sponsored links
TED2010

James Cameron: Before Avatar ... a curious boy

ジェームス・キャメロン: 「アバター」を生み出した好奇心

February 12, 2010

ジェームス・キャメロンの大予算な(そしてそれ以上に利益をあげる)映画は、それぞれが独自の世界を作り出します。彼はこの私的な話の中で、子供の頃に感じたSFやダイビングの魅力が、いかに彼を「エイリアン」「ターミネーター」「タイタニック」や「アバター」の成功に導いたかを明かします。

James Cameron - Director
James Cameron is the director of Avatar, Titanic, Terminator, The Abyss and many other blockbusters. While his outsize films push the bounds of technology, they're always anchored in human stories with heart and soul. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I grew up on a steady diet of science fiction.
私はSFで育ちました
00:15
In high school, I took a bus to school
高校時代は片道一時間の道を
00:20
an hour each way every day.
バスで通いましたが
00:23
And I was always absorbed in a book,
いつも本に没頭していました
00:25
science fiction book,
SFの本です
00:27
which took my mind to other worlds,
心は別世界に飛び
00:29
and satisfied, in a narrative form,
物語という形で 飽くことのない
00:32
this insatiable sense of curiosity that I had.
好奇心を満たしてくれました
00:36
And you know, that curiosity also manifested itself
好奇心は別の形でも顔を出し
00:41
in the fact that whenever I wasn't in school
学校がないときはいつも
00:44
I was out in the woods,
森にハイキングに出かけ
00:47
hiking and taking "samples" --
標本集めをしていました
00:49
frogs and snakes and bugs and pond water --
カエル ヘビ 虫や池の水など
00:53
and bringing it back, looking at it under the microscope.
持ち帰っては 顕微鏡で覗きました
00:55
You know, I was a real science geek.
科学オタクだったんですね
00:58
But it was all about trying to understand the world,
それらは全て 世界を理解したい
01:00
understand the limits of possibility.
可能性の限界を知りたいがためでした
01:03
And my love of science fiction
そして 私のSFに対する愛は
01:07
actually seemed mirrored in the world around me,
現実世界にも反映されているようでした
01:11
because what was happening, this was in the late '60s,
この60年代後半の時代は
01:14
we were going to the moon,
人類は月を目指し
01:16
we were exploring the deep oceans.
深海を探索していました
01:19
Jacques Cousteau was coming into our living rooms
ジャック・クストーの特別番組が放映され
01:21
with his amazing specials that showed us
私たちがそれまで想像もしなかった
01:24
animals and places and a wondrous world
驚異的な生物や光景を
01:27
that we could never really have previously imagined.
見せてくれた時代でもあります
01:29
So, that seemed to resonate
それらのSF的な側面が
01:32
with the whole science fiction part of it.
私の心に響いたのでしょう
01:34
And I was an artist.
また 私は芸術家でもありました
01:37
I could draw. I could paint.
スケッチや絵が描けました
01:39
And I found that because there weren't video games
当時はテレビゲームもありませんでしたし
01:41
and this saturation of CG movies and all of this
今日のように映画やメディアがCGで
01:44
imagery in the media landscape,
溢れかえってもいなかったので
01:48
I had to create these images in my head.
自分で想像するしか無かったのです
01:51
You know, we all did, as kids having to
私たちは皆そうでしたよね
01:53
read a book, and through the author's description,
本を読んで その記述から
01:55
put something on the movie screen in our heads.
頭の中のスクリーンに想い描いたのです
01:58
And so, my response to this was to paint, to draw
私が想い描いたのは
02:02
alien creatures, alien worlds,
エイリアンや 異世界
02:05
robots, spaceships, all that stuff.
ロボットに宇宙船などでした
02:07
I was endlessly getting busted in math class
授業では 教科書に落書きしているのを
02:09
doodling behind the textbook.
見つかる度に 怒られていました
02:12
That was -- the creativity
つまるところ 想像力には
02:15
had to find its outlet somehow.
