16:55
TEDMED 2009

Jamie Heywood: The big idea my brother inspired

ジェイミー・ヘイウッド:弟が命を吹き込んだ大計画

Filmed:

ジェイミー・ヘイウッドの弟はALS(筋萎縮性側索硬化症)と診断され、ジェイミー自身も弟の闘病生活に力を注ぐことになった。ヘイウッド兄弟は精巧なウェブサイトを立ち上げ、患者が病状を共有し、経過を追うことができるようにしたのである。収集されたデータが、患者を癒し、病状を説明し、予測するのにどれだけ大きな威力を発揮するか二人は知ることになる。

- Healthcare revolutionary
When MIT-trained mechanical engineer Jamie Heywood discovered that his younger brother was diagnosed with the terminal illness ALS, he focused all his energy on founding revolutionary healthcare initiatives to help his brother and others like him. Full bio

When my brother called me in December of 1998,
弟が電話をしてきたのは 1998年12月のことでした
00:15
he said, "The news does not look good."
あまりいいニュースじゃない とのことでした
00:18
This is him on the screen.
このスクリーンに映っているのが弟です
00:20
He'd just been diagnosed with ALS,
ちょうどALSと診断された頃のものです
00:22
which is a disease that the average lifespan is three years.
ALSは平均余命が3年と言われている病気です
00:24
It paralyzes you. It starts by killing
脊髄にある運動神経がだめになって
00:28
the motor neurons in your spinal cord.
体が麻痺するんです
00:30
And you go from being a healthy,
それで 健康で丈夫な
00:33
robust 29-year-old male
29歳の男性が
00:35
to someone that cannot breathe,
自分で呼吸することも
00:38
cannot move, cannot speak.
動くことも 話すこともできなくなるのです
00:40
This has actually been, to me, a gift,
これは私にとって はなむけとなりました―
00:46
because we began a journey
私は弟とともに 新しい人生観を
00:50
to learn a new way of thinking about life.
学ぶ旅に出ることになりました
00:53
And even though Steven passed away three years ago
スティーブンは3年前に他界しましたが
00:56
we had an amazing journey as a family.
私達は家族として 素晴らしい旅をしました
01:00
We did not even --
私達はもはや―
01:02
I think adversity is not even the right word.
“災難”とさえも思っていませんでした
01:05
We looked at this and we said, "We're going to do something with this
事態を把握し これは何とかしなければと
01:07
in an incredibly positive way."
とてつもなく前向きに話し合いました
01:10
And I want to talk today
今日お話ししたいのは
01:12
about one of the things that we decided to do,
私達の取り組みの一つである
01:14
which was to think about a new way of approaching healthcare.
医療への新しいアプローチについてです
01:17
Because, as we all know here today,
というのも 皆さんご存知の通り
01:21
it doesn't work very well.
現状では上手く機能していないからです
01:23
I want to talk about it in the context of a story.
これを物語と関連付けて お話しようと思います
01:25
This is the story of my brother.
これは弟の物語です
01:28
But it's just a story. And I want to go beyond the story,
でも私が伝えたいのは物語ではなく
01:30
and go to something more.
それを超えた もっと高い次元の話です
01:33
"Given my status, what is the best outcome
“全てを考え合せた上で 今の私にできる 最善のことは何なのか―
01:35
I can hope to achieve, and how do I get there?"
また いかにしてそこに到達するのか?”
01:38
is what we are here to do in medicine, is what everyone should do.
これが医学分野で我々がやろうとしている また皆がやるべきことでもあります
01:41
And those questions all have variables to them.
この問いには多くの変数が含まれています
01:44
All of our statuses are different.
私達はひとりひとり立場や状況が異なります
01:46
All of our hopes and dreams, what we want to accomplish,
望みや夢 何を成し遂げたいかは十人十色です
01:48
is different, and our paths will be different,
そこまでの道筋も 人それぞれです
01:50
they are all stories.
そしてどれもが物語なのです
01:52
But it's a story until we convert it to data
でもデータに変換するまでは 物語の域を超えません
01:54
and so what we do, this concept we had,
そこで私達がやったのは スティーブンの状況の把握でした
01:56
was to take Steven's status, "What is my status?"
“今の自分の状態は?”と問うことで
01:58
and go from this concept of walking, breathing,
歩行と呼吸にはじまり
02:01
and then his hands, speak,
手と会話―
02:06
and ultimately happiness and function.
そして最終的に 幸せと機能の状態を調べました
02:09
So, the first set of pathologies, they end up in the stick man
最初の病状が 彼のアイコンの
02:13
on his icon,
棒人間に表現されていますが
02:15
but the rest of them are really what's important here.
