sponsored links
TED2010

Seth Berkley: HIV and flu -- the vaccine strategy

セス・バークレー: HIVとインフルエンザ ー ワクチンの戦略

February 5, 2010

ワクチンの設計や製造、流通についての知見が進歩して、世界の脅威である AIDSやマラリアやインフルエンザの根絶に近づいていることをセス・バークレーが語ります

Seth Berkley - Vaccine visionary
Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Do you worry about what is going to kill you?
自分がどう死ぬか 心配ですか?
00:17
Heart disease, cancer,
心臓病やガン
00:20
a car accident?
交通事故でしょうか?
00:22
Most of us worry about things we can't control,
多くの人はコントロールできないことを心配します
00:24
like war, terrorism,
戦争やテロや
00:27
the tragic earthquake that just occurred in Haiti.
ハイチの悲惨な地震なども心配です
00:29
But what really threatens humanity?
では人類にとって真の脅威は何でしょうか
00:32
A few years ago, Professor Vaclav Smil
数年前 バーツラフ・スミル教授は
00:36
tried to calculate the probability
歴史を変えるほどの
00:38
of sudden disasters
大きな災害が突然起こる
00:40
large enough to change history.
確率の計算を試みました
00:42
He called these,
彼が名付けた
00:44
"massively fatal discontinuities,"
大規模な致命的断絶とは
00:46
meaning that they could kill
今後50年に起こり得る
00:48
up to 100 million people
最高1億人の命を奪う
00:50
in the next 50 years.
災害のことです
00:52
He looked at the odds of another world war,
世界大戦が発生する確率や
00:54
of a massive volcanic eruption,
大規模な火山の噴火や
00:57
even of an asteroid hitting the Earth.
小惑星が地球に衝突する確率を求めました
00:59
But he placed the likelihood of one such event
しかしその他の何よりも発生の確率が高く
01:01
above all others
ほぼ100%の確率で
01:04
at close to 100 percent,
起こり得るとされたのが
01:06
and that is a severe flu pandemic.
インフルエンザの大流行です
01:08
Now, you might think of flu
インフルエンザは
01:12
as just a really bad cold,
カゼがひどくなったものと思われがちですが
01:14
but it can be a death sentence.
致命的になることもあります
01:17
Every year, 36,000 people in the United States
アメリカでは毎年 季節性インフルエンザで
01:19
die of seasonal flu.
3万6千人が命を落とします
01:22
In the developing world, the data is much sketchier
発展途上国のデータは不完全ですが
01:25
but the death toll is almost
死者の人数は
01:27
certainly higher.
もっと多いことでしょう
01:29
You know, the problem is if
さらに 厄介なことに
01:31
this virus occasionally mutates
ウイルスはしばしば
01:33
so dramatically,
著しい変異を遂げると
01:35
it essentially is a new virus
実質的に新種ウイルスのようになり
01:37
and then we get a pandemic.
こうして大流行が生じるのです
01:39
In 1918, a new virus appeared
1918年には新種のウイルスが出現して
01:43
that killed some 50 to 100 million people.
5000万人から1億人が亡くなりました
01:46
It spread like wildfire
燎原の火の如し です
01:49
and some died within hours of developing symptoms.
発症してから数時間で亡くなった患者もいました
01:51
Are we safer today?
今日 我々は大丈夫なのでしょうか?
01:54
Well, we seem to have dodged
誰もが心配していた
01:56
the deadly pandemic this year
今年のひどい流行は
01:58
that most of us feared,
なんとか回避できたようです
02:00
but this threat could reappear at any time.
しかしこの脅威はいつ再現してもおかしくありません
02:02
The good news is that
幸いなことに
02:05
we're at a moment in time
今の時代は
02:07
when science, technology, globalization is converging
科学と技術と国際化が結びついて
02:09
to create an unprecedented possibility:
かつてない可能性を拓きつつあります
02:12
the possibility to make history
いまだに地球上の全死者の
02:14
by preventing infectious diseases
5分の1と多くの苦しみの
02:16
that still account for one-fifth of all deaths
原因である感染症を撲滅して
02:19
and countless misery on Earth.
歴史を刻む可能性です
02:22
We can do this.
それは 実行可能なのです
02:25
We're already preventing millions of deaths
すでに現在のワクチンによって
02:27
with existing vaccines,
何百万人もの命を救っています
02:29
and if we get these to more people,
ワクチンをより広く行き渡らせれば
02:31
we can certainly save more lives.