はけ口が必要なんでしょうね
02:18
And an interesting thing happened: The Jacques Cousteau shows
興味深いことに ジャック・クストーが
02:22
actually got me very excited about the fact that there was
この地球上に「異世界」があるという事実を伝え
02:25
an alien world right here on Earth.
私はすごく興奮しました
02:28
I might not really go to an alien world
私が宇宙船で異世界に行くことは
02:30
on a spaceship someday --
まずないでしょう
02:33
that seemed pretty darn unlikely.
あり得ない事でした
02:35
But that was a world I could really go to,
でも 本を読んで想像したのと
02:38
right here on Earth, that was as rich and exotic
同じくらい豊かで魅惑的な世界が
02:40
as anything that I had imagined
この地球に存在する事が
02:42
from reading these books.
分かったのです
02:45
So, I decided I was going to become a scuba diver
なので ダイバーになろうと決めました
02:47
at the age of 15.
15歳の時です
02:49
And the only problem with that was that I lived
唯一の問題は 私がカナダの
02:51
in a little village in Canada,
片田舎に住んでいて
02:53
600 miles from the nearest ocean.
海から1000キロ離れている事でした
02:55
But I didn't let that daunt me.
でも くじけませんでした
02:58
I pestered my father until he finally found
親父にせがんで 国境を越えてすぐの
03:00
a scuba class in Buffalo, New York,
ニューヨーク州バッファローにある
03:03
right across the border from where we live.
ダイビングスクールを探してもらいました
03:05
And I actually got certified
そして本当に免許を取りました
03:07
in a pool at a YMCA in the dead of winter
真冬のニューヨークの
03:10
in Buffalo, New York.
YMCAにあるプールでね
03:12
And I didn't see the ocean, a real ocean,
しかもその後2年間
03:14
for another two years,
カリフォルニアに引っ越すまで
03:17
until we moved to California.
本物の海を見る事すらなかったんです
03:19
Since then, in the intervening
それからというもの
03:21
40 years,
40年間で
03:24
I've spent about 3,000 hours underwater,
およそ3000時間を水中で過ごしました
03:26
and 500 hours of that was in submersibles.
そのうち500時間は潜水艇です
03:30
And I've learned that that deep-ocean environment,
私が学んだのは 深海や
03:33
and even the shallow oceans,
浅い海でさえ
03:36
are so rich with amazing life
私たちの想像を超える
03:38
that really is beyond our imagination.
驚くべき生物に満ちている事です
03:42
Nature's imagination is so boundless
自然界の想像力というのは 人類の
03:45
compared to our own
貧相な想像力と比べ
03:49
meager human imagination.
本当に無限大です
03:51
I still, to this day, stand in absolute awe
私は今でも 水中で目にする光景に
03:53
of what I see when I make these dives.
畏敬の念を禁じ得ません
03:55
And my love affair with the ocean is ongoing,
私の海への情熱は昔も今も
03:58
and just as strong as it ever was.
変わる事がありません
04:01
But when I chose a career as an adult,
しかし大人になって選んだ職業は
04:03
it was filmmaking.
映画制作でした
04:06
And that seemed to be the best way to reconcile
それは 物語を伝えたいという衝動と
04:09
this urge I had to tell stories
映像を生み出したいという欲求を
04:12
with my urges to create images.
うまく調和できると思ったのです
04:14
And I was, as a kid, constantly drawing comic books, and so on.
子供の頃はいつも漫画を描いていましたしね
04:18
So, filmmaking was the way to put pictures and stories
映画制作なら 映像とストーリーを
04:21
together, and that made sense.
一緒にできます 理想的でした
04:23
And of course the stories that I chose to tell
そしてもちろん 私が選んだストーリーは
04:25
were science fiction stories: "Terminator," "Aliens"
SFものでした 「ターミネーター」に「エイリアン」
04:28
and "The Abyss."
そして「アビス」
04:30
And with "The Abyss," I was putting together my love
「アビス」では 私の海とダイビングに対する
04:32
of underwater and diving with filmmaking.
