sponsored links
TED in the Field

Craig Venter: Watch me unveil "synthetic life"

クレイグ・ベンター:「人工生命」について発表する

May 21, 2010

クレイグ・ベンターのチームが歴史的な発表を行いました。完全に機能する、人工のDNAによってコントロールされた自己増殖する細胞を初めて作り出したのです。どのようにしてこれを達成したのか、この成果が科学の新しい時代の幕開けとなる理由を語ります。

Craig Venter - Biologist, genetics pioneer
In 2001, Craig Venter made headlines for sequencing the human genome. In 2003, he started mapping the ocean's biodiversity. And now he's created the first synthetic lifeforms -- microorganisms that can produce alternative fuels. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
We're here today to announce
本日 発表致しますのは
00:16
the first synthetic cell,
初の人工細胞です
00:18
a cell made by
細胞は
00:21
starting with the digital code in the computer,
コンピュータのデジタルコードとして誕生し
00:23
building the chromosome
4本の化学物質のボトルから
00:26
from four bottles of chemicals,
染色体が作られ
00:29
assembling that chromosome in yeast,
その染色体はイースト菌内で組み立てられ
00:32
transplanting it into
レシピエントとなる細菌の細胞に
00:34
a recipient bacterial cell
移植され
00:37
and transforming that cell
その細胞が
00:39
into a new bacterial species.
別の種の細菌へと変化したのです
00:41
So this is the first self-replicating species
つまり これはこの惑星上で初めての
00:44
that we've had on the planet
コンピュータを親にもつ
00:47
whose parent is a computer.
自己複製できる種なのです
00:49
It also is the first species
また 自分のWebサイトに
00:52
to have its own website
エンコードした遺伝情報を公開した
00:54
encoded in its genetic code.
初めての種でもあります
00:56
But we'll talk more about
それでは少し
00:59
the watermarks in a minute.
ウオーターマーク(目印)についてお話ししましょう
01:01
This is a project that had its inception
このプロジェクトの発端は
01:04
15 years ago
15年前に遡ります
01:06
when our team then --
我々のチームは
01:08
we called the institute TIGR --
その頃はTIGRと呼んでいましたが
01:10
was involved in sequencing
歴史上初めて 二つのゲノムの
01:12
the first two genomes in history.
配列を決める仕事に取り組んでいました
01:14
We did Haemophilus influenzae
インフルエンザ菌
01:16
and then the smallest genome of a self-replicating organism,
そして自己複製する生命体として最小である
01:18
that of Mycoplasma genitalium.
マイコプラズマ=ジェニタリウムです
01:21
And as soon as
これらのゲノム配列を
01:24
we had these two sequences
決定し終えた後で考えたことは
01:26
we thought, if this is supposed to be the smallest genome
これが自己複製する種で最小の
01:28
of a self-replicating species,
ゲノムであるとすれば
01:31
could there be even a smaller genome?
さらに小さなゲノムは存在するのだろうか
01:33
Could we understand the basis of cellular life
そして ゲノムのレベルで細胞の活動に関する基礎を
01:35
at the genetic level?
理解できないかということです
01:38
It's been a 15-year quest
15年間の探究を経て
01:40
just to get to the starting point now
この問いに答えるための
01:42
to be able to answer those questions,
スタートに やっとたどり着くことができました
01:44
because it's very difficult to eliminate
細胞から複数の遺伝子を
01:47
multiple genes from a cell.
除去することは非常に困難だからです
01:49
You can only do them one at a time.
一度に一つずつ除去するしかないのです
01:51
We decided early on
そこで早い段階で
01:54
that we had to take a synthetic route,
人工的な手段を採ることにしました
01:56
even though nobody had been there before,
誰も試していない方法ではありましたが
01:58
to see if we could synthesize
細菌の染色体を
02:00
a bacterial chromosome
合成できるのか確かめ
02:02
so we could actually vary the gene content
どの遺伝子が必須であるかを理解するため
02:04
to understand the essential genes for life.
遺伝子の内容を様々に変えてみました
02:06
That started our 15-year quest
それが15年の探究の
02:09
to get here.
