sponsored links
TED2003

Juan Enriquez: The life code that will reshape the future

フアン・エンリケス: 未来を象る命のコード

February 2, 2003

科学の発見によって、コードの変更さえ求められるようになり、繁栄のためにはコードの使用に習熟することが重要になるとフューチャリスト、フアン・エンリケスは語ります。この考え方をゲノム科学の分野にあてはめると、どうなるでしょう。

Juan Enriquez - Futurist
Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and other life sciences will bring in business, technology, politics and society. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm supposed to scare you, because it's about fear, right?
私は怖い話を皆さんに
する予定でしたね?
00:25
And you should be really afraid,
皆さんも恐れて下さい
00:29
but not for the reasons why you think you should be.
ご想像とは別の理由でですが
00:31
You should be really afraid that --
本当に恐れるべきなのは―
00:34
if we stick up the first slide on this thing -- there we go -- that you're missing out.
まず スライドを―出ましたね―
チャンスを逃すことです
00:36
Because if you spend this week thinking about Iraq and
もしあなたが 今週 イラクや
ブッシュ大統領 株式市場について
00:42
thinking about Bush and thinking about the stock market,
考えて過ごすのであれば
人類史上 最も素晴らしい
00:46
you're going to miss one of the greatest adventures that we've ever been on.
冒険の一つを見過ごすでしょう
00:50
And this is what this adventure's really about.
この話はその冒険についてです
00:53
This is crystallized DNA.
これが結晶化したDNAです
00:55
Every life form on this planet -- every insect, every bacteria, every plant,
この惑星の全ての生命は--
全ての 昆虫
00:59
every animal, every human, every politician -- (Laughter)
細菌 植物 動物 人間
政治家― (笑)
01:02
is coded in that stuff.
これに暗号化され記録されています
01:07
And if you want to take a single crystal of DNA, it looks like that.
そして単体のDNAの結晶は
このようになります
01:09
And we're just beginning to understand this stuff.
私たちは やっとこれを理解し始めました
01:13
And this is the single most exciting adventure that we have ever been on.
これは史上最もワクワクする
冒険―
01:16
It's the single greatest mapping project we've ever been on.
最も偉大なマッピング・プロジェクトです
01:20
If you think that the mapping of America's made a difference,
アメリカの地図の完成や
01:23
or landing on the moon, or this other stuff,
月への着陸などが
違いをもたらしたのであれば―
01:25
it's the map of ourselves and the map of every plant
この私たち自身の
そしてあらゆる植物の 昆虫の
01:28
and every insect and every bacteria that really makes a difference.
細菌の地図もまた
大きな違いをもたらすのです
01:31
And it's beginning to tell us a lot about evolution.
そして 進化について たくさんのことを
私たちに伝え始めています―(笑)
01:34
(Laughter)
そして 進化について たくさんのことを
私たちに伝え始めています―(笑)
01:39
It turns out that what this stuff is --
この物質はリチャード・ドーキンスが
01:43
and Richard Dawkins has written about this --
本で述べたように―
01:45
is, this is really a river out of Eden.
まさにエデンから流れ出た川のようです
01:47
So, the 3.2 billion base pairs inside each of your cells
すなわち あなたの全ての
細胞内にある32億個の塩基対は
01:49
is really a history of where you've been for the past billion years.
あなたの過去
数十億年の歴史なのです
01:53
And we could start dating things,
そして 時を遡り
医学と考古学を変えることができます
01:56
and we could start changing medicine and archeology.
そして 時を遡り
医学と考古学を変えることができます
01:57
It turns out that if you take the human species about 700 years ago,
どうやら人間という種族は
700年前
02:01
white Europeans diverged from black Africans in a very significant way.
白いヨーロッパ民族と黒いアフリカ民族が
大きく分岐したようなのです
02:04
White Europeans were subject to the plague.
ヨーロッパの白人は
ペストに晒されました  そして―
02:07
And when they were subject to the plague, most people didn't survive,
晒された人の殆どは
生き残れませんでした
02:13
but those who survived had a mutation on the CCR5 receptor.
しかし 生き残った人は
CCR5受容体に変異があり
02:16
And that mutation was passed on to their kids
生き残ったために子供たちに
02:20
because they're the ones that survived,
その変異が受け継がれました
02:22
so there was a great deal of population pressure.
すごい人口圧力だったのです
02:24
In Africa, because you didn't have these cities,
アフリカでは 都市がなかったため
02:26
you didn't have that CCR5 population pressure mutation.
CCR5変異を選ぶ
人口圧力がなかったのです
02:28
We can date it to 700 years ago.
これは700年前に起きたと
特定できます
02:31
That is one of the reasons why AIDS is raging across Africa as fast as it is,
そして これがAIDSがアフリカ
で急速に蔓延し
02:34
and not as fast across Europe.
ヨーロッパでの伝染がそれほどでもない
理由の一つです
02:38
And we're beginning to find these little things for malaria,
そして マラリア 鎌状赤血球症
癌に関しても
02:42
for sickle cell, for cancers.
このようなちょっとした事実が
明らかになってきています
02:45
And in the measure that we map ourselves,
私たち自身のマッピングは
02:49
this is the single greatest adventure that we'll ever be on.
