17:03
TEDxAmsterdam

Kevin Kelly: Technology's epic story

ケビン・ケリー: テクノロジーの壮大な歴史について

Filmed:

今回のTEDxアムステルダムから届ける広範囲・刺激的な話は、ケビン・ケリーが人の生活にとってテクノロジーは何なのかについて語ったものです。個人的レベルへの影響から宇宙における意義について話します。

- Digital visionary
There may be no one better to contemplate the meaning of cultural change than Kevin Kelly, whose life story reads like a treatise on the value and impacts of technology. Full bio

今日は日々の生活において
テクノロジーがどのような
00:15
I want to talk about my investigations
意味を持つかの研究について
話をしたいと思います
00:18
into what technology means in our lives --
身近な生活ではなく 宇宙的な意味で
00:23
not just our immediate life, but in the cosmic sense,
世界の長い歴史
00:26
in the kind of long history of the world
この世界において我々の居場所について
00:29
and our place in the world:
これはなんでしょうか?
00:32
What is this stuff?
重要性はなんでしょう?
00:34
What is the significance?
発見した事を
00:36
And so, I want to kind of go through my
お話したいと思います
00:38
little story of what I found out.
一番最初に研究したのは
00:40
And one of the first things that I started to investigate was
「テクノロジー」という名前の由来でした
00:42
the history of the name of technology.
アメリカには1790年以降代々の大統領によって
00:46
And in the United States there is a State of the Union address
行われてきた一般教書演説があります
00:48
given by every president since 1790.
それぞれその時々のアメリカにとって
00:51
And each one of those is really kind of
最重要課題を要約したものです
00:54
summing up the most important things
00:56
for the United States at that time.
「テクノロジー」という言葉を検索すると
00:58
If you search for the word "technology,"
01:00
it was not used until 1952.
1952年以降に使用されるようになったことが
分かります
1952年まで「テクノロジー」は
人々の思考の中にいわば存在しなかったのです
01:04
So, technology was sort of absent
1952年は偶然にも私の誕生した年です
01:06
from everybody's thinking until 1952, which happened to be the year of my birth.
当然テクノロジーは
それ以前から存在していましたが
01:09
And obviously, technology
人はそれを知らずにいたのです
01:12
had existed before then, but we weren't aware of it,
人の生活に眠っていたこの力の
01:14
and so it was sort of an awakening
目覚めのようなものです
01:16
of this force in our life.
最初の「テクノロジー」という単語の使用について
01:19
I actually did research to find out the first
01:21
use of the word "technology."
調べて見ました
1829年でした
01:23
It was in 1829,
美術工芸や産業を総合的に教える
01:25
and it was invented by a guy who was starting a curriculum --
カリキュラムを始めた人が
01:28
a course, bringing together all the kinds
発明したということです
01:30
of arts and crafts, and industry --
彼は「テクノロジー」と呼びました
01:33
and he called it "Technology."
初めて使われたのです
01:35
And that's the very first use of the word.
皆が消耗させられ
01:37
So, what is this stuff
迷惑をかけられているこれは
01:39
that we're all consumed by,
いったいなんでしょうか?
01:42
and bothered by?
アラン・ケイは「テクノロジーは
あなたが生まれた後に
01:45
Alan Kay calls it, "Technology is anything
発明された全ての物」と呼んでいます
01:47
that was invented after you were born."
01:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
これがテクノロジーについて
皆が持っている見解です
01:50
Which is sort of the idea that we normally have about what technology is:
すべての新しいものです
01:54
It's all that new stuff.
01:56
It's not roads, or penicillin,
道路やペニシリン
工場やタイヤなどではなく 新しい物を指します
01:58
or factory tires; it's the new stuff.
友人のダニー・ヒリスは
似たようなことを言っています
02:02
My friend Danny Hillis says kind of a similar one,
彼によると「テクノロジーは
まだ使えない物のことをいいます」 (笑)
02:04
he says, "Technology is anything that doesn't work yet."
02:07
(Laughter)
02:08
Which is, again, a sense that it's all new.