始まりだったのです
02:12
But before we did the first experiments,
最初の実験を始める前に
02:14
we actually asked
我々は
02:16
Art Caplan's team at the University of Pennsylvania
当時ペンシルバニア大学にあったアート=カプランのチームに
02:19
to undertake a review
検討を依頼しました
02:22
of what the risks, the challenges,
研究室で新しい種を作ることに対して
02:24
the ethics around creating new
どのようなリスクや課題 倫理問題が
02:27
species in the laboratory were
存在するかという検討です
02:29
because it hadn't been done before.
初めての試みだったからです
02:31
They spent about two years
アート=カプランは2年を費やして
02:33
reviewing that independently
独自に検討を行い
02:35
and published their results in Science in 1999.
1999年にサイエンス誌に結果を発表しました
02:37
Ham and I took two years off
ハムと私は2年間 この研究から離れ
02:40
as a side project to sequence the human genome,
ヒトゲノムを解析する別のプロジェクトに参加していました
02:42
but as soon as that was done
しかし 結果が発表されるや否や
02:44
we got back to the task at hand.
直ちに この仕事に戻りました
02:46
In 2002, we started
2002年に
02:50
a new institute,
新たな機関を設立しました
02:52
the Institute for Biological Energy Alternatives,
それが生物代替エネルギー研究所です
02:54
where we set out two goals:
目標は二つありました
02:57
One, to understand
一つ目は 我々の技術が
02:59
the impact of our technology on the environment,
環境に与える影響を把握し
03:01
and how to understand the environment better,
環境をより深く理解する手法を見つけること
03:04
and two, to start down this process
二つ目は 人工生命を作る過程を経て
03:06
of making synthetic life
生命の基礎についての理解を
03:08
to understand basic life.
深めることです
03:11
In 2003,
2003年に
03:14
we published our first success.
最初の成果を公開しました
03:16
So Ham Smith and Clyde Hutchison
ハム=スミスとクライド=ハッチンソンが
03:18
developed some new methods
小さなレベルで
03:20
for making error-free DNA
エラーのないDNAを作る
03:22
at a small level.
新しい手法を開発したのです
03:25
Our first task was
最初の仕事の対象は
03:27
a 5,000-letter code bacteriophage,
バクテリオファージの5000文字のコードでした
03:29
a virus that attacks only E. coli.
これは大腸菌のみを攻撃するウイルスです
03:32
So that was
ファージ ファイ X 174
03:36
the phage phi X 174,
を使用しましたが
03:38
which was chosen for historical reasons.
その選択には歴史的経緯があります
03:40
It was the first DNA phage,
事実上 初めて解読された
03:42
DNA virus, DNA genome
DNAファージであり
03:45
that was actually sequenced.
DNAウイルス DNAゲノムだったのです
03:48
So once we realized
5000の塩基対でできている
03:50
that we could make 5,000-base pair
ウイルスサイズのピースを作成することが
03:53
viral-sized pieces,
可能であると判明したので
03:55
we thought, we at least have the means
これで道は開けたと考え
03:57
then to try and make serially lots of these pieces
このピースを大量に連続して作成することを試みました
03:59
to be able to eventually assemble them together
最終目標は ピースを纏めて作成し
04:02
to make this mega base chromosome.
このメガ塩基対の染色体を作成することでした
04:05
So, substantially larger than
これは当初想定していたより
04:09
we even thought we would go initially.
かなり大きなサイズでした
04:11
There were several steps to this. There were two sides:
幾つかの段階がありました これには二つの課題がありました
04:15
We had to solve the chemistry
大きなサイズのDNA分子を作るには
04:18
for making large DNA molecules,
化学的な問題を解決すると共に
04:20
and we had to solve the biological side
生物学的な問題も解決する必要がありました
04:22
of how, if we had this new chemical entity,
つまり この新たな化学物質を作り出せたとして
04:24
how would we boot it up, activate it
それをレシピエントの細胞内で
04:27
in a recipient cell.
どのように起動し 活性化するかということです
04:30
We had two teams working in parallel:
そこで 二つのチームが平行して作業を行いました
04:33
one team on the chemistry,
一つは化学チーム
04:35
and the other on trying to
もう一つのチームは
04:37
be able to transplant
染色体全体を
04:40
entire chromosomes
新しい細胞に移植するための
04:42
to get new cells.