史上 最も素晴らしい冒険です
02:51
And this Friday, I want you to pull out a really good bottle of wine,
そして今週の金曜日には
とびきりにいいワインで
02:53
and I want you to toast these two people.
この二人に乾杯してください
02:57
Because this Friday, 50 years ago, Watson and Crick found the structure of DNA,
50年前の金曜日は ワトソンとクリックが
DNAの構造を発見した日で この日は
03:00
and that is almost as important a date
(2001年)2月12日 ヒトの
遺伝子のマッピングが
03:04
as the 12th of February when we first mapped ourselves,
完了した日と同じ位に
特別な日なのですから
03:07
but anyway, we'll get to that.
このことは また後で話すとして
03:10
I thought we'd talk about the new zoo.
まず 新しい動物園の話をします
03:12
So, all you guys have heard about DNA, all the stuff that DNA does,
DNAとその役割については
皆さんもすでにご存知でしょう
03:14
but some of the stuff we're discovering is kind of nifty
しかし 私たちのいくつかの
発見はしゃれています
03:18
because this turns out to be the single most abundant species on the planet.
これは地球上で最も多く存在する種です
03:21
If you think you're successful or cockroaches are successful,
人間やゴキブリは
繁栄していると思いますか?
03:26
it turns out that there's ten trillion trillion Pleurococcus sitting out there.
プルロコッカスは
実は10兆匹も存在していますが
03:29
And we didn't know that Pleurococcus was out there,
私たちはその存在すら
知りませんでした
03:32
which is part of the reason
1種族に属する生物達を丸々マッピングする
プロジェクトの重要性がここにあります
03:35
why this whole species-mapping project is so important.
1種族に属する生物達を丸々マッピングする
プロジェクトの重要性がここにあります
03:36
Because we're just beginning to learn
私たち人間がどこから来た 何者なのか
わかり始めたばかりです
03:41
where we came from and what we are.
私たち人間がどこから来た 何者なのか
わかり始めたばかりです
03:43
And we're finding amoebas like this. This is the amoeba dubia.
このアメーバ・ドゥビアのような発見もあります
03:45
And the amoeba dubia doesn't look like much,
大した生物ではなさそうですが
03:49
except that each of you has about 3.2 billion letters,
皆さんを 皆さんたらしめるための
03:51
which is what makes you you,
遺伝子記号が32億個 これは
03:54
as far as gene code inside each of your cells,
皆さんの細胞内の
遺伝子コードの塩基数です
03:56
and this little amoeba which, you know,
このアメーバは
水中に何百
03:59
sits in water in hundreds and millions and billions,
何百万 何十億も存在します
04:02
turns out to have 620 billion base pairs of gene code inside.
そして6,200億塩基対もの遺伝子コード
を細胞内に保有していました
04:05
So, this little thingamajig has a genome
こんな小っちゃいやつが
皆さんより200倍も
04:11
that's 200 times the size of yours.
大きな遺伝子を持っていたのです
04:14
And if you're thinking of efficient information storage mechanisms,
もし 優れた情報記録システム
について考えるなら
04:17
it may not turn out to be chips.
それはチップではなく
04:21
It may turn out to be something that looks a little like that amoeba.
このアメーバのようなものに
なるかもしれません
04:24
And, again, we're learning from life and how life works.
繰り返しますが 私たちは 命の仕組みを
生命から学び始めています
04:28
This funky little thing: people didn't used to think
この小っちゃい いかした生物:
サンプルを原子炉から
04:32
that it was worth taking samples out of nuclear reactors
取るなんて意味がないと
誰もが思っていました
04:36
because it was dangerous and, of course, nothing lived there.
危険で何も生きていないはずだからです
04:39
And then finally somebody picked up a microscope
ついに誰かが顕微鏡を持ち出して
04:42
and looked at the water that was sitting next to the cores.
核燃料が浸っている
水の中を覗くと そこには
04:45
And sitting next to that water in the cores
デイノコッカス・レディオデュランスが
背泳ぎをしていたのです
04:48
was this little Deinococcus radiodurans, doing a backstroke,
デイノコッカス・レディオデュランスが
背泳ぎをしていたのです
04:50
having its chromosomes blown apart every day,
人の致死量の200倍もの
04:53
six, seven times, restitching them,
放射線量の中で 毎日6、7回
染色体を破壊され
04:55
living in about 200 times the radiation that would kill you.
それを修繕しながら生きています
04:58
And by now you should be getting a hint as to how diverse
この生命の探求が いかに多様で 重要で
05:01
and how important and how interesting this journey into life is,
面白いか 分かってきたはずです
05:04
and how many different life forms there are,
どれだけ沢山の生命の形があるのか
05:06
and how there can be different life forms living in
色々な形の生命が
様々な場所に存在できるか
05:09
very different places, maybe even outside of this planet.
この惑星の外にもいるかもしれません
05:12
Because if you can live in radiation that looks like this,
こんな放射線の中で生きることが
05:16
that brings up a whole series of interesting questions.
できるのであれば 新たに
興味深い疑問が出てきます
05:18
This little thingamajig: we didn't know this thingamajig existed.
存在を知られてなかった
この小さな生命体も
05:22
We should have known that this existed
本来 知られていたはずです
05:26
because this is the only bacteria that you can see to the naked eye.
