16:59
TEDMED 2009

Eric Topol: The wireless future of medicine

エリク・トポル:無線通信を使うこれからの医療

Filmed:

エリク・トポルは、近いうちにスマートフォンを使って生命徴候や慢性疾患を確認するようになると説き、TEDMEDではこれからの医療で特に役立つ無線通信機器をいくつか紹介しています。これらの機器を使えば、病院のベッドで寝なくてすむ人がもっと増えるでしょう。

- Cardiologist and geneticist
Eric Topol is a leading cardiologist who has embraced the study of genomics and the latest advances in technology to treat chronic disease. Full bio

Does anybody know when the stethoscope was invented?
聴診器が発明されたのがいつかご存知の人はいますか
00:15
Any guesses? 1816.
誰かご存知ですか 1816年です
00:20
And what I can say is, in 2016,
私の予測では、2016年には
00:23
doctors aren't going to be walking around with stethoscopes.
医師は聴診器を持ち歩かなくなるでしょう
00:26
There's a whole lot better technology coming,
もっと優れた技術が生まれているのです
00:28
and that's part of the change in medicine.
それが医療の変化の一役を担っているのです
00:30
What has changed our society
この社会を変えてきたもの
00:33
has been wireless devices.
それは無線通信機器です
00:36
But the future are digital medical wireless devices, OK?
でもこれからは医療用の無線通信機器です
00:38
So, let me give you some examples of this
では、いくつか例を紹介しましょう
00:43
to kind of make this much more concrete.
もっと具体的に理解していただくためです
00:45
This is the first one. This is an electrocardiogram.
まずはこちらです 心電図です
00:48
And, as a cardiologist, to think that you could see in real time
心臓専門医としては、リアルタイムで
00:51
a patient, an individual, anywhere in the world
患者個人が世界のどこにいるかにかかわらず
00:54
on your smartphone,
医師側のスマートフォンで見ることができて
00:57
watching your rhythm -- that's incredible,
患者の調律が分かるのは信じがたいことです
00:59
and it's with us today.
これはもう実現しています
01:01
But that's just the beginning.
ただ、これはまだ序章にすぎません
01:03
You check your email while you're sitting here.
皆さんはここに座っている間にもメールを確認しますよね
01:06
In the future you're going to be checking all your vital signs,
でも将来的には、あらゆるバイタルサインを確認するようになります
01:09
all your vital signs: your heart rhythm,
全てのバイタルサインです 心臓の鼓動や
01:13
your blood pressure, your oxygen, your temperature, etc.
血圧、酸素、体温などです
01:15
This is already available today.
これはすでに実現しています
01:19
This is AirStrip Technologies.
エアストリップテクノロジーズ社です
01:21
It's now wired -- or I should say, wireless --
もうつながっているのです もちろん無線通信で
01:23
by taking the aggregate of these signals
先ほどのような信号を集約し
01:27
in the hospital, in the intensive care unit,
病院や集中治療室でですが、
01:29
and putting it on a smartphone for physicians.
医師のスマートフォンにそれが表示されます
01:31
If you're an expectant parent,
もうすぐ子供が生まれるなら
01:34
what about the ability to monitor, continuously,
こんな計測機能はどうでしょう 継続的に
01:36
fetal heart rate, or intrauterine contractions,
胎児の心拍数や子宮の収縮を計測します
01:39
and not having to worry so much that things are
そうすれば心配しすぎずに
01:42
fine as the pregnancy,
妊娠経過が良好であるとわかり
01:45
and moving over into the time of delivery?
出産のときを迎えるのです
01:47
And then as we go further,
では、さらに話を進めましょう
01:50
today we have continuous glucose sensors.
今でも連続測定用のグルコース・センサーはありますが
01:53
Right now, they are under the skin,
今はそれを皮膚の下に埋めています
01:55
but in the future, they won't have to be implanted.
でも将来的には埋め込む必要がなくなります
01:57
And of course, the desired range -- trying to keep glucose
グルコースを理想的な範囲、つまり
02:01
between 75 and less than 200,
75から200未満の間に維持するために
02:03
checking it every five minutes in a continuous glucose sensor --
連続計測できるグルコースセンサーで5分毎に計測します
02:07
you'll see how that can impact diabetes.
それを見れば糖尿病にどれくらい影響するかわかります
02:10
And what about sleep?
睡眠はどうでしょうか
02:12
We're going to zoom in on that a little bit.
