18:48
TEDxNASA

Dennis Hong: My seven species of robot

デニス・ホン 「私の7つのロボットたち」

Filmed:

TEDxNASAでデニス・ホンが、数々の受賞歴を誇る7つの全地形対応ロボットを紹介します。サッカーをするヒューマノイド型のDARwInや崖を這い上るCLIMBeRなど、バージニア工科大学のRoMeLaのチームにより作られたロボットたちです。講演の最後に、ラボの目覚ましい技術的成功をもたらしている創造性の5つの秘訣が明らかにされます。

- Roboticist
Dennis Hong is the founder and director of RoMeLa -- a Virginia Tech robotics lab that has pioneered several breakthroughs in robot design and engineering. Full bio

So, the first robot to talk about is called STriDER.
最初にご紹介するロボットはSTriDERです
00:15
It stands for Self-excited
「三脚動的自励式試作ロボット」
00:18
Tripedal Dynamic Experimental Robot.
という意味です
00:20
It's a robot that has three legs,
3本脚のロボットで
00:22
which is inspired by nature.
自然からヒントを得ました
00:24
But have you seen anything in nature,
でも自然界に3本脚の生き物なんて
00:27
an animal that has three legs?
いたでしょうか?
00:29
Probably not. So, why do I call this
たぶんいないでしょう
00:31
a biologically inspired robot? How would it work?
ではなぜ? どんな風に動くのでしょう?
00:33
But before that, let's look at pop culture.
それをご説明する前に ポップカルチャーにちょっと目を向けましょう
00:35
So, you know H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds," novel and movie.
H G ウェルズの「宇宙戦争」の小説と映画はご存じでしょう
00:38
And what you see over here is a very popular
今映っているのは
00:41
video game,
人気ゲームの一場面です
00:43
and in this fiction they describe these alien creatures that
この架空の物語の中では 地球を脅かす宇宙人が
00:45
are robots that have three legs that terrorize Earth.
3本脚ロボットとして描かれています
00:48
But my robot, STriDER, does not move like this.
でも私のロボット STriDERはこんな風には動きません
00:50
So, this is an actual dynamic simulation animation.
これは動的シミュレーションの動画です
00:54
I'm just going to show you how the robot works.
ロボットがどんな風に動くかご覧ください
00:57
It flips its body 180 degrees
ボディを180度反転させています
00:59
and it swings its leg between the two legs and catches the fall.
1本の脚を 他の2本の脚の間に通し 倒れ込むのを支えます
01:02
So, that's how it walks. But when you look at us
こんな風に歩くわけです
01:05
human being, bipedal walking,
人が二足歩行するときだって
01:07
what you're doing is you're not really using a muscle
筋肉を使って脚を持ち上げて
01:09
to lift your leg and walk like a robot. Right?
ロボットみたいに歩くわけではありません
01:11
What you're doing is you really swing your leg and catch the fall,
実際には 脚を振って 倒れるのを支え 立ち上がり
01:14
stand up again, swing your leg and catch the fall.
脚を振って 倒れるのを支え…という具合にやっています
01:17
You're using your built-in dynamics, the physics of your body,
体自体の重みや物理的な特性を ちょうど振り子のように
01:20
just like a pendulum.
利用しているのです
01:23
We call that the concept of passive dynamic locomotion.
私たちはこれを受動動的移動と呼んでいます
01:25
What you're doing is, when you stand up,
私たちが歩くときも同じです
01:29
potential energy to kinetic energy,
位置エネルギーから 運動エネルギーへ
01:31
potential energy to kinetic energy.
位置エネルギーから 運動エネルギーへ
01:33
It's a constantly falling process.
繰り返し落下するプロセスです
01:35
So, even though there is nothing in nature that looks like this,
だから自然界にこんな生き物はいないにしても
01:37
really, we were inspired by biology
実際に生物からヒントを得て
01:40
and applying the principles of walking
生物が歩く原理を応用しているのです
01:42
to this robot. Thus it's a biologically inspired robot.
だから生物をヒントにして作ったロボットというわけです
01:44
What you see over here, this is what we want to do next.
これは私たちが次にやりたいと思っていることです
01:47
We want to fold up the legs and shoot it up for long-range motion.
脚を畳んで遠くへ打ち出します
01:49
And it deploys legs -- it looks almost like "Star Wars" --
それから脚を出します スターウォーズみたいですね
01:53
when it lands, it absorbs the shock and starts walking.