目に見える唯一の細菌ですから
05:28
So, this thing is 0.75 millimeters.
この生命は0.75 mmの大きさで
ナミビア沖の海溝に住んでいます
05:31
It lives in a deep trench off the coast of Namibia.
この生命は 0.75 mm の大きさで
ナミビア沖の海溝に住んでいます
05:34
And what you're looking at with this namibiensis
ナミビエンシスを見るということは
05:37
is the biggest bacteria we've ever seen.
最も大きな細菌を見ることになります
05:39
So, it's about the size of a little period on a sentence.
この生命はピリオドほどの大きさです
05:41
Again, we didn't know this thing was there three years ago.
繰り返しますが 3年前 私たちは
この生命の存在を知りませんでした
05:45
We're just beginning this journey of life in the new zoo.
新しい動物園での
生命の冒険は始まったばかりです
05:49
This is a really odd one. This is Ferroplasma.
こいつはフェロプラズマという
本当に奇妙な奴です
05:53
The reason why Ferroplasma is interesting is because it eats iron,
フェロプラズマが面白い理由は
鉄を食べ―
05:57
lives inside the equivalent of battery acid,
電池の中のような酸性環境で生き―
06:01
and excretes sulfuric acid.
硫酸を排出するからです
06:05
So, when you think of odd life forms,
このような奇妙な生物
06:09
when you think of what it takes to live,
そして彼らの生き方を研究すると
実はこれは
06:11
it turns out this is a very efficient life form,
すごく効率のいい生命体でした
06:15
and they call it an archaea. Archaea means "the ancient ones."
そして彼らは古細菌
「太古の者」と呼ばれています
06:17
And the reason why they're ancient is because this thing came up
そしてなぜ彼らが「太古」なのかというと
彼らが生まれた時代は
06:21
when this planet was covered
この地球が電池中の
硫酸のようなものに覆われ
06:25
by things like sulfuric acid in batteries,
この地球が電池中の
硫酸のようなものに覆われ
06:27
and it was eating iron when the earth was part of a melted core.
また 溶けた核と一体で その時
鉄を食べて生きていたからです
06:28
So, it's not just dogs and cats and whales and dolphins
なので この小さな冒険で注目すべきは
06:33
that you should be aware of and interested in on this little journey.
犬や猫やクジラや
イルカだけではありません
06:37
Your fear should be that you are not,
あなたの感じるべき恐怖は
一時的なことに―
06:41
that you're paying attention to stuff which is temporal.
着目し続けていることに対してです
06:44
I mean, George Bush -- he's going to be gone, alright? Life isn't.
ジョージ・ブッシュはそのうち
いなくなりますよね?生命は違います
06:47
Whether the humans survive or don't survive,
人間が生存しようがしまいが
06:53
these things are going to be living on this planet or other planets.
彼らは この惑星や他の惑星で生き続けます
06:56
And it's just beginning to understand this code of DNA
そしてこのDNAの暗号は
解け始めたばかりです
06:59
that's really the most exciting intellectual adventure
本当に 私たちがこれまで行ってきた中で
07:03
that we've ever been on.
最もエキサイティングな
知的冒険です
07:06
And you can do strange things with this stuff. This is a baby gar.
これを使えば奇妙なことが色々出来ます
これはガーの赤ちゃん
07:09
Conservation group gets together,
保護団体がこの絶滅しそうな
07:13
tries to figure out how to breed an animal that's almost extinct.
動物を繁殖させようと
知恵を絞っています
07:15
They can't do it naturally, so what they do with this thing is
自然には繁殖させられないので
07:20
they take a spoon, take some cells out of an adult gar's mouth, code,
スプーンで大人のガーの口の中から
細胞を すなわち暗号を採取しました
07:23
take the cells from that and insert it into a fertilized cow's egg,
その細胞を受精した牛の
卵子の中に入れたのです
07:29
reprogram cow's egg -- different gene code.
つまり 違う遺伝子で
プログラムし直したのです
07:34
When you do that, the cow gives birth to a gar.
そうすることで 牛がガーを産みます
07:38
We are now experimenting with bongos, pandas, elims, Sumatran tigers,
今は ボンゴやパンダ エリム
スマトラトラでも実験が行われています
07:43
and the Australians -- bless their hearts --
オーストラリア人は―
彼らに祝福あれ―
07:49
are playing with these things.
彼らで遊んでいます
07:52
Now, the last of these things died in September 1936.
タスマニアンタイガーの最後の個体は
1936年の9月に
07:53
These are Tasmanian tigers. The last known one died at the Hobart Zoo.
ホバート動物園で亡くなりました
07:57
But it turns out that as we learn more about gene code
しかし 遺伝子コードや
生命のプログラム方法
08:01
and how to reprogram species,
それらの理解を深めていくと
08:04
we may be able to close the gene gaps in deteriorate DNA.
どうやら 劣化したDNAの遺伝子の
隙間を埋めることが出来そうなのです
08:06
And when we learn how to close the gene gaps,
そして 隙間の埋め方を習得すれば
08:11
then we can put a full string of DNA together.
完全なDNAができます
08:14
And if we do that, and insert this into a fertilized wolf's egg,
そうすれば それをオオカミの卵子に入れて
08:17
we may give birth to an animal
1936年以来この地球上に存在しなかった
08:22
that hasn't walked the earth since 1936.