少しこの点に注目してみましょう
02:14
We're supposed to spend a third of our life in sleep.
人生の3分の1は寝ていることになります
02:16
What if, on your phone,
もし手元の電話に、
02:18
which will be available in the next few weeks,
これから数週間のうちに利用できるのですが、
02:20
you had every minute of your sleep displayed?
毎分の睡眠状態が表示されるとすればどうでしょう
02:22
And this is, of course, as you can see, the awake is the orange.
ご覧のように、覚醒状態がオレンジ色です
02:25
The REM sleep, rapid eye movement,
急速眼球運動するレム睡眠、つまり
02:28
dream state, is in light green;
夢を見ている状態は、薄緑色です
02:30
and light is gray, light sleep;
浅い眠りは、灰色です
02:32
and deep sleep, the best restorative sleep,
熟睡状態つまり最良の回復睡眠は
02:34
is that dark green.
暗い緑色です
02:36
How about counting every calorie?
カロリーを全て計算するのはどうでしょう
02:38
And this is ability, in real time, to actually take
これは、リアルタイムに
02:40
measurements of caloric intake
カロリー摂取量を実際に計測できます
02:43
as well as expenditure, through a Band-Aid.
もちろん消費量も 計測にはバンドエイドのようなものを使います
02:45
Now, what I've talked about are physiologic metrics.
ここまでは生理的な数値指標についてお話してきました
02:48
But what I want to get to, the next frontier,
でも私がお話ししたいのは次世代の領域です
02:51
very quickly, and why the stethoscope
手早くお話ししますが、なぜ、聴診器が
02:54
is on its way out,
消えようとしているのでしょうか
02:56
is because we can transcend listening to the valve sounds,
腸管音や呼吸音を聞くより優れた方法があるからです
02:58
and the breath sounds, because now,
最近、
03:02
introduced by G.E. is a handheld ultra-sound.
G. E. が携帯型の超音波検査装置を発表したのです
03:04
Why is this important? Because this is so much more sensitive.
これがなぜ重要なのでしょうか それは、はるかに高感度だからです
03:07
Here is an example of an abdominal ultrasound,
こちらは腹部超音波検査装置の一例です
03:10
and also a cardiac echo, which can be sent wireless,
心臓超音波検査装置もあり、これは無線で通信します
03:13
and then there's an example of fetal monitoring on your smartphone.
スマートフォンで胎児を観察するものもあります
03:17
So, we're not just talking about physiologic metrics --
ここで取り上げているのは、生理的な数値指標だけではありませんし
03:21
the key measurements of vital signs,
バイタルサインの主要データだけでもありません
03:24
and all those things in physiology -- but also all the imaging
生理的なものだけではなく、スマートフォンで見ることができる
03:27
that one could look at in your smartphone.
種々の動画像も含んでいます
03:30
Now, this is an example of another obsolete technology,
これも時代遅れな技術の一例です
03:32
soon to be buried: the Holter Monitor.
そのうち使われなくなるホルター心電計です
03:36
Twenty-four hour recording, lots of wires.
24時間記録するもので、配線が多いですね
03:38
This is now a little tiny patch.
でも今はこのようなとても小さなパッチに収まります
03:40
You can put it on for two weeks
2週間付けておくことができますし
03:42
and send it in the mail.
メールで信号を送信することができます
03:44
Now, how does this work? Well,
では、どのように動作するのでしょう
03:47
there is these smart Band-Aids or these sensors
こちらのようなしゃれたバンドエイドや
03:49
that one would put on, on a shoe or on the wrist.
靴や手首に装着するセンサーなどがあります
03:51
And this sends a signal
これが信号を送信します
03:54
and it creates a body area network to a gateway.
体の周辺に、ゲートウェイにつながるネットワークを構成します
03:57
Gateway could be a smartphone or it could be a dedicated gateway,
スマートフォンを使ったゲートウェイでもいいですし、専用のゲートウェイでもかまいません
04:01
as today many of these things are dedicated gateways,
今はこの手のものは専用のゲートウェイを使います
04:04
because they are not so well integrated.
あまりうまく統合されていないからです
04:06
That signal goes to the web, the cloud,
信号はウェブすなわちクラウドに送信され
04:08
and then it can be processed and sent anywhere:
必要な処理をしたり、どこかに送信したりすることができます
04:11
to a caregiver, to a physician,
介護士に送信したり、医師に送信したり
04:13
back to the patient, etc.
