出すために、ダン・ベットナーとチームは、世界中の長寿者が元気と活力のある生活を送っている社会、「ブルーゾーン」を研究しています。TEDxTCで、長寿者がかくしゃくと100歳を超えて過ごすための9つの共通の食習慣と生活習慣を話します。

Dan Buettner - Longevity coach, explorer
National Geographic writer and explorer Dan Buettner studies the world's longest-lived peoples, distilling their secrets into a single plan for health and long life. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Something called the Danish Twin Study
Danish Twin Studyと呼ばれる研究によれば
00:16
established that only about 10 percent
生物学的限界内で
00:18
of how long the average person lives,
平均的なヒトが生きる寿命の
00:20
within certain biological limits, is dictated by our genes.
わずか10%だけが遺伝的に決まるそうです
00:23
The other 90 percent is dictated by our lifestyle.
残りの90%は生活習慣によって決まります
00:26
So the premise of Blue Zones: if we can find the
ブルーゾーン(長寿地域)の前提はこうです:もし我々が
00:31
optimal lifestyle of longevity
長寿に最適な生活習慣を
00:33
we can come up with a de facto formula
発見できれば、長生きの処方箋を
00:35
for longevity.
見つけたことになる
00:38
But if you ask the average American what the optimal formula
しかし、普通のアメリカ人に長寿の秘訣は何だと
00:40
of longevity is, they probably couldn't tell you.
訊ねても、たぶん答えられないでしょう
00:42
They've probably heard of the South Beach Diet, or the Atkins Diet.
たぶんサウスビーチダイエットやアトキンスダイエットは聞いたことがある
00:45
You have the USDA food pyramid.
USDA食物ピラミッドもある
00:48
There is what Oprah tells us.
オプラ・ウィンフリーが何か言ってる
00:50
There is what Doctor Oz tells us.
ドクター・オズも何か言っている
00:52
The fact of the matter is there is a lot of confusion
要するに、長生きのために本当に何が良いか
00:54
around what really helps us live longer better.
皆悩んでいるのです
00:57
Should you be running marathons or doing yoga?
マラソンやヨガをすべきなのか?
01:00
Should you eat organic meats
オーガニックミートや
01:05
or should you be eating tofu?
豆腐を食べるべきなのか?
01:07
When it comes to supplements, should you be taking them?
サプリメントというやつは摂るべきなのか?
01:09
How about these hormones or resveratrol?
ホルモンや抗酸化物質は?
01:12
And does purpose play into it?
目的にかなっているのか?
01:15
Spirituality? And how about how we socialize?
精神世界は? 世間付き合いは?
01:17
Well, our approach to finding longevity
長寿を発見するるための我々の方法は
01:20
was to team up with National Geographic,
ナショナルジオグラフィック誌、および
01:22
and the National Institute on Aging,
国立老化研究所とチームを組み
01:24
to find the four demographically confirmed areas
地理的に限定された、人口統計的に(長寿が)確認されている
01:26
that are geographically defined.
4地域の調査を行うことでした
01:30
And then bring a team of experts in there
そして専門家チームを派遣し
01:32
to methodically go through exactly what these people do,
そこの人々の行動を系統的に調査し
01:34
to distill down the cross-cultural distillation.
文化を超えた要素を抜き出しました
01:37
And at the end of this I'm going to tell you what that distillation is.
その結果が何だったかは最後にお話します
01:41
But first I'd like to debunk some common myths
しかしまず、長寿に関するよくある俗説の
01:44
when it comes to longevity.
正体を暴きましょう
01:47
And the first myth is if you try really hard
最初は「一生懸命努力すれば
01:49
you can live to be 100.
100歳まで生きられるか」です
01:52
False.
間違いです
01:54
The problem is, only about one out of 5,000 people
アメリカ人5000人のうち、1人だけしか
01:56
in America live to be 100.
100歳まで生きられません
01:59
Your chances are very low.
チャンスはとても少ない
02:02
Even though it's the fastest growing demographic in America,
最も成長しているアメリカの人口層を取っても
02:04
it's hard to reach 100.
なかなか100歳まではとどかない
02:07
The problem is
問題は
02:09
that we're not programmed for longevity.
我々は長寿に設計されていない、ということです
02:11
We are programmed for something called
我々は「次世代生産型」に
02:15
procreative success.
設計されています
02:17
I love that word.
大学時代を思い出させてくれる
02:20
It reminds me of my college days.
私の大好きな言葉です
02:22
Biologists term procreative success to mean
生物学者のいう「次世代生産型」とは
02:25
the age where you have children
あなたが子供を持つ年齢のことで
02:27
and then another generation, the age when your children have children.