動物を誕生させることが出来ます
08:24
And then you can start going back further,
そして さらに遡って
08:27
and you can start thinking about dodos,
ドードーや他の種について
08:29
and you can think about other species.
考えることが出来ます
08:32
And in other places, like Maryland, they're trying to figure out
その他の場所 例えばメリーランドでは
08:34
what the primordial ancestor is.
遠い祖先について考えています
08:37
Because each of us contains our entire gene code
なぜなら 私たち一人一人が
過去数十億年の
08:39
of where we've been for the past billion years,
遺伝子コードを全て持っています
08:42
because we've evolved from that stuff,
そこから進化していますからね
08:45
you can take that tree of life and collapse it back,
進化系図を遡ることが出来ます
08:47
and in the measure that you learn to reprogram,
そしてリプログラミングを学ぶ内に
08:49
maybe we'll give birth to something
最も原始的な生命体を
08:52
that is very close to the first primordial ooze.
生み出すことが出来るかもしれません
08:54
And it's all coming out of things that look like this.
全ては5年前に存在しなかった
08:56
These are companies that didn't exist five years ago.
この様な施設で生み出されます
08:58
Huge gene sequencing facilities the size of football fields.
サッカー場の大きさの
遺伝子シークエンシング施設
09:00
Some are public. Some are private.
公的施設も民間施設もあります
09:04
It takes about 5 billion dollars to sequence a human being the first time.
最初の人のシークエンシングには
50億ドル程度
09:06
Takes about 3 million dollars the second time.
2回目は300万ドル程度かかりました
09:10
We will have a 1,000-dollar genome within the next five to eight years.
次の5から8年の間に1,000ドルで
ゲノム情報が手に入るようになり
09:12
That means each of you will contain on a CD your entire gene code.
皆さん一人一人の 全ての
遺伝情報がCDに記録されます
09:16
And it will be really boring. It will read like this.
このようなとても退屈な情報です
09:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:24
The really neat thing about this stuff is that's life.
これが生命です すごいですよね
09:26
And Laurie's going to talk about this one a little bit.
これについてはローリーが
後程お話します
09:28
Because if you happen to find this one inside your body,
これが体の中にあったら大問題です
09:31
you're in big trouble, because that's the source code for Ebola.
これはエボラのコードですから
09:33
That's one of the deadliest diseases known to humans.
最も危険な病気の一つです
09:37
But plants work the same way and insects work the same way,
しかし 植物も昆虫もリンゴも
09:39
and this apple works the same way.
同じ原理で動いています
09:41
This apple is the same thing as this floppy disk.
このリンゴはフロッピーと同じです
09:43
Because this thing codes ones and zeros,
これは1と0のコードで出来ていて
09:45
and this thing codes A, T, C, Gs, and it sits up there,
これはA T C Gのコードで
09:47
absorbing energy on a tree, and one fine day
木の枝で光合成をしながら
エネルギーを蓄え
09:49
it has enough energy to say, execute, and it goes [thump]. Right?
それが終われば「実行」ボタンで
こうなります(落ちる音)
09:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:56
And when it does that, pushes a .EXE, what it does is,
EXEを押して「実行」した時
何が起こっているかというと
09:59
it executes the first line of code, which reads just like that,
コードの最初の部分
根っこを作れという
10:03
AATCAGGGACCC, and that means: make a root.
AATCAGGGACCCを
読み 実行するのです
10:06
Next line of code: make a stem.
次のコードは:幹を作れ
10:09
Next line of code, TACGGGG: make a flower that's white,
その次は:白くて 春に咲いて
10:11
that blooms in the spring, that smells like this.
このような匂いのする花を作れ
10:14
In the measure that you have the code
このようなコードがあり
10:17
and the measure that you read it --
それを読む方法があるということは―
10:19
and, by the way, the first plant was read two years ago;
ちなみに最初の植物は2年前に
10:22
the first human was read two years ago;
最初の人の情報も2年前―
10:24
the first insect was read two years ago.
最初の虫も2年前に解読されました
10:26
The first thing that we ever read was in 1995:
本当に最初の解読は
1995年に行われました
10:28
a little bacteria called Haemophilus influenzae.
インフルエンザ菌という小さな細菌です
10:31
In the measure that you have the source code, as all of you know,
ソースコードを保有すれば
それをプログラムし直し
10:34
you can change the source code, and you can reprogram life forms
生命体をリプログラムすることにより
10:37
so that this little thingy becomes a vaccine,
こいつをワクチンにしたり
10:39
or this little thingy starts producing biomaterials,
バイオマテリアルを作らせたり
することが出来ます
10:41
which is why DuPont is now growing a form of polyester
デュポンが絹のようなポリエステルを
トウモロコシの中で
10:44
that feels like silk in corn.
作れるのはこのためです
10:47
This changes all rules. This is life, but we're reprogramming it.
これはあらゆる法則を変えてしまいます
私たちは命をリプログラムするのです
10:50
This is what you look like. This is one of your chromosomes.