患者に返信したりできます
04:15
So, that's basically very simplistic technology
まあ、これは大筋で非常に単純化した
04:17
of how this works.
技術的な動作説明です
04:20
Now, I have this device on.
いま、私はこの装置を身に着けています
04:22
I didn't want to take my shirt off to show you, but I can tell you it's on.
シャツを脱いでお見せするのはいやですが、脱がなくても説明できます
04:24
This is a device that not only measures cardiac rhythm,
この装置は心調律を測定するだけではありません
04:27
as you saw already,
それはもうご覧いただきましたね
04:31
but it also goes well beyond that.
それ以上のことができます
04:33
This is me now. And you can see the ECG.
これは私のデータです 心電図が見えますね
04:36
Below that's the actual heart rate and the trend;
その下のは実際の心電図とトレンドです
04:39
to the right of that is a bioconductant.
その右側は生体電気特性です
04:42
That's the fluid status,
体液状態を示します
04:44
fluid status, that's really important
体液状態が非常に重要なのは
04:46
if you're monitoring somebody with heart failure.
心不全の人を監視するときです
04:48
And below that's temperature,
下は体温です
04:50
and respiration, and oxygen,
そして、呼吸作用と酸素を示しています
04:52
and then the position activity.
それから姿勢動作です
04:54
So, this is really striking, because this device
この装置は本当にすごいんです なぜならこの装置は、
04:56
measures seven things
7項目を測定し
04:59
that are very much vital signs
それがまさにバイタルサインであり
05:01
for monitoring someone with heart failure. OK?
心不全の人を監視するために使えるのです よろしいでしょうか
05:04
And why is this important? Well,
なぜこれが重要なのでしょうか
05:08
this is the most expensive bed.
これは最も高価なベッドです
05:10
What if we could reduce the need for hospital beds?
病院のベッドの需要を減らせるとしたらどうでしょう
05:13
Well, we can. First of all, heart failure
でも、できないのです まず第1に
05:16
is the number one reason
わが国の入院や再入院の理由としては
05:18
for hospital admissions and readmissions in this country.
心不全が一番多いのです
05:21
The cost of heart failure is 37 billion dollars a year,
年間370億ドルが心不全に費やされています
05:24
which is 80 percent related to hospitalization.
その80%が入院に関連しています
05:29
And in the course of 30 days after a hospital stay
入院後30日のうちに
05:32
for a Medicare greater than 65 years or older,
メディケアの対象となる場合ですが
05:35
is -- 27 percent are readmitted in 30 days,
65才以上の27%が30日以内に再入院するのです
05:38
and by six months, over 56 percent are readmitted.
それでなくても、6か月を超えると、56%が再入院します
05:41
So, can we improve that? Well the idea is
では、改善はできるのでしょうか その方法は
05:45
we take this device that I'm wearing,
私が身に着けているこの装置を使うことです
05:47
and we put it on 600 patients with heart failure,
600人の心不全患者にこれを付けます
05:49
randomly assigned, versus 600 patients
無作為に選んだ人です これに対して、別の600人の患者には
05:53
who don't have active monitoring,
能動的な監視を行いません
05:55
and see whether we can reduce heart failure readmissions,
そうして心不全による入院を減らせるか調べます
05:57
and that's exciting. And we'll start that trial,
面白そうですから、試してみるつもりです
06:00
and you'll hear more about how we're going to do that,
その時には詳細をお話できると思います
06:02
but that's a type of wireless device trial
無線通信機器を使った実験の一種で
06:04
that could change medicine in the years ahead.
ここ数年のうちに医療の変革をもたらす可能性があるものです
06:07
Why now? Why has this all of a sudden become
なぜいま なぜこれが突然
06:10
a reality, an exciting direction in the future of medicine?
実現し、これからの医療にとって興味深い目標となるのでしょうか
06:13
What we have is, in a way, a perfect positive storm.
現在の状況は、ある意味、完全に理想的な流れといえます
06:17
This sets up consumer-driven healthcare.
これが利用者主体の健康管理を築くのです
06:21
That's where this is all starting.
すべての始まりはここからです
06:23
Let me just give you specifics about why this is
もしお気づきでなければ、なぜこれが
06:25
a big movement if you're not aware of it:
大きな流れなのかご説明しましょう
06:28
1.2 million Americans
120万人のアメリカ人が
06:30
have gotten a Nike shoe, which is a body-area network
ナイキの靴を履いたことがあります これは体の周辺にネットワークを構築し
06:32
that connects the shoe, the sole of the shoe to the iPhone, or an iPod.