研究をしていました
04:44
When we started this out, we thought the synthesis would be the biggest problem,
研究を始めた当初は 合成が最大の課題になると考え
04:47
which is why we chose the smallest genome.
最小のゲノムを選択することにしました
04:50
And some of you have noticed that we switched from the smallest genome
お気づきのように 我々は最小のゲノムではなく
04:53
to a much larger one.
より大きなゲノムを対象に変えました
04:56
And we can walk through the reasons for that,
その理由をいくつかご紹介することは出来ますが
04:58
but basically the small cell
基本的に 小さな細胞では
05:00
took on the order of
結果が判明するまでに
05:03
one to two months to get results from,
1~2ヶ月の単位で時間がかかる一方
05:05
whereas the larger, faster-growing cell
大きな細胞の場合は 成長が早く
05:08
takes only two days.
二日ほどで結果が得られるからです
05:10
So there's only so many cycles we could go through
その結果 1サイクル6週間で1年間に
05:12
in a year at six weeks per cycle.
何サイクルも結果を検討することができたのです
05:15
And you should know that basically
我々の行った実験の99パーセント
05:18
99, probably 99 percent plus
恐らく99パーセント以上が
05:20
of our experiments failed.
失敗したことをご理解いただけるでしょう
05:23
So this was a debugging,
これは所謂デバッグ作業です
05:25
problem-solving scenario from the beginning
つまり当初から 問題解決型のシナリオであったのです
05:27
because there was no recipe
なぜなら 成功への道筋は
05:30
of how to get there.
存在しなかったからです
05:32
So, one of the most important publications we had
最も重大は発表は2007年に
05:34
was in 2007.
行ったものです
05:37
Carole Lartigue led the effort
キャラル=ラルティグのチームが
05:39
to actually transplant a bacterial chromosome
染色体を ある細菌から
05:42
from one bacteria to another.
別の細菌に移植することに成功したのです
05:45
I think philosophically, that was one of the most important papers
振り返って考えると これは我々が発表した成果の中で
05:47
that we've ever done
最も重要なものだったと思います
05:50
because it showed how dynamic life was.
生命がいかにダイナミックなものかを示していたからです
05:52
And we knew, once that worked,
そして これが上手くゆけば
05:55
that we actually had a chance
本当にチャンスがあるのだと考えていました
05:57
if we could make the synthetic chromosomes
染色体を合成できれば
05:59
to do the same with those.
あとは同じことをすれば良かったのです
06:01
We didn't know that it was going to take us
あと数年で達成できるのか それとも
06:04
several years more to get there.
さらに年月を要するのかは分かっていませんでした
06:06
In 2008,
2008年に
06:08
we reported the complete synthesis
マイコプラズマ=ジェニタリウムのゲノム
06:10
of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome,
50万文字を上回るゲノムコードを
06:12
a little over 500,000 letters of genetic code,
完全に合成できたと発表しました
06:15
but we have not yet succeeded in booting up that chromosome.
しかし 染色体を起動することには成功していませんでした
06:19
We think in part, because of its slow growth
理由として 一点目は成長の遅さ
06:22
and, in part,
もう一点は
06:26
cells have all kinds of unique defense mechanisms
細胞がこのような事態を防ぐための様々な防衛システムを
06:28
to keep these events from happening.
持っているためだと考えました
06:31
It turned out the cell that we were trying to transplant into
我々が移植対象としていた細胞には
06:33
had a nuclease, an enzyme that chews up DNA on its surface,
表面に ヌクレアーゼというDNA分解酵素があることが分かったのです
06:36
and was happy to eat
我々が与えた合成DNAを
06:39
the synthetic DNA that we gave it
好んで消化してしまっており
06:41
and never got transplantations.
移植の障害となっていたのです
06:43
But at the time, that was the largest
しかし当時は それが過去に作成された
06:46
molecule of a defined structure
定義済みの構造体のうち
06:48
that had been made.
最大の分子でした
06:50
And so both sides were progressing,
どちらの面でも進歩が見られました
06:52
but part of the synthesis
しかし一部の合成はイースト菌を使用し
06:54
had to be accomplished or was able to be accomplished
この物質をイースト菌に入れることで
06:56
using yeast, putting the fragments in yeast
我々に変わって合成を行ってくれるはずであり
06:59
and yeast would assemble these for us.