更に次の世代、あなたの子どもが更に子供を持つ年齢のことです
02:30
After that the effect of evolution
それから先は、進化の効果は
02:33
completely dissipates.
全くなくなってしまう
02:35
If you're a mammal, if you're a rat
哺乳類なら、ネズミでも
02:38
or an elephant, or a human, in between, it's the same story.
象でも、人間でも、その間の何かでも、話は同じです
02:41
So to make it to age 100, you not only have to have
100歳まで生きるなら、よき生活習慣と共に
02:45
had a very good lifestyle, you also have to have won
遺伝的なくじびきに当たるだけの
02:48
the genetic lottery.
幸運が必要なのです
02:51
The second myth is,
二つ目の俗説は
02:53
there are treatments that can help slow,
「加齢を遅らせる、逆転させる、あるいは
02:55
reverse, or even stop aging.
止める治療法がある」というものです
02:58
False.
間違いです
03:00
When you think of it, there is 99 things that can age us.
考えてみれば、老化する方法はいくらでもあります
03:02
Deprive your brain of oxygen for just a few minutes,
数分間あなたの脳から酸素を奪えば
03:06
those brain cells die, they never come back.
脳細胞が死に、元へは戻りません
03:08
Play tennis too hard, on your knees, ruin your cartilage,
テニスをしすぎれば膝の軟骨が傷み
03:11
the cartilage never comes back.
元には戻りません
03:14
Our arteries can clog. Our brains can gunk up with plaque,
動脈は詰まる 脳にはモノが溜まる
03:16
and we can get Alzheimer's.
するとアルツハイマー病になる
03:19
There is just too many things to go wrong.
悪くなる理由はいくらでもあります
03:21
Our bodies have 35 trillion cells,
人体には35兆の細胞があり
03:23
trillion with a "T." We're talking national debt numbers here.
1兆(Trillion)のTです 国債で出てくる単位です
03:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:33
Those cells turn themselves over once every eight years.
これらの細胞は8年に一度は入れ替わっています
03:34
And every time they turn themselves over
そして入れ替わるたびに
03:37
there is some damage. And that damage builds up.
いくらかダメージを受ける ダメージは蓄積され
03:39
And it builds up exponentially.
指数関数的に増えていきます
03:41
It's a little bit like the days when we all had
ちょうど昔われわれが持っていた
03:43
Beatles albums or Eagles albums
ビートルズやイーグルスのアルバムを
03:45
and we'd make a copy of that on a cassette tape,
カセットテープにコピーして
03:48
and let our friends copy that cassette tape,
友人にそのテープをコピーさせると
03:50
and pretty soon, with successive generations
テープが世代を下ると、すぐに
03:52
that tape sounds like garbage.
ひどい音になるようなものです
03:54
Well, the same things happen to our cells.
細胞でも同じことが起きます
03:57
That's why a 65-year-old person
だから65歳の人間は
03:59
is aging at a rate of about
12歳の人間の
04:01
125 times faster
125倍の速さで
04:03
than a 12-year-old person.
老いてゆくのです
04:06
So, if there is nothing you can do
それでもし、我々が加齢を遅らせたり
04:08
to slow your aging or stop your aging,
止めたりできないのだとしたら
04:10
what am I doing here?
私はここで何をしているんでしょう?
04:13
Well, the fact of the matter is
実際のところはどうかというと
04:15
the best science tells us that the capacity of the human body,
科学的に言えば、ヒトの体の
04:17
my body, your body,
私や、あなたの体の寿命は
04:21
is about 90 years,
約90年です
04:23
a little bit more for women.
女性はもう少し長い
04:25
But life expectancy in this country
しかしこの国の平均余命は
04:27
is only 78.
わずか78歳です
04:29
So somewhere along the line,
つまり我々はどこかで
04:31
we're leaving about 12 good years on the table.
12年分を置き忘れているのです
04:33
These are years that we could get.
これは本来あるべき年月で、
04:38
And research shows that they would be years largely free of chronic disease,
研究によれば、その多くは、心疾患、がん、糖尿病といった慢性疾患が
04:40
heart disease, cancer and diabetes.
ない場合の期間になります
04:46
We think the best way to get these missing years
この失った年月を取り戻す為には
04:50
is to look at the cultures around the world
実際に世界で長寿を
04:53
that are actually experiencing them,
享受している地域、
04:55
areas where people are living to age 100
我々よりも10倍も多くの人々が
04:57
at rates up to 10 times greater than we are,
100歳以上まで生きる地域や
05:00
areas where the life expectancy
平均余命があと12年ほど
05:02
is an extra dozen years,
長い地域や
05:04
the rate of middle age mortality is a fraction
中年の死亡率がこの国より非常に小さい場所を
05:06
of what it is in this country.