着地時はショックを吸収し 歩き出します
01:56
What you see over here, this yellow thing, this is not a death ray. (Laughter)
この黄色いのは殺人光線じゃありませんよ
01:59
This is just to show you that if you have cameras
単にカメラか他の種類の
02:02
or different types of sensors --
センサーを表しています
02:04
because it is tall, it's 1.8 meters tall --
高さが1.8メートルあるので
02:06
you can see over obstacles like bushes and those kinds of things.
藪のような障害物があっても見渡すことができます
02:08
So we have two prototypes.
プロトタイプを2つ作りました
02:11
The first version, in the back, that's STriDER I.
最初に作ったのが 後ろにあるSTriDER Iで
02:13
The one in front, the smaller, is STriDER II.
手前にある小さいのがSTriDER IIです
02:16
The problem that we had with STriDER I is
STriDER Iの問題は重すぎることです
02:18
it was just too heavy in the body. We had so many motors,
関節の調整などに使うモーターが
02:20
you know, aligning the joints, and those kinds of things.
たくさん入っていたためです
02:23
So, we decided to synthesize a mechanical mechanism
それで機械的な機構を統合し
02:25
so we could get rid of all the motors, and with a single motor
1つのモーターですべての動作を
02:29
we can coordinate all the motions.
制御できるようにしました
02:32
It's a mechanical solution to a problem, instead of using mechatronics.
メカトロニクスを使わずに機械的なもので問題を解決したのです
02:34
So, with this now the top body is light enough. So, it's walking in our lab;
新しい方は本体が軽いのでラボの中でも動かせます
02:37
this was the very first successful step.
成功した第一歩でした
02:40
It's still not perfected -- its coffee falls down --
まだまだ完璧ではありませんので
02:43
so we still have a lot of work to do.
やるべきことは たくさんあります
02:45
The second robot I want to talk about is called IMPASS.
次のロボットはIMPASSです
02:48
It stands for Intelligent Mobility Platform with Actuated Spoke System.
「作動スポークシステムによる知的移動プラットフォーム」の略です
02:51
So, it's a wheel-leg hybrid robot.
車輪と脚のハイブリッドになっています
02:55
So, think of a rimless wheel
リムのない車輪 あるいは
02:58
or a spoke wheel,
スポークでできた車輪だと考えてください
03:00
but the spokes individually move in and out of the hub;
スポークが個々に動いて ハブを出入りします
03:02
so, it's a wheel-leg hybrid.
車輪と脚の組み合わせです
03:05
We are literally re-inventing the wheel here.
文字通り「車輪を再発明」したわけです
03:07
Let me demonstrate how it works.
動いているところをお見せしましょう
03:09
So, in this video we're using an approach
この映像では反応的アプローチを
03:12
called the reactive approach.
取っています
03:14
Just simply using the tactile sensors on the feet,
足の触覚センサーを使って
03:16
it's trying to walk over a changing terrain,
押すとへこむ柔らかい
03:19
a soft terrain where it pushes down and changes.
変化する地形の上を歩いています
03:21
And just by the tactile information,
触覚センサーの情報をたよりに
03:24
it successfully crosses over these type of terrain.
うまく柔らかい地形を移動しています
03:26
But, when it encounters a very extreme terrain,
大きな地形の変化に出会ったときはどうするのか?
03:29
in this case, this obstacle is more than three times
ここではロボットの高さの3倍以上ある
03:33
the height of the robot,
障害物にぶつかっています
03:36
Then it switches to a deliberate mode,
すると計画的動作モードに切り替えます
03:38
where it uses a laser range finder,
レーザー式の距離計や
03:40
and camera systems, to identify the obstacle and the size,
カメラを使って障害物の大きさを識別し
03:42
and it plans, carefully plans the motion of the spokes
スポークをどう動かすか注意深く計画し
03:44
and coordinates it so that it can show this
調整することによって このように
03:47
kind of very very impressive mobility.
とても優れた機動性を発揮します
03:49
You probably haven't seen anything like this out there.
こんなものをご覧になったのはきっと初めてでしょう
03:51
This is a very high mobility robot
私たちが開発した
03:53
that we developed called IMPASS.
超高機動性ロボットIMPASSです
03:56
Ah, isn't that cool?
ほら! すごいでしょう?
03:59
When you drive your car,
自動車の運転では
04:01
when you steer your car, you use a method
アッカーマン ステアリングと
04:04
called Ackermann steering.