また それは達成せねばなりませんでした
07:02
It's an amazing step forward,
前に進めることは喜びでしたが
07:04
but we had a problem because now we had
問題もありました
07:07
the bacterial chromosomes growing in yeast.
細菌の染色体をイースト菌の中で育てていましたので
07:09
So in addition to doing the transplant,
移植をおこなうためには
07:12
we had to find out how to get a bacterial chromosome
細菌の染色体を真核性のイースト菌から
07:15
out of the eukaryotic yeast
レシピエントに移植可能な形で取り出すには
07:17
into a form where we could transplant it
どうすれば良いのか明確にする
07:19
into a recipient cell.
必要があったのです
07:21
So our team developed new techniques
そこで我々のチームは 完全な細菌の染色体を
07:25
for actually growing, cloning
イースト菌の中で成長させ クローンを作成する
07:28
entire bacterial chromosomes in yeast.
新技術を開発しました
07:30
So we took the same mycoides genome
そこでキャロルが最初に移植に成功したのと同じ
07:32
that Carole had initially transplanted,
ミコイデスのゲノムを
07:35
and we grew that in yeast
人工染色体として
07:37
as an artificial chromosome.
イースト菌の中で成長させることを試みました
07:39
And we thought this would be a great test bed
イースト菌から染色体を取り出し
07:42
for learning how to get chromosomes out of yeast
移植する方法を学ぶ上で
07:44
and transplant them.
有効な試験台となると考えたのです
07:46
When we did these experiments, though,
そして実験を行いましたが
07:48
we could get the chromosome out of yeast
イースト菌から染色体を取り出すことはできても
07:50
but it wouldn't transplant and boot up a cell.
それを移植し 細胞の中で起動させることはできませんでした
07:52
That little issue took the team two years to solve.
この小さな問題の解決に2年費やしました
07:56
It turns out, the DNA in the bacterial cell
細菌の細胞に存在するDNAは
07:59
was actually methylated,
メチル基と結合しており
08:02
and the methylation protects it from the restriction enzyme,
メチル化することによって 制限酵素による
08:04
from digesting the DNA.
DNAの分解から守られていることが分かりました
08:08
So what we found is if we took the chromosome
つまり イースト菌から染色体を取り出し
08:11
out of yeast and methylated it,
メチル化することができれば
08:13
we could then transplant it.
移植が可能になるということが分かったのです
08:15
Further advances came
レシピエントであるマイコプラズマの細胞から
08:17
when the team removed the restriction enzyme genes
制限酵素の遺伝子を取り除くことに成功し
08:19
from the recipient capricolum cell.
研究はさらに進歩しました
08:22
And once we had done that, now we can take
いったん これに成功して以降
08:25
naked DNA out of yeast and transplant it.
DNAをそのまま移植することが可能となりました
08:27
So last fall
昨秋 我々は
08:30
when we published the results of that work in Science,
成果をサイエンス誌に公表しました
08:32
we all became overconfident
我々は自信過剰となり
08:35
and were sure we were only
イースト菌から取り出した染色体を
08:37
a few weeks away
あと数週間で
08:39
from being able to now boot up
細胞内で起動させることが
08:41
a chromosome out of yeast.
実現可能であると考えていました
08:43
Because of the problems with
1年半前のマイコプラズマ=ジェニタリウムと
08:46
Mycoplasma genitalium and its slow growth
その成長の遅さに関する問題が
08:48
about a year and a half ago,
1年半前に解決していたため
08:51
we decided to synthesize
さらに大きな染色体である ミコイデの染色体を
08:54
the much larger chromosome, the mycoides chromosome,
合成することにしました
08:57
knowing that we had the biology worked out on that
移植に当たって 我々は生物学的にうまくいくと
09:00
for transplantation.
考えていました
09:03
And Dan led the team for the synthesis
ダンのチームが この百万の塩基対からなる染色体の
09:05
of this over one-million-base pair chromosome.