ここで本当に大切なのは 病状以外の部分です
02:17
Because Steven, despite the fact that he was paralyzed,
スティーブンは あのプールにいた時
02:20
as he was in that pool, he could not walk,
体が麻痺していて 歩くことができず
02:23
he could not use his arms -- that's why he had the little floaty things on them,
腕も動かせず 小さな浮き輪までつけていましたが
02:26
did you see those? --
見ましたか?
02:28
he was happy. We were at the beach,
それにもかかわらず彼は楽しそうでした 海辺に行ったときは―
02:30
he was raising his son, and he was productive.
弟は息子を育ていました 生産的でした
02:32
And we took this, and we converted it into data.
こういう情報を集め データにしました
02:34
But it's not a data point at that one moment in time.
しかし たった一度きりではデータ点にはなりません
02:39
It is a data point of Steven in a context.
一連の流れの中で スティーブンのデータ点となるのです
02:41
Here he is in the pool. But here he is healthy,
プールにいる写真です この頃はまだ健康で
02:43
as a builder: taller, stronger,
大工で 背が高くて 強くって
02:45
got all the women, amazing guy.
どんな女性にももてる スゴいやつでした
02:48
Here he is walking down the aisle,
バージンロードを歩いている写真です
02:50
but he can barely walk now, so it's impaired.
弱っていて 歩くのもやっとです
02:52
And he could still hold his wife's hand, but he couldn't do buttons on his clothes,
妻の手は握れましたが 服のボタンはとめられませんでした
02:55
can't feed himself.
自分で食事をすることもできませんでした
02:57
And here he is, paralyzed completely,
この写真ではすっかり麻痺しています
02:59
unable to breathe and move, over this time journey.
呼吸することも 動くことも この時期にはできなくなっていました
03:01
These stories of his life, converted to data.
こういった彼の人生の物語が データに変換されました
03:03
He renovated my carriage house
スティーブンは 体が完全に麻痺して
03:06
when he was completely paralyzed, and unable to speak,
話すことも 呼吸もできなかったときに
03:08
and unable to breathe, and he won an award for a historic restoration.
私の馬車置き場を復元し 賞までもらいました
03:10
So, here's Steven alone, sharing this story in the world.
ここでスティーブンが 物語を世界と共有しています
03:16
And this is the insight, the thing that we are
このとき ワクワクするような
03:18
excited about,
見通しが立ちました―
03:21
because we have gone away from the community that we are,
人間関係が希薄になってきている今だからこそ
03:23
the fact that we really do love each other and want to care for each other.
人はお互いを愛し 気にかけたくなる
03:26
We need to give to others to be successful.
人に善を尽くしてこそ 自らも成功するのです
03:29
So, Steven is sharing this story,
だから スティーブンは物語を共有しています
03:31
but he is not alone.
でも彼だけではありません
03:34
There are so many other people sharing their stories.
他にも多くの人が 自分達の物語を共有しています
03:36
Not stories in words, but stories in data and words.
言葉だけでなく データと言葉で物語を伝えています
03:38
And we convert that information into this structure,
そして私達は それらの情報を
03:41
this understanding, this ability to convert
構造 知識に置き換え
03:44
those stories into something that is computable,
物語を 計算可能なものに変換します
03:47
to which we can begin to change the way
そうすることで 薬物療養の提供方法に
03:49
medicine is done and delivered.
影響を与え得る情報となります
03:51
We did this for ALS. We can do this for depression,
これをALSに適用しました うつ病
03:53
Parkinson's disease, HIV.
パーキンソン病 HIVにも適用できます
03:55
These are not simple, they are not internet scalable;
情報量が多ければ良いってわけじゃないから 難しい
03:57
they require thought and processes
病気について 意味のある情報を見つけるには
03:59
to find the meaningful information about the disease.
思考とプロセスが必要になってきます
04:01
So, this is what it looks like when you go to the website.
さて ウェブサイトはこのようになっています
04:04
And I'm going to show you what Patients Like Me,
Patients Like Me をお見せしましょう
04:07
the company that myself, my youngest brother
この会社は 私と 一番下の弟と
04:10
and a good friend from MIT started.
MIT時代の親友とで立ち上げました
04:12
Here are the actual patients, there are 45,000 of them now,
ここに実際の患者がいます 現在 45,000人ほどですが
04:14
sharing their stories as data.
それぞれの物語をデータとして共有しています
04:17
Here is an M.S. patient.
これは多発性硬化症の患者のマイクです
04:19
His name is Mike, and he is uniformly impaired
知覚 視覚 歩行 感覚のどれにおいても
04:21
on cognition, vision, walking, sensation.
一様に悪化しました
04:23
Those are things that are different for each M.S. patient.
これらは多発性硬化症の患者間でも 個人差があります
04:26
Each of them can have a different characteristic.