呼ばれる方法が使われます
04:06
The front wheels rotate like this.
前輪がこの様に曲がります
04:08
For most small wheeled robots,
小さな車輪を持つロボットでは 多くの場合
04:10
they use a method called differential steering
差動ステアリングを使います
04:13
where the left and right wheel turns the opposite direction.
左の車輪と右の車輪を逆向きに回転させるのです
04:15
For IMPASS, we can do many, many different types of motion.
IMPASSの場合 様々な異なるタイプの動きをさせることができます
04:18
For example, in this case, even though the left and right wheel is connected
例えば 左右の車輪が1つの車軸でつながり 角速度が同じであっても
04:21
with a single axle rotating at the same angle of velocity.
曲がらせることができます
04:24
We just simply change the length of the spoke.
スポークの長さを変えてやれば良いのです
04:26
It affects the diameter and then can turn to the left, turn to the right.
すると直径が変わって 左右に曲がります
04:29
So, these are just some examples of the neat things
これはIMPASSにできる面白いことの
04:31
that we can do with IMPASS.
ほんの一例です
04:33
This robot is called CLIMBeR:
次のロボットはCLIMBeR
04:36
Cable-suspended Limbed Intelligent Matching Behavior Robot.
「ケーブル支持式有足知的適合動作ロボット」です
04:38
So, I've been talking to a lot of NASA JPL scientists --
私はNASAのJPLの科学者たちとよく話をします
04:41
at JPL they are famous for the Mars rovers --
マーズローバーが有名ですね
04:44
and the scientists, geologists always tell me
地質学者がいつも言っているのは
04:46
that the real interesting science,
科学的に本当に興味深い場所というのは
04:48
the science-rich sites, are always at the cliffs.
いつも崖のようなところにあるということです
04:51
But the current rovers cannot get there.
現在のローバーでは行くことができません
04:54
So, inspired by that we wanted to build a robot
それで私たちは ごつごつした崖を
04:56
that can climb a structured cliff environment.
よじ登れるロボットを作りたいと思いました
04:58
So, this is CLIMBeR.
それがこのCLIMBeRです
05:01
So, what it does, it has three legs. It's probably difficult to see,
3本脚で 見えにくいですが
05:03
but it has a winch and a cable at the top --
上にウィンチとケーブルがついています
05:05
and it tries to figure out the best place to put its foot.
そして最適な足の置き場を見つけ
05:08
And then once it figures that out
力の分散のさせ方を
05:10
in real time, it calculates the force distribution:
リアルタイムで計算します
05:12
how much force it needs to exert to the surface
表面にどれだけの力をかければ
05:15
so it doesn't tip and doesn't slip.
滑ったり転んだりしないか?
05:18
Once it stabilizes that, it lifts a foot,
安定したら 足を持ち上げ
05:20
and then with the winch it can climb up these kinds of thing.
ウィンチを使って這い上がります
05:22
Also for search and rescue applications as well.
捜索や救助のような用途にも使えるでしょう
05:26
Five years ago I actually worked at NASA JPL
5年前に私はNASAのJPLで
05:28
during the summer as a faculty fellow.
ひと夏の間 研究スタッフとして働きました
05:30
And they already had a six legged robot called LEMUR.
その時すでにLEMURという6本脚ロボットが開発されていて
05:32
So, this is actually based on that. This robot is called MARS:
これはそれをベースにした MARSです
05:36
Multi-Appendage Robotic System. So, it's a hexapod robot.
「多肢ロボットシステム」 六本脚を持つロボットです
05:39
We developed our adaptive gait planner.
適応型の歩行プランナーを開発しました
05:42
We actually have a very interesting payload on there.
面白い荷物を積んでいますね
05:44
The students like to have fun. And here you can see that it's
学生たちは楽しいことをやりたがります
05:46
walking over unstructured terrain.
凹凸のある地形を越えています
05:48
It's trying to walk on the coarse terrain,
こちらは粗い砂地の上を
05:51
sandy area,
歩いているところです
05:53
but depending on the moisture content or the grain size of the sand
湿り具合とか砂粒の大きさによって
05:55
the foot's soil sinkage model changes.
脚の沈み加減のモデルを変更します
06:00
So, it tries to adapt its gait to successfully cross over these kind of things.
足運びを環境に適応させることで このような地形をうまく渡ることができます
06:02
And also, it does some fun stuff, as can imagine.