これも 最新の物を指します
しかし 最新のものだけではありません
02:10
But we know that it's just not new.
実はとても古くにさかのぼります
02:12
It actually goes way back, and what I want to suggest
それがわたしの提案です
02:14
is it goes a long way back.
別の方向からテクノロジーについて考えて見ます
02:18
So, another way to think about technology, what it means,
テクノロジーの無い世界を想像して見る事です
02:20
is to imagine a world without technology.
現代世界にあるテクノロジーを全て
02:22
If we were to eliminate every single bit of technology in the world today --
全てですよ
02:25
and I mean everything,
刃物からスクレイパー、服までを削除しますと
02:27
from blades to scrapers to cloth --
人類という種はそう長く生存できないでしょう
02:31
we as a species would not live very long.
何十億人もの単位で急速に死んでいくでしょう
02:34
We would die by the billions, and very quickly:
狼に襲われても 人は無防備です
02:37
The wolves would get us, we would be defenseless,
十分な食物を育てたり
見つける事が出来なくなります
02:40
we would be unable to grow enough food, or find enough food.
狩猟採集民族でさえ
なんらかの簡単な道具を使っていました
02:43
Even the hunter-gatherers used some elementary tools.
最小限のテクノロジーですが
02:47
And so, they had minimal technology,
何らかのテクノロジーを持っていました
02:49
but they had some technology.
他の狩猟採集部族や
02:51
And if we study those hunter-gatherer tribes
初期の人類に近縁のネアンデルタール人を
研究して見ますと
02:54
and the Neanderthal, which are very similar to early man,
テクノロジーのない世界について
面白い事を見つけました
02:58
we find out a very curious thing about this world without technology,
彼らの平均年齢についてです
03:01
and this is a kind of a curve of their average age.
40歳以上のネアンデルタール人の化石は
03:04
There are no Neanderthal fossils that are older than 40 years old
発見されていません
03:07
that we've ever found,
狩猟採集部族の平均年齢は
03:09
and the average age of most of these
20から30代です
03:11
hunter-gatherer tribes is 20 to 30.
死亡率が高いため
03:14
There are very few young infants
幼児と老人がほとんどいません
03:17
because they die -- high mortality rate -- and there's very few old people.
そのプロファイルは
サンフランシスコの近郊の様です
03:20
And so the profile is sort of for your average San Francisco neighborhood:
若者が非常に多いです
03:24
a lot of young people.
そこに行けば「皆 健康だ」というでしょう
03:26
And if you go there, you say, "Hey, everybody's really healthy."
それは全員が若いからです
03:28
Well, that's because they're all young.
狩猟採集部落と初期の人類はそれと同じです
03:30
And the same thing with the hunter-gatherer tribes and early man
30歳以上生きられなかったのです
03:32
is that you didn't live beyond the age of 30.
祖父母のいない世界でした
03:35
So, it was a world without grandparents.
祖父母は非常に大切です
03:37
And grandparents are very important,
彼らが文化の進歩と情報の伝達者です
03:39
because they are the transmitter of cultural evolution and information.
全員が20-30代の世界を想像してみて下さい
03:43
Imagine a world and basically everybody was 20 to 30 years old.
どれほどの学習ができるでしょう?
03:46
How much learning can you do?
一生大した学習は出来ません
03:48
You can't do very much learning in your own life,
短すぎるのです
03:50
it's so short,
学んだ事を伝えていく人がいません
03:52
and there's nobody to pass on what you do learn.
これが一つの側面です
03:54
So, that's one aspect.
非常に短い一生でした その反面
03:57
It was a very short life. But at the same time
わずかばかりでもテクノロジーを持った
03:59
anthropologists know
狩猟採集部族の多くは
04:02
that most hunter-gatherer tribes of the world,
実は必要となる食料を採集するのに
04:04
with that very little technology, actually did not spend
長い時間をかけていないことが
人類学者の研究で分かりました
04:06
a very long time gathering the food that they needed:
一日3~6時間です
04:09
three to six hours a day.