見てみるべきだと思います
05:08
We found our first Blue Zone about 125 miles
最初のブルーゾーンは、イタリアの海岸から200kmほど
05:11
off the coast of Italy, on the island of Sardinia.
離れた場所、サルディーニャ島にありました
05:14
And not the entire island, the island is about 1.4 million people,
島全体ではありません 島には140万人が居ますが
05:17
but only up in the highlands, an area called the Nuoro province.
ヌオロ県という高地地帯だけがそうでした
05:20
And here we have this area where men live the longest,
この地方では男性の方が長寿で
05:23
about 10 times more centenarians than we have here in America.
アメリカの10倍の100歳以上の人間が居ます
05:26
And this is a place where people not only reach age 100,
しかもここでは、単に100歳以上であるだけでなく
05:29
they do so with extraordinary vigor.
彼らは非常に活動的です
05:32
Places where 102 year olds still ride their bike to work,
102歳の老人がバイクで仕事にでかけ
05:34
chop wood, and can beat a guy 60 years younger than them.
薪割りをし、60歳も若い相手を負かすほどです
05:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:42
Their history actually goes back to about the time of Christ.
歴史はキリストの時代にまで遡ります
05:44
It's actually a Bronze Age culture that's been isolated.
青銅器時代の文化が温存されています
05:47
Because the land is so infertile,
土地があまりに不毛なため
05:49
they largely are shepherds,
殆どが羊飼いをしていて
05:51
which occasions regular, low-intensity physical activity.
規則正しい、低強度の肉体活動をすることになります
05:53
Their diet is mostly plant-based,
食事は殆どが植物性で
05:56
accentuated with foods that they can carry into the fields.
それに山に持っていけるような食物が目立ちます
05:59
They came up with an unleavened whole wheat bread
つまりnotamusicaというデュラム小麦で作った
06:02
called carta musica made out of durum wheat,
非発酵の全粒小麦パンと
06:05
a type of cheese made from grass-fed animals
トウモロコシで飼育された家畜の
06:07
so the cheese is high in Omega-3 fatty acids
オメガ6脂肪酸でなく、草で飼育された動物の
06:10
instead of Omega-6 fatty acids from corn-fed animals,
オメガ3脂肪酸を多く含むチーズ、それに
06:15
and a type of wine that has three times the level
世界で知られているどのワインよりも
06:18
of polyphenols than any known wine in the world.
3倍のポリフェノールを含むワインで
06:22
It's called Cannonau.
Cannonauと呼ばれています
06:24
But the real secret I think lies more
しかし本当の秘密は、むしろ
06:26
in the way that they organize their society.
彼らが社会を形成する方法にあると思います
06:28
And one of the most salient elements of the Sardinian society
そしてサルディーニャの社会のもっとも目立った要素は
06:30
is how they treat older people.
老人に対する扱いです
06:34
You ever notice here in America, social equity
ここアメリカでは社会的な価値は
06:37
seems to peak at about age 24?
24歳でピークになりますね?
06:39
Just look at the advertisements.
広告をご覧なさい
06:42
Here in Sardinia, the older you get
サルディーニャでは歳をとるにつれて
06:44
the more equity you have,
人の価値が高まり
06:46
the more wisdom you're celebrated for.
その知恵でより賞賛されるのです
06:48
You go into the bars in Sardinia,
サルディーニャでバーに行くと
06:50
instead of seeing the Sports Illustrated swimsuit calendar,
スポーツイラストレイテッドの水着カレンダーではなく
06:52
you see the centenarian of the month calendar.
「今月の100歳者」のカレンダーがあるのです
06:54
This, as it turns out, is not only good for your aging parents
年老いた両親が家族の近くに
06:58
to keep them close to the family --
いることで
07:02
it imparts about four to six years of extra life expectancy --
4年から6年分、寿命が伸びるのですが、
07:04
research shows it's also good for the children of those families,
これはその家族の子供にもよいことだと判明しており、
07:07
who have lower rates of mortality and lower rates of disease.
その子どもたちの死亡率と疾病罹患率がより低くなります
07:10
That's called the grandmother effect.
祖母効果と呼ばれています
07:13
We found our second Blue Zone
二つ目のブルーゾーンは
07:16
on the other side of the planet,
地球の反対側
07:18
about 800 miles south of Tokyo,
東京から南へ1200km
07:20
on the archipelago of Okinawa.
沖縄群島にあります
07:23
Okinawa is actually 161 small islands.
沖縄は161の小島からなります
07:26
And in the northern part of the main island,
その本島の北部は
07:30
this is ground zero for world longevity.
世界一の長寿地域です
07:32
This is a place where the oldest living female population is found.