すごく面白いものをご覧に入れましょう
06:06
We get so many visitors visiting our lab.
ラボを見学しに来る人はたくさんいるのですが
06:08
So, when the visitors come, MARS walks up to the computer,
お客様が来るとMARSはコンピュータの前に歩み寄り
06:11
starts typing "Hello, my name is MARS."
タイプし始めるのです
06:13
Welcome to RoMeLa,
「こんにちは 私はMARSです
06:15
the Robotics Mechanisms Laboratory at Virginia Tech.
バージニア工科大学ロボティクスラボRoMeLaへようこそ」
06:17
This robot is an amoeba robot.
これはアメーバロボットです
06:21
Now, we don't have enough time to go into technical details,
技術的な詳細をご説明している時間はないのですが
06:23
I'll just show you some of the experiments.
いくつか実験の様子をお見せしましょう
06:26
So, this is some of the early feasibility experiments.
実現可能性を検討している段階です
06:28
We store potential energy to the elastic skin to make it move.
弾性のある表面に位置エネルギーを蓄えて移動したり
06:30
Or use an active tension cords to make it move
あるいは弾性コードを使って前後に動きます
06:34
forward and backward. It's called ChIMERA.
こちらはChIMERAで
06:36
We also have been working with some scientists
ペンシルバニア大の人たちと
06:39
and engineers from UPenn
協力して作っている
06:41
to come up with a chemically actuated version
化学物質に反応する
06:43
of this amoeba robot.
アメーバロボットです
06:45
We do something to something
あるところにあることをすると
06:47
And just like magic, it moves. The blob.
魔法のように動き出します 変な生き物みたいですね
06:49
This robot is a very recent project. It's called RAPHaEL.
お次は新しいロボットのRAPHaELです
06:55
Robotic Air Powered Hand with Elastic Ligaments.
「弾性靱帯を持つ空気式ロボットハンド」です
06:57
There are a lot of really neat, very good robotic hands out there in the market.
商用で非常に良いロボティクスハンドはたくさんありますが
07:00
The problem is they're just too expensive, tens of thousands of dollars.
それらの問題は値段が高すぎるということです 何万ドルもします
07:04
So, for prosthesis applications it's probably not too practical,
だから義肢という用途で使うのは
07:08
because it's not affordable.
あまり現実的ではありません
07:10
We wanted to go tackle this problem in a very different direction.
私たちはこの問題に別な方向から取り組みたいと思いました
07:12
Instead of using electrical motors, electromechanical actuators,
電気モーターや電気機械アクチュエーターを使うのではなく
07:16
we're using compressed air.
圧搾空気を使っています
07:19
We developed these novel actuators for joints.
関節のための新しいアクチュエーターを開発しました
07:21
It is compliant. You can actually change the force,
柔軟にできていて 空気圧を変えるだけで
07:23
simply just changing the air pressure.
力加減を簡単に変えられます
07:26
And it can actually crush an empty soda can.
ジュースの空き缶を潰すことができますが
07:28
It can pick up very delicate objects like a raw egg,
生卵や電球のような壊れやすいものを
07:30
or in this case, a lightbulb.
掴むこともできます
07:33
The best part, it took only $200 dollars to make the first prototype.
一番いいのは 最初のプロトタイプ作成に200ドルしか かからなかったことです
07:36
This robot is actually a family of snake robots
次はヘビ型ロボットのシリーズで
07:40
that we call HyDRAS,
HyDRASという名前です
07:43
Hyper Degrees-of-freedom Robotic Articulated Serpentine.
「超高自由度ヘビ型連節ロボット」です
07:45
This is a robot that can climb structures.
このような地形を よじ登ることができます
07:47
This is a HyDRAS's arm.
こちらはHyDRASの腕です
07:50
It's a 12 degrees of freedom robotic arm.
12の自由度のあるロボットアームです
07:52
But the cool part is the user interface.
いかしているのはユーザインタフェースの部分です
07:54
The cable over there, that's an optical fiber.
あのケーブルは光ファイバーです
07:56
And this student, probably the first time using it,
この学生は たぶん初めて使うのですが
07:59
but she can articulate it many different ways.
関節を様々に動かすことができます
08:01
So, for example in Iraq, you know, the war zone,
たとえばイラクなんかの交戦地帯では
08:03
there is roadside bombs. Currently you send these
道端に爆弾があります
08:06
remotely controlled vehicles that are armed.