愛情を 映画制作に注ぎました
04:35
So, you know, merging the two passions.
二つの情熱を組み合わせたんですね
04:37
Something interesting came out of "The Abyss,"
「アビス」では面白い収穫がありました
04:40
which was that to solve a specific narrative
あるシーンの映像を作る上で
04:44
problem on that film,
解決策が必要でした
04:47
which was to create this kind of liquid water creature,
水のような生き物を作る必要があったんです
04:50
we actually embraced computer generated animation, CG.
そこでコンピュータによるCGを利用しました
04:54
And this resulted in the first soft-surface
結果的にそれは 映画界初の
05:00
character, CG animation
ソフトサーフェスCGアニメーションを使った
05:05
that was ever in a movie.
キャラクターになりました
05:08
And even though the film didn't make any money --
全くお金にならない映画でしたが
05:10
barely broke even, I should say --
かろうじてトントン と言っておきましょうか
05:12
I witnessed something amazing, which is that the audience,
とても興味深い発見をしたんです
05:15
the global audience, was mesmerized
世界中の観客が この目に見える魔法に
05:17
by this apparent magic.
魅了されたのです
05:19
You know, it's Arthur Clarke's law
まさにアーサー・クラークの法則:
05:21
that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
「充分に発達した科学技術は 魔法と区別が付かない」です
05:23
They were seeing something magical.
観客は魔法を見ているかのようでした
05:27
And so that got me very excited.
その反応に私は興奮したんです
05:30
And I thought, "Wow, this is something that needs to be embraced
「これは映像表現の手法として取り入れなければ!」
05:33
into the cinematic art."
そう思いました
05:35
So, with "Terminator 2," which was my next film,
そこで 次の作品「ターミネーター2」では
05:37
we took that much farther.
それを更に 推し進めました
05:39
Working with ILM, we created the liquid metal dude
ILMと組んで 液状金属のキャラクターを生み出しました
05:41
in that film. The success hung in the balance
映画の成功は その特殊効果が
05:44
on whether that effect would work.
当たるかどうかにかかっていました
05:46
And it did, and we created magic again,
そして成功したんです 再び魔法が生まれました
05:48
and we had the same result with an audience --
観客の反応も前回同様でした
05:50
although we did make a little more money on that one.
前よりはお金になりましたけどね
05:52
So, drawing a line through those two dots
異なる二つの経験を
05:54
of experience
組み合わせることにより
05:59
came to, "This is going to be a whole new world,"
全く新しい世界 映画制作者にとって
06:02
this was a whole new world of creativity
今までにない想像の世界が
06:04
for film artists.
もたらされると思いました
06:06
So, I started a company with Stan Winston,
そこで当時一流のクリーチャーデザイナー兼
06:09
my good friend Stan Winston,
メイクアップアーティストだった
06:11
who is the premier make-up and creature designer
スタン・ウィンストンと
06:13
at that time, and it was called Digital Domain.
デジタル・ドメインという会社を始めたのです
06:17
And the concept of the company was
会社のコンセプトは
06:20
that we would leapfrog past
光学式プリンタのようなアナログのプロセスを
06:22
the analog processes of optical printers and so on,
過去のものにし デジタルプロダクションに
06:25
and we would go right to digital production.
一気に移行しようというものでした
06:28
And we actually did that and it gave us a competitive advantage for a while.
私たちはそれをやり遂げ しばらくは業界をリードしましたが
06:30
But we found ourselves lagging in the mid '90s
90年代半ばには 怪物や
06:34
in the creature and character design stuff
キャラクターデザインにおいて 後れを取りました
06:37
that we had actually founded the company to do.