より多くの命を救えます
02:33
But with new or better vaccines
さらに新種や改良型のワクチンであれば
02:36
for malaria, TB, HIV,
マラリアや結核やHIV
02:38
pneumonia, diarrhea, flu,
肺炎や下痢やインフルエンザなどの
02:41
we could end suffering
これまでずっと続いてきた苦しみに
02:43
that has been on the Earth since the beginning of time.
終わりを告げることができるはずです
02:45
So, I'm here to trumpet vaccines for you.
今日はワクチンの成果についてお話します
02:48
But first, I have to explain why they're important
最初に なぜワクチンが重要か説明しましょう
02:50
because vaccines, the power of them,
ワクチンの力は たとえるなら
02:53
is really like a whisper.
ささやき声のようです
02:56
When they work, they can make history,
ワクチンの成果があると歴史に残りますが
02:58
but after a while
その後しばらくすると
03:00
you can barely hear them.
ほとんど耳にすることもなくなります
03:02
Now, some of us are old enough
ある年齢以上の人なら
03:04
to have a small, circular scar on our arms
腕に小さな丸い痕が付いているでしょう
03:07
from an inoculation we received as children.
子どものときの予防接種の痕です
03:10
But when was the last time you worried about smallpox,
でも最近は天然痘の心配はしなくなりました
03:13
a disease that killed half a billion people last century
20世紀に5億人の命を奪った病気が
03:16
and no longer is with us?
撲滅されたのです
03:19
Or polio? How many of you remember the iron lung?
ポリオもです 鉄の肺を覚えている方などいますか?
03:21
We don't see scenes like this anymore
こういう物を目にすることは無くなりました
03:24
because of vaccines.
ワクチンのおかげです
03:27
Now, it's interesting
さて興味深いのは
03:29
because there are 30-odd diseases
今日では 30種余りの病気に
03:31
that can be treated with vaccines now,
ワクチンで対処できるのに
03:34
but we're still threatened by things like HIV and flu.
HIVやインフルエンザは未だに脅威だということです
03:36
Why is that?
それはなぜでしょうか?
03:39
Well, here's the dirty little secret.
こんな事情があるのです
03:41
Until recently, we haven't had to know
ごく最近になるまで
03:43
exactly how a vaccine worked.
ワクチンの仕組みは明らかではありませんでした
03:45
We knew they worked through old-fashioned trial and error.
試行錯誤によって効果は確認されていました
03:48
You took a pathogen, you modified it,
病原体を確保し それを改変して
03:51
you injected it into a person or an animal
人や動物に投与したら
03:53
and you saw what happened.
どうなるか観察するのです
03:56
This worked well for most pathogens,
この方法は多くの病原体に対して有効で
03:58
somewhat well for crafty bugs like flu,
やっかいなインフルエンザにもなんとか使えますが
04:01
but not at all for HIV,
人間が天然の免疫を持たない
04:04
for which humans have no natural immunity.
HIVにはまったく効果がありません
04:06
So let's explore how vaccines work.
ではワクチンの作用を見てみましょう
04:09
They basically create a cache
簡単に言えば 必要に応じて
04:12
of weapons for your immune system
免疫系が使うための
04:14
which you can deploy when needed.
秘密兵器を作っておくのです
04:16
Now, when you get a viral infection,
普通は ウイルス感染してから
04:19
what normally happens is it takes days or weeks
体が完全な反撃体制を整えるまで
04:22
for your body to fight back
数日から
04:24
at full strength,
数週間かかるのです
04:26
and that might be too late.
それでは手遅れになることもあります
04:28
When you're pre-immunized,
あらかじめ免疫をつけていれば
04:30
what happens is you have forces in your body
特定の敵を認識して
04:32
pre-trained to recognize
打倒できる戦力が
04:34
and defeat specific foes.
体内に配備されるわけです
04:36
So that's really how vaccines work.
ワクチンはそういう働きをします
04:38
Now, let's take a look at a video
ではビデオをお見せします
04:40
that we're debuting at TED, for the first time,
TED で初めて公開するこのビデオは
04:42
on how an effective HIV vaccine might work.
効果的なHIVワクチンの作用を説明するものです
04:45
(Music)
(音楽)
04:49
Narrator: A vaccine trains the body in advance
ワクチンは 特定の侵入者を
04:55
how to recognize and neutralize
認識し中和するように
04:57
a specific invader.
人体を訓練しておくものです
04:59
After HIV penetrates the body's mucosal barriers,
HIVは人体の粘膜関門を突破して侵入すると
05:01
it infects immune cells to replicate.