一人一人が異なった特徴を持ちます
04:28
You can see fibromyalgia, HIV, ALS, depression.
線維筋痛 HIV ALS うつ病が見えますね
04:30
Look at this HIV patient down here, Zinny.
これはジニーというHIVの患者です
04:35
It's two years of this disease. All of the symptoms are not there.
発症して2年たっています 全ての症状は出ていませんが
04:38
But he is working to keep his CD4 count high
彼はCD4値を上げたままにし ウイルスのレベルを
04:41
and his viral level low so he can make his life better.
下げた状態を維持して 生活しやすくしています
04:43
But you can aggregate this and you can discover things about treatments.
こうした情報を集めていけば 治療に関する情報も見えてきます
04:46
Look at this, 2,000 people almost, on Copaxone.
見てください 約2,000人が コパキソンを使用しています
04:50
These are patients currently on drugs,
これらは現在薬を服用中の患者で
04:52
sharing data.
データを共有している人々です
04:54
I love some of these, physical exercise, prayer.
私は 体操とかお祈りとかの類が好きです
04:56
Anyone want to run a comparative effectiveness study
何かと“お祈り”の相対的有効性を
04:59
on prayer against something? Let's look at prayer.
研究したい方 いらっしゃいませんか? お祈りを見てみましょう
05:01
What I love about this, just sort of interesting design problems.
このデザイン なかなか興味深くて気に入っているんですが
05:03
These are why people pray.
これは人々がお祈りをする理由です
05:07
Here is the schedule of how frequently they -- it's a dose.
ここはお祈りの頻度― つまり投与量です
05:09
So, anyone want to see the 32 patients that pray for 60 minutes a day,
1日60分お祈りをする この32人の患者が
05:11
and see if they're doing better, they probably are.
快方に向かっているか見てみましょう きっとそうなっています
05:14
Here they are. It's an open network,
出ました これはオープン・ネットワークです
05:16
everybody is sharing. We can see it all.
みんなが情報を共有し 誰でも閲覧できます
05:19
Or, I want to look at anxiety, because people are praying for anxiety.
不安を見てみましょう 人は心配なことがあると祈るものです
05:22
And here is data on 15,000 people's current anxiety, right now.
これは 15,000人の患者の現在の不安を表したデータです
05:25
How they treat it,
彼らがどのように向き合ったか
05:30
the drugs, the components of it,
使用した薬品 またその内訳
05:33
their side effects, all of it in a rich environment,
副作用 それら全てが 見やすく表示されており
05:36
and you can drill down and see the individuals.
掘り下げていくと 個々の情報が見られます
05:39
This amazing data allows us to drill down and see
この素晴らしいデータのおかげで 掘り下げていくと
05:41
what this drug is for --
この薬品が 何に効くのか分かります
05:44
1,500 people on this drug, I think. Yes.
1,500人がこの薬品を使用しています
05:47
I want to talk to the 58 patients down here
私はこの58人の患者の話が聞いてみたい―
05:49
who are taking four milligrams a day.
彼らは毎日4ミリグラムを常用しています
05:51
And I want to talk to the ones of those that have been doing
中でも特に 常用歴2年以上の人たちの
05:53
it for more than two years.
話が聞いてみたい
05:55
So, you can see the duration.
期間も見られます
06:01
All open, all available.
全て公開されており 全てを参照できます
06:03
I'm going to log in.
ログインします
06:07
And this is my brother's profile.
これは私の弟のプロフィールです
06:11
And this is a new version of our platform we're launching right now.
これはちょうど今立ち上げようとしている 新しいプラットフォームです
06:13
This is the second generation. It's going to be in Flash.
第二世代でフラッシュで作っています
06:17
And you can see here, as this animates over,
マウスを持っていくと出てきますね
06:19
Steven's actual data against the background of all other patients,
スティーブンのデータが 他の患者データを背景にして表示され
06:22
against this information.
比較しながら見られます
06:25
The blue band is the 50th percentile. Steven is the 75th percentile,
青い部分が中央値です 弟は第三四分位数でした
06:28
that he has non-genetic ALS.
彼は非遺伝的ALSだったということになります
06:30
You scroll down in this profile and you can see
プロフィール画面をスクロールすると
06:33
all of his prescription drugs,
処方された薬品を全て閲覧できます
06:35
but more than that, in the new version, I can look at this interactively.
さらに新しいバージョンでは これをインタラクティブに見られます
06:37
Wait, poor spinal capacity.
お待ちください 低下した脊髄能力
06:40
Doesn't this remind you of a great stock program?
優秀な株価プログラムみたいでしょう?
06:42
Wouldn't it be great if the technology we used to take care of ourselves
健康管理のテクノロジーが お金儲けのテクノロジーと
06:44
was as good as the technology we use to make money?
同じぐらい優れているなんて 最高でしょ?