靴や靴のかかとをiPhoneやiPodに接続するものです
06:35
And this Wired Magazine cover article
ワイヤードマガジンの記事には
06:39
really captured a lot of this; it talked a lot about the Nike shoe
これに関して多く記載されています ナイキの靴について多くの記述があり
06:41
and how quickly that's been adopted to monitor exercise physiology
運動中の生理機能の監視や、エネルギー消費量の監視に
06:44
and energy expenditure.
いかに早くから採用されてきたか記載されています
06:47
Here are some things, the principles
ここで、いくつかの理念を紹介します
06:49
that are guiding principles to keep in mind:
覚えておくとよい指針となる理念です
06:51
"A data-driven health revolution
「データに基づく健康管理という変革は
06:53
promises to make us all
確実に私たちを
06:55
better, faster, and stronger. Living by numbers."
より快適で、気ままで、丈夫にする 数字を指針に生きることだ」
06:57
And this one, which is really telling,
そしてこちらは実に深い言葉です
07:00
this was from July, this cover article:
こちらは7月の表紙の記事です
07:02
"The personal metrics movement goes way beyond
「個人の数値指標を使う流れは、食事療法や運動よりはるかに優れており
07:05
diet and exercise. It's about tracking every facet
眠りから、心的状態や痛みまで
07:08
of life, from sleep to mood to pain,
生活のあらゆる側面を追跡するものだ
07:11
24/7/365."
24時間、7日間、365日ずっと」
07:13
Well, I tried this device.
私はこの装置を試してみました
07:16
A lot of you have gotten that Phillips Direct Life.
皆さんの多くはフィリップス社のディレクトライフを持っているでしょう
07:19
I didn't have one of those,
私はディレクトライフは持っていないのですが
07:22
but I got the Fitbit.
フィットビットなら持っています
07:24
That looks like this.
このようなものです
07:26
It's like a wireless accelerometer, pedometer.
無線の加速度計とか万歩計みたいなものです
07:28
And I want to just give you the results of that testing,
使ってみた結果をお話しします
07:31
because I wanted to understand about the consumer movement.
消費者の動向を理解したいからです
07:33
I hope the, by the way, the Phillips Direct Life works better --
でも、フィリップス社のディレクトライフのほうが良いと思います
07:36
I hope so.
そうだといいのですが
07:38
But this monitors food, it monitors activity and tracks weight.
これは食べ物と行動を計測し、体重を記録します
07:40
However you have to put in most of this stuff.
でも、ほとんど自分で入力しなければなりません
07:44
The only thing it really tracks by itself is activity,
この装置が記録するのは実際は運動だけです
07:46
and even then, it's not complete.
それさえ、十分ではないのですが
07:49
So, you exercise and it picks up the exercise.
運動するとこの装置が検知します
07:51
You put in your height and weight, it calculates BMI,
身長と体重を入力するとBMIを計算してくれます
07:54
and of course it tells you how many calories you're expending
それから運動によるカロリー消費量を表示します
07:57
from the exercise, and how many you took in,
摂取量も表示してくれます
08:00
if you go in and enter all the foods.
でも、食べたものをここに全部入力する必要があります
08:03
But it really wants you to enter all your activity.
このシステムでは自分の行動を全て入力する必要があります
08:04
And so I went to this,
それで、私もやってみたのですが
08:07
and of course I was gratified that it picked up
42分の運動を検知してくれたので、もちろん満足しました
08:10
the 42 minutes of exercise, elliptical exercise I did,
やったのは楕円軌道を描くペダリング運動です
08:12
but then it wants more information.
でもこのシステムではもっと多くの情報を必要としています
08:16
So, it says, "You want to log sexual activity.
こう聞かれます 「性生活を記録しよう
08:18
How long did you do it for?"
どれぐらいの時間しましたか」
08:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:23
And it says, "How hard was it?"
こうも聞いています 「どれくらい大変でしたか」
08:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:29
Furthermore it says, "Start time."
更には「開始時間」も入力させようとしています
08:30
Now, this doesn't appear -- this just doesn't work,
でも、これは...あまり役に立ちません
08:33
I mean, this just doesn't work.
そう、あまり役に立たないのです
08:35
So, now I want to move to sleep.