免疫細胞に感染して増殖します
05:04
The invader draws the attention
免疫系の最前線部隊は
05:08
of the immune system's front-line troops.
侵入者を発見します
05:10
Dendritic cells, or macrophages,
樹状細胞やマクロファージが
05:12
capture the virus and display pieces of it.
ウィルスを捕らえてその断片を「提示」します
05:14
Memory cells generated by the HIV vaccine
前線からHIVの侵入を知らされると
05:18
are activated when they learn
HIVワクチンで作られた
05:21
HIV is present from the front-line troops.
記憶細胞が活性化します
05:23
These memory cells immediately deploy
この記憶細胞は直ちに
05:26
the exact weapons needed.
必要とされる兵器を配備します
05:29
Memory B cells turn into plasma cells,
メモリB細胞はプラズマ細胞となって
05:32
which produce wave after wave
次から次へと
05:35
of the specific antibodies
HIVにピタリと適合した
05:37
that latch onto HIV
特定の抗体を産出して
05:39
to prevent it from infecting cells,
HIVが細胞を感染させるのを防ぎます
05:41
while squadrons of killer T cells
同時にキラーT細胞大隊が
05:43
seek out and destroy cells
HIVに感染してしまった細胞を
05:45
that are already HIV infected.
探して破壊します
05:47
The virus is defeated.
ウイルスは打ち負かされます
05:50
Without a vaccine,
ワクチンが無かったら
05:52
these responses would have taken more than a week.
これらの兵器を準備するまでに1週間以上もかかり
05:54
By that time, the battle against HIV
その間にHIVとの戦いには
05:57
would already have been lost.
敗北してしまっているでしょう
05:59
Seth Berkley: Really cool video, isn't it?
よくできたビデオでしょう?
06:08
The antibodies you just saw in this video,
ビデオに出てきた抗体の作用は
06:11
in action, are the ones that make most vaccines work.
ほとんどのワクチンで同様に働きます
06:14
So the real question then is:
つまり肝心なのは
06:17
How do we ensure that your body makes
どうすれば インフルエンザや
06:19
the exact ones that we need to protect
HIVに対して必要な抗体を
06:21
against flu and HIV?
人体が作るようにできるのか です
06:23
The principal challenge for both of these viruses
これらのウイルスの厄介なところは
06:25
is that they're always changing.
常に変化しているということです
06:28
So let's take a look at the flu virus.
インフルエンザのウイルスを見てみましょう
06:30
In this rendering of the flu virus,
この図にあるいろいろな色の突起を用いて
06:33
these different colored spikes are what it uses to infect you.
インフルエンザのウイルスは感染します
06:35
And also, what the antibodies use is a handle
また抗体がウイルスを捕まえて
06:38
to essentially grab and neutralize the virus.
中和するのに用いるのもこの突起です
06:41
When these mutate, they change their shape,
変異によって突起の形が変化すると
06:44
and the antibodies don't know what they're looking at anymore.
抗体はウィルスを認識できなくなってしまいます
06:47
So that's why every year
だから毎年
06:50
you can catch a slightly different strain of flu.
違った系列のインフルエンザにかかるのです
06:53
It's also why in the spring,
だから 春には
06:56
we have to make a best guess
次のシーズンに流行しそうなインフルエンザを
06:58
at which three strains are going to prevail the next year,
3つの系列からできるだけ推定し
07:00
put those into a single vaccine
1つのワクチンに仕立てて
07:03
and rush those into production for the fall.
秋には生産できるように急ぐのです
07:05
Even worse,
さらに困ったことに
07:08
the most common influenza -- influenza A --
最も多いA型インフルエンザは
07:10
also infects animals
人の周辺で生息する
07:13
that live in close proximity to humans,
動物にも感染します
07:15
and they can recombine
A型はそれらの動物の中で
07:17
in those particular animals.
遺伝子組み換えを起こします
07:19
In addition, wild aquatic birds
さらに 野生の水鳥は
07:21
carry all known strains
全ての系統のインフルエンザの
07:23
of influenza.
キャリアです
07:25
So, you've got this situation:
するとこんな状況が生じます
07:27
In 2003,
2003年には
07:29
we had an H5N1 virus
H5N1 ウイルスが発生しました
07:31
that jumped from birds into humans
これは鳥から人への伝染が何件か
07:34
in a few isolated cases
別々に起こったものです
07:37
with an apparent mortality rate of 70 percent.