06:46
Detrol. In the side effects for his drug,
デトロール 彼の薬の副作用は
06:49
integrated into that, the stem cell transplant that he had,
彼の幹細胞移植の項目に統合されています
06:51
the first in the world, shared openly for anyone who wants to see it.
こんな風に 誰でも自由に閲覧できるのは 世界で初めてです
06:53
I love here -- the cyberkinetics implant,
すごいですよ サイバーキネティックス社のインプラントの患者データが
06:59
which was, again, the only patient's data that was online and available.
オンラインで参照できるのはここだけです
07:01
You can adjust the time scale. You can adjust the symptoms.
時間の尺度や症状も調整できます
07:05
You can look at the interaction between how I treat my ALS.
自分のALSの治療がどのような効果を得ているか見られます
07:07
So, you click down on the ALS tab there.
ALSのタブをクリックします
07:11
I'm taking three drugs to manage it. Some of them are experimental.
3種類の薬を服用しています いくつかは試験的なものです
07:13
I can look at my constipation, how to manage it.
便秘の状態を見て どう処置をしたらいいか見てみます
07:16
I can see magnesium citrate, and the side effects
クエン酸マグネシウムがあります その薬の副作用が
07:18
from that drug all integrated in the time
意味のある形で時間軸に
07:20
in which they're meaningful.
組み込まれています
07:22
But I want more.
でも私はもっと欲しい
07:25
I don't want to just look at this cool device, I want to take this
優れた機能を見ているだけじゃ物足りない
07:27
data and make something even better.
このデータをうまく活用したい
07:29
I want my brother's center of the universe and his symptoms
弟を宇宙の中心に据え
07:31
and his drugs,
彼の症状や薬品
07:34
and all of the things that interact among those,
相互作用しているすべての要素に
07:37
the side effects, to be in this beautiful data galaxy
副作用 全てを網羅するデータの銀河系をつくり
07:39
that we can look at in any way we want to understand it,
思い通りに切りとり 吟味したい
07:42
so that we can take this information
この集めた情報から
07:45
and go beyond just this simple model
記録という域を超えた…
07:48
of what a record is.
と申しましたが 実は医療記録というものが
07:52
I don't even know what a medical record is.
どういうものか よく知りません
07:55
I want to solve a problem. I want an application.
私は問題を解決したい そのためのアプリケーションが欲しい
07:57
So, can I take this data -- rearrange yourself,
手に入れたデータを 自分で再編成したい
07:59
put the symptoms in the left, the drugs across the top,
症状を左側に 薬は上部に配置したい
08:02
tell me everything we know about Steven and everyone else,
そしてスティーブンと他のみんなの情報全てと
08:04
and what interacts.
何が作用しているのかを知りたい
08:06
Years after he's had these drugs,
弟がこれらの薬を服用していた頃から 何年も経って
08:09
I learned that everything he did to manage his excess saliva,
唾液の過剰分泌を抑えようとして彼がやったことは
08:11
including some positive side effects that came from other drugs,
良い副作用をもたらした薬も含めてすべて
08:14
were making his constipation worse.
彼の便秘を悪化させていた ということを知りました
08:17
And if anyone's ever had severe constipation,
ひどい便秘になったことがある人なら誰でも
08:19
and you don't understand how much of an impact that has on your life --
人生に便秘がどれ程の“重み”を持つか 分かるはずです
08:21
yes, that was a pun.
ええ ダジャレを言ってみました...
08:23
You're trying to manage these,
こうしたことをうまく扱いたいんですね
08:26
and this grid is available here,
使えるグリッドがここにある
08:28
and we want to understand it.
そして私達は理解したい
08:30
No one's ever had this kind of information.
今まで誰も こんな情報持っていませんでした
08:33
So, patients have this. We're for patients.
今は患者の手にあります 私達は患者のために存在します
08:36
This is all about patient health care, there was no doctors on our network.
患者の健康管理が全てです 私達のネットワークに医師はいません
08:38
This is about the patients.
これは患者についての話なのです
08:40
So, how can we take this and bring them a tool
では これをどうやったら 医療の場に反映でき
08:42
that they can go back and they can engage the medical system?
医療システムと関わるれるようなの道具として提供できるのか?
08:45
And we worked hard, and we thought about it and we said,
私達は頭を働かせ 考え抜いた末に こう言いました
08:47
"What's something we can use all the time,
「私達がいつでも使うことができて
08:50
that we can use in the medical care system,
医療システムにも使うことができる
08:52
that everyone will understand?"
誰にでも理解できるものって何だろう?」
08:54
So, the patients print it out,
そういうわけで 患者はプリントアウトしました
08:56
because hospitals usually block us
私達はソーシャルネットワークだと思われていているので
08:58
because they believe we are a social network.