ある人類学者はこれを
原始余裕社会と呼びました
04:11
Some anthropologists call that the original affluent society.
銀行員並みの仕事時間だったからです
04:14
Because they had banker hours basically.
つまり十分な食物を入手できたのです
04:17
So, it was possible to get enough food.
しかし 食糧不足が始まり
04:20
But when the scarcity came
浮き沈みそして旱魃が来て
04:22
when the highs and lows and the droughts came,
人は飢餓に陥りました
04:24
then people went into starvation.
それが長く生存できなかった理由です
04:27
And that's why they didn't live very long.
このように非常にシンプルな
04:29
So, what technology brought,
石器のテクノロジーによって
ーこのように小さなものであってもー
04:31
through the very simple tools like these stone tools here --
早期の人間集団は実際に
04:36
even something as small as this --
1万年前に初めて北米に到着した際
04:38
the early bands of humans were actually able
250種の大型動物を
04:40
to eliminate to extinction
絶滅させたのです
04:43
about 250 megafauna animals
これがテクノロジーなのです
04:47
in North America when they first arrived 10,000 years ago.
つまり 産業時代が来るずっと前から
04:51
So, long before the industrial age
人はわずかなテクノロジーで
04:53
we've been affecting the planet on a global scale,
地球規模の影響を与えていたのです
04:56
with just a small amount of technology.
早期の人類が発明したもうひとつの物は火です
04:58
The other thing that the early man invented was fire.
火は空地を作るために使われ
ここでもまた
05:01
And fire was used to clear out, and again,
植物の生態系や大陸全体に
影響しました
05:03
affected the ecology of grass and whole continents,
また料理にも使われました
05:07
and was used in cooking.
多種多様な物を食べられるようにし
05:10
It enabled us to actually eat all kinds of things.
マクルーハン風に言うなら
05:12
It was sort of, in a certain sense, in a McLuhan sense,
体外の胃袋のようなものだったのです
05:14
an external stomach,
つまりこれがなければ食べられない物を
食べられるようにした
05:17
in the sense that it was cooking food that we could not eat otherwise.
火がなかったら 人は生存できなかったでしょう
05:20
And if we don't have fire, we actually could not live.
人の体はこの新しい食事法に適応しました
05:23
Our bodies have adapted to these new diets.
過去1万年の間に人の体は変化しました
05:26
Our bodies have changed in the last 10,000 years.
このようなわずかなテクノロジーで
05:29
So, with that little bit of technology,
人間はネアンデルタール人の数と同じ
05:32
humans went from a small band of 10,000 or so --
一万人から
急激に増加しました
05:34
the same number as Neanderthals everywhere --
言語が発明されたのは
05:36
and we suddenly exploded. With the invention of language
5万年前のことです
05:38
around 50,000 years ago,
人の数は急増し
05:40
the number of humans exploded,
瞬く間に地球の支配的種族となりました
05:42
and very quickly became the dominant species on the planet.
彼らは一年に2キロメートルの速度で
地球全体に移住を続け
05:45
And they migrated into the rest of the world at two kilometers per year
何万年もの間に
05:49
until, within several tens of thousands of years,
人は地球上すべての流域を占領し
05:52
we occupied every single watershed on the planet
非常にわずかのテクノロジーを使って
05:54
and became the most dominant species,
もっとも優勢的な種族となりました
05:56
with a very small amount of technology.
8千年から1万年前に
05:58
And even at that time, with the introduction of agriculture,
農業が導入された時期からすでに
06:01
8,000, 10,000 years ago
気候変動が見られ始めていました
06:03
we started to see climate change.
つまり気候変動は新しくないのです
06:05
So, climate change is not a new thing.
新しいのはその度合いです
06:07
What's new is just the degree of it. Even during
農耕時代でさえ気候変動はありました
06:09
the agricultural age there was climate change.
わずかなテクノロジーでも既に
06:12
And so, already small amounts of technology
世界は変えられていたのです
06:14
were transforming the world.
ここで言おうとしているのは
06:16
And what this means, and where I'm going, is that
テクノロジーは
世界で一番強力な力となっていることです
06:18
technology has become the most powerful force in the world.