現在はリモコン式の武装車両を送り込んでいますが
08:08
It takes really a lot of time and it's expensive
すごく時間がかかり
08:11
to train the operator to operate this complex arm.
複雑な腕を操作できるようオペレータを訓練するのも高く付きます
08:13
In this case it's very intuitive;
このロボットなら直感的に操作できます
08:17
this student, probably his first time using it, doing very complex manipulation tasks,
この学生も恐らく初めて使っているのですが モノを拾い上げて操作する
08:19
picking up objects and doing manipulation,
とても複雑なタスクをうまくこなしています
08:23
just like that. Very intuitive.
このようにとても直感的なんです
08:25
Now, this robot is currently our star robot.
次のロボットは 現在の我々のスターです
08:30
We actually have a fan club for the robot, DARwIn:
このDARwInには実際ファンクラブがあります
08:32
Dynamic Anthropomorphic Robot with Intelligence.
「ダイナミック人型知的ロボット」です
08:35
As you know, we are very interested in
私たちはヒューマノイド つまり
08:38
humanoid robot, human walking,
人型の歩くロボットにとても関心があります
08:40
so we decided to build a small humanoid robot.
それで小型のものを作ってみることにしました
08:42
This was in 2004; at that time,
2004年当時には
08:44
this was something really, really revolutionary.
とても革新的なことで
08:46
This was more of a feasibility study:
実現可能性を探る研究でした
08:48
What kind of motors should we use?
どんな種類のモーターを使うべきか?
08:50
Is it even possible? What kinds of controls should we do?
そもそも可能なのか? どのような制御が必要になるか?
08:52
So, this does not have any sensors.
これにはまだセンサーがついていません
08:54
So, it's an open loop control.
開ループ制御です
08:56
For those who probably know, if you don't have any sensors
皆さんはきっとご存じですね
08:58
and there are any disturbances, you know what happens.
センサーなしでバランスを崩したら…
09:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:05
So, based on that success, the following year
この成功をベースとして 次の年には
09:06
we did the proper mechanical design
運動学に基づいてちゃんとした
09:08
starting from kinematics.
機械設計を行い
09:11
And thus, DARwIn I was born in 2005.
2005年にDARwIn I が誕生しました
09:13
It stands up, it walks -- very impressive.
立ち上がり 歩きます
09:15
However, still, as you can see,
しかしまだコードが繋がっています
09:17
it has a cord, umbilical cord. So, we're still using an external power source
外部の電源と 外部での計算処理に
09:19
and external computation.
まだ頼っていました
09:23
So, in 2006, now it's really time to have fun.
2006年に本当に面白いものになりました
09:25
Let's give it intelligence. We give it all the computing power it needs:
知性を持たせたのです 必要な計算能力を与えました
09:29
a 1.5 gigahertz Pentium M chip,
1.5GHzのPentium M
09:32
two FireWire cameras, rate gyros, accelerometers,
2つのFireWireカメラ 8つのジャイロ 加速度計
09:34
four force sensors on the foot, lithium polymer batteries.
足には4つのトルクセンサー リチウム電池
09:36
And now DARwIn II is completely autonomous.
DARwIn II は完全に自律的です
09:39
It is not remote controlled.
遠隔操作はしていません
09:43
There are no tethers. It looks around, searches for the ball,
ケーブルもついていません 周りを見回し ボールを探し
09:45
looks around, searches for the ball, and it tries to play a game of soccer,
周りを見回し ボールを探し 自律的な人工知能によって
09:48
autonomously: artificial intelligence.
サッカーをプレーします
09:51
Let's see how it does. This was our very first trial,
見てみましょう この時はまさに私たちの最初の試行でした
09:54
and... Spectators (Video): Goal!
ゴーーール!!
09:57
Dennis Hong: So, there is actually a competition called RoboCup.
RoboCupという大会があります
10:03
I don't know how many of you have heard about RoboCup.
ご存じの方がどれくらいいるかわかりませんが
10:06
It's an international autonomous robot soccer competition.
国際的な自律ロボットによるサッカー競技会です
10:08
And the goal of RoboCup, the actual goal is,
RoboCupの目標は 2050年までに
10:13
by the year 2050
等身大の
10:16
we want to have full size, autonomous humanoid robots
自律ヒューマノイド型ロボットで
10:18
play soccer against the human World Cup champions
人間のワールドカップ優勝チームと試合をして
10:21
and win.