世界で最高齢の女性人口が見られます
07:34
It's a place where people have the longest disability-free
疾患無しで、世界で最長寿の
07:40
life expectancy in the world.
人々が住んでいます
07:42
They have what we want.
まさに私たちが望むものです
07:44
They live a long time, and tend to die in their sleep,
長い時間を生き、眠っている間に
07:46
very quickly,
さっ、と他界します
07:48
and often, I can tell you, after sex.
それもなんと、しばしばセックスの後にです
07:50
They live about seven good years longer than the average American.
平均的なアメリカ人より7年ほど長生きし
07:53
Five times as many centenarians as we have in America.
100歳以上の人口はアメリカの5倍
07:56
One fifth the rate of colon and breast cancer,
それはアメリカでは大きな死因である
08:00
big killers here in America.
大腸がんと乳がんの発生率は5分の1です
08:03
And one sixth the rate of cardiovascular disease.
心血管病の発生率は6分の1です
08:05
And the fact that this culture has yielded these numbers
これだけ多くの長寿者がいる文化だということは
08:08
suggests strongly they have something to teach us.
そこに学ぶべきものがあることを強く示唆しています
08:11
What do they do?
どんな生活をしているのか?
08:14
Once again, a plant-based diet,
またしても植物性中心の食生活で
08:16
full of vegetables with lots of color in them.
いろいろな色の野菜がたくさん入っています
08:18
And they eat about eight times as much tofu
そしてアメリカ人の8倍の量の
08:21
as Americans do.
豆腐を食べます
08:24
More significant than what they eat is how they eat it.
何を食べるかよりもどう食べるかがさらに重要で
08:26
They have all kinds of little strategies
彼らはこまごまとした
08:30
to keep from overeating,
過食防止の方法を持っています
08:32
which, as you know, is a big problem here in America.
アメリカではその過食が大問題です
08:34
A few of the strategies we observed:
観察された方法のいくつかは:
08:37
they eat off of smaller plates, so they tend to eat fewer calories at every sitting.
小さめの皿で食べることで、毎回の食事でのカロリー摂取が控えめになっている
08:39
Instead of serving family style,
ファミリースタイルの食卓で
08:43
where you can sort of mindlessly eat as you're talking,
しゃべりながら考えなしに食べ続けるのでなく
08:45
they serve at the counter, put the food away,
カウンターで食事を皿にとり
08:48
and then bring it to the table.
食卓まで持ってきます
08:50
They also have a 3,000-year-old adage,
彼らには3000年前からの古い格言があり
08:52
which I think is the greatest sort of diet suggestion ever invented.
今までで最高の食に関する提案だと思います
08:54
It was invented by Confucius.
孔子の言葉です
08:57
And that diet is known as the Hara, Hatchi, Bu diet.
それは「腹八分」食事法と言われています
08:59
It's simply a little saying these people say before their meal
食事の前にそれを簡単に唱えます
09:03
to remind them to stop eating when their stomach is [80] percent full.
満腹の20%手前で食べるのを止める、ということです
09:06
It takes about a half hour for that full feeling
満腹感が腹部から脳に伝わるには
09:10
to travel from your belly to your brain.
30分かかります
09:12
And by remembering to stop at 80 percent
そして80%で止めることを思い出すことで
09:14
it helps keep you from doing that very thing.
満腹になることを防いでいるのです
09:17
But, like Sardinia, Okinawa has a few social constructs
しかしサルディーニャと同様に、沖縄にも長寿と関連した
09:20
that we can associate with longevity.
いくつかの社会構造があります
09:23
We know that isolation kills.
孤独は死への早道です
09:26
Fifteen years ago, the average American had three good friends.
15年前、平均的アメリカ人には親友が3人いました
09:28
We're down to one and half right now.
現在は1.5人になっています
09:32
If you were lucky enough to be born in Okinawa,
幸運にも沖縄で生まれたならば
09:34
you were born into a system where you
それは生涯を通じて付き合える
09:37
automatically have a half a dozen friends
6人の友達を持てる社会に
09:39
with whom you travel through life.
生まれたということです
09:42
They call it a Moai. And if you're in a Moai
「模合(もあい)」というものがあります 模合に入ると
09:44
you're expected to share the bounty if you encounter luck,
順番に一定の金額を受け取り
09:47
and if things go bad,
状況が悪い時や
09:51
child gets sick, parent dies,
子どもが病気の時、親が死んだ時などには
09:53
you always have somebody who has your back.
いつも助けになってくれる誰かがいることになります
09:55
This particular Moai, these five ladies
この模合の場合、この5人の女性は
09:58
have been together for 97 years.
97年間、一緒にいます
10:00
Their average age is 102.