今日ここに見る
06:22
All the things that we see today
私たちの生活を変えていく物はすべて
06:24
that are changing our lives, we can always trace back
新しいテクノロジーの導入に遡る事ができます
06:26
to the introduction of some new technology.
これは 地球に解き放たれた力
06:28
So, it's a force that is the most powerful force
最も強い力となり
06:32
that has been unleashed on this planet,
私たち自身となったのです
06:34
and in such a degree that I think
私たち自身となったのです
06:37
that it's become our -- who we are.
実際 人間性そして
自分について考えるすべてのことは
06:42
In fact, our humanity, and everything that we think about ourselves
自分たちによって発明されたのです
06:45
is something that we've invented.
06:47
So, we've invented ourselves. Of all the animals that we have domesticated,
自分自身を発明したのです
飼いならした動物の中で
飼いならした一番大事な動物は
06:49
the most important animal that we've domesticated
私たち自身なのです
いいですか?
06:51
has been us. Okay?
人間性が最もすばらしい発明です
06:54
So, humanity is our greatest invention.
もちろんまた終わったわけではありません
06:57
But of course we're not done yet.
今でも発明しています
テクノロジーはこれを可能にしました
06:59
We're still inventing, and this is what technology is allowing us to do --
繰り返し自分自身を再発明することです
07:02
it's continually to reinvent ourselves.
とてつもなく強い力です
07:05
It's a very, very strong force.
この物全体を
私たち人間はテクノロジーと呼びます
07:07
I call this entire thing -- us humans as our technology,
作られた全ての物
生活の中の小物を
07:10
everything that we've made, gadgets in our lives --
テクニアムと呼んでいます
それがこの世界です
07:13
we call that the technium. That's this world.
人が作る便利なもの
07:15
My working definition of technology
それがテクノロジーである
というのが私の定義です
07:17
is "anything useful that a human mind makes."
金槌やパソコンといった器具だけではありません
07:20
It's not just hammers and gadgets, like laptops.
勿論 法律や都市も
07:22
But it's also law. And of course cities are ways to make
人にとって便利です
07:27
things more useful to us.
人によって考案された物も
07:29
While this is something that comes from our mind,
宇宙に深く
07:31
it also has its roots deeply
根ざしています
07:34
into the cosmos.
過去に遡ります
テクノロジーの源泉とルーツは
07:36
It goes back. The origins and roots of technology
ビッグバンに遡ります
07:38
go back to the Big Bang,
この自己組織化されたつながりの
07:40
in this way, in that they are part of this
一部であり
07:42
self-organizing thread
ビッグバンから始まり
07:44
that starts at the Big Bang
銀河系と星々を駆け抜け
07:46
and goes through galaxies and stars,
生命 そして我々にたどり着くのです
07:49
into life, into us.
初期の宇宙の3段階は
07:51
And the three major phases of the early universe
支配的な力がエネルギーの時は
エネルギーでした
07:53
was energy, when the dominant force was energy;
それが冷却して行くと
支配的な力は物質となりました
07:55
then it became, the dominant force, as it cooled, became matter;
そして40億年前に生命が生まれ
07:58
and then, with the invention of life, four billion years ago,
地球での支配的な力は情報となりました
08:02
the dominant force in our neighborhood became information.
それが生命の持つ意味です
それは再構成し
08:04
That's what life is: It's an information process
新しい秩序を創り出す情報プロセスです
08:06
that was restructuring and making new order.
アインシュタインは
エネルギーと物質が
08:09
So, those energy, matter Einstein show
同等だと発見しました
08:12
were equivalent, and now new sciences
量子計算という新しい科学によると
08:15
of quantum computing show that entropy
エントロピー、情報、物質そしてエネルギーは
08:17
and information and matter and energy
全部関連し 連続体なのです
08:20
are all interrelated, so it's one long continuum.
エネルギーを正しい系の中に置くと
08:24
You put energy into the right kind of system
消費された熱、エントロピー
エクストロピーが排出されます
08:27
and out comes wasted heat, entropy
これが秩序なのです
08:30
and extropy, which is order.
