10:45
TED2010

Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids

アドーラ・スヴィタク 「大人は子供から何を学べるか」

Filmed:

神童アドーラ・スヴィタクは、世界には「子供っぽい」考え方が必要だと言います。大胆なアイデア、奔放な創造力、そして何よりも楽観的であること。子供たちの大きな夢は高い期待を受けるにふさわしいものであり、大人は子供に教えるのと同じくらいに、子供からも学ぶようにしてほしいと彼女は言います。

- Child prodigy
A prolific short story writer and blogger since age seven, Adora Svitak (now 12) speaks around the United States to adults and children as an advocate for literacy. Full bio

Now, I want to start with a question:
最初に質問があります
00:15
When was the last time you were called childish?
「子供っぽい」と最後に言われたのはいつのことですか?
00:17
For kids like me,
私なんかは
00:20
being called childish can be a frequent occurrence.
「子供っぽい」ことはよしなさいと しょっちゅう言われます
00:22
Every time we make irrational demands,
何か道理に合わない要求をしているときとか
00:25
exhibit irresponsible behavior
無責任な行動を取ったときとか
00:28
or display any other signs
そのほか何であれ 普通に
00:30
of being normal American citizens,
アメリカ人らしいことをすると
00:32
we are called childish.
「子供っぽい」と言われます
00:34
Which really bothers me.
本当にうんざりです
00:36
After all, take a look at these events:
世界の問題を考えてみてください
00:38
Imperialism and colonization,
帝国主義に 植民地支配
00:40
world wars, George W. Bush.
世界大戦に ジョージ W ブッシュ
00:43
Ask yourself, who's responsible? Adults.
一体誰のせいでしょうか? 大人たちです
00:46
Now, what have kids done?
一方で子供たちは何をしてきたでしょうか?
00:49
Well, Anne Frank touched millions
アンネ フランクはホロコーストのことを
00:52
with her powerful account of the Holocaust,
力強い文章で伝え 何百万という人の心を動かしました
00:54
Ruby Bridges helped to end segregation in the United States,
ルビィ ブリッジスはアメリカから人種差別をなくす力になりました
00:57
and, most recently,
もっと最近では
01:00
Charlie Simpson helped to raise
チャーリー シンプソンが ハイチのため
01:02
120,000 pounds for Haiti
小さな自転車に乗って
01:04
on his little bike.
12万ポンドも募金を集めました
01:06
So, as you can see evidenced by such examples,
このような証拠を見れば
01:08
age has absolutely nothing to do with it.
年齢なんか関係ないことがわかります
01:11
The traits the word childish addresses
「子供っぽい」と非難される振る舞いは
01:14
are seen so often in adults
大人にこそよく見受けられます
01:16
that we should abolish this age-discriminatory word
この年齢差別的な言葉を
01:18
when it comes to criticizing behavior
無責任さや不合理な考えを持つ
01:20
associated with irresponsibility and irrational thinking.
振る舞いを批判するときに使うのはやめるべきです
01:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:25
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
01:31
Then again, who's to say
一方で 世界には
01:33
that certain types of irrational thinking
ある種の不合理な考えが
01:35
aren't exactly what the world needs?
必要かもしれません
01:37
Maybe you've had grand plans before
昔は大きな構想を持っていたのに
01:40
but stopped yourself, thinking,
自分で捨ててはいませんか?
01:42
"That's impossible," or, "That costs too much,"
不可能だとか お金がかかり過ぎるとか
01:44
or, "That won't benefit me."
自分の得にならないと考えて
01:46
For better or worse, we kids aren't hampered as much
いいにせよ悪いにせよ 私たち子供は
01:48
when it comes to thinking about reasons why not to do things.
やるべきでない理由を考えて 思いとどまったりはしません
01:51
Kids can be full of inspiring aspirations
子供はワクワクするような憧れや
01:54
and hopeful thinking.
希望に満ちた考えでいっぱいです
01:56
Like my wish that no one went hungry
誰も飢えることのない世界や
01:58
or that everything were a free kind of utopia.
すべてが無料というユートピアを夢見ます
02:00
How many of you still dream like that
皆さんの中で まだそんな夢を持ち
02:03
and believe in the possibilities?
可能性を信じている人は どれくらいいるでしょうか?
02:05
Sometimes a knowledge of history
時に歴史の知識や
02:08
and the past failures of utopian ideals
ユートピア的な理想の失敗事例が
02:10
can be a burden
足かせとなることもあります
02:12
because you know that if everything were free,
全てが無料になったら
02:14