勝つことです
10:25
It's a true actual goal. It's a very ambitious goal,
それが真の目標です 野心的な目標ですが
10:27
but we truly believe that we can do it.
私たちはやれると信じています
10:29
So, this is last year in China.
2008年は中国で行われました
10:31
We were the very first team in the United States that qualified
この競技会にアメリカから参加したのは
10:34
in the humanoid RoboCup competition.
私たちが最初でした
10:36
This is this year in Austria.
今年2009年はオーストラリアで行われました
10:38
You're going to see the action, three against three,
3対3で全く自律的に
10:41
completely autonomous.
試合を行います
10:43
There you go. Yes!
そら入った!
10:45
The robots track and they
ロボット同士で
10:48
team play amongst themselves.
チームプレーを競うのです
10:50
It's very impressive. It's really a research event
とても見応えのある エキサイティングな
10:53
packaged in a more exciting competition event.
競技イベントの形を取った研究イベントです
10:55
What you see over here, this is the beautiful
これは美しいルイ ヴィトンカップの
10:59
Louis Vuitton Cup trophy.
トロフィーです
11:01
So, this is for the best humanoid,
最高のヒューマノイドに与えられる賞です
11:03
and we would like to bring this for the very first time, to the United States
来年には是非 このトロフィーを初めて
11:05
next year, so wish us luck.
アメリカに持ち帰るチームに
11:07
(Applause)
なりたいと思っています
11:09
Thank you.
(拍手)
11:11
DARwIn also has a lot of other talents.
DARwInは他にもたくさんの才能があります
11:14
Last year it actually conducted the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra
去年はホリデーコンサートで
11:16
for the holiday concert.
ロアノーク交響楽団の指揮をしました
11:19
This is the next generation robot, DARwIn IV,
これは次世代のロボットDARwIn IV です
11:22
but smarter, faster, stronger.
より賢く より速く より強くなっています
11:25
And it's trying to show off its ability:
その能力を披露しようとしています
11:28
"I'm macho, I'm strong.
「俺はマッチョだ 俺は強いんだ」
11:30
I can also do some Jackie Chan-motion,
ジャッキー チェンみたいな
11:33
martial art movements."
カンフーアクションだってできます
11:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:39
And it walks away. So, this is DARwIn IV.
そして歩き去ります これがDARwIn IV です
11:41
And again, you'll be able to see it in the lobby.
ロビーでご覧いただけます
11:43
We truly believe this is going to be the very first running
これをアメリカ初の
11:45
humanoid robot in the United States. So, stay tuned.
走れるロボットにしたいと思っていますので ご期待ください
11:47
All right. So I showed you some of our exciting robots at work.
私たちのエキサイティングなロボットの動作をご覧頂きました
11:50
So, what is the secret of our success?
では私たちの成功の秘密は何でしょう?
11:53
Where do we come up with these ideas?
どうやって考え出しているのか?
11:56
How do we develop these kinds of ideas?
どうやってアイデアを発展させているのか?
11:58
We have a fully autonomous vehicle
私たちは都市域を完全自動走行する
12:00
that can drive into urban environments. We won a half a million dollars
自動車を作り DARPAアーバンチャレンジで
12:02
in the DARPA Urban Challenge.
50万ドルの賞金を獲得しました
12:04
We also have the world's very first
私たちはまた 視覚障害者が運転できる
12:06
vehicle that can be driven by the blind.
世界最初の車も作りました
12:08
We call it the Blind Driver Challenge, very exciting.
これは視覚障害ドライバーチャレンジと呼んでいます
12:10
And many, many other robotics projects I want to talk about.
まだまだお話ししたいエキサイティングなロボティクスプロジェクトがたくさんあります
12:12
These are just the awards that we won in 2007 fall
これは私たちが2007年秋に
12:16
from robotics competitions and those kinds of things.
ロボティクス関係のコンペで受賞したものです
12:18
So, really, we have five secrets.
秘密は5つあります
12:21
First is: Where do we get inspiration?
まずどこからインスピレーションを得るか
12:23
Where do we get this spark of imagination?
イマジネーションの閃きをどうやって得ているかです
12:25
This is a true story, my personal story.
これは本当のことで 私自身の話です
12:27
At night when I go to bed, 3 - 4 a.m. in the morning,
夜眠るとき 明け方の3時か4時頃ですが
12:30
I lie down, close my eyes, and I see these lines and circles
横になって目を閉じると 線や円や
12:32
and different shapes floating around.