平均年齢は102歳です
10:03
Typically in America
アメリカでは、典型的には
10:06
we've divided our adult life up into two sections.
大人の人生は二期に分けられます
10:08
There is our work life,
仕事の時代があり
10:12
where we're productive.
その間は生産的です
10:14
And then one day, boom, we retire.
そしてある日、ボン、と引退します
10:16
And typically that has meant
そして典型的には
10:19
retiring to the easy chair,
安楽椅子に座るか
10:21
or going down to Arizona to play golf.
アリゾナにゴルフをしに行きます
10:24
In the Okinawan language there is not even
沖縄の言語には「引退」という
10:27
a word for retirement.
単語さえありません
10:29
Instead there is one word
代わりに人生すべてを
10:31
that imbues your entire life,
含める単語
10:33
and that word is "ikigai."
「生き甲斐」があります
10:36
And, roughly translated, it means
大ざっぱに訳すると、それは
10:38
"the reason for which you wake up in the morning."
「翌日目覚めるための理由」ということです
10:40
For this 102-year-old karate master,
この102歳の空手の道士の場合
10:43
his ikigai was carrying forth this martial art.
彼の生き甲斐は空手道を発展させることです
10:46
For this hundred-year-old fisherman
この100歳の漁師にとって
10:50
it was continuing to catch fish for his family three times a week.
生き甲斐は家族のために週3回、魚を獲ってくることです
10:52
And this is a question. The National Institute on Aging
ここで質問です 国立老化研究所は、私たちに
10:55
actually gave us a questionnaire to give these centenarians.
100歳者向けのアンケートを用意しました
10:57
And one of the questions, they were very culturally astute,
質問の一つは -- アンケートを作った人たちは
11:01
the people who put the questionnaire.
文化的な洞察力に富んでいて --
11:03
One of the questions was, "What is your ikigai?"
「あなたの生き甲斐はなんですか?」というものでした
11:05
They instantly knew why they woke up in the morning.
長寿者たちはすぐに翌朝起きる理由を考えだしました
11:07
For this 102 year old woman, her ikigai
この102歳の女性の場合、彼女の生き甲斐は
11:12
was simply her great-great-great-granddaughter.
彼女の曾曾曾孫だと言いました
11:14
Two girls separated in age by 101 and a half years.
その少女とは歳が101歳半、離れています
11:20
And I asked her what it felt like
私は彼女に曾曾曾孫を持つのは
11:24
to hold a great-great-great-granddaughter.
どんな気分かと尋ねました
11:26
And she put her head back and she said,
彼女は答えました
11:29
"It feels like leaping into heaven."
「そりゃ天に昇りそうさー」
11:31
I thought that was a wonderful thought.
素晴らしい考えだと思いました
11:34
My editor at Geographic
ナショナルジオグラフィック誌の編集者は
11:36
wanted me to find America's Blue Zone.
アメリカでもブルーゾーンを見つけて欲しいと言いました
11:38
And for a while we looked on the prairies of Minnesota,
そこでミネソタの大草原をしばらく探し
11:40
where actually there is a very high proportion of centenarians.
非常に高い率で100歳以上の人がいる場所を見つけました
11:43
But that's because all the young people left.
しかしそれは若い人がいなくなったからでした
11:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:49
So, we turned to the data again.
そこで我々はデータを見直し
11:52
And we found America's longest-lived population
アメリカの最長寿の人口は
11:54
among the Seventh-Day Adventists
セブンスデイアドベンチストに多く
11:57
concentrated in and around Loma Linda, California.
カリフォルニア州のロマリンダ周辺に集まっているのを発見しました
11:59
Adventists are conservative Methodists.
アドベンチストは保守的メソジストです
12:03
They celebrate their Sabbath
彼らは安息日として
12:06
from sunset on Friday till sunset on Saturday.
金曜の日没から土曜日の日没を定めています
12:09
A "24-hour sanctuary in time," they call it.
「24時間の聖域」と彼らは呼んでいます
12:12
And they follow five little habits
彼らは五つの小さな習慣に従い
12:16
that conveys to them extraordinary longevity,
それが彼らに、他と比較した場合
12:19
comparatively speaking.
破格の長寿をもたらしています
12:22
In America here, life expectancy
ここアメリカでは、平均的な女性の
12:24
for the average woman is 80.
平均余命は80歳です
12:26
But for an Adventist woman,
しかしアドベンチストの女性では
12:28
their life expectancy is 89.
平均余命は89歳です
12:30
And the difference is even more pronounced among men,
そして男性ではその差はさらに顕著で
12:33
who are expected to live about 11 years
標準的なアメリカ人男性より
12:35
longer than their American counterparts.
約11年も長生きします
12:37
Now, this is a study that followed
さて、これは30年間にわたって
12:40
about 70,000 people for 30 years.