秩序の増加です
08:33
It's the increased order.
根源はどこでしょうか?
太古に遡ります
08:35
Where does this order come from? Its roots go way back.
知っている人はいませんが
08:37
We actually don't know.
昔から宇宙全体に
08:39
But we do know that the self-organization trend
自己組織傾向があることは明らかで
08:42
throughout the universe is long,
銀河系のようなものから始まったことは
分かっています
08:44
and it began with things like galaxies;
08:46
they maintained their order for billions of years.
何十億年もの間この秩序を保ってきました
星は基本的に核融合装置であり
08:49
Stars are basically nuclear fusion machines
何十億年もの間自己組織し
自己維持してきました
08:53
that self-organize and self-sustain themselves for billions of years,
この秩序は世界のエントロピーに
抗うものです
08:56
this order against the entropy of the world.
花や植物は同じ事の延長線上にあります
08:58
And flowers and plants are the same thing, extended,
テクノロジーは基本的に
生命の延長線上にあります
09:04
and technology is basically an extension of life.
これらに見られる一つの傾向は
09:08
One trend that we notice in all those things is that
グラムあたり1秒間に通り抜ける
09:12
the amount of energy per gram per second
エネルギー量として増加しているのです
09:14
that flows through this, is actually increasing.
この小さな連鎖を通して
エネルギーの量は増加しています
09:17
The amount of energy is increasing through this little sequence.
毎グラム、毎秒ごとに生命を通過する
エネルギーの量は
09:22
And that the amount of energy per gram per second that flows through life
実は星よりも大きいのです
09:26
is actually greater than a star --
星は長い寿命を持っているからです
09:28
because of the star's long lifespan,
生命のもつエネルギー密度は
星よりも大きいのです
09:31
the energy density in life is actually higher than a star.
この宇宙で最大のエネルギー密度を
見られる場所は
09:34
And the energy density that we see in the greatest
実はPCチップです
09:37
of anywhere in the universe is actually in a PC chip.
そこを通り抜けるエネルギーは
09:40
There is more energy flowing through, per gram per second,
グラムあたり毎秒で比べれば
どこよりも多いのです
09:43
than anything that we have any other experience with.
ここで申し上げたいのは
テクノロジーがどこに
09:46
What I would suggest is that if you want to see
向かっているのかを見たいなら
この軌跡を見ればよいのです
09:49
where technology is going, we continue that trajectory,
さらにエネルギー密度が高くなるのは
何だろうと考えれば
09:52
and we say "Well what's going to become more energy-dense,
そこに向かうことになります
09:55
that's where it's going." And so what I've done
そこで同じような物を取りあげますが
09:57
is, I've taken the same kinds of things
進化する生命を違う角度から眺めて
09:59
and looked at other aspects
「進化する生命の一般的な傾向は何か」と
10:01
of evolutionary life and say,
考えました
10:03
"What are the general trends in evolutionary life?"
これらの物はより複雑に向かって進み
10:05
And there are things moving towards
より多様に、より特殊性を持ち
10:07
greater complexity, moving towards greater diversity,
知覚的に、偏在的に
10:09
moving towards greater specialization,
そして一番大事なのは 進化可能性です
10:12
sentience, ubiquity and most important, evolvability:
このようなことはテクノロジーにも存在します
10:16
Those very same things are also present in technology.
テクノロジーはそこに向かっているのです
10:20
That's where technology is going.
テクノロジーは実は生命の
10:22
In fact, technology is accelerating
あらゆる側面を加速します
10:24
all the aspects of life,
そうなっていることは分かりますね
生命の多様性の存在と同様に
10:27
and we can see that happening; just as there's diversity in life,
我々が作るものも多様性は増します
10:30
there's more diversity in things we make.
生命は一般的な細胞から始まり
10:33
Things in life start out being general cell,
特殊なものに変化します
人は組織細胞を持ち
10:35
and they become specialized: You have tissue cells,
筋肉、脳細胞を持っています
同じ事は
10:37
you have muscle, brain cells. And same things happens with
例えば金槌にも起こり
最初は一般的な形で
10:39
say, a hammer, which is general at first
徐々に特殊になっていきます
10:41
and becomes more specific.