たいてい病院からブロックされています
09:00
It's actually the most used feature on the website.
実はプリント出力が このウェブサイトで最も使われる機能です
09:03
Doctors actually love this sheet, and they're actually really engaged.
医師も気に入ってくれて 多大な関心を持ってくれました
09:05
So, we went from this story of Steven
スティーブンの物語と彼の経緯から始まって
09:08
and his history to data, and then back to paper,
データとなり そして紙へ戻りました
09:11
where we went back and engaged the medical care system.
そして医療システムとの連携が始まりました
09:14
And here's another paper.
こちらに論文があります
09:15
This is a journal, PNAS --
これはPNASという学会誌です
09:17
I think it's the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science
確か正式名称を「米国科学アカデミー紀要」と言います
09:19
of the United States of America.
アメリカ合衆国の学会誌です
09:21
You've seen multiple of these today, when everyone's bragging about
今日 色々な方々が偉業を報告なさった時に
09:23
the amazing things they've done.
何冊かご覧になったかもしれません
09:25
This is a report about a drug called lithium.
これはリチウムという薬に関するレポートです
09:27
Lithium, that is a drug used to treat bipolar disorder,
リチウムは 双極性障害の治療に使われる薬ですが
09:29
that a group in Italy found
イタリアのあるグループが
09:33
slowed ALS down in 16 patients, and published it.
ALS患者16人の症状を軽減した という報告をしました
09:35
Now, we'll skip the critiques of the paper.
ここでは論文の批評については触れません
09:38
But the short story is: If you're a patient,
かいつまんで言えば もしあなたが患者なら
09:40
you want to be on the blue line.
青い線上にいたいと望みます
09:42
You don't want to be on the red line, you want to be on the blue line.
赤い線上でありたいとは思いません 青い線上でありたいのです
09:44
Because the blue line is a better line. The red line
それは青い線の方が良いからです 赤い線は
09:46
is way downhill, the blue line is a good line.
下り坂で 青い線は良い線なのです
09:48
So, you know we said -- we looked at this, and what I love also
これを見て言ったんですけど―
09:50
is that people always accuse these Internet sites
人はいつでもインターネットのサイトのせいにします
09:54
of promoting bad medicine and having people do things irresponsibly.
悪い薬を紹介したり 人を翻弄していると言い掛かりをつけてきます
09:56
So, this is what happened when PNAS published this.
PNASがリチウムことを発表したときも 同じことが起こりました
09:59
Ten percent of the people in our system took lithium.
私達のシステム内の 10パーセントの人々がリチウムを服用しました
10:02
Ten percent of the patients started taking lithium based on 16 patients of data
質の悪い出版物で挙げられた 16人の例をもとに
10:05
in a bad publication.
リチウムを服用する判断を下しました
10:08
And they call the Internet irresponsible.
なのに無責任なのはインターネットだと言うんですね
10:10
Here's the implication of what happens.
どういうことになるかという例をご紹介します
10:12
There's this one guy, named Humberto, from Brazil,
ここにブラジルのハンベルトという男性がいます
10:14
who unfortunately passed away nine months ago,
不幸にも9ヶ月前に亡くなってしまいましたが
10:17
who said, "Hey, listen. Can you help us answer this question?
彼は言いました「ねぇ 答えてもらえますか?
10:20
Because I don't want to wait for the next trial, it's going to be years.
次の臨床試験を待っていたら 何年も先になりますから…
10:22
I want to know now. Can you help us?"
僕は今知りたいんですよ 答えてもらえますか?」
10:25
So, we launched some tools, we let them track their blood levels.
要請を受け 私達はいくつかツールをつくり 血圧の遷移を追いました
10:27
We let them share the data and exchange it.
データを互いに共有し交換できるようにもしました
10:30
You know, a data network.
いわゆるデータネットワークというものです
10:32
And they said, you know, "Jamie, PLM,
彼らは言いました「Patients Like Me のジェイミー
10:35
can you guys tell us whether this works or not?"
リチウムって効くのかどうか教えてくれない?」
10:37
And we went around and we talked to people,
そこで私達は あちこちで色んな人と話をしました
10:39
and they said, "You can't run a clinical trial like this. You know?
こう言われました「あなた方に こんな臨床試験は無理でしょう?
10:41
You don't have the blinding, you don't have data,
盲検もできないし データもない
10:43
it doesn't follow the scientific method.
それに科学的な手法にも則っていない
10:45
It's never going to work. You can't do it."
決して上手く行くはずがない あなた方には無理だ」
10:47
So, I said, "Okay well we can't do that. Then we can do something harder."
私は言いました「確かに無理そうだから もっと難しいことをやってのけます」
10:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:52
I can't say whether lithium works in all ALS patients,
リチウムが全てのALS患者に効くかどうか 私には判断できませんが
10:55
but I can say whether it works in Humberto.