これがあなたです
これはあなたの染色体の一つです
10:57
And what you can do now is,
そして現在 何が出来るかというと
11:01
you can outlay exactly what your chromosome is,
ここに染色体が全て展開されて
11:03
and what the gene code on that chromosome is right here,
染色体にある遺伝コードが
ここに出てきて
11:06
and what those genes code for, and what animals they code against,
その働きや類似する他の
生物のコードがあり
11:09
and then you can tie it to the literature.
文献情報に関連付けることができます
11:12
And in the measure that you can do that, you can go home today,
今日 家に帰って
インターネットにつなげば
11:14
and get on the Internet, and access
世界で最も大きな公共図書館―
11:17
the world's biggest public library, which is a library of life.
生命の図書館にアクセスできます
11:19
And you can do some pretty strange things
そして奇妙なことが出来ます
11:23
because in the same way as you can reprogram this apple,
リンゴをプログラムし直すように
11:25
if you go to Cliff Tabin's lab at the Harvard Medical School,
ハーバード医学大学院 クリフ・タビンの
11:28
he's reprogramming chicken embryos to grow more wings.
研究室では 鶏の胚をプログラムし直し
翼の数を増やしています
11:31
Why would Cliff be doing that? He doesn't have a restaurant.
レストランの経営者でもないのに
11:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:40
The reason why he's reprogramming that animal to have more wings
羽根が余計に生えるよう
プログラムした理由は
11:42
is because when you used to play with lizards as a little child,
子供の時 トカゲで遊んでいて
トカゲを摘まむと
11:45
and you picked up the lizard, sometimes the tail fell off, but it regrew.
たまに尻尾がとれましたが
また生えましたよね
11:48
Not so in human beings:
人はそうはいきません
11:52
you cut off an arm, you cut off a leg -- it doesn't regrow.
腕や脚を切っても
また生えてはきません
11:55
But because each of your cells contains your entire gene code,
しかし あなたの細胞は全て
全遺伝コードを保有しています
11:58
each cell can be reprogrammed, if we don't stop stem cell research
全てプログラムし直せます
もし 幹細胞の研究を止めなければ
12:03
and if we don't stop genomic research,
そして 様々な体の機能を
12:07
to express different body functions.
発現させる遺伝子研究を止めなければです
12:09
And in the measure that we learn how chickens grow wings,
鶏が羽根を生やす方法を
そして細胞が分化する
12:13
and what the program is for those cells to differentiate,
プログラムを研究することで
12:16
one of the things we're going to be able to do
何が出来るかというと
分化しない細胞を
12:18
is to stop undifferentiated cells, which you know as cancer,
すなわち癌細胞を止めることが出来ます
12:21
and one of the things we're going to learn how to do
また もう一つ学びたいことは
12:25
is how to reprogram cells like stem cells
幹細胞のような細胞をプログラムし直し
12:27
in such a way that they express bone, stomach, skin, pancreas.
骨 胃 皮膚 膵臓等を
発現させる方法です
12:30
And you are likely to be wandering around -- and your children --
そして皆さんと皆さんの子供たちも
そう遠くない将来
12:37
on regrown body parts in a reasonable period of time,
研究を止めない世界では
人工的に育てた
12:40
in some places in the world where they don't stop the research.
体の一部と共に生活しているでしょう
12:44
How's this stuff work? If each of you differs
なぜそんな事が可能か?
皆さん一人一人は全体の遺伝子コードの
12:49
from the person next to you by one in a thousand, but only three percent codes,
3パーセントの中で 1000分の1の
違いしかありません
12:54
which means it's only one in a thousand times three percent,
つまり0.003パーセントの違いです
12:57
very small differences in expression and punctuation
句読点や表現の小さな違いが
大きな違いになります
12:59
can make a significant difference. Take a simple declarative sentence.
非常にシンプルな文を見てみましょう
13:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:07
Right?
でしょう?
13:09
That's perfectly clear. So, men read that sentence,
明確な文です
男性が読むとこうなります
13:10
and they look at that sentence, and they read this.
「女性は男性がいなければ無力です」
13:14
Okay?
いいですか?
13:22
Now, women look at that sentence and they say, uh-uh, wrong.
そして女性がこの文を見て
間違いを指摘します
13:23
This is the way it should be seen.
本当はこう読むと
13:27
(Laughter)
「女性:彼女なしでは男は無力です」
(笑)
13:31
That's what your genes are doing.
これが遺伝子のしていることです
13:39
That's why you differ from this person over here by one in a thousand.
1000分の1の違いがあなたを隣の人とは
違う人にしているのです
13:40
Right? But, you know, he's reasonably good looking, but...
でしょう? ただ この人は
見た目がいいですが…
13:45
I won't go there.
それには触れないでおきましょう
13:48
You can do this stuff even without changing the punctuation.
これは句読点の変更なしにも可能です
13:51
You can look at this, right?
これを見てください
(The IRS:アメリカ合衆国内国歳入庁)
13:55
And they look at the world a little differently.
彼らはこれを違う視点で読みます
13:59
They look at the same world and they say...
彼らの視点で読むとこのようになります
[Theirs:彼らの](笑)
14:01
(Laughter)
彼らの視点で読むとこのようになります
[Theirs:彼らの](笑)
14:03
That's how the same gene code -- that's why you have 30,000 genes,
これで同じ遺伝子で違いを出せます―
あなたは3万の遺伝子があり
14:09
mice have 30,000 genes, husbands have 30,000 genes.