では、睡眠の場合についてお話しましょう
08:37
Who would ever have thought you could have your own EEG
家庭に個人用の脳波計を置くようになるなんて誰も想像していませんでした
08:39
at your home, tagged to a very nice alarm clock, by the way?
ちなみに素敵な目覚まし時計に組み込まれていますね
08:42
This is the headband that goes with this alarm clock.
こちらは先ほどの目覚まし時計と一体になったヘッドバンドで
08:45
It monitors your brainwaves continuously, when you're sleeping.
睡眠中に連続的に脳波を計測します
08:48
So, I did this thing for seven days
私は7日間使ってみました
08:51
getting ready for TEDMed.
TEDMedに備えるためです
08:53
This is an important part of our life, one-third you're supposed to be sleeping.
睡眠は生活にとって重要な要素です 3分の1は寝ているのですから
08:55
Of course how many here
ところで 睡眠に問題をお持ちの方は
08:58
have any problems with sleeping?
どれくらい いらっしゃるでしょうか?
09:00
It's usually 90 percent. So, you tell me you sleep better than expected.
通常は90%ぐらいなのですが、皆さんは思いのほか良く眠れているようですね
09:04
Okay, well this was a week of
では、こちらは1週間にわたる
09:07
my life in sleeping,
私の睡眠生活を示しています
09:10
and you get a Z.Q. score. Instead of an I.Q. score,
Z.Q.値を示しています I.Q.値ではありませんよ
09:12
you get a Z.Q. score when you wake up.
Z.Q.値は起きる時に獲得します
09:15
You say, "Oh, OK." And a Z.Q. score
「それなら分かる」と言うでしょうね
09:17
is adjusted to age,
Z.Q.値は年齢に合わせて調整されています
09:19
and you want to get as high as you possibly can.
できるだけ高い値を獲得したほうがよいでしょう
09:21
So this is the moment-by-moment,
こちらは時間を追って
09:24
or minute-by-minute sleep.
1分ごとの睡眠を示しています
09:26
And you see that Z.Q. there was 80-odd.
そこに表示されたZ.Q値は80過ぎですね
09:28
And the wake time is in orange.
覚醒状態の時はオレンジ色です
09:31
And this can be a problem, as I learned.
これは問題を引き起こす可能性があると気づきました
09:34
Because it not only helps you with quantifying
このシステムは
09:37
your sleep,
睡眠を定量化してくれるだけではなく
09:39
but also tells others you're awake.
起きていることを他の人に知らせてもくれるのです
09:41
So, when my wife came in and she
妻が現れて
09:44
could tell you're awake.
起きてるでしょうと話しかけることも出来たのです
09:47
"Eric, I want to talk. I want to talk."
「エリック、話をしたいの 話をしたいの」
09:49
And I'm trying to play possum.
でも、私は狸寝入りをしているんです
09:51
This thing is very, very impressive.
これは、すごく印象的です
09:53
OK. So, that's the first night.
さて、これは最初の夜です
09:56
And this one is now 67,
この時は67です
09:59
and that's not a good score.
あまり良い値ではありません
10:01
And this tells you, of course, how much you had in REM sleep,
もちろん、レム睡眠時の値や
10:03
in deep sleep, and all this sort of thing.
深い眠りの時の値など、全ての状態について値を表示してくれます
10:05
This was really fascinating because
とても興味をそそられますね
10:07
this gave that quantitation
なぜなら、睡眠のあらゆる段階を
10:09
about all the different phases of sleep.
定量化してくれるからです
10:11
So, it also then tells you how you do compared to your age group.
それから、同世代の人たちと比べてどうなのか教えてくれます
10:13
It's like a managed competition of sleep.
管理された睡眠コンテストのようなものです
10:16
And really interesting stuff.
本当に面白いものです
10:19
Look at this thing and say, "Well, I didn't think I was a very good sleeper,
こちらを見てこう言いましょう 「良く眠れているとは思っていなかったけど
10:23
but actually I did better than average in 50 to 60 year olds." OK?
実際には、50から60才の平均より良いな」
10:26
And the key thing was, what I didn't know,
重要なのは、自分では気づかなかったのに
10:31
was that I was a really good dreamer.
実によく夢を見ていたことです
10:33
OK. Now let's move from sleep to diseases.