その為の会社であったにも関わらずです
06:40
So, I wrote this piece called "Avatar,"
そこで「アバター」を書きました
06:43
which was meant to absolutely push the envelope
特殊効果やCGの限界を
06:45
of visual effects,
圧倒的に押し広げ
06:49
of CG effects, beyond,
人間のように情感豊かな
06:51
with realistic human emotive characters
キャラクターが CGで
06:53
generated in CG,
登場するものでした
06:57
and the main characters would all be in CG,
主要なキャラクターは全てCGで
06:59
and the world would be in CG.
世界もまたCGで出来ています
07:01
And the envelope pushed back,
でも限界はすぐ押し戻されました
07:03
and I was told by the folks at my company
この作品はまだしばらく無理だと
07:05
that we weren't going to be able to do this for a while.
会社のスタッフに言われたんです
07:10
So, I shelved it, and I made this other movie about a big ship that sinks.
なので一旦保留にして でかい船が沈む映画を作りました
07:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:16
You know, I went and pitched it to the studio as "'Romeo and Juliet' on a ship:
映画会社には「これは船上のロミオとジュリエットだ」
07:19
"It's going to be this epic romance,
「壮大なラブロマンスなんだ」と
07:22
passionate film."
売り込みました
07:24
Secretly, what I wanted to do was
でも密かに私が企んでいたのは
07:26
I wanted to dive to the real wreck of "Titanic."
実物のタイタニック号を潜って見る事でした
07:28
And that's why I made the movie.
その為にこの映画を作ったんです
07:31
(Applause)
(笑)
07:33
And that's the truth. Now, the studio didn't know that.
本当です でも制作会社には言えません
07:37
But I convinced them. I said,
そこでこう言って説得しました
07:39
"We're going to dive to the wreck. We're going to film it for real.
「本物のタイタニックを撮影しましょう」
07:41
We'll be using it in the opening of the film.
「それを映画のオープニングで使うんです」
07:43
It will be really important. It will be a great marketing hook."
「もの凄い宣伝効果がありますよ」
07:46
And I talked them into funding an expedition.
そして探索の経費まで話をつけました
07:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:50
Sounds crazy. But this goes back to that theme
どうかしてますよね でもこれが 想像力が
07:52
about your imagination creating a reality.
現実を生み出すという テーマに戻ってくるんです
07:54
Because we actually created a reality where six months later,
なぜなら 半年後私たちは
07:57
I find myself in a Russian submersible
実際にロシアの潜水艇に乗り
07:59
two and a half miles down in the north Atlantic,
深度4000メートルの北大西洋で
08:01
looking at the real Titanic through a view port.
本物のタイタニック号を見ていたんです
08:04
Not a movie, not HD -- for real.
映画でもテレビでもなく 現実にです
08:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:09
Now, that blew my mind.
何もかも圧倒的でした
08:12
And it took a lot of preparation, we had to build cameras
準備からして大変でした
08:14
and lights and all kinds of things.
カメラから照明から 全部作りました
08:16
But, it struck me how much
驚いたのは 深海への潜水が
08:18
this dive, these deep dives,
まるで宇宙での活動のように
08:20
was like a space mission.
感じられる事でした
08:22
You know, where it was highly technical,
極めて専門的な分野であり
08:24
and it required enormous planning.
膨大な準備を必要とします
08:26
You get in this capsule, you go down to this dark
小さなカプセルに閉じこもって
08:28
hostile environment
自力で戻れなければ
08:30
where there is no hope of rescue
絶体絶命な
08:33
if you can't get back by yourself.
暗黒の世界へ向かうんです
08:35
And I thought like, "Wow. I'm like,
こう思いました
08:37
living in a science fiction movie.
「まるでSF映画の中にいるみたいだ」
08:39
This is really cool."
「これは凄いぞ」
08:41
And so, I really got bitten by the bug of deep-ocean exploration.
そして深海探索の虜になりました
08:43
Of course, the curiosity, the science component of it --
その奇妙さと科学的な側面に魅了されたんです
08:46
it was everything. It was adventure,
全てが揃っていました 冒険であり
08:49
it was curiosity, it was imagination.
好奇心を満たし 想像力を掻き立て
08:51
And it was an experience that
それはハリウッドでも得られない
08:53
Hollywood couldn't give me.