合成に挑みました
09:07
But it turned out it wasn't going to be as simple in the end,
しかしそれは後に それほど単純ではないことが分かったのです
09:12
and it set us back three months
そして3ヶ月分 後戻りすることになりました
09:15
because we had one error
合成した配列において 百万の塩基対のうち
09:17
out of over a million base pairs in that sequence.
1塩基分間違いがあることが分かったのです
09:19
So the team developed new debugging software,
そこでダンのチームは新たなデバッグ用ソフトウエアを開発し
09:22
where we could test each synthetic fragment
合成断片が野生型DNAの環境において
09:25
to see if it would grow in a background
増えることができるかどうか
09:28
of wild type DNA.
テストを実施することにしました
09:30
And we found that 10 out of the 11
合成した10万の塩基対のうち 割合にして
09:33
100,000-base pair pieces we synthesized
11セット中10セットは
09:36
were completely accurate
生命を形成する配列と
09:39
and compatible with
完全に正確で
09:41
a life-forming sequence.
一致していました
09:43
We narrowed it down to one fragment;
一つの断片に焦点を絞り
09:47
we sequenced it
その配列を調べたところ
09:49
and found just one base pair had been deleted
必須遺伝子の たった一つの塩基対が
09:51
in an essential gene.
欠落していることが分かりました
09:53
So accuracy is essential.
このように 正確さが不可欠なのです
09:55
There's parts of the genome
ゲノムには
09:58
where it cannot tolerate even a single error,
たった一つのエラーも許されない部分がある一方
10:00
and then there's parts of the genome
我々が目印として
10:03
where we can put in large blocks of DNA,
長い配列のDNAを組み込んだように
10:05
as we did with the watermarks,
どんなエラーがあったとしても
10:07
and it can tolerate all kinds of errors.
問題がない部分が存在するのです
10:09
So it took about three months to find that error
このため エラーを発見して修正するのに
10:12
and repair it.
三ヶ月かかりました
10:15
And then early one morning, at 6 a.m.
そしてある朝の6時にダンから
10:17
we got a text from Dan
初めて青色のコロニーが見つかったと
10:20
saying that, now, the first blue colonies existed.
メッセージを受け取ったのです
10:23
So, it's been a long route to get here:
大変長い道のりでした
10:26
15 years from the beginning.
15年を費やしました
10:29
We felt
この分野の研究において
10:32
one of the tenets of this field
守るべき基本原則の一つは
10:34
was to make absolutely certain
人工合成したDNAと天然のDNAを
10:36
we could distinguish synthetic DNA
明確に見分けることができるようにすることだと
10:39
from natural DNA.
考えていました
10:42
Early on, when you're working in a new area of science,
科学の新しい分野に取り組む時 早い段階では
10:44
you have to think about all the pitfalls
あらゆる落とし穴について考慮する必要があります
10:47
and things that could lead you
あるいは 達成していないことを
10:50
to believe that you had done something when you hadn't,
達成できたと思わせるようなものについて注意を払うべきです
10:52
and, even worse, leading others to believe it.
最悪の場合 他人にもそれを信じさせてしまうことになります
10:55
So, we thought the worst problem would be
最も考慮すべき問題は
10:58
a single molecule contamination
自然に存在する染色体の
11:00
of the native chromosome,
たった一つの分子の混入によって
11:03
leading us to believe that we actually had
単なる混入に過ぎないというのに
11:05
created a synthetic cell,
細胞を合成することができたと
11:08
when it would have been just a contaminant.
誤信してしまうことだと考えていました
11:10
So early on, we developed the notion
そこで早い段階から
11:12
of putting in watermarks in the DNA
DNAに目印を付けて
11:14
to absolutely make clear
そのDNAが合成のものであることが
11:16
that the DNA was synthetic.
明確になるようにしました
11:18
And the first chromosome we built
2008年に最初の染色体を
11:21
in 2008 --
作った時は
11:24
the 500,000-base pair one --
50万塩基対の染色体に
11:26
we simply assigned
染色体作成者の名前を
11:28
the names of the authors of the chromosome
遺伝子コードとして
11:31
into the genetic code,
組み込みました
11:34
but it was using just amino acid
しかし それはアミノ酸配列の
11:37
single letter translations,
一文字表記を利用したものであり
11:39
which leaves out certain letters of the alphabet.