ハンベルトに効くかどうかは答えられると思ったんです
10:57
I bought a Mac about two years ago, I converted over,
私は2年前にMac に切り替えました
11:00
and I was so excited about this new feature of the time machine
タイムマシンという新しい機能にワクワクしました
11:02
that came in Leopard. And we said -- because it's really cool,
レオパードになって搭載された機能です なかなか素晴らしいです
11:04
you can go back and you can look at the entire history of your computer,
過去にさかのぼって コンピューターの全履歴を見られるし
11:06
and find everything you've lost, and I loved it.
失ったデータも探し当てられます 大好きになりました
11:08
And I said, "What if we built a time machine for patients,
私は言いました「患者にタイムマシンを作ってみたらどうだろう?
11:10
except instead of going backwards, we go forwards.
過去にさかのぼる代わりに 未来に進んでみるんだ
11:14
Can we find out what's going to happen to you,
事前に何が起こるか分かったら
11:17
so that you can maybe change it?"
未来を変えることができるんじゃない?」
11:20
So, we did. We took all the patients like Humberto,
私達はやってみました ハンベルトのような患者全員のデータを集め―
11:23
That's the Apple background, we stole that because we didn't have time
ちなみに時間がなかったんでアップル社の背景を使っていますが―
11:26
to build our own. This is a real app by the way.
実用的なアプリケーションを作りました
11:28
This is not just graphics.
これ 画像だけではありませんよ
11:30
And you take those data, and we find the patients like him, and we bring
データを集めて 彼のような患者を探して
11:32
their data together. And we bring their histories into it.
全てのデータを合わせます さらに履歴も加えます
11:34
And then we say, "Well how do we line them all up?"
それから「どうやって組みかえたらいい?」と話し合いました
11:38
So, we line them all up so they go together
そして 全てのデータの重要なポイントが
11:40
around the meaningful points,
重なるように並べ
11:42
integrated across everything we know about the patient.
患者の全情報を統合しました
11:44
Full information, the entire course of their disease.
まさに全ての情報 病気の全行程がはじき出されました
11:46
And that's what is going to happen to Humberto,
そこには 何か手を打たない限り ハンベルトを待ち受けている
11:50
unless he does something.
運命が描き出されていました
11:52
And he took lithium, and he went down the line.
彼はリチウムを服用することにしました 状態は下り坂になりました
11:54
And it works almost every time.
ほぼ毎回ドンピシャです
11:57
Now, the ones that it doesn't work are interesting.
外れるケースが興味深いぐらいです
12:00
But almost all the time it works.
でもほぼ毎回当たります
12:02
It's actually scary. It's beautiful.
ある意味恐ろしくもありますが 美しくもあります
12:05
So, we couldn't run a clinical trial, we couldn't figure it out.
私達には臨床試験はできませんし 理解もできません
12:07
But we could see whether it was going to work for Humberto.
でもハンベルトに効き目があるかどうかは推測できました
12:09
And yeah, all the clinicians in the audience will talk about power
ご参加の臨床医の方々は 威力やら標準偏差やらについて
12:12
and all the standard deviation. We'll do that later.
言いたいことがあるでしょう それについては後ほど話します
12:14
But here is the answer
しかしここにあるのが
12:16
of the mean of the patients that actually decided
実際にリチウムを服用すると決めた患者の
12:20
to take lithium.
結果の平均値です
12:22
These are all the patients that started lithium.
ここの患者全員が リチウムを服用し始めました
12:24
It's the Intent to Treat Curve.
運命の曲線を変えようとしてです
12:26
You can see here, the blue dots on the top, the light ones,
一番上にある青い点 明るい色のが見えますね
12:28
those are the people in the study in PNAS
これはPNASの研究で取り上げられていた人々で
12:32
that you wanted to be on. And the red ones are the ones,
あなたもそうなりたいと願う点です 赤い点や
12:34
the pink ones on the bottom are the ones you didn't want to be.
下のピンクの点にはなりたくありません
12:36
And the ones in the middle are all of our patients
真ん中にあるのは全部 私達の患者の点です
12:38
from the start of lithium at time zero,
リチウム服用開始を時間軸0地点として
12:41
going forward, and then going backward.
その前後のデータが記録されています
12:43
So, you can see we matched them perfectly, perfectly.
データが完璧なまでに一致しているのが分かりますね
12:47
Terrifyingly accurate matching.
恐ろしいほど正確に一致しています
12:50
And going forward, you actually don't want to be a lithium patient this time.
時間軸を進めると リチウムを服用しないほうが賢明ということが分かります
12:52
You're actually doing slightly worse -- not significantly,
容態が幾分か悪くなります 著しくではありませんが
12:56
but slightly worse. You don't want to be a lithium patient this time.