体験だったんです
08:56
Because, you know, I could imagine a creature and we could
私は生き物を想像し 特殊効果で
08:58
create a visual effect for it. But I couldn't imagine what I was seeing
作り出せますが 窓の向こうのそれは
09:00
out that window.
想像すら出来ないものでした
09:02
As we did some of our subsequent expeditions,
その後も探索を続けるにつれ
09:04
I was seeing creatures at hydrothermal vents
熱水噴出孔に住む生き物を見たり
09:07
and sometimes things that I had never seen before,
私がそれまで見た事のないものや
09:09
sometimes things that no one had seen before,
さらには誰一人見た事のないもの
09:13
that actually were not described by science
当時の科学では説明されていない事象を
09:15
at the time that we saw them and imaged them.
発見し 撮影しました
09:17
So, I was completely smitten by this,
私はすっかり夢中になってしまい
09:20
and had to do more.
もう止められませんでした
09:23
And so, I actually made a kind of curious decision.
そこで私は奇妙な決断をしたんです
09:25
After the success of "Titanic,"
「タイタニック」の成功の後で言いました
09:27
I said, "OK, I'm going to park my day job
「ハリウッドの映画制作者という仕事は
09:29
as a Hollywood movie maker,
一時休業だ
09:32
and I'm going to go be a full-time explorer for a while."
しばらく探検家になるんだ」
09:34
And so, we started planning these
そして 探査計画を
09:38
expeditions.
練り始めました
09:40
And we wound up going to the Bismark,
その成果として 戦艦ビスマルク号を
09:42
and exploring it with robotic vehicles.
ロボット潜水艇で探索しました
09:44
We went back to the Titanic wreck.
その後タイタニック号に戻り 今度は
09:48
We took little bots that we had created
光ファイバーを積んだ小型ロボットを
09:50
that spooled a fiber optic.
作り 持ち込んだのです
09:52
And the idea was to go in and do an interior
当時まだ謎に包まれていた
09:54
survey of that ship, which had never been done.
船内の調査をするためです
09:56
Nobody had ever looked inside the wreck. They didn't have the means to do it,
それまで手段が無く 誰も入れなかったので
10:00
so we created technology to do it.
私たちはその為の技術を開発したんです
10:02
So, you know, here I am now, on the deck
私は潜水艇に乗って タイタニック号の
10:05
of Titanic, sitting in a submersible,
デッキにいました
10:07
and looking out at planks that look much like this,
ちょうどこんな感じのステージがあり
10:10
where I knew that the band had played.
そこはあのバンドが演奏していた場所でした
10:13
And I'm flying a little robotic vehicle
私は小型ロボット潜水艇を操縦し
10:16
through the corridor of the ship.
船内の通路を進んでいました
10:18
When I say, "I'm operating it,"
操縦していると言いましたが
10:21
but my mind is in the vehicle.
私の心はそのロボットの中にありました
10:24
I felt like I was physically present
難破したタイタニック号の船内に
10:27
inside the shipwreck of Titanic.
本当に自分が潜入しているようでした
10:29
And it was the most surreal kind
そして私は かつてない 超現実的な
10:31
of deja vu experience I've ever had,
デジャヴ 既視感を体験したんです
10:33
because I would know before I turned a corner
ロボット潜水艇のライトが
10:35
what was going to be there before the lights
通路の先を照らし出す前に
10:39
of the vehicle actually revealed it,
私には何が見えるかが分かったんです
10:41
because I had walked the set for months
なぜなら 映画を撮影している時に
10:43
when we were making the movie.
セットの中を何ヶ月も歩いていたんですね
10:45
And the set was based as an exact replica
そのセットはタイタニック号の設計図を
10:48
on the blueprints of the ship.
完全に再現していたんです
10:50
So, it was this absolutely remarkable experience.