致死率は70%と推定されました
07:39
Now luckily, that particular virus,
当時は大変恐れられましたが
07:42
although very scary at the time,
幸運にも このウイルスは
07:45
did not transmit from person to person
人から人へは
07:47
very easily.
伝染しにくいものでした
07:49
This year's H1N1 threat
今年メキシコで発生して恐れられた
07:51
was actually a human, avian, swine mixture
H1N1 ウイルスは人と鳥とブタからのウイルスが
07:54
that arose in Mexico.
混ざったものでした
07:58
It was easily transmitted,
簡単に伝染するものでしたが
08:00
but, luckily, was pretty mild.
幸運にも 軽度のものでした
08:02
And so, in a sense,
ある意味で
08:05
our luck is holding out,
これまでは 運がよかったのです
08:07
but you know, another wild bird could fly over at anytime.
しかし いつ別の野鳥が飛び込んでくるかもしれません
08:09
Now let's take a look at HIV.
こんどはHIVを見てみましょう
08:13
As variable as flu is,
インフルエンザは変化が多いのですが
08:15
HIV makes flu
HIVと比べてしまうと
08:17
look like the Rock of Gibraltar.
ジブラルタルの岩のように見えます
08:19
The virus that causes AIDS
エイズの原因となるウイルスは
08:21
is the trickiest pathogen
これまで科学者が目にした
08:23
scientists have ever confronted.
最も難解な病原体で
08:25
It mutates furiously,
猛烈に変異します
08:27
it has decoys to evade the immune system,
免疫系を回避するオトリの機能を持ち
08:29
it attacks the very cells that are trying to fight it
攻撃してきた細胞を逆に攻撃して
08:31
and it quickly hides itself
そのゲノムの中に
08:34
in your genome.
身を潜めます
08:36
Here's a slide looking at
このスライドはインフルエンザの遺伝子が
08:38
the genetic variation of flu
どう変化し得るか示しています
08:40
and comparing that to HIV,
これに比べるとHIVは
08:42
a much wilder target.
遥かにやっかいなターゲットですね
08:44
In the video a moment ago,
先ほどのビデオでは 感染した細胞から
08:47
you saw fleets of new viruses launching from infected cells.
ウイルス艦隊が送り出されていました
08:49
Now realize that in a recently infected person,
感染したばかりの人の中には
08:52
there are millions of these ships;
こんな輸送艦が100万個もあって
08:55
each one is just slightly different.
それぞれが少しずつ異なっているのです
08:57
Finding a weapon that recognizes
全てを識別して仕留めることのできる
08:59
and sinks all of them
兵器を用意することは
09:01
makes the job that much harder.
実に困難な課題となります
09:03
Now, in the 27 years since HIV
HIVウイルスがエイズの原因であると
09:05
was identified as the cause of AIDS,
確認されて以来の27年間で
09:08
we've developed more drugs to treat HIV
他のあらゆる感染症の治療薬より
09:11
than all other viruses put together.
多くの種類のHIV薬が開発されてきました
09:13
These drugs aren't cures,
これらの薬では治癒できませんが
09:16
but they represent a huge triumph of science
それでも HIVと診断されることが
09:18
because they take away the automatic death sentence
すなわち 死の告知ではなくなったのは
09:20
from a diagnosis of HIV,
科学の大きな成果です
09:22
at least for those who can access them.
薬を入手できる者にとっては成果です
09:24
The vaccine effort though is really quite different.
しかしワクチンへの取り組みは全く違っていて
09:27
Large companies moved away from it
大企業はそこから撤退しました
09:30
because they thought the science was so difficult
科学として実に難しく ビジネスとしても
09:32
and vaccines were seen as poor business.
成り立たないと見なされたからです
09:35
Many thought that it was just impossible to make an AIDS vaccine,
エイズのワクチンを作ることは不可能と考えられていましたが
09:38
but today, evidence tells us otherwise.
そうではないという証拠が集まっています
09:41
In September,
この9月には
09:44
we had surprising but exciting findings
タイで行われた臨床試験から
09:46
from a clinical trial that took place in Thailand.
予想もしないエキサイティングな結果が得られました
09:49
For the first time, we saw an AIDS vaccine work in humans --
エイズのワクチンが初めて人体で効果を示したのです
09:52
albeit, quite modestly --
残念ながら 効き目は弱いのですが
09:55
and that particular vaccine was made
このワクチンが作られたのは
09:58
almost a decade ago.