アルファベットの特定の文字が除外されたものでした
11:41
So the team actually developed a new code
このようにして 遺伝子コードの中に
11:45
within the code within the code.
別の遺伝子コードを埋め込みました
11:48
So it's a new code
DNAに新しいコードを
11:51
for interpreting and writing messages in DNA.
変換して書き込んだことになります
11:53
Now, mathematicians have been hiding and writing
長い間 遺伝子コードにメッセージを書き込む仕事は
11:56
messages in the genetic code for a long time,
数学者が行ってきました
11:59
but it's clear they were mathematicians and not biologists
数学者は生物学者ではありません
12:02
because, if you write long messages
数学者が作成したコードを使って
12:05
with the code that the mathematicians developed,
長いメッセージを書いたとすると
12:08
it would more than likely lead to
未知の機能を持った
12:11
new proteins being synthesized
新しいタンパク質の
12:13
with unknown functions.
合成につながることでしょう
12:16
So the code that Mike Montague and the team developed
そこで マイク=モンタギューのチームが開発したコードでは
12:19
actually puts frequent stop codons,
度々 終始コドンを加えています
12:22
so it's a different alphabet
異なった体系のアルファベッドですが
12:24
but allows us to use
これによって
12:27
the entire English alphabet
すべての英文字と
12:29
with punctuation and numbers.
句読点 数字を使用できるようになりました
12:32
So, there are four major watermarks
膨大な遺伝子コードの中で
12:34
all over 1,000 base pairs of genetic code.
主に使用している目印は4つあります
12:36
The first one actually contains within it
一つ目は遺伝子コードの残りの部分を
12:39
this code for interpreting
解読するためのコードを
12:42
the rest of the genetic code.
含んだものです
12:45
So in the remaining information,
目印の中には
12:49
in the watermarks,
その他の情報として
12:51
contain the names of, I think it's
作者や このプロジェクトを
12:53
46 different authors
成功に導いた主立った貢献者の
12:56
and key contributors
名前が含まれています
12:58
to getting the project to this stage.
確か46人だったと思います
13:00
And we also built in
名前だけではなく
13:04
a website address
Webサイトのアドレスも記してあります
13:06
so that if somebody decodes the code
もしコードに含まれるコードを利用して
13:09
within the code within the code,
誰かがコードを解読したとしたら
13:11
they can send an email to that address.
このアドレスにメールを送ることができます
13:13
So it's clearly distinguishable
つまり 他の種とは明確に
13:15
from any other species,
区別できるということです
13:18
having 46 names in it,
46名の名前を持ち
13:20
its own web address.
ウエブのアドレスが記されているのですから
13:23
And we added three quotations,
引用句も3つ記してあります
13:27
because with the first genome
なぜなら 最初のゲノムの時には
13:30
we were criticized for not trying to say something more profound
意味深げなことを言わずに 作品にサインをしただけだと
13:32
than just signing the work.
批判されたからです
13:35
So we won't give the rest of the code,
そこで 残りのコードの場所はお伝えしませんが
13:37
but we will give the three quotations.
代わりに3つの引用句をご紹介します
13:39
The first is,
一つ目は
13:41
"To live, to err,
"To live, to err,
13:43
to fall, to triumph
to fall, to triumph,
13:45
and to recreate life out of life."
and to recreate life out of life.''
13:47
It's a James Joyce quote.
ジェームス=ジョイスの言葉です
13:49
The second quotation is, "See things not as they are,
二つ目は ''See things, not as they are,
13:53
but as they might be."
but as they might be.''
13:56
It's a quote from the "American Prometheus"
ロバート=オッペンハイマーの著書
13:58
book on Robert Oppenheimer.
「アメリカのプロメテウス」からの引用です
14:01
And the last one is a Richard Feynman quote:
最後はリチャード=ファイマンの言葉で
14:03
"What I cannot build,
'What I cannot build,
14:06
I cannot understand."
I cannot understand.''
14:08
So, because this is as much a philosophical advance
今回の成果は科学における技術的進歩であるとともに
14:13
as a technical advance in science,
哲学的な進歩でもあるという観点から
14:16
we tried to deal with both the philosophical
技術的側面に加えて 哲学的側面にも
14:19
and the technical side.