then the food stocks would become depleted
食料の蓄えがなくなって飢饉になり
02:16
and scarce and lead to chaos.
混乱状態に陥るかもしれません
02:18
On the other hand,
一方 私たち子供は
02:20
we kids still dream about perfection.
まだ完全な世界を夢見ています
02:22
And that's a good thing because in order
それはいいことです
02:24
to make anything a reality,
何かを実現しようと思ったら
02:26
you have to dream about it first.
まずそれを夢見る必要があるからです
02:28
In many ways, our audacity to imagine
多くの点で 私たちの大胆な想像力は
02:30
helps push the boundaries of possibility.
可能性の地平を広げる助けになります
02:33
For instance, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington,
たとえば ワシントン州タコマにあるガラスの博物館です
02:36
my home state -- yoohoo Washington!
私の故郷です ワシントン州万歳!
02:39
(Applause) --
(拍手)
02:41
has a program called Kids Design Glass,
「子供のためのガラスデザイン」では
02:44
and kids draw their own ideas for glass art.
子供たちがガラス工芸のアイデアを描きます
02:46
Now, the resident artist said they got
そこのガラス作家は このプログラムから
02:48
some of their best ideas through the program
最高のアイデアが得られたと言っています
02:50
because kids don't think about the limitations
ガラスを吹いてある形にするのが
02:52
of how hard it can be to blow glass into certain shapes;
どれほど難しいか子供たちは考えません
02:54
they just think of good ideas.
ただ素敵なアイデアについて考えます
02:56
Now, when you think of glass, you might
皆さんはガラス細工というと
02:58
think of colorful Chihuly designs
カラフルなチフーリの作品や イタリア製の花瓶なんかを
03:00
or maybe Italian vases,
思い浮かべるかもしれません
03:03
but kids challenge glass artists to go beyond that
でも子供たちはガラス作家に それ以上のことを求めます
03:05
into the realm of broken-hearted snakes
これは「心傷ついたヘビ」と
03:08
and bacon boys, who you can see has meat vision.
「ミート光線を出すベーコンボーイ」です
03:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:13
Now, our inherent wisdom
私たち子供に備わる知恵が
03:15
doesn't have to be insider's knowledge.
子供限定の知識である必要はありません
03:17
Kids already do a lot of learning from adults,
子供たちは大人から既に多くのことを学んでおり
03:20
and we have a lot to share.
伝えるべきこともたくさんあるのです
03:23
I think that adults should start learning from kids.
大人たちは子供から学び始めるべきだと思います
03:25
Now, I do most of my speaking in front of an education crowd,
私は学校関係の人を前に話すことが多いので
03:29
teachers and students, and I like this analogy:
このアナロジーは好きです
03:32
It shouldn't just be a teacher at the head of the classroom
教室を仕切って ああしろ こうしろと言うのは
03:34
telling students, "Do this, do that."
先生だけであるべきではありません
03:36
The students should teach their teachers.
生徒だって先生を教えるべきなのです
03:38
Learning between grown ups and kids
大人と子供の間の教育は
03:41
should be reciprocal.
相互的であるべきです
03:43
The reality, unfortunately, is a little different,
現実は 残念ながら それとは違っており
03:45
and it has a lot to do with trust, or a lack of it.
信頼関係の欠如に大きな原因があります
03:48
Now, if you don't trust someone, you place restrictions on them, right?
人を信頼しないとき その相手を制限することになります
03:51
If I doubt my older sister's ability
私が融資に対して設定した
03:54
to pay back the 10 percent interest
10%の利息に対する
03:56
I established on her last loan,
姉の支払い能力が疑わしければ
03:58
I'm going to withhold her ability to get more money from me
今の借金を返すまで 私はそれ以上の借金を認めないでしょう
04:00
until she pays it back. (Laughter)
(笑)
04:03
True story, by the way.
ちなみにこれは実話です
04:05
Now, adults seem to have
大人たちは一般に子供に対して
04:07
a prevalently restrictive attitude towards kids
制約的な態度を取ります 事細かに
04:10
from every "don't do that,
「あれは駄目」「これは駄目」と
04:13
don't do this" in the school handbook
書かれた学校の手引き書から
04:15
to restrictions on school Internet use.
学校でのインターネット利用まで すべてです
04:17
As history points out, regimes become oppressive
歴史が示す通り 管理に不安があるときほど
04:20
when they're fearful about keeping control.