7万人をフォローした研究です
12:42
Sterling study. And I think it supremely illustrates
信頼できる研究です これはブルーゾーン計画の根拠を
12:45
the premise of this Blue Zone project.
見事に示しています
12:49
This is a heterogeneous community.
ここは多民族の社会で
12:52
It's white, black, Hispanic, Asian.
白人、黒人、ヒスパニック、アジア系もいます
12:54
The only thing that they have in common are a set of
彼らに共通しているのは、いくつかの種類の
12:57
very small lifestyle habits
細かい生活習慣を
12:59
that they follow ritualistically
皆、生涯を通じて
13:01
for most of their lives.
儀式的に行っていることです
13:03
They take their diet directly from the Bible.
彼らは聖書にある食事法をそのまま実践しています
13:05
Genesis: Chapter one, Verse [29],
創世記第1章第26節
13:07
where God talks about legumes and seeds,
主が豆と種についてお話しになり
13:10
and on one more stanza about green plants,
緑色植物についてのいくつかの節では
13:13
ostensibly missing is meat.
明示的に肉が省略されています
13:16
They take this sanctuary in time very serious.
彼らはこの神聖な時間を厳格に守ります
13:18
For 24 hours every week,
毎週の24時間、
13:21
no matter how busy they are, how stressed out they are at work,
どんなに忙しくとも、仕事でどんなにストレスがあろうとも、
13:24
where the kids need to be driven,
子どもが遊びたがっても、
13:27
they stop everything and they focus on their God,
彼らは全てを止めて神と対峙し、
13:29
their social network, and then, hardwired right in the religion,
社会生活にいそしみ、それから信仰と直結した
13:32
are nature walks.
野外散歩を行うのです
13:35
And the power of this is not that it's done occasionally,
これがすごいのは、ただ時々に行われるのでなく
13:38
the power is it's done every week for a lifetime.
毎週、生涯にわたって行われることです
13:40
None of it's hard. None of it costs money.
どれも難しいことではなく、お金もかかりません
13:44
Adventists also tend to hang out with other Adventists.
アドベンチストはまた、他のアドベンチストと付き合うものです
13:46
So, if you go to an Adventist's party
だからアドベンチストのパーティへ行っても
13:49
you don't see people swilling Jim Beam or rolling a joint.
バーボンをがぶ飲みしたり、いかがわしいところへ行ったりはしません
13:51
Instead they're talking about their next nature walk,
彼らは次回の野外散歩について語り
13:54
exchanging recipes, and yes, they pray.
料理法を交換し、そして祈るのです
13:58
But they influence each other in profound and measurable ways.
しかし彼らは互いに、深く、測定可能な方法で影響しあっています
14:01
This is a culture that has yielded Ellsworth Whareham.
これがエルスワーズワラムを生んだ文化です
14:06
Ellsworth Whareham is 97 years old.
彼は97歳です
14:09
He's a multimillionaire,
彼は大富豪ですが
14:11
yet when a contractor wanted 6,000 dollars
土木業者が垣根を作るのに
14:13
to build a privacy fence,
6千ドルいると言えば
14:17
he said, "For that kind of money I'll do it myself."
「そういう出費については、私は自分でやるよ」と言うのです
14:19
So for the next three days he was out shoveling cement,
そしてそれから3日間、彼はセメントをこね
14:21
and hauling poles around.
柱を立てて回るのです
14:24
And predictably, perhaps, on the fourth day
そしてご想像の通り、4日目には
14:26
he ended up in the operating room.
彼は手術室にいることになりました
14:28
But not as the guy on the table;
しかし手術台に載っているわけではなく
14:32
the guy doing open-heart surgery.
彼自身が心臓外科手術を行っているのです
14:35
At 97 he still does 20 open-heart surgeries every month.
97歳にして、毎月20例の心臓外科手術をまだ行っているのです
14:39
Ed Rawlings, 103 years old now,
エドローリングスは現在103歳の
14:45
an active cowboy, starts his morning with a swim.
現役のカウボーイで、朝は水泳から始めます
14:48
And on weekends he likes to put on the boards,
週末には水上スキーで
14:51
throw up rooster tails.
水しぶきをあげるのです
14:53
And then Marge Deton.
そしてマージディートン
14:56
Marge is 104.
104歳です
14:58
Her grandson actually lives in the Twin Cities here.
彼女の孫は実はここツインシティに住んでいますが
15:00
She starts her day with lifting weights.
彼女は一日を重量挙げから始めます
15:02
She rides her bicycle.