いろいろな形が浮遊して
12:35
And they assemble, and they form these kinds of mechanisms.
組み合わさり ある種のメカを形作ります
12:37
And then I think, "Ah this is cool."
そうすると私は 「ああ これはいいな」と思い
12:40
So, right next to my bed I keep a notebook,
ベッドの脇に置いてあるノートと
12:42
a journal, with a special pen that has a light on it, LED light,
特別なLEDライト付きペンを取り出します
12:44
because I don't want to turn on the light and wake up my wife.
明かりを点けて妻を起こしたくはないので
12:47
So, I see this, scribble everything down, draw things,
思いついたことをすべて書き 絵を描いて
12:49
and I go to bed.
それから眠りにつきます
12:51
Every day in the morning,
毎朝一番にやるのは
12:53
the first thing I do before my first cup of coffee,
一杯のコーヒーよりも 歯磨きよりも先にするのは
12:55
before I brush my teeth, I open my notebook.
そのノートを開いて見ることです
12:57
Many times it's empty,
多くの場合何も書かれていません
12:59
sometimes I have something there -- if something's there, sometimes it's junk --
時々何か書かれていますが
13:01
but most of the time I can't even read my handwriting.
大抵 自分でも何が書いてあるのかわかりません
13:03
And so, 4 am in the morning, what do you expect, right?
朝の4時に寝ぼけて書いたのですから無理もありません
13:06
So, I need to decipher what I wrote.
解読する必要があります
13:09
But sometimes I see this ingenious idea in there,
でも時々そこに すごいアイデアが書かれていることがあります
13:11
and I have this eureka moment.
「見つけた!」という瞬間です
13:14
I directly run to my home office, sit at my computer,
すぐに書斎に走り コンピュータの前に座って
13:16
I type in the ideas, I sketch things out
アイデアを打ち込み スケッチを描き
13:18
and I keep a database of ideas.
そうやってアイデアのデータベースに保存します
13:20
So, when we have these calls for proposals,
そして公募があると
13:23
I try to find a match between my
要件に合う可能性のあるアイデアを
13:25
potential ideas
その中から探します
13:27
and the problem. If there is a match we write a research proposal,
ピッタリのものがあれば 研究企画書を書いて
13:29
get the research funding in, and that's how we start our research programs.
研究資金を獲得します 私たちの研究プログラムはそうやって始まります
13:31
But just a spark of imagination is not good enough.
しかしイマジネーションの閃きだけでは十分ではありません
13:35
How do we develop these kinds of ideas?
そのようなアイデアをどうやって発展させるのか?
13:38
At our lab RoMeLa, the Robotics and Mechanisms Laboratory,
私たちのラボRoMeLaでは 素晴らしい
13:40
we have these fantastic brainstorming sessions.
ブレインストーミングセッションをやっています
13:43
So, we gather around, we discuss about problems
みんな集まって 課題や
13:46
and social problems and talk about it.
社会的問題について議論し 話し合います
13:48
But before we start we set this golden rule.
始める前にルールを確認します
13:50
The rule is:
そのルールとは
13:53
Nobody criticizes anybody's ideas.
「誰のアイデアも批判しない
13:55
Nobody criticizes any opinion.
どんな意見も批判しないこと」です
13:58
This is important, because many times students, they fear
これはとても重要で 学生は
14:00
or they feel uncomfortable how others might think
自分の意見や考えを他の人がどう思うか不安になったり
14:02
about their opinions and thoughts.
怖れたりするものだからです
14:05
So, once you do this, it is amazing
このルールを徹底するだけで 学生たちは
14:07
how the students open up.
驚くほど自由にアイデアを出せるようになります
14:09
They have these wacky, cool, crazy, brilliant ideas, and
彼らはすごいクールでクレージーな素晴らしいアイデアを持っています
14:11
the whole room is just electrified with creative energy.
部屋全体に創造的なエネルギーが充満しているかのようです
14:14
And this is how we develop our ideas.
そうやってアイデアを発展させるのです
14:17
Well, we're running out of time. One more thing I want to talk about is,
もう時間がありませんが もう1つお話ししておきたいのは
14:20
you know, just a spark of idea and development is not good enough.
アイデアを閃めかせ 展開させるだけでは十分でないということです
14:23
There was a great TED moment,
TEDで素晴らしい講演がありました
14:27
I think it was Sir Ken Robinson, was it?
ケン ロビンソン卿です
14:29
He gave a talk about how education
彼は教育や学校がいかに
14:32
and school kills creativity.