生命には6つの界がありますが
10:43
So, I would like to say that while there is six kingdoms of life,
テクノロジーは根本的に
10:46
we can think of technology basically
生命 7つ目の界といえるでしょう
10:48
as a seventh kingdom of life.
人間の姿から分かれた枝の一つです
10:50
It's a branching off from the human form.
しかしテクノロジーは
生命や他のものと同じように
10:52
But technology has its own agenda,
10:54
like anything, like life itself.
それ自体の行動目的をもっています
例えば 今私達が使っているエネルギーの3/4は
10:56
For instance, right now, three-quarters of the energy that we use
テクノロジーのために使われています
10:59
is actually used to feed the technium itself.
交通は 人を動かすのではなく
11:01
In transportation, it's not to move us, it's to move
人が作ったものを動かします
11:03
the stuff that we make or buy.
「欲する」と言いましょう
テクノロジーは「欲する」のです
11:05
I use the word "want." Technology wants.
11:07
This is a robot that wants to plug itself in to get more power.
ロボットはパワーを求めて
電源ケーブルを欲するのです
あなたの猫はもっと餌を欲します
11:10
Your cat wants more food.
細菌は意識がなくとも
11:12
A bacterium, which has no consciousness at all,
光に向かうことを欲します
11:15
wants to move towards light.
衝動に駆られるのです
テクノロジーは衝動に駆られるのです
11:17
It has an urge, and technology has an urge.
同時に 人に物を与えたいと感じます
11:20
At the same time, it wants to give us things,
人に与える物は基本的に進歩です
11:22
and what it gives us is basically progress.
変化は
すべて進歩を目指します
11:25
You can take all kinds of curves, and they're all pointing up.
それにかかる費用さえ無視すれば
11:27
There's really no dispute about progress,
進歩について論争の余地はありません
11:30
if we discount the cost of that.
その費用の問題が多くの人を困らせています
11:33
And that's the thing that bothers most people,
確かに進歩があったときに
11:35
is that progress is really real,
悩ましいのは 環境面での費用は
どれほどかという問いです
11:37
but we wonder and question: What are the environmental costs of it?
家にある人工物の数を調べて見ました
11:41
I did a survey of a number of species of artifacts in my house,
6千でした
1万くらいだという人もいます
11:45
and there's 6,000. Other people have come up with 10,000.
英国王ヘンリーが死んだとき
11:48
When King Henry of England died,
家には1万8千個の品物がありました
11:51
he had 18,000 things in his house,
それは英国の全資産でした
11:53
but that was the entire wealth of England.
英国全土の資産を持ってしても
11:56
And with that entire wealth of England,
ヘンリー王は抗生物質を買えませんでした
12:00
King Henry could not buy any antibiotics,
冷蔵庫も買えず 1千マイルの旅も買えませんでした
12:03
he could not buy refrigeration, he could not buy a trip of a thousand miles.
しかし このインドの車夫は
12:06
Whereas this rickshaw wale in India
金をためて抗生物質を買う事ができますし
12:09
could save up and buy antibiotics
冷蔵庫も買えます
12:11
and he could buy refrigeration.
ヘンリー王が全資産でも買えないものを
買う事が出来るのです
12:13
He could buy things that King Henry, in all his wealth, could never buy.
それが進歩です
12:16
That's what progress is about.
テクノロジーはわがままであり
寛大です
12:18
So, technology is selfish; technology is generous.
この対立と緊張は永遠に人と共にあるでしょう
12:21
That conflict, that tension, will be with us forever,
時に自分の欲する事を行い
12:24
that sometimes it wants to do what it wants to do,
時には人のために働きます
12:26
and sometimes it's going to do things for us.
新しいテクノロジーをどう考えればよいのか
ということは混乱しています
12:28
We have confusion about what we should think about a new technology.