自転車にも乗ります
15:04
And then she gets in her root-beer colored
そしてルートビア色の
15:06
1994 Cadillac Seville,
1994年型キャデラックセビルに乗り
15:08
and tears down the San Bernardino freeway,
サンベルナーディノ道路を突っ走って
15:11
where she still volunteers for seven different organizations.
いくつかの組織へボランティアをしに行くのです
15:13
I've been on 19 hardcore expeditions.
私は手ごわい冒険を19回やりました
15:17
I'm probably the only person you'll ever meet
私はたぶん、日焼け止めなしに
15:20
who rode his bicycle across
自転車でサハラ砂漠を横断した
15:22
the Sahara desert without sunscreen.
唯一の人間です
15:24
But I'll tell you, there is no adventure more harrowing
でもそれでも、マージディートンと一緒にぶっ飛ばすくらい
15:26
than riding shotgun with Marge Deton.
きつい冒険はありません
15:29
"A stranger is a friend I haven't met yet!" she'd say to me.
「知らない人なんて会ったことがないわ」と彼女は言います
15:33
So, what are the common denominators
それで、これら3つの文化の
15:38
in these three cultures?
共通項はなんでしょうか?
15:40
What are the things that they all do?
彼らが皆やっていることはなんでしょう?
15:42
And we managed to boil it down to nine.
我々はそれを9つに集約しました
15:44
In fact we've done two more Blue Zone expeditions since this
実際はその後さらに2つのブルーゾーン調査を行い
15:48
and these common denominators hold true.
共通項はそこでも一致しました
15:51
And the first one,
まず最初は
15:54
and I'm about to utter a heresy here,
これには異論をつぶやきたいのですが
15:56
none of them exercise,
誰も運動を、つまり我々が
15:59
at least the way we think of exercise.
考えるような運動をしていません
16:01
Instead, they set up their lives
代わりに、彼らの生活が
16:03
so that they are constantly nudged into physical activity.
常に肉体活動を要求するようになっています
16:06
These 100-year-old Okinawan women
あの100歳になる沖縄の女性達は
16:09
are getting up and down off the ground, they sit on the floor,
色々な場所に行き、毎日30回も40回も
16:12
30 or 40 times a day.
立ったり座ったりします
16:15
Sardinians live in vertical houses, up and down the stairs.
サルディーニャの人たちは上下構造の家に住み、階段を登り下りします
16:17
Every trip to the store, or to church
店に行ったり、教会に行ったり、
16:20
or to a friend's house occasions a walk.
友達の家に行ったり、全てが歩きになります
16:23
They don't have any conveniences.
便利な道具はないのです
16:26
There is not a button to push to do yard work or house work.
庭仕事や家事をやってくれる押しボタンはありません
16:28
If they want to mix up a cake, they're doing it by hand.
ケーキの生地を作りたければ、自分の手で混ぜます
16:30
That's physical activity.
これも肉体活動です
16:33
That burns calories just as much as going on the treadmill does.
それで丁度ランニングマシンに乗るくらいのカロリーを消費するのです
16:35
When they do do intentional physical activity,
意識的に運動する時には
16:38
it's the things they enjoy. They tend to walk,
楽しんでいます 彼らはよく歩きますし
16:41
the only proven way to stave off cognitive decline,
それはボケを予防できる唯一証明された行為です
16:44
and they all tend to have a garden.
庭いじりもたくさんやります
16:47
They know how to set up their life in the right way
いい身体に見えるためにやるべき正しい方法を
16:50
so they have the right outlook.
知っているのです
16:52
Each of these cultures take time to downshift.
これらのどの文化にも、くつろぐ時間があります
16:54
The Sardinians pray. The Seventh-Day Adventists pray.
サルディーニャ人は祈ります セブンスデイアドベンチストも祈ります
16:57
The Okinawans have this ancestor veneration.
沖縄人は先祖を祀っています
17:00
But when you're in a hurry or stressed out,
しかし急いでいたり、ストレスがあると
17:03
that triggers something called the inflammatory response,
それが炎症反応と呼ばれるものの引き金になり
17:05
which is associated with everything from Alzheimer's
それはアルツハイマー病から心血管病まで
17:07
disease to cardiovascular disease.
あらゆる病気と関連しています
17:09
When you slow down for 15 minutes a day
一日15分の休憩があると
17:13
you turn that inflammatory state
炎症状態を
17:15
into a more anti-inflammatory state.
もっと非炎症的な状態にすることができます
17:17
They have vocabulary for sense of purpose,
彼らには皆、目的の感覚に関する言葉、つまり
17:20
ikigai, like the Okinawans.
沖縄の「生き甲斐」のような用語があります
17:23
You know the two most dangerous years in your life
人生の最も危険な時期は
17:25
are the year you're born, because of infant mortality,
乳児死亡のある乳児期と
17:27
and the year you retire.