これは本当に驚くべき体験でした
10:52
And it really made me realize that
このようなロボットアバターを使い
10:55
the telepresence experience --
遠隔地の臨場感を経験すると
10:57
that you actually can have these robotic avatars,
意識はそのアバターに乗り移り
10:59
then your consciousness is injected into the vehicle,
形を変えて存続出来るのだと
11:01
into this other form of existence.
気がついたのです
11:06
It was really, really quite profound.
もの凄く深い体験でした
11:08
And it may be a little bit of a glimpse as to what might be happening
ひょっとすると 何十年後かに
11:10
some decades out
人類が探検などの目的で
11:13
as we start to have cyborg bodies
サイボーグの体を持つようになって
11:15
for exploration or for other means
もたらされる世界を
11:18
in many sort of
私がSFファンとして
11:20
post-human futures
想像する
11:22
that I can imagine,
「人類後の世界」を
11:24
as a science fiction fan.
垣間見たのかも知れません
11:26
So, having done these expeditions,
これらの探索を行う事で
11:28
and really beginning to appreciate what was down there,
深海の素晴らしさを理解するようになりました
11:33
such as at the deep ocean vents
海底の熱水孔や
11:37
where we had these amazing, amazing animals --
そこに生きる不思議な生物の事です
11:40
they're basically aliens right here on Earth.
彼らは地球に住むエイリアンのようなものです
11:43
They live in an environment of chemosynthesis.
化学合成によって生きているんです
11:45
They don't survive on sunlight-based
光合成ベースの生態系では
11:48
system the way we do.
生きていけないのです
11:50
And so, you're seeing animals that are living next to
摂氏500度もの水柱の
11:52
a 500-degree-Centigrade
側で生きる動物を
11:54
water plumes.
目の当たりにしているんです
11:56
You think they can't possibly exist.
ありえないと思いませんか
11:58
At the same time
同時に私は
12:00
I was getting very interested in space science as well --
宇宙科学にも強い興味を持ちました
12:02
again, it's the science fiction influence, as a kid.
これもまた 子供の頃のSFの影響でした
12:05
And I wound up getting involved with
結局私は 宇宙関係の
12:08
the space community,
コミュニティーとつながりを持ち
12:10
really involved with NASA,
NASAとも関わるようになり
12:12
sitting on the NASA advisory board,
諮問委員会に参加し
12:14
planning actual space missions,
実際の宇宙計画を立て
12:17
going to Russia, going through the pre-cosmonaut
ロシアで宇宙飛行前の
12:19
biomedical protocols,
生体検査や いろいろなものに参加し
12:21
and all these sorts of things,
私たちの3Dカメラシステムと一緒に
12:23
to actually go and fly to the international space station
実際に宇宙ステーションに
12:25
with our 3D camera systems.
乗り込む計画もありました
12:27
And this was fascinating.
とても魅力的でした
12:29
But what I wound up doing was bringing space scientists
でも気がつくと 宇宙科学者達を
12:31
with us into the deep.
深海に案内していました
12:33
And taking them down so that they had access --
宇宙生物学者や惑星学者など
12:36
astrobiologists, planetary scientists,
極限の環境に興味を持つ人々ですね
12:39
people who were interested in these extreme environments --
彼らを熱水孔まで連れて行き
12:42
taking them down to the vents, and letting them see,
サンプルの採取や 機材のテストなどを
12:45
and take samples and test instruments, and so on.
行ってもらいました
12:48
So, here we were making documentary films,
それはドキュメンタリーの撮影でありながら
12:50
but actually doing science,
実際には宇宙科学に
12:52
and actually doing space science.
取り組んでいたのです
12:54
I'd completely closed the loop
私は完全に輪を閉じました
12:56
between being the science fiction fan,
子供の頃に
12:58
you know, as a kid,
SFファンだった少年が
13:00
and doing this stuff for real.
それを現実のものにしているのです
13:02
And you know, along the way in this journey
そしてこの発見の
13:04
of discovery,
旅の途中で
13:07
I learned a lot.