今新しいテクノロジーが現れた時の
12:32
Right now the default position about when
デフォルトの考え方は
12:34
a new technology comes along, is we --
「予防原則」です
12:36
people talk about the precautionary principle,
これは欧州で非常に一般的なことです
12:38
which is very common in Europe,
基本的に新しいテクノロジーを見たら
12:41
which says, basically, "Don't do anything. When you meet a new
「何もするな」と言っているわけです
12:43
technology, stop,
危険が無いということがはっきりするまで
12:45
until it can be proven that there's no harm."
これでは何もできないと思います
12:47
I think that really leads nowhere.
もっと良い方法は
「推進原則」だと思います
12:50
But a better way is to, what I call proactionary principle,
つまり テクノロジーに関与して
12:52
which is: You engage with technology.
試してみてください
12:55
You try it out.
予防原則から考えられることも行います
12:57
You obviously do what the precautionary principle suggests,
予測を試み
ただ予測した後は
13:01
you try to anticipate it, but after anticipating it,
一度ならず
13:03
you constantly asses it,
いつまでも検証を続けます
13:05
not just once, but eternally.
期待するものから外れてきたら
13:07
And when it diverts from what you want,
リスクを優先順位づけ
新しい物だけではなく
13:10
we prioritize risk, we evaluate not just
古い物も再評価します
13:12
the new stuff, but the old stuff.
課題に対処し
また転用することも重要です
13:14
We fix it, but most importantly, we relocate it.
どういう意味かというと
13:17
And what I mean by that is that
それに新しい任務を見つけることです
13:19
we find a new job for it.
核分裂エネルギーは
13:21
Nuclear energy, fission, is really bad idea
爆弾には向きません
13:23
for bombs.
しかし それを他のところ
13:25
But it may be a pretty good idea
石炭ではなく 持続可能な核エネルギーを
13:27
relocated into sustainable nuclear energy
発電に使うのはとても良い考えだと思います
13:30
for electricity, instead of burning coal.
悪いアイデアがあった時
このアイデアに対する反応は
13:33
When we have a bad idea, the response to a bad idea
無アイデアではなく
考え続けることです
13:36
is not no ideas, it's not to stop thinking.
悪いアイデアへの反応は
13:39
The response to a bad idea --
例えばタングステン電球のように
13:41
like, say, a tungsten light bulb --
良い発案ではないでしょうか
13:44
is a better idea. OK?
人の嫌うテクノロジーに対抗する
13:46
So, better ideas is really -- always the response
良いアイデアが
13:50
to technology that we don't like
基本的に良いテクノロジーとなるのです
13:51
is basically, better technology.
テクノロジーは
13:54
And actually, in a certain sense, technology
考えようによっては
13:56
is a kind of a method for generating better ideas,
良いアイデアを生む手段です
13:59
if you can think about it that way.
穀物にDDTを撒く事は
非常に悪い考えかもしれません
14:01
So, maybe spraying DDT on crops is a really bad idea.
しかし マラリアを絶滅させるためには
14:04
But DDT sprayed on local homes,
家でDDTを染み込ませた蚊帳を使うのが
14:07
there's nothing better to eliminate malaria,
一番良い方法です
14:10
besides insect DDT-impregnated mosquito nets.
非常に良いアイデアであり
テクノロジーのお手柄です
14:14
But that's a really good idea; that's a good job for technology.
私達 人としての仕事は
14:17
So, our job as humans is to
「思考の子供」を育て
14:19
parent our mind children,
彼らに良い友達を見つけ
14:21
to find them good friends,
良い仕事を見つけることです
14:23
to find them a good job.
すべてのテクノロジーは
見合う仕事を
14:25
And so, every technology is sort of a creative force
見つける創造的な力です
14:27
looking for the right job.
ここにいる息子です
14:29
That's actually my son, right here.
(笑)
14:31
(Laughter)
悪いテクノロジーはありません
14:32
There are no bad technologies,
悪い子供がいないのと同じです
14:35
just as there are no bad children.
子供が中立的だとか
肯定的だとは言いません
14:37
We don't say children are neutral, children are positive.