では、睡眠の話から病気の話に変えましょう
10:35
Eighty percent of Americans have chronic disease,
80%のアメリカ人が慢性疾患を抱えています
10:40
or 80 percent of age greater than 65 have
65才を過ぎた80%の人が
10:43
two or more chronic disease,
2つ以上の慢性疾患を抱えています
10:46
140 million Americans
1億4千万人のアメリカ人が
10:48
have one or more chronic disease,
1つ以上の慢性疾患を抱えています
10:50
and 80 percent of our 1.5, whatever, trillion
1.5兆の支出の80%が
10:52
expenditures are related to chronic disease.
慢性疾患に関連しているのです
10:57
Now, diabetes is one of the big ones.
糖尿病はその中でも多い方です
10:59
Almost 24 million people have diabetes.
2400万人近くが糖尿病です
11:01
And here is the latest map. It was published
こちらは最新の地図で
11:04
just a little more than a week ago in the New York Times,
1週間ちょっと前にニューヨークタイムズに載っていたものです
11:06
and it isn't looking good.
良いようには見えませんね
11:09
That is, for men, 29 percent
男性の場合、国内で60才を過ぎた人の29%が
11:11
in the country over 60 have Type II diabetes,
2型糖尿病を患っています
11:14
and women, although it's less, it's terribly high.
女性の場合、男性よりは少ないですが、すごく多いですね
11:17
But of course we have a way to measure that now
でも、これを継続して計測する手段があるのですが
11:20
on a continuous basis,
それには、
11:22
with a sensor that detects blood glucose,
血糖値を計測するセンサーを使用します
11:24
and it's important because we could detect
これは重要なのです
11:26
hyperglycemia that otherwise wouldn't be known,
なぜなら、これまでは分からなかった高血糖を検知できるのですから
11:28
and also hypoglycemia.
低血糖も分かります
11:30
And you can see the red dots, in this particular patient's case,
赤い点で示した、同じ患者に対する手掌での採血では
11:32
were finger sticks, which would have missed both ends.
最大値及び最小値は測定できていませんでした
11:35
But by continuous monitoring,
しかし、連続的に測定することによって
11:38
it captures all that vital information.
このような決定的な情報を全て記録することができるのです
11:40
The future of this though,
さらにこれからは、このセンサーを
11:42
is being able to move this to a Band-Aid type phenomenon,
バンドエイド型にまでできつつあるのです
11:44
and that's not so far away.
しかもそれほど遠くない未来に実現します
11:46
So, let me just give you, very quickly,
では、ざっと説明しますが
11:49
10 top targets for wireless medicine.
無線通信医療の対象となる主要10項目です
11:51
All these things are possible --
これは全て実現可能です
11:53
some of them are very close,
すぐに実現できるものもありますし
11:55
or already, as you heard,
お聞きになった通り、すでに
11:57
are available today, in some way or form.
何らかの方法や形で実現しているものもあります
11:59
Alzheimer's disease:
アルツハイマー病は
12:01
there's five million people affected, and you can check
500万人が患っていますが、これについては
12:03
vital signs, activity, balance.
バイタルサイン、活動、情緒の安定性を確認できます
12:05
Asthma: large number, we could detect things like
ぜんそく患者は多いですが、これについては
12:07
pollen count, air quality, respiratory rate. Breast cancer,
花粉数、大気環境、呼吸数などを測定できます
12:10
I'll show you an example of that real quickly.
乳がんについては、あとで簡単に一例を紹介します
12:13
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
慢性閉塞性肺疾患もあります
12:16
Depression, there's a great approach to that in mood disorders.
鬱病については、気分障害の人に対する素晴らしい取り組みが存在しています
12:19
Diabetes I've just mentioned. Heart failure we already talked about. Hypertension:
糖尿病は今お話ししましたね 心不全もお話ししました 高血圧については
12:22
74 million people could have continuous blood-pressure monitoring
7400万人が連続的に血圧を測定可能ですから
12:25
to come up with much better management and prevention.
もっと優れた管理法や予防法が現れるでしょう
12:28
And obesity we already talked about, the ways to get to that.
肥満については、これに効く方法をお話ししました
12:33
And sleep disorders.
そして睡眠障害もありますね
12:36
This is effective around the world. The access to smartphones
これは世界中で実現できます スマートフォンや
12:38
and cell phones today is extraordinary.