引退した年です
17:31
These people know their sense of purpose,
長寿地域の人々は人生の意味を知っており
17:33
and they activate in their life, that's worth about seven years
それにより活動的な人生を過ごし、それがプラス7年分の
17:35
of extra life expectancy.
長寿になるのです
17:37
There's no longevity diet.
長生きのダイエットはありません
17:40
Instead, these people drink a little bit every day,
代わりに毎日少しだけ酒を飲みます
17:42
not a hard sell to the American population.
アメリカ人のきつい酒じゃないですよ
17:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:46
They tend to eat a plant-based diet.
植物性の食生活です
17:47
Doesn't mean they don't eat meat, but lots of beans and nuts.
肉を食べないのではなく、豆や木の実を沢山食べるのです
17:50
And they have strategies to keep from overeating,
彼らには過食を避ける方法があり
17:52
little things that nudge them away from the table at the right time.
ちょうどいい時に食卓から離れるよう仕向けています
17:55
And then the foundation of all this is how they connect.
そしてこれらすべての基礎は、彼らの人間関係にあります
17:58
They put their families first,
家族を第一に考え
18:01
take care of their children and their aging parents.
子供や老人の世話をします
18:03
They all tend to belong to a faith-based community,
信頼に基づいた共同体があり
18:05
which is worth between four and 14
そこでの習慣を毎月4回続けるだけで
18:09
extra years of life expectancy
4年から14年分の
18:11
if you do it four times a month.
長寿の効果があります
18:13
And the biggest thing here
そして最大の利点は
18:15
is they also belong to the right tribe.
彼らがちょうどいい種族に属していることです
18:17
They were either born into
生まれた時から
18:20
or they proactively surrounded themselves with the right people.
きちんとした人達に囲まれているのです
18:22
We know from the Framingham studies,
フラミンガム研究によって
18:27
that if your three best friends are obese
親友3人が肥満なら
18:29
there is a 50 percent better chance that you'll be overweight.
自分が体重過多になる可能性が5割多いことが知られています
18:32
So, if you hang out with unhealthy people,
つまり不健康な人達に囲まれていると
18:35
that's going to have a measurable impact over time.
長期的には測定可能な影響が出てくるということです
18:38
Instead, if your friend's idea of recreation
代わりに、もしあなたの友人の余暇が
18:40
is physical activity, bowling, or playing hockey,
ボーリングやホッケーや、自転車や庭いじりのような
18:45
biking or gardening,
肉体活動であれば、また
18:47
if your friends drink a little, but not too much,
彼らがわずかばかりは酒を飲むが、飲みすぎないなら、
18:49
and they eat right, and they're engaged, and they're trusting and trustworthy,
そして正しく食事し、付き合い、互いに信頼があれば
18:52
that is going to have the biggest impact over time.
長期的にはそれが最大の影響を生むのです
18:55
Diets don't work. No diet in the history of the world
ダイエットは役に立ちません 世界のどんな歴史でも
18:58
has ever worked for more than two percent of the population.
人口の2%以上には効果がありません
19:01
Exercise programs usually start in January;
運動プログラムはだいたい1月に始まり
19:04
they're usually done by October.
10月には終わります
19:07
When it comes to longevity
長寿に関して言えば
19:09
there is no short term fix
飲み薬やその他の短期的な解決方法は
19:11
in a pill or anything else.
存在しないのです
19:13
But when you think about it,
しかしそれについて考えれば
19:16
your friends are long-term adventures,
あなたの友人こそが、長期的な冒険で、
19:18
and therefore, perhaps the most significant thing you can do
だからこそ、おそらくそれが、あなたの人生にもっと歳を加え、
19:21
to add more years to your life,
そしてその歳にもっと意味を加える
19:24
and life to your years. Thank you very much.
最良の方法なのです どうもありがとう
19:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:29
Translator:Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewer:Akira KAKINOHANA

sponsored links

Dan Buettner - Longevity coach, explorer
National Geographic writer and explorer Dan Buettner studies the world's longest-lived peoples, distilling their secrets into a single plan for health and long life.

Why you should listen

What do Seventh-Day Adventists in California, the residents of Sardinia, Italy and the inhabitants of the islands of Okinawa, Japan have in common? They enjoy the longest, healthiest lives on the planet. Dan Buettner assembled a team of researchers to seek out these "hotspots of human health and vitality," which he calls Blue Zones, and to figure out what they do that helps them live so long.

Buettner, a world-renowned explorer and a writer for National Geographic, travels the world seeking out new Blue Zones (he's found five, to date) and speaking at seminars and on TV, sharing the habits that lead to long life. He is the founder of Quest Network, and has set three world records for endurance cycling.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.