10年ほど前のことです
10:00
Newer concepts and early testing now
新しいやり方や早期検査によって
10:02
show even greater promise in the best of our animal models.
高等な実験動物でもさらに有望な結果を出しています
10:04
But in the past few months, researchers have also isolated
でも ここ数ヶ月の間に HIV患者の血液から
10:09
several new broadly neutralizing antibodies
広い範囲にわたって効力を持つ
10:12
from the blood of an HIV infected individual.
新しい中和抗体も特定されました
10:15
Now, what does this mean?
これは何を意味するのでしょうか
10:18
We saw earlier that HIV
先ほど述べたように
10:20
is highly variable,
HIVは変化しやすいのですが
10:22
that a broad neutralizing antibody
効力の広い抗体は
10:24
latches on and disables
ウイルスの様々な変種に適合して
10:26
multiple variations of the virus.
中和できるのです
10:28
If you take these and you put them
こんな抗体を手に入れて
10:31
in the best of our monkey models,
サルに投与すると
10:33
they provide full protection from infection.
完全に感染を防ぎます
10:35
In addition, these researchers found
さらに この研究者たちは
10:38
a new site on HIV
抗体がHIVを捕捉する場所として
10:40
where the antibodies can grab onto,
新しい部位を発見しました
10:42
and what's so special about this spot
この場所の何が特別なのかと言うと
10:44
is that it changes very little
ウイルスが変異を起こしても
10:46
as the virus mutates.
ほとんど変化しない場所であることです
10:48
It's like, as many times
例えて言うなら ウイルスが
10:50
as the virus changes its clothes,
何度着替えても履いている靴下は
10:52
it's still wearing the same socks,
同じなわけです
10:54
and now our job is to make sure
すると次にするべきことは 体がきちんと
10:55
we get the body to really hate those socks.
この靴下に反応するようにすることです
10:58
So what we've got is a situation.
こうして次のような状況に至りました
11:01
The Thai results tell us
タイの臨床結果から
11:03
we can make an AIDS vaccine,
エイズにもワクチンを作れることが確かめられ
11:05
and the antibody findings
抗体の研究結果が
11:07
tell us how we might do that.
そのやり方を示唆しているのです
11:09
This strategy, working backwards
この戦略では抗体をもとにしてワクチン候補を作ります
11:11
from an antibody to create a vaccine candidate,
ワクチン研究において初めての
11:14
has never been done before in vaccine research.
逆からの戦略です
11:16
It's called retro-vaccinology,
「レトロ=ワクチン学」と呼ばれる
11:19
and its implications extend
ここでの考え方は
11:22
way beyond that of just HIV.
HIVのみに留まるものではありません
11:24
So think of it this way.
こういうふうに考えてみてください
11:27
We've got these new antibodies we've identified,
新しい抗体が特定できました
11:29
and we know that they latch onto many, many variations of the virus.
この抗体はウイルスの多様な変種にも適合します
11:32
We know that they have to latch onto a specific part,
この抗体が結合する特定の部位がわかっています
11:35
so if we can figure out the precise structure of that part,
その部分の構造を正確に理解することができれば
11:38
present that through a vaccine,
それをワクチンに反映させて
11:41
what we hope is we can prompt
ヒトの免疫系に働きかけて 適合した抗体を
11:43
your immune system to make these matching antibodies.
作らせることができると考えられます
11:45
And that would create
うまくいけば
11:48
a universal HIV vaccine.
HIVの万能ワクチンが作れるでしょう
11:50
Now, it sounds easier than it is
まあ 「言うはやすし」ですね
11:52
because the structure actually looks more like
実際の構造は
11:54
this blue antibody diagram
この青色の抗体が黄色の部位に
11:56
attached to its yellow binding site,
結合する といったものだからです
11:58
and as you can imagine, these three-dimensional structures
ご想像のとおり この3次元構造は
12:00
are much harder to work on.
取り組んでみると厄介です
12:02
And if you guys have ideas to help us solve this,
何か役立つアイデアのある方は
12:04
we'd love to hear about it.
ぜひお聞かせ下さい
12:06
But, you know, the research that has occurred from HIV now
このように HIVから始まった研究は
12:08
has really helped with innovation with other diseases.
他の病気に対するイノベーションを促します
12:11
So for instance, a biotechnology company
例えばバイオ技術の会社は
12:14
has now found broadly neutralizing
インフルエンザに対する
12:16
antibodies to influenza,
新しい抗体のターゲットと共に
12:18
as well as a new antibody target on the flu virus.