でも確かに悪化します リチウムは服用しないほうがよさそうです
12:58
But you know, a lot of people dropped out,
でもですね 多くの人々が試験をやめてしまいます
13:01
the trial, there is too much drop out.
あまりにもたくさんの人たちが途中でやめてしまいます
13:04
Can we do the even harder thing? Can we go to the patients
私達はもっと高度なことができるでしょうか? 患者の元に行けるでしょうか?
13:06
that actually decided to stay on lithium,
良くなっていると確信して
13:08
because they were so convinced they were getting better?
リチウムを服用し続けることにした患者のところにです
13:12
We asked our control algorithm,
私達は制御アルゴリズムを確認しました
13:14
are those 69 patients -- by the way, you'll notice
これらの69人の患者を―
13:16
that's four times the number of patients in the clinical trial --
ちなみに臨床試験の4倍もの患者数ですが―
13:18
can we look at those patients and say,
この患者たちをみてこう言いました
13:21
"Can we match them with our time machine
「タイムマシンを使って この69人と彼らの病状に
13:24
to the other patients that are just like them,
似た患者達とを合わせてみられるかな
13:27
and what happens?"
そうしたら どんな結果になるかな?」
13:29
Even the ones that believed they were getting better
結果は 良くなっていると思っていた人々でさえ
13:31
matched the controls exactly. Exactly.
ぴったりと対照と合致していたのです
13:34
Those little lines? That's the power.
この小さな線はどうでしょう? これは強力です
13:37
So, we -- I can't tell you lithium doesn't work. I can't tell you
リチウムは効かないとは言えません
13:39
that if you did it at a higher dose
もっと大量に服用した場合や
13:41
or if you run the study proper -- I can tell you
実験を正しい方法で行った場合のことは分かりません
13:43
that for those 69 people that took lithium,
分かるのは リチウムを服用した69人が
13:45
they didn't do any better than the people that were just like them,
リチウムを服用していない 似たような症状の患者よりも
13:49
just like me,
良くなりはしなかった という事です
13:51
and that we had the power to detect that at about
私達はこれを 当初の研究で示された強さの
13:53
a quarter of the strengths reported in the initial study.
1/4 程度で見抜きました
13:56
We did that one year ahead of the time
私達は1年先がけて見抜いていました
13:59
when the first clinical trial funded by the NIH
NIH により数百万ドルが投じられた
14:02
for millions of dollars failed for futility last week,
最初の臨床実験が先週
14:04
and announced it.
失敗に終わったという発表がありました
14:07
So, remember I told you about my brother's stem cell transplant.
先ほど 弟の幹細胞移植についてお話ししましたね
14:10
I never really knew whether it worked.
効果があったのかどうかよく分かりませんでした
14:13
And I put 100 million cells in his cisterna magna,
私は1億もの細胞を
14:16
in his lumbar cord,
彼の大槽と腰髄に移植し
14:19
and filled out the IRBs and did all this work,
IRBにも記入し 全ての手筈を整えました
14:21
and I never really knew.
でもずっと分かりませんでした
14:23
How did I not know?
どうして分からなかったんだろう?
14:26
I mean, I didn't know what was going to happen to him.
要するに 彼に何が起ころうとしていたのか 分からなかったのです
14:28
I actually asked Tim, who is the quant in our group --
私はティムにたずねました 彼は私達のグループの金融アナリストです
14:30
we actually searched for about a year to find someone
実は1年間ほど 数学と統計とモデリングのできる人を
14:33
who could do the sort of math and statistics and modeling
医療畑で探していましたが 見つかりませんでした
14:36
in healthcare, couldn't find anybody. So, we went to the finance industry.
そこで金融業界で探してみました
14:38
And there are these guys who used to model the future
そしたら 利率の予測とかそういう類の
14:41
of interest rates, and all that kind of stuff.
モデリングをやっていた人たちが 見つかりました
14:43
And some of them were available. So, we hired one.
何人かは手が空いていたので 一人雇うことにしました
14:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:48
We hired them, set them up, assisting at lab.
彼らを雇って仕事を始めさせ 研究所で役立ってもらいました
14:51
I I.M. him things. That's the way I communicate with him,
用件をメールで送信 そんなふうに彼とやりとりをしました
14:53
is like a little guy in a box. I I.M.ed Tim. I said,
僕にとって彼は"箱の中の小さな男"です 私はメールでたずねました
14:55
"Tim can you tell me whether my brother's stem cell transplant
「ティム 教えてくれないか? 弟がやった幹細胞移植は
14:57
worked or not?"
役に立ったのかどうか」
14:59
And he sent me this two days ago.
彼は2日前にこれを私に送ってきました
15:02
It was that little outliers there. You see that guy that lived a long time?