旦那さんもネズミも
同じく3万の遺伝子を持ち―
14:13
Mice and men are the same. Wives know that, but anyway.
ネズミと旦那さんが同じなんです
奥さん方は分かりますよね
14:16
You can make very small changes in gene code
遺伝子コードの文字は同じでも
14:20
and get really different outcomes,
ごく小さな変化を入れることで
14:22
even with the same string of letters.
結果に大きな違いを出せます
14:26
That's what your genes are doing every day.
これが遺伝子が毎日していることです
14:30
That's why sometimes a person's genes
このために 人の細胞がガン化するのに
14:33
don't have to change a lot to get cancer.
多くの変化は必ずしも必要ないのです
14:35
These little chippies, these things are the size of a credit card.
この小さなチップは
クレジットカードの大きさですが
14:41
They will test any one of you for 60,000 genetic conditions.
6万種の遺伝子疾患を検査出来ます
14:46
That brings up questions of privacy and insurability
プライバシーや保険契約条件などの
問題は出てきますが
14:49
and all kinds of stuff, but it also allows us to start going after diseases,
病気を追究することが出来ます
14:52
because if you run a person who has leukemia through something like this,
これを使って白血病の患者を検査すると
14:55
it turns out that three diseases with
全く同じ症状が出る
14:59
completely similar clinical syndromes
三つの病気が 実は全く別の
病気であることが
15:01
are completely different diseases.
分かりました
15:05
Because in ALL leukemia, that set of genes over there over-expresses.
ALL型白血病ではこちらの遺伝子が
過剰発現しています
15:07
In MLL, it's the middle set of genes,
MLL型は真ん中の遺伝子が
15:10
and in AML, it's the bottom set of genes.
そしてAML型は下の遺伝子です
15:12
And if one of those particular things is expressing in your body,
この内の一つが過剰発現している場合
グリベックを飲めば
15:14
then you take Gleevec and you're cured.
治るでしょう
15:19
If it is not expressing in your body,
もし発現していない場合
15:22
if you don't have one of those types --
この内の一つの
15:24
a particular one of those types -- don't take Gleevec.
特定の遺伝子がない場合
グリベックは飲まないでください
15:26
It won't do anything for you.
何の効果もありませんからね
15:29
Same thing with Receptin if you've got breast cancer.
乳癌用のレセプティンもそうです
15:31
Don't have an HER-2 receptor? Don't take Receptin.
HER-2受容体がなければ
レセプティンは摂らないでください
15:34
Changes the nature of medicine. Changes the predictions of medicine.
薬の本質が変わります
薬の予想が変わります
15:37
Changes the way medicine works.
薬の効果が変わります
15:41
The greatest repository of knowledge when most of us went to college
私たちが大学にいた頃の
もっとも偉大な
15:43
was this thing, and it turns out that
知の貯蔵庫はこれでした
15:46
this is not so important any more.
もう それほど重要ではありません
15:48
The U.S. Library of Congress, in terms of its printed volume of data,
アメリカ議会図書館が貯蔵する
活字データの量は
15:50
contains less data than is coming out of a good genomics company
優良な遺伝子企業が毎月出す
化合物の量で数えた
15:54
every month on a compound basis.
データ量より少ないのです
15:58
Let me say that again: A single genomics company
もう一度言います: 一つの遺伝子企業は
16:01
generates more data in a month, on a compound basis,
議会図書館に貯蔵された活字よりも
16:04
than is in the printed collections of the Library of Congress.
多くの化合物のデータを毎月生み出しています
16:07
This is what's been powering the U.S. economy. It's Moore's Law.
これがアメリカ経済を動かしています
ムーアの法則です
16:11
So, all of you know that the price of computers halves every 18 months
皆さんご存知の通りコンピューターの
価格は18か月ごとに半減します
16:15
and the power doubles, right?
そして能力は2倍になりますね?
16:20
Except that when you lay that side by side with the speed
ただし これを遺伝子バンクに
遺伝子データが
16:22
with which gene data's being deposited in GenBank,
蓄積されるスピードと比較すると
16:26
Moore's Law is right here: it's the blue line.
ムーアの法則はここになります
青い線です
16:29
This is on a log scale, and that's what superexponential growth means.
これは対数軸です
これが超急成長と言えるものです
16:34
This is going to push computers to have to grow faster
これはコンピューターの成長速度を
今まで以上に速めるように
16:38
than they've been growing, because so far,
作用します なぜなら
16:42
there haven't been applications that have been required
ムーアの法則より急激に伸びる
コンピューターの
16:44
that need to go faster than Moore's Law. This stuff does.
使用用途はありませんでしたが
これは伸びます
16:47
And here's an interesting map.
ここに興味深い地図があります
16:50
This is a map which was finished at the Harvard Business School.
この地図はハーバードビジネススクール
が完成させました
16:52
One of the really interesting questions is, if all this data's free,
この膨大なデータが無料だとして
誰が使用しているのか?
16:56
who's using it? This is the greatest public library in the world.