携帯電話は、今では途方もなく使われています
12:41
And this article from The Economist summed it up beautifully
このエコノミスト誌の記事は見事に
12:44
about the opportunities in health across the developing world:
発展途上国において健康を管理する機会についてまとめています
12:47
"Mobile phones made a bigger difference to the lives of more people,
「携帯電話は従来のどんな技術よりも、たくさんの人の命に
12:49
more quickly, than any previous technology."
急速に影響を及ぼしている」
12:52
And that's before we got going on the m-health world.
こちらは携帯電話を利用した健康管理を広める前です
12:55
Aging: The problem is enormous,
高齢化の問題は非常に大きいものです
12:58
300,000 broken hips per year;
毎年300,000人の大腿骨頸部骨折
13:01
but the solutions are extraordinary,
でも、その解決法は素晴らしいものです
13:03
and they include so many different things.
実に様々な方法がありますが
13:06
One of the ones I just wanted to mention:
ぜひ紹介したいのがこちらです
13:08
The iShoe is another example of a sensor that
iShoseは、これもセンサーを使った例ですが
13:10
improves proprioception among the elderly
高齢者の固有受容性感覚を改善して
13:13
to prevent falling.
転倒を防止します
13:16
One of many different techniques using wireless sensors.
無線センサーを使った様々な技術の1つです
13:17
So, we can change medicine across the continuum of care,
継続的に行う健康管理を変えることができます
13:20
across the ages from premies or unborn children
未熟児や胎児から高齢者までのあらゆる年代にわたって変えられます
13:23
to seniors; the pharmaceutical arena changes;
製薬の領域も変わります
13:27
the full spectrum of disease -- I hope I've given you a sense of that --
あらゆる範囲の病気に対応できます そのイメージをお伝えできたならいいのですが
13:30
across the globe.
そして全世界に及ぶのです
13:33
There are two things that can really accelerate this whole process.
この一連の動きを加速してくれる事が2つあります
13:35
One of them -- we're very fortunate -- is to develop a dedicated institute
1つは専門機関の立ち上げなのですが、運よく
13:38
and that's work that started with the work that Scripps with Qualcomm ...
スクリップスとクアルコム社によって始動し
13:42
and then the great fortune of meeting up with Gary and Mary West,
更に幸運にもゲアリー・ウェスト、メアリー・ウエスト夫妻と出会い
13:48
to get behind this wireless health institute.
ワイヤレス医療研究所を後援してもらえることになりました
13:51
San Diego is an extraordinary place for this.
サンディエゴは特別な地です
13:54
There's over 650 wireless companies,
無線通信関連の企業が650社を超え
13:56
100 of which or more are working in wireless health.
その100社以上が無線通信による健康管理に取り組み
13:59
It's the number one source of commerce, and interestingly
商取引の最も中心的な地であり、面白いことに
14:02
it dovetails beautifully with over 500 life science companies.
500社を超える生命科学関連の企業と見事に連携しています
14:05
The wireless institute,
このワイヤレス研究所つまり
14:08
the West Wireless Health Institute,
ウェストワイヤレス医療研究所は
14:11
is really the outgrowth of two extraordinary people
素晴らしい2人の協力で設立されたものです
14:13
who are here this evening:
今日ここにこられている、ゲアリー・ウェスト、メアリー・ウェスト夫妻です
14:17
Gary and Mary West. And I'd like to give it up for them for getting behind this.
後援していただいたことに感謝したいと思います
14:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:22
Their fantastic philanthropic investment made this possible,
夫妻の素晴らしい慈善の投資によりこれが実現しました
14:26
and this is really a nonprofit education center
完全に非営利の教育機関であり
14:29
which is just about to open. It looks like this,
今まさに始動しようとしています このような外観です
14:32
this whole building dedicated.
この建物全体を作っていただきました
14:35
And what it's trying to do is accelerate this era:
この研究所は、この時代を加速しようとしています
14:38
to take unmet medical needs, to work and innovate --
まだ解決していない医療ニーズを取り上げ、研究し、改良を加えます
14:40
and we just appointed the chief engineer, Mehran Mehregany,
メヘラーン・メラガーニを技術責任者に任命したところで
14:43
it was announced on Monday --
これは月曜日に発表されました
14:46
then to move up with development,
更に発展させ
14:48
clinical trial validation and then changing medical practice,
臨床試験による検証を行い、医療行為を変えるのですが
14:50
the most challenging thing of all,
最も困難なこととして
14:53
requiring attention to reimbursement, healthcare policy, healthcare economics.