それはちょっとした外れ値でした あの長生きした人 見えますか?
15:05
We have to go talk to him. Because I'd like to know what happened.
彼に話を聞いて 何が起こったのか知りたいです
15:08
Because something went different.
何かが違っていたんです
15:10
But my brother didn't. My brother went straight down the line.
私の弟の場合は違いました 彼の線はまっすぐ下降しました
15:12
It only works about 12 months.
タイムマシンは 12ヶ月まで対応可能です
15:15
It's the first version of the time machine.
これはタイムマシンの最初のバージョンです
15:17
First time we ever tried it. We'll try to get it better later
初めての試みです これから改善を重ねます
15:19
but 12 months so far.
今のところ向こう12ヶ月の予測ができます
15:21
And, you know, I look at this,
これを見ると
15:24
and I get really emotional.
とても感情的になります
15:28
You look at the patients, you can drill in all the controls,
ご覧になっている患者の 全ての対照を深く見ることができます
15:30
you can look at them, you can ask them.
見て 問いかけることができます
15:32
And I found a woman that had --
私はある女性に気がつきました―
15:34
we found her, she was odd because she had data
彼女は亡くなってあるというのに
15:37
after she died.
データが入力されているんです
15:39
And her husband had come in and entered her last functional scores,
ご主人が 奥様の最後の機能点数を 入力してくれていました
15:41
because he knew how much she cared.
奥様が どれ程このサイトを大事に思っていたか 知っていたからです
15:44
And I am thankful.
私は感謝しています
15:47
I can't believe that these people,
こんな人達がいるなんて信じられません
15:50
years after my brother had died,
私の弟が亡くなって何年も経つのに
15:52
helped me answer the question about whether
私の疑問に答えようとしてくれているのです
15:54
an operation I did, and spent millions of dollars on
数年前に 私が何百万ドルもかけて行った手術が
15:56
years ago, worked or not.
果たして役に立ったのかどうか…
15:59
I wished it had been there
最初の手術の段階で答えが
16:01
when I'd done it the first time,
用意されていれば良かったのにと思います
16:03
and I'm really excited that it's here now,
今では ちゃんと答えが用意されていることに興奮しています
16:05
because the lab that I founded
私が立ち上げた研究所には
16:07
has some data on a drug that might work,
効き目のありそうな薬のデータがあります
16:12
and I'd like to show it.
それをお見せしたい
16:14
I'd like to show it in real time, now,
リアルタイムで 今お見せしたい
16:18
and I want to do that for all of the diseases that we can do that for.
私達に取り組める 全ての病気に対応していきたい
16:20
I've got to thank the 45,000 people
私達と共に 社会的な実験に参加してくれた
16:25
that are doing this social experiment with us.
45,000人の人々にお礼を申し上げます
16:28
There is an amazing journey we are going on
私達の旅は素晴らしいものとなってきています
16:31
to become human again,
ふたたび人間になるための旅です
16:34
to be part of community again,
ふたたび人間の絆を深める旅です
16:36
to share of ourselves, to be vulnerable,
自分達を共有し 敏感であるためです
16:39
and it's very exciting. So, thank you.
本当にワクワクすることです どうもありがとうございます
16:41
(Applause)
(拍手喝采)
16:44
Translated by Noriko Araki
Reviewed by Caoli Price

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jamie Heywood - Healthcare revolutionary
When MIT-trained mechanical engineer Jamie Heywood discovered that his younger brother was diagnosed with the terminal illness ALS, he focused all his energy on founding revolutionary healthcare initiatives to help his brother and others like him.

Why you should listen

After finding out that his brother, Stephen, had the terminal illness ALS, Jamie Haywood founded the ALS Therapy Development Institute in 1999. ALS TDI is the world’s first non-profit biotechnology company and accelerated research on the disease by hiring scientists to develop treatments outside of academia and for-profit corporations. They were the first to publish research on the safety of using stem cells in ALS patients.

In 2005,Jamie and his youngest brother Ben, along with close friend Jeff Cole, built PatientsLikeMe.com to give patients control and access to their healthcare information and compare it to others like them. Its bold (and somewhat controversial) approach involves aggregating users health info in order to test the effects of particular treatments, bypassing clinical trials. It was named one of "15 companies that will change the world" by CNN Money.

Although his brother passed away in the fall of 2006, Jamie continues to serve as chairman of PatientsLikeMe and on the board of directors of ALS TDI. Jamie has raised over $50 million dollars for ALS TDI and was the subject of the biography His Brother’s Keeper, written by Jonathan Weiner. He was also featured in the documentary So Much So Fast, exploring the development of ALS TDI and the personal story of he and Stephen.

More profile about the speaker
Jamie Heywood | Speaker | TED.com