対応しようと試みたというわけです
14:22
The last thing I want to say before turning it over to questions
質疑に入る前に 一言付け加えたいと思います
14:24
is that the extensive work
我々は多岐にわたる活動を
14:26
that we've done --
行ってきました
14:29
asking for ethical review,
これに関して倫理的な検討を求め
14:31
pushing the envelope
技術的な面と同様に
14:33
on that side as well as the technical side --
その面においても限界を広げようと試みました
14:35
this has been broadly discussed in the scientific community,
科学界および政界においても
14:38
in the policy community
広く議論がなされました
14:41
and at the highest levels of the federal government.
連邦政府でも高レベルでの検討がなされています
14:43
Even with this announcement,
今回の発表についても
14:46
as we did in 2003 --
2003年の発表と同様でした
14:49
that work was funded by the Department of Energy,
エネルギー省から資金を得ていましたので
14:51
so the work was reviewed
ホワイトハウスのレベルにおいて
14:54
at the level of the White House,
極秘にしておくか 公開するかの決定について
14:56
trying to decide whether to classify the work or publish it.
ホワイトハウスのレベルでの検討が行われたのです
14:58
And they came down on the side of open publication,
そして公開という正しい形で
15:01
which is the right approach --
実を結んだのです
15:04
we've briefed the White House,
ホワイトハウスを説得し
15:07
we've briefed members of Congress,
何人もの議員も説得しました
15:09
we've tried to take and push
科学的な進歩を続けるとともに
15:12
the policy issues
政治的な問題についても
15:14
in parallel with the scientific advances.
解決しようと努めてきたのです
15:16
So with that, I would like
それでは ここで
15:20
to open it first to the floor for questions.
皆様からの質問を受けたいと思います
15:22
Yes, in the back.
では 後ろの方
15:25
Reporter: Could you explain, in layman's terms,
記者:今回の発表がどのくらい革命的であるか
15:27
how significant a breakthrough this is please?
素人にも分かるように説明していただけるでしょうか
15:29
Craig Venter: Can we explain how significant this is?
クレイグ:重要性についての質問ですね
15:33
I'm not sure we're the ones that should be explaining how significant it is.
重要性について私が説明すべき立場にあるかどうかは分かりません
15:35
It's significant to us.
これは全員にとって重要なことです
15:38
Perhaps it's a giant philosophical change
我々の生命に対するとらえ方が
15:41
in how we view life.
哲学的に大きく変わるでしょう
15:44
We actually view it as a baby step in terms of,
基本的なレベルで生命を理解すべく
15:46
it's taken us 15 years to be able
15年前に研究を開始しました
15:49
to do the experiment
15年間かけて
15:51
we wanted to do 15 years ago
到達した現在の段階は
15:53
on understanding life at its basic level.
まだ ほんの手始めでしかないと思います
15:55
But we actually believe
しかし この成果は今後
15:58
this is going to be a very powerful set of tools
非常に有効なツールとなると確信しています
16:00
and we're already starting
すでに このツールを使った
16:04
in numerous avenues
研究をいくつか
16:06
to use this tool.
開始しています
16:08
We have, at the Institute,
我々の研究機関において
16:10
ongoing funding now from NIH
現在 国立衛生研究所から資金提供を受け
16:12
in a program with Novartis
ノバルティス社と共同で
16:15
to try and use these new
これらの合成DNAのツールを使用した
16:17
synthetic DNA tools
プロジェクトを行っています
16:19
to perhaps make the flu vaccine
おそらく来年には インフルエンザの
16:21
that you might get next year.
ワクチンを提供できると思います
16:24
Because instead of taking weeks to months to make these,
以前であれば数週間から数ヶ月を要していたことを
16:27
Dan's team can now make these
ダンのチームは24時間以内で完了できる
16:30
in less than 24 hours.
ようになったのです
16:33
So when you see how long it took to get an H1N1 vaccine out,
H1N1ワクチンができるまでどのくらい必要かと考えると
16:36
we think we can shorten that process
大幅に必要な時間を短縮できると
16:39
quite substantially.