創造力を殺しているかという話をしました
14:34
Well, actually, there are two sides to the story.
これには実際2つの面があります
14:36
So, there is only so much one can do
独創的なアイデアと 創造力と
14:39
with just ingenious ideas
工学的直感だけでは
14:42
and creativity and good engineering intuition.
できることが限られています
14:44
If you want to go beyond a tinkering,
ただの工作以上のことをやり
14:47
if you want to go beyond a hobby of robotics
趣味のロボットを越え
14:49
and really tackle the grand challenges of robotics
しっかりした研究に基づいて本当に大きなロボティクスの
14:51
through rigorous research
課題に取り組もうと思ったら
14:54
we need more than that. This is where school comes in.
他にも必要になるものがあります そこが学校の生きてくる部分です
14:56
Batman, fighting against bad guys,
悪者たちと戦うバットマンは
14:59
he has his utility belt, he has his grappling hook,
ユーティリティーベルトや 引っ掛けフックや
15:02
he has all different kinds of gadgets.
さまざまな小道具を持っています
15:04
For us roboticists, engineers and scientists,
私たちロボティクス研究者 エンジニア
15:06
these tools, these are the courses and classes you take in class.
サイエンティストにとって そのツールに当たるのが大学の授業や教程なのです
15:08
Math, differential equations.
数学 微分方程式
15:13
I have linear algebra, science, physics,
線形代数 科学 物理
15:15
even nowadays, chemistry and biology, as you've seen.
最近では化学や生物学まで活用しています
15:17
These are all the tools that we need.
これらは私たちが必要とするツールなのです
15:20
So, the more tools you have, for Batman,
ツールがたくさんあるほど バットマンは
15:22
more effective at fighting the bad guys,
悪者相手に効果的に戦うことができます
15:24
for us, more tools to attack these kinds of big problems.
私たちには 大きな問題に取り組むための足がかりが増えます
15:26
So, education is very important.
教育というのはとても重要なのです
15:30
Also, it's not about that,
またそれだけでなく
15:33
only about that. You also have to work really, really hard.
本当に熱心に 働く必要があります
15:35
So, I always tell my students,
私は学生にいつも言っています
15:37
"Work smart, then work hard."
「賢く働き そして熱心に働くこと」
15:39
This picture in the back this is 3 a.m. in the morning.
後ろに出ている写真は午前3時のラボの様子です
15:41
I guarantee if you come to your lab at 3 - 4 am
私たちのラボに午前3時とか4時に来ていただけば
15:44
we have students working there,
きっと学生たちがまだ働いているでしょう
15:46
not because I tell them to, but because we are having too much fun.
私がしろと言ったからではありません みんなすごく楽しいからやっているんです
15:48
Which leads to the last topic:
これが最後の点に繋がります
15:51
Do not forget to have fun.
「楽しみを忘れないこと」
15:53
That's really the secret of our success, we're having too much fun.
これこそ私たちの成功の一番の秘密です みんな本当に楽しんでやっています
15:55
I truly believe that highest productivity comes when you're having fun,
最高の生産性は楽しんでいるときにこそ得られるのです
15:58
and that's what we're doing.
それが私たちのしていることです
16:01
There you go. Thank you so much.
以上です どうもありがとうございました
16:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:05
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Yuki Okada

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Dennis Hong - Roboticist
Dennis Hong is the founder and director of RoMeLa -- a Virginia Tech robotics lab that has pioneered several breakthroughs in robot design and engineering.

Why you should listen

As director of a groundbreaking robotics lab, Dennis Hong guides his team of students through projects on robot locomotion and mechanism design, creating award-winning humanoid robots like DARwIn (Dynamic Anthropomorphic Robot with Intelligence). His team is known as RoMeLa (Robotics & Mechanisms Laboratory) and operates at Virginia Tech.

Hong has also pioneered various innovations in soft-body robots, using a “whole-skin locomotion” as inspired by amoebae. Marrying robotics with biochemistry, he has been able to generate new types of motion with these ingenious forms. For his contributions to the field, Hong was selected as a NASA Summer Faculty Fellow in 2005, given the CAREER award by the National Science Foundation in 2007 and in 2009, named as one of Popular Science's Brilliant 10. He is also a gourmet chef and a magician, performing shows for charity and lecturing on the science of magic.

More profile about the speaker
Dennis Hong | Speaker | TED.com