体制は圧政的になります
04:23
And although adults may not be quite at the level
大人は 全体主義体制ほど
04:25
of totalitarian regimes,
酷くはないかもしれませんが
04:27
kids have no, or very little say in making the rules,
ルール作りに関して 子供には ほとんど発言権がありません
04:29
when really the attitude should be reciprocal,
本当は相互的な態度が必要なのに
04:32
meaning that the adult population should learn
若い人たちが望むことを
04:34
and take into account the wishes
大人たちは考慮に入れ
04:36
of the younger population.
学ぶべきなのです
04:38
Now, what's even worse than restriction
制限よりもっと悪いのは
04:40
is that adults often underestimate kids abilities.
大人たちが子供の能力を過小評価することです
04:42
We love challenges, but when expectations are low,
私たちは挑戦が好きですが かけられる期待が低ければ
04:45
trust me, we will sink to them.
低いなりのことしかできなくなります
04:48
My own parents had anything but low expectations
私の両親は 私や姉に低い期待をするなんて
04:51
for me and my sister.
けっしてありませんでした
04:54
Okay, so they didn't tell us to become doctors
医者になれとか 弁護士になれとか
04:56
or lawyers or anything like that,
言われたことはありませんが
04:59
but my dad did read to us
父が読んでくれた本は
05:01
about Aristotle
アリストテレスとか
05:03
and pioneer germ fighters
「病原菌と闘う人々」でした
05:05
when lots of other kids were hearing
他の子供たちが聞いていたのは
05:07
"The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round."
「バスの車輪がくーるくる」だったのに
05:09
Well, we heard that one too, but "Pioneer Germ Fighters" totally rules.
私たちも聞きましたけど 「病原菌と闘う人々」の方が断然素敵です
05:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:14
I loved to write from the age of four,
私は4歳の頃から書くのが好きで
05:16
and when I was six
6歳のときには母が
05:18
my mom bought me my own laptop equipped with Microsoft Word.
Microsoft Wordが入った私用のノートパソコンを買ってくれました
05:20
Thank you Bill Gates and thank you Ma.
ありがとう ママとビル ゲイツ
05:23
I wrote over 300 short stories
私はその小さなノートパソコンで
05:25
on that little laptop,
300篇以上の短編を書き
05:27
and I wanted to get published.
そして本にしたいと思うようになりました
05:29
Instead of just scoffing at this heresy
両親は 子供が本を出したがるなんて
05:32
that a kid wanted to get published
突拍子もないと笑ったり
05:34
or saying wait until you're older,
大きくなるまで待ちなさいなんて言いません
05:36
my parents were really supportive.
とても力になってくれました
05:38
Many publishers were not quite so encouraging,
多くの出版社はあまり乗り気でなく
05:40
one large children's publisher ironically saying
ある大きな子供の本の出版社などは 皮肉なことに
05:44
that they didn't work with children --
「私たちは子供とは仕事しません」と言いました
05:47
children's publisher not working with children?
子供向けの出版社が子供とは仕事しないですって?
05:49
I don't know, you're kind of alienating a large client there.
一番のお得意様をないがしろにしてはいませんか?
05:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:55
Now, one publisher, Action Publishing,
アクション出版という出版社が
05:57
was willing to take that leap and trust me
勇気を示して 私を信頼し
06:00
and to listen to what I had to say.
私が言いたかったことを聞いてくれました
06:03
They published my first book, "Flying Fingers," -- you see it here --
そして出版されたのが 私の最初の本「空飛ぶ指」です
06:05
and from there on, it's gone to speaking at hundreds of schools,
それ以降 何百という学校で講演し
06:08
keynoting to thousands of educators
何千という教育者を前に基調講演をし
06:12
and finally, today, speaking to you.
そして今日 皆さんの前で講演しているのです
06:14
I appreciate your attention today,
皆さんに聞いていただいてとても嬉しいです
06:16
because to show that you truly care,
本当に関心を示して
06:18
you listen.
耳を傾けてくださいますから
06:20
But there's a problem with this rosy picture
しかし この子供は大人よりずっと素晴らしいという
06:22
of kids being so much better than adults.
バラ色のストーリーには1つ大きな問題があります
06:25
Kids grow up and become adults just like you.
子供は成長して皆さんみたいな大人になるということです
06:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:31