考えられるのです
16:41
In the vaccine area,
ワクチンの分野では
16:43
Synthetic Genomics and the Institute
シンセティック=ゲノミクス社と共同で
16:45
are forming a new vaccine company
会社を設立しようとしてるところです
16:47
because we think these tools can affect vaccines
その理由は このツールによって
16:49
to diseases that haven't been possible to date,
今までは対応ができないと思われていた病気のワクチン
16:52
things where the viruses rapidly evolve,
進化が非常に早いライノウイルスなどのワクチンを
16:55
such with rhinovirus.
開発できると考えているためです
16:58
Wouldn't it be nice to have something that actually blocked common colds?
普通の風邪を防ぐ方法が見つかったら素晴らしいでしょう
17:00
Or, more importantly, HIV,
HIVだと もっと素晴らしいはずです
17:03
where the virus evolves so quickly
こういった病気では ウイルスが急速に進化するために
17:06
the vaccines that are made today
現在の方法ではワクチンが
17:08
can't keep up
ウイルスの進化による変化に
17:10
with those evolutionary changes.
追いついていないのです
17:12
Also, at Synthetic Genomics,
また シンセティック=ゲノミクス社では
17:15
we've been working
重要な環境問題についても
17:17
on major environmental issues.
取り組んでいます
17:19
I think this latest oil spill in the Gulf
メキシコ湾での石油流出は
17:21
is a reminder.
我々への警告です
17:23
We can't see CO2 --
CO2は目に見えず
17:25
we depend on scientific measurements for it
計測には科学的手法が必要です
17:27
and we see the beginning results
そして CO2の排出量が増えすぎている
17:29
of having too much of it --
状況を目の当たりにしています
17:31
but we can see pre-CO2 now
しかし現在 CO2の前段階である
17:33
floating on the waters
石油が海上や
17:35
and contaminating the beaches in the Gulf.
湾岸地域の海岸を汚染しているのです
17:37
We need some alternatives
石油の代替となるものが
17:40
for oil.
必要です
17:43
We have a program with Exxon Mobile
エクソン=モービル社と共同で
17:45
to try and develop new strains of algae
大気中や 濃縮された物質から
17:47
that can efficiently capture carbon dioxide
効果的に二酸化炭素を吸収する
17:50
from the atmosphere or from concentrated sources,
新種の藻を開発しようとしています
17:53
make new hydrocarbons that can go into their refineries
エクソンの精油所で その藻が発生した炭化水素から
17:56
to make normal gasoline
CO2を含まないガソリンや
17:59
and diesel fuel out of CO2.
ディーゼル燃料が生成されるのです
18:01
Those are just a couple of the approaches
これらは我々が現在行っている
18:03
and directions that we're taking.
研究アプローチの例に過ぎません
18:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:08
Translator:Kazuyuki Shimatani
Reviewer:Yuki Okada

sponsored links

Craig Venter - Biologist, genetics pioneer
In 2001, Craig Venter made headlines for sequencing the human genome. In 2003, he started mapping the ocean's biodiversity. And now he's created the first synthetic lifeforms -- microorganisms that can produce alternative fuels.

Why you should listen

Craig Venter, the man who led the private effort to sequence the human genome, is hard at work now on even more potentially world-changing projects.

First, there's his mission aboard the Sorcerer II, a 92-foot yacht, which, in 2006, finished its voyage around the globe to sample, catalouge and decode the genes of the ocean's unknown microorganisms. Quite a task, when you consider that there are tens of millions of microbes in a single drop of sea water. Then there's the J. Craig Venter Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to researching genomics and exploring its societal implications.

In 2005, Venter founded Synthetic Genomics, a private company with a provocative mission: to engineer new life forms. Its goal is to design, synthesize and assemble synthetic microorganisms that will produce alternative fuels, such as ethanol or hydrogen. He was on Time magzine's 2007 list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World.

In early 2008, scientists at the J. Craig Venter Institute announced that they had manufactured the entire genome of a bacterium by painstakingly stitching together its chemical components. By sequencing a genome, scientists can begin to custom-design bootable organisms, creating biological robots that can produce from scratch chemicals humans can use, such as biofuel. And in 2010, they announced, they had created "synthetic life" -- DNA created digitally, inserted into a living bacterium, and remaining alive.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.