正しい場所を見つけてあげる
必要があるだけです
14:39
We just have to find them the right place.
長い時間の 進化の延長線上から
14:42
And so, what technology gives us,
時間の始まりから
14:45
over the long term, over the sort of
植物と動物の出現を通して
14:47
extended evolution -- from the beginning of time,
そして生命の進化
脳の進化を通して
14:49
through the invention of the plants and animals,
テクノロジーは人に
14:53
and the evolution of life, the evolution of brains --
ますます多くの違いを
14:56
what that is constantly giving us
与えてきました
14:58
is increasing differences:
多様性を増やし
選択肢を増やし
15:00
It's increasing diversity, it's increasing options,
候補と機会
15:02
it's increasing choices, opportunities,
可能性そして自由を増やします
15:04
possibilities and freedoms.
ずっとテクノロジーから
15:06
That's what we get from technology
受け取っていました
人が村から出て
15:09
all the time. That's why people leave villages
都市に行くのも
常に増加する選択肢と
15:11
and go into cities, is because they are always
可能性を求めての結果です
15:13
gravitating towards increased choices and possibilities.
その代償にも気付いています
15:17
And we are aware of the price.
代償を払いますが
そのことにも気付いています
15:20
We pay a price for that, but we are aware of it, and generally
人は増加した自由
15:22
we will pay the price for increased freedoms,
選択そして機会に
対価を払うものです
15:24
choices and opportunities.
テクノロジーさえ
きれいな水を要求します
15:27
Even technology wants clean water.
テクノロジーは自然と
15:30
Is technology diametrically opposed
正反対なのでしょうか?
15:32
to nature?
テクノロジーは生命の延長線上にあるので
15:34
Because technology is an extension of life,
生命が必要とする物と
15:37
it's in parallel and aligned with the same things
平行して同じ物を必要とします
15:39
that life wants.
それが許されれば
15:42
So that I think technology loves biology,
テクノロジーは生物学を好むはずです
15:44
if we allow it to.
何十億年も前から始まった生命という動きは
15:46
Great movement that is starting billions of years ago
人を貫き 今も動き続けています
15:50
is moving through us and it continues to go,
テクノロジーに関して
15:52
and our choice, so to speak,
人は 自分達よりずっと大きな
この力との
15:55
in technology, is really to align ourselves
共調を選ぶべきです
15:57
with this force much greater than ourselves.
テクノロジーはポケットに入っている物や
ガジェット以上のものです
15:59
So, technology is more than just the stuff in your pocket.
人が発明した以上のものです
16:02
It's more than just gadgets; it's more than just things that people invent.
これは何十億年も前に始まった
長い生命の物語
16:05
It's actually part of a very long story,
偉大な物語の一部なのです
16:08
a great story, that began billions of years ago.
自己組織化する人間を貫く物語であり
16:11
And it's moving through us, this self-organization,
我々はそれを拡張し
加速させているのです
16:13
and we're extending and accelerating it,
その物語から人が創り出すテクノロジーと
16:15
and we can be part of it by aligning the technology
共調することでその物語の一部となれるのです
16:17
that we make with it.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
16:19
I really appreciate your attention today. Thank you.
(拍手)
16:23
(Applause)
Translated by yusi SHANG
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Kevin Kelly - Digital visionary
There may be no one better to contemplate the meaning of cultural change than Kevin Kelly, whose life story reads like a treatise on the value and impacts of technology.

Why you should listen

Kelly has been publisher of the Whole Earth Review, executive editor at Wired magazine (which he co-founded, and where he now holds the title of Senior Maverick), founder of visionary nonprofits and writer on biology, business and “cool tools.” He’s renounced all material things save his bicycle (which he then rode 3,000 miles), founded an organization (the All-Species Foundation) to catalog all life on Earth, championed projects that look 10,000 years into the future (at the Long Now Foundation), and more. He’s admired for his acute perspectives on technology and its relevance to history, biology and society. His new book, The Inevitable, just published, explores 12 technological forces that will shape our future.

More profile about the speaker
Kevin Kelly | Speaker | TED.com