というのは興味深い質問です
これは世界で最も大きな公共図書館です
16:59
Well, it turns out that there's about 27 trillion bits
この地図によると
どうやら約27兆ビットが
17:03
moving inside from the United States to the United States;
アメリカ内で移動していて
約4.6兆ビットが
17:06
about 4.6 trillion is going over to those European countries;
ヨーロッパ諸国に移動しています
約5.5兆は日本に行っていますが
17:09
about 5.5's going to Japan; there's almost no communication
日本からはほぼ何も帰ってきません
17:13
between Japan, and nobody else is literate in this stuff.
またこのライブラリを読める国は
他にありません
17:16
It's free. No one's reading it. They're focusing on the war;
無料なのに誰も読まないのです
皆戦争や―
17:20
they're focusing on Bush; they're not interested in life.
ブッシュの事に注目していて
生命には興味が無い
17:25
So, this is what a new map of the world looks like.
これが新しい世界地図です
17:28
That is the genomically literate world. And that is a problem.
これがゲノムが読める世界です
そしてこれは問題なのです
17:31
In fact, it's not a genomically literate world.
実は読める「世界」ではありません
17:37
You can break this out by states.
「州」に分けることが出来ます
17:39
And you can watch states rise and fall depending on
そして生命の言語を読む能力により
17:41
their ability to speak a language of life,
州が浮き沈みするのが見えます
17:43
and you can watch New York fall off a cliff,
ニューヨークが凋落し
17:45
and you can watch New Jersey fall off a cliff,
ニュージャージーが凋落し
17:47
and you can watch the rise of the new empires of intelligence.
新しい知の帝国が興隆するのが
見て取れます
17:49
And you can break it out by counties, because it's specific counties.
郡によっても分けられます
なぜなら特定の郡が―
17:53
And if you want to get more specific,
さらに特定するなら
17:56
it's actually specific zip codes.
特定の郵便番号を見てみることですね
17:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:00
So, you want to know where life is happening?
生命が起こっている場所を
知りたいですか?
18:02
Well, in Southern California it's happening in 92121. And that's it.
南カリフォルニアの場合
92121で起こっています
18:05
And that's the triangle between Salk, Scripps, UCSD,
サルク、スクリップス、そしてUCSDの
三角形の中です
18:11
and it's called Torrey Pines Road.
トレイパイン通りと呼ばれています
18:16
That means you don't need to be a big nation to be successful;
すなわち 成功するために
大国である必要はなく
18:18
it means you don't need a lot of people to be successful;
たくさんの人員は必要なく
18:21
and it means you can move most of the wealth of a country
国内のほとんどの富が厳選された
18:23
in about three or four carefully picked 747s.
3、4ヶ所の中で動いているということです
18:26
Same thing in Massachusetts. Looks more spread out but --
マサチューセッツも同じです
少し分散してますが
18:30
oh, by the way, the ones that are the same color are contiguous.
ちなみに同じ色の地区は隣接しています
18:34
What's the net effect of this?
これはどういう影響を及ぼすでしょう?
18:38
In an agricultural society, the difference between
農業社会での最も貧しい者と
18:40
the richest and the poorest,
富める者の差は
18:42
the most productive and the least productive, was five to one. Why?
生産性の高い者と低い者の差は
5対1でした なぜか?
18:44
Because in agriculture, if you had 10 kids
農業では子供が10人いて
18:48
and you grow up a little bit earlier and you work a little bit harder,
少し早く生まれて 少し多く働けば
平均的に
18:50
you could produce about five times more wealth, on average,
隣人と比較して平均5倍程度の
18:53
than your neighbor.
富を生み出せます
18:55
In a knowledge society, that number is now 427 to 1.
知識社会ではこの数値は
427対1です
18:57
It really matters if you're literate, not just in reading and writing
読み書きが出来るのは本当に
重要なのです
19:01
in English and French and German,
英語 フランス語 ドイツ語だけでなく
19:05
but in Microsoft and Linux and Apple.
マイクロソフト、Linuxや
アップルの使う言語でも
19:07
And very soon it's going to matter if you're literate in life code.
そしてすぐに 命のコードの
読み書きも重要になるでしょう
19:10
So, if there is something you should fear,
ですから あなたが恐れるべきなのは
19:14
it's that you're not keeping your eye on the ball.
大事なことから目を背けていることです
19:16
Because it really matters who speaks life.
生命の読み書きが出来る人は
重要になります
19:19
That's why nations rise and fall.
国の興亡もかかってきます
19:22
And it turns out that if you went back to the 1870s,
1870年代に遡ると
地球上で最も一人あたりの
19:25
the most productive nation on earth was Australia, per person.
生産性が高い国はオーストラリアで
ニュージーランドも
19:28
And New Zealand was way up there. And then the U.S. came in about 1950,
上位に位置していました
1950年代にはアメリカが台頭し
19:31
and then Switzerland about 1973, and then the U.S. got back on top --
1973年はスイスが その後アメリカが
トップに返り咲きます
19:34
beat up their chocolates and cuckoo clocks.
チョコレートと鳩時計に打ち勝ちました
19:38
And today, of course, you all know that the most productive nation
現在はみなさんもご存知のように
ルクセンブルグが
19:42
on earth is Luxembourg, producing about one third more wealth
最も生産性が高く
一人あたりアメリカ人より1.3倍も
19:45
per person per year than America.
多くの富を生み出しています
19:48
Tiny landlocked state. No oil. No diamonds. No natural resources.
石油も ダイヤも 天然資源も持たない
小さな内陸の国です
19:51
Just smart people moving bits. Different rules.