多くを学びました
13:09
I learned a lot about science. But I also learned a lot
科学についてもたくさん学びましたが
13:11
about leadership.
リーダーシップについても学びました
13:13
Now you think director has got to be a leader,
皆さんは監督というのはリーダーであり
13:16
leader of, captain of the ship, and all that sort of thing.
船の船長のようなものだと思うでしょう
13:18
I didn't really learn about leadership
私はこれらの探査活動を行うまで
13:20
until I did these expeditions.
リーダーシップについて理解していませんでした
13:22
Because I had to, at a certain point, say,
ある時点で こう思ってしまったのです
13:25
"What am I doing out here?
「自分はここで何をしているんだ?
13:28
Why am I doing this? What do I get out of it?"
なぜやっているんだ?何を得られるんだ?」
13:30
We don't make money at these damn shows.
この手の見せ物はお金になりません
13:33
We barely break even. There is no fame in it.
利益にならず 名声も得られない
13:36
People sort of think I went away
人々は 私が「タイタニック」と
13:38
between "Titanic" and "Avatar" and was buffing my nails
「アバター」の間 どこかのリゾートで
13:40
someplace, sitting at the beach.
爪でも磨いていると 思っていました
13:42
Made all these films, made all these documentary films
これらのドキュメンタリーを撮りましたが
13:44
for a very limited audience.
とても限られた観客向けのものです
13:47
No fame, no glory, no money. What are you doing?
名声も栄誉もお金もない 自分は何をしているんだ?
13:49
You're doing it for the task itself,
まさにその任務のため
13:52
for the challenge --
その挑戦のためなのです
13:54
and the ocean is the most challenging environment there is --
海ほど挑戦的な環境は無いでしょう
13:56
for the thrill of discovery,
そして発見のスリルと
13:59
and for that strange bond that happens
チームが結束したときに出来る
14:02
when a small group of people form a tightly knit team.
奇妙な「絆」のために行動するのです
14:05
Because we would do these things with 10, 12 people,
これらの仕事は10人ほどのチームで
14:08
working for years at a time,
何年間にも及びます
14:11
sometimes at sea for two, three months at a time.
時には洋上で2、3ヶ月も過ごします
14:13
And in that bond, you realize
この絆の中で 最も重要な事は
14:17
that the most important thing
お互いに対する敬意であり
14:20
is the respect that you have for them
それぞれが 他の誰にも説明不可能な
14:22
and that they have for you, that you've done a task
課題を克服しているんだという
14:24
that you can't explain to someone else.
尊敬の念だと 気づきました
14:27
When you come back to the shore and you say,
陸に上がっては 言うんです
14:29
"We had to do this, and the fiber optic, and the attentuation,
光ファイバーがどうだの 減衰がどうだの
14:31
and the this and the that,
あれやらこれやら
14:33
all the technology of it, and the difficulty,
その技術的側面と 難しさ
14:35
the human-performance aspects of working at sea,"
洋上で働く事による人間的側面
14:37
you can't explain it to people. It's that thing that
うまく説明出来ないのですが
14:40
maybe cops have, or people in combat that have gone through something together
警官か 戦場で共に戦い抜いた仲間なら
14:42
and they know they can never explain it.
この意味が分かると思います
14:46
Creates a bond, creates a bond of respect.
尊敬の絆が生まれるのです
14:48
So, when I came back to make my next movie,
次の映画を撮るために戻ったとき
14:50
which was "Avatar,"
「アバター」だったのですが
14:52
I tried to apply that same principle of leadership,
同じリーダーシップ論を持ち込み
14:55
which is that you respect your team,
チームを尊敬し 彼らからも
14:58
and you earn their respect in return.
尊敬を得られるよう努めました
15:00
And it really changed the dynamic.
これは本当に原動力を変えました
15:02
So, here I was again with a small team,
私は再び小さなチームと共に
15:04
in uncharted territory,
未開拓の分野で
15:07
doing "Avatar," coming up with new technology
それまで存在しなかった技術を使い
15:09
that didn't exist before.