債務の弁済、健康管理に関わる政策や経済に注意することがあります
14:56
The other big thing, besides having this fantastic
素晴らしい研究所で この取り組みを結実させる
14:59
institute to catalyze this process
それ以外に重要なこととして
15:02
is guidance,
手本となるということがあります
15:05
and that's of course relying on the fact that medicine goes digital.
もちろん医療がデジタル化することが前提です
15:08
If we understand biology from genomics and omics
ゲノミクスやオミクスにより生態を理解し
15:11
and wireless through physiologic phenotyping, that's big.
生理学的な表現型検査を全て無線通信で実行することは、素晴らしいことです
15:15
Because what it does is allow a convergence like we've never had before.
これまでなかったような情報の集約を可能にするからです
15:19
Over 80 major diseases have been cracked at the genomic level,
80を超える病気がゲノムに基づいて解明されていますが
15:22
but this is quite extraordinary: More has been learned about
これは桁はずれのことです 病気の基礎について
15:27
the underpinnings of disease in the last two and a half years
これまでの人類史上の成果と比較しても
15:30
than in the history of man.
この2年半ぐらいの間に分かったことの方が多いのです
15:32
And when you put that together with, for example,
それを例えば、今ならiPhoneアプリと連携させて
15:34
now an app for the iPhone with your genotype
自分の遺伝子型を入れることで
15:36
to guide drug therapy ...
薬物治療をガイドします
15:39
but, the future -- we can now tell who's going to get Type II diabetes
将来、いや今でも、高頻度のバリアントを見れば
15:41
from all the common variants,
誰が2型糖尿病になるかわかります
15:45
and that's going to get filled in more
将来的には低頻度のバリアントによって
15:47
with low-frequency variants in the future.
もっと隙間が埋まっていきます
15:49
We can tell who's going to get breast cancer
また、様々な遺伝子を見れば
15:51
from the various genes.
誰が乳がんになるか分かります
15:53
We can also know who's likely to get atrial fibrillation.
誰が心房細動を起こしやすいかも分かります
15:55
And finally, another example: sudden cardiac death.
最後の例は突然心臓死です
15:58
Each of these has a sensor.
それぞれに対応したセンサーがあります
16:01
We can give glucose a sensor for diabetes to prevent it.
糖尿病の場合にはグルコースセンサーを使用して予防します
16:03
We can prevent, or have the earliest detection possible,
乳がんの予防や早期発見を可能にするため
16:07
for breast cancer with an ultrasound device
超音波検査装置を
16:10
given to the patient.
患者に持たせます
16:13
An iPatch, iRhythm, for atrial fibrillation.
心房細動の場合にはiRhythmを使います
16:15
And vital-signs monitoring to prevent sudden cardiac death.
突然心臓死の予防にはバイタルサイン監視装置を使います
16:18
We lose 700,000 people a year in the U.S. from sudden cardiac death.
米国では毎年70万人が突然心臓死により亡くなっています
16:22
So, I hope I've convinced you of this,
ぜひ信じていただきたいのですが
16:25
of the impact on hospital clinic resources is profound
病院の能力に与える影響は計り知れないもので
16:28
and then the impact on diseases is equally impressive
これら全ての病気や他の病気に対し
16:32
across all these different diseases and more.
一様に素晴らしい影響を与えるものなのです
16:35
It's really taking individualized medicine to a new height
個別化医療を新たな段階へと進めるもので
16:38
and it's hyper-innovative,
これは最高に革新的なことです
16:42
and I think it represents the black swan of medicine.
医療界のブラックスワンといえるでしょう
16:45
Thanks for your attention.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
16:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:52
Translated by Satoshi Tatsuhara
Reviewed by Kazuyuki Shimatani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Eric Topol - Cardiologist and geneticist
Eric Topol is a leading cardiologist who has embraced the study of genomics and the latest advances in technology to treat chronic disease.

Why you should listen

As director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, California, Eric Topol uses the study of genomics to propel game-changing medical research. The Institute combines clinical investigation with scientific theory, training physicians and scientists for research-based careers. He also serves on the board of the West Wireless Health Institute, discovering how wireless technology can change the future of health care.

In his early career, Topol was credited with leading the cardiovascular program at Cleveland Clinic to the topmost position in the US. He also was the first physician researcher to raise questions about the safety of Vioxx, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and was named Doctor of the Decade by the Institute for Scientific Information.

More profile about the speaker
Eric Topol | Speaker | TED.com