頭のいい人たちがビットを動かしている
別のルールがそこでは動いているのです
19:55
Here's differential productivity rates.
次は比生産性です
20:01
Here's how many people it takes to produce a single U.S. patent.
アメリカの特許を一つ
得るのに必要な人数は
20:05
So, about 3,000 Americans, 6,000 Koreans, 14,000 Brits,
アメリカ人は3千人 韓国人は6千人
イギリス人は1万4千人
20:08
790,000 Argentines. You want to know why Argentina's crashing?
アルゼンチン人は79万人です
この国の破たんには
20:12
It's got nothing to do with inflation.
インフレーションは関係ありません
20:15
It's got nothing to do with privatization.
民営化も関係ありません
20:17
You can take a Harvard-educated Ivy League economist,
もしハーバード出のエコノミストを
アルゼンチンの首脳に据えても
20:19
stick him in charge of Argentina. He still crashes the country
ルールの変化を理解しない人間では
20:23
because he doesn't understand how the rules have changed.
国は破たんするでしょう
20:26
Oh, yeah, and it takes about 5.6 million Indians.
そしてインド人は560万人必要です
20:29
Well, watch what happens to India.
インドがどうなるか見守りましょう
20:32
India and China used to be 40 percent of the global economy
インドと中国は産業革命時代
20:34
just at the Industrial Revolution, and they are now about 4.8 percent.
世界経済の40%を占めていました
今は4.8%です
20:37
Two billion people. One third of the global population producing 5 percent of the wealth
20億人 世界の人口の3分の1が
富の5%しか生み出していない
20:42
because they didn't get this change,
なぜなら変化を捉えなかったから
20:46
because they kept treating their people like serfs
プロジェクトの共同出資者ではなく
20:49
instead of like shareholders of a common project.
農奴のように人々を扱い続けたからです
20:51
They didn't keep the people who were educated.
教育を受けた人々を引き止めなかった
20:55
They didn't foment the businesses. They didn't do the IPOs.
ビジネスを促さず IPOをしなかった
20:58
Silicon Valley did. And that's why they say
シリコンバレーはそうしました
だからシリコンバレーは
21:01
that Silicon Valley has been powered by ICs.
「ICが動力源」だと言われます
21:05
Not integrated circuits: Indians and Chinese.
集積回路ではなく
インド人(I)と中国人(C)です
21:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:11
Here's what's happening in the world.
これが世界の動きです
21:15
It turns out that if you'd gone to the U.N. in 1950,
1950年 国連が創設された時には
世界には
21:17
when it was founded, there were 50 countries in this world.
50ヶ国しかありませんでした
21:20
It turns out there's now about 192.
今では192ヶ国になります
21:22
Country after country is splitting, seceding, succeeding, failing --
国が分裂し 分離し 興隆し 衰退し―
21:25
and it's all getting very fragmented. And this has not stopped.
どんどん断片的になってきています
この傾向は続いています
21:30
In the 1990s, these are sovereign states
1990年代 これらの主権国家は
21:35
that did not exist before 1990.
1990年以前は存在しませんでした
21:38
And this doesn't include fusions or name changes or changes in flags.
ここでは国家の統合 名称の変更
旗の変更は含んでいません
21:40
We're generating about 3.12 states per year.
毎年3.12の国家が生まれています
21:45
People are taking control of their own states,
人々は自ら国家を運営したがっています
21:48
sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse.
結果の良し悪しは分かれますがね
21:51
And the really interesting thing is,
そして非常に興味深いことは
21:54
you and your kids are empowered to build great empires,
あなたやあなたの子供は帝国を
21:56
and you don't need a lot to do it.
築くことが簡単にできます
21:58
(Music)
(音楽)
22:00
And, given that the music is over, I was going to talk
音楽が終わりましたね
遺伝子コードがどのように働き
22:02
about how you can use this to generate a lot of wealth,
それを使って どのように富を築けるか
22:05
and how code works.
話そうと思っていたのですが
22:08
Moderator: Two minutes.
司会者:残り2分です
22:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
22:11
Juan Enriquez: No, I'm going to stop there and we'll do it next year
ファン:いや ここで止めて
それは来年話すとしましょう
22:13
because I don't want to take any of Laurie's time.
ローリーの講演時間を削らないように―
22:17
But thank you very much.
ありがとうございました(拍手)
22:20
Translator:Makoto Ikeo
Reviewer:Eriko T.

sponsored links

Juan Enriquez - Futurist
Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and other life sciences will bring in business, technology, politics and society.

Why you should listen

A broad thinker who studies the intersections of these fields, Enriquez has a talent for bridging disciplines to build a coherent look ahead. He is the managing director of Excel Venture Management, a life sciences VC firm. He recently published (with Steve Gullans) Evolving Ourselves: How Unnatural Selection and Nonrandom Mutation Are Shaping Life on Earth. The book describes a world where humans increasingly shape their environment, themselves and other species.

Enriquez is a member of the board of Synthetic Genomics, which recently introduced the smallest synthetic living cell. Called “JCVI-syn 3.0,” it has 473 genes (about half the previous smallest cell). The organism would die if one of the genes is removed. In other words, this is the minimum genetic instruction set for a living organism.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.