「アバター」の制作にかかりました
15:11
Tremendously exciting.
もの凄くエキサイティングで
15:13
Tremendously challenging.
とてつもない挑戦でした
15:15
And we became a family, over a four-and-half year period.
そして4年半の歳月を経て 家族になりました
15:17
And it completely changed how I do movies.
私の映画制作は完全に変わりました
15:19
So, people have commented on how, "Well, you know,
人々は 私がうまい事
15:22
you brought back the ocean organisms
海の生物を 惑星パンドラに
15:24
and put them on the planet of Pandora."
当てはめたと言いますが
15:27
To me, it was more of a fundamental way of doing business,
私にとっては 変わったのは
15:29
the process itself, that changed as a result of that.
基本的な仕事の進め方であり 結果的にこうなったのです
15:31
So, what can we synthesize out of all this?
さて ここから何を導き出せるでしょうか?
15:35
You know, what are the lessons learned?
教訓は何でしょうか
15:37
Well, I think number one is
まず第一に
15:40
curiosity.
好奇心です
15:42
It's the most powerful thing you own.
あなたが持つ最もパワフルなものです
15:44
Imagination is a force
想像力は実際に
15:47
that can actually manifest a reality.
現実を呼び起こす力があります
15:50
And the respect of your team
そして チームからの尊敬は
15:54
is more important than all the
世界中のどんな栄誉よりも
15:58
laurels in the world.
重要なのです
16:00
I have young filmmakers
若い映画制作者が
16:03
come up to me and say, "Give me some advice for doing this."
アドバイスが欲しいと言ってきました
16:05
And I say, "Don't put limitations on yourself.
こう言いました 「自分に限界を設けるな
16:09
Other people will do that for you -- don't do it to yourself,
それは周りがやる事だ 自分じゃない
16:13
don't bet against yourself,
自分で出来ないと思うな
16:15
and take risks."
進んでリスクを取れ」と
16:17
NASA has this phrase that they like:
NASAの好きなこんな文句があります
16:19
"Failure is not an option."
「失敗は選択肢にない」
16:22
But failure has to be an option
でも 芸術や探求においては 選択肢で
16:24
in art and in exploration, because it's a leap of faith.
あるべきです 信じて飛び込むべきなんです
16:27
And no important endeavor
革新的な試みは全て
16:30
that required innovation
リスクを承知で
16:32
was done without risk.
実行されてきたのです
16:34
You have to be willing to take those risks.
このリスクは 自ら引き受けるべきです
16:36
So, that's the thought I would leave you with,
最後に申し上げたいのは
16:39
is that in whatever you're doing,
何をするにしても
16:41
failure is an option,
失敗は選択肢であり
16:44
but fear is not. Thank you.
選択肢にないのは「恐れ」なんです ありがとう
16:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:50
Translator:Satoru Arao
Reviewer:Masahiro Kyushima

sponsored links

James Cameron - Director
James Cameron is the director of Avatar, Titanic, Terminator, The Abyss and many other blockbusters. While his outsize films push the bounds of technology, they're always anchored in human stories with heart and soul.

Why you should listen

James Cameron has written and directed some of the largest blockbuster movies of the last 20 years, including The Terminator, Aliens, The Abyss, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Titanic, and Avatar. His films  pushed the limits of special effects, and his fascination with technical developments led him to co-create the 3-D Fusion Camera System. He has also contributed to new techniques in underwater filming and remote vehicle technology.

Although now a major filmmaker, Cameron's first job was as a truck driver and he wrote only in his spare time. After seeing Star Wars, he quit that job and wrote his first science fiction script for a ten-minute short called Xenogenesis. Soon after, he began working with special effects, and by 1984 he had written and directed the movie that would change his life -- The Terminator. Today, he has received three Academy Awards, two honorary doctorates and sits on the NASA Advisory Council. 

Read more about Cameron's planned trip to the Challenger Deep, the deepest point yet reached in the ocean »

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.