Or just like you? Really?
でも ほんとに皆さんみたいになるのでしょうか?
06:33
The goal is not to turn kids into your kind of adult,
目標は子供たちが皆さんみたいな大人ではなく
06:35
but rather better adults than you have been,
もっと良い大人になるということですが
06:38
which may be a little challenging
皆さんの業績を考えると
06:41
considering your guys' credentials (Laughter).
結構大変かもしれません
06:43
But the way progress happens
しかし進歩が起きるのは
06:45
is because new generations and new eras
新たな世代と新たな時代が成長し発展し
06:47
grow and develop and become better than the previous ones.
前の世代よりもっと優れたものになることによってです
06:50
It's the reason we're not in the Dark Ages anymore.
私たちが暗黒時代にいないのはそれが理由です
06:53
No matter your position or place in life,
皆さんが人生のどんな段階にいようと
06:56
it is imperative to create opportunities for children
子供たちのために機会を作り出すことは必須です
06:59
so that we can grow up to blow you away.
そして子供たちが成長して あなた方を吹き飛ばせるようにするのです
07:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:05
Adults and fellow TEDsters,
大人とTED仲間のみなさん
07:08
you need to listen and learn from kids
子供たちに耳を傾けて学び
07:10
and trust us and expect more from us.
子供を信頼し もっと期待をかけてください
07:12
You must lend an ear today,
みなさんが今日耳を傾ける必要があるのは
07:16
because we are the leaders of tomorrow,
私たち子供が明日のリーダーだからです
07:18
which means we're going to be taking care of you
年取ってもうろくした皆さんの
07:20
when you're old and senile. No, just kidding.
面倒を見るのは子供たちです 冗談ですよ
07:22
No, really, we are going to be the next generation,
私たちは次の世代であり
07:25
the ones who will bring this world forward.
世界を前に押し進めます
07:28
And in case you don't think that this really has meaning for you,
もし自分には関係ないと思っている人がいるなら
07:31
remember that cloning is possible,
クローン技術のことを考えてください
07:34
and that involves going through childhood again,
そうしたら子供時代をもう一度過ごすことになり
07:36
in which case you'll want to be heard
そのときは私たちの世代のように
07:38
just like my generation.
ちゃんと耳を傾けて欲しいと思うでしょう
07:40
Now, the world needs opportunities
世界は新しいリーダーと新しいアイデアを
07:42
for new leaders and new ideas.
必要としています
07:45
Kids need opportunities to lead and succeed.
子供はリードし成功する機会を必要としています
07:48
Are you ready to make the match?
皆さんは準備ができていますか?
07:51
Because the world's problems
世界の問題は
07:53
shouldn't be the human family's heirloom.
人類という家族の相続財産であるべきではないのですから
07:55
Thank you.
どうもありがとうございました
07:58
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:00
Thank you. Thank you.
ありがとう ありがとう
08:03
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Wataru Narita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Adora Svitak - Child prodigy
A prolific short story writer and blogger since age seven, Adora Svitak (now 12) speaks around the United States to adults and children as an advocate for literacy.

Why you should listen

A voracious reader from age three, Adora Svitak's first serious foray into writing -- at age five -- was limited only by her handwriting and spelling. (Her astonishing verbal abilities already matched that of young adults over twice her age.) As her official bio says, her breakthrough would soon come "in the form of a used Dell laptop her mother bought her." At age seven, she typed out over 250,000 words -- poetry, short stories, observations about the world -- in a single year.

Svitak has since fashioned her beyond-her-years wordsmithing into an inspiring campaign for literacy -- speaking across the country to both adults and kids. She is author of Flying Fingers, a book on learning.

More profile about the speaker
Adora Svitak | Speaker | TED.com