広範な中和抗体を見つけています
12:20
They're currently making a cocktail --
現在彼らは 極めて激しいインフルエンザに
12:23
an antibody cocktail -- that can be used to treat
対応できる抗体の組み合わせを検討し
12:26
severe, overwhelming cases of flu.
調合しようとしています
12:29
In the longer term, what they can do
将来的には
12:32
is use these tools of retro-vaccinology
これらの「レトロ=ワクチン学」のツールを用いて
12:34
to make a preventive flu vaccine.
予防的なインフルエンザワクチンを作れるでしょう
12:36
Now, retro-vaccinology is just one technique
また 合理的ワクチンデザインの観点からは
12:39
within the ambit of so-called rational vaccine design.
「レトロ=ワクチン法」は一つの手法にすぎません
12:42
Let me give you another example.
別の例を挙げましょう
12:45
We talked about before the H and N spikes
インフルエンザウイルスの表面に出ている
12:48
on the surface of the flu virus.
H型とM型の突起の話をしましたが
12:50
Notice these other, smaller protuberances.
別の小さな突起に注目してください
12:52
These are largely hidden from the immune system.
免疫系からはほとんど隠れているのです
12:55
Now it turns out that these spots
これらの部位も ウイルスの変異の際に
12:58
also don't change much when the virus mutates.
あまり変化しないことがわかってきました
13:00
If you can cripple these with specific antibodies,
そこで特別な抗体でこの部位を攻撃すれば
13:03
you could cripple all versions of the flu.
どの種類のインフルエンザも機能を失います
13:05
So far, animal tests indicate
これまでの動物実験によると
13:08
that such a vaccine could prevent severe disease,
軽い症状は出るかもしれませんが
13:10
although you might get a mild case.
重症になることは防げます
13:13
So if this works in humans, what we're talking about
人にも効果があるなら これは
13:15
is a universal flu vaccine,
万能インフルエンザワクチンになります
13:18
one that doesn't need to change every year
毎年変更しなくても良く
13:20
and would remove the threat of death.
死の危険から守ってくれるのです
13:22
We really could think of flu, then,
そうなればインフルエンザは
13:25
as just a bad cold.
ただの「たちの悪いかぜ」になります
13:27
Of course, the best vaccine imaginable
もちろんどんなに素晴らしいワクチンでも
13:30
is only valuable to the extent
必要な人全員に行き渡らなくては
13:32
we get it to everyone who needs it.
意味がありません
13:34
So to do that, we have to combine
そうするためには
13:36
smart vaccine design with smart production methods
優れたワクチンの設計と優れた生産手段 そして
13:38
and, of course, smart delivery methods.
優れた流通手段を組み合わせなくてはなりません
13:41
So I want you to think back a few months ago.
数ヶ月前のことを思い出してください
13:44
In June, the World Health Organization
この6月に WHO (世界保険機関) は
13:46
declared the first global
41年ぶりにインフルエンザの
13:49
flu pandemic in 41 years.
大流行を宣言しました
13:51
The U.S. government promised
インフルエンザのピークに備え10月15日までに
13:53
150 million doses of vaccine
1億5千本のワクチンを用意すると
13:55
by October 15th for the flu peak.
アメリカ政府は約束しました
13:57
Vaccines were promised to developing countries.
発展途上国向けのワクチンも約束しました
13:59
Hundreds of millions of dollars were spent
数億ドルを費やして
14:01
and flowed to accelerating vaccine manufacturing.
ワクチンの製造を急いだのです
14:03
So what happened?
どういう結果になったでしょう?
14:06
Well, we first figured out
インフルエンザワクチンの作り方
14:08
how to make flu vaccines, how to produce them,
つまり製造技術は
14:10
in the early 1940s.
1940年代初期に開発されました
14:13
It was a slow, cumbersome process
時間のかかる面倒な工程です
14:15
that depended on chicken eggs,
鶏卵を用いる方法で
14:18
millions of living chicken eggs.
生きた鶏卵を何百万個も使います
14:21
Viruses only grow in living things,
ウイルスは生き物の中でしか増殖せず
14:24
and so it turned out that, for flu,
インフルエンザに対しては
14:26
chicken eggs worked really well.
鶏卵が大変適していたのでした
14:28
For most strains, you could get one to two doses
ほとんどの型のインフルエンザでは
14:30
of vaccine per egg.
一つの卵からワクチンが1-2本できます
14:33
Luckily for us,
幸運にも
14:35
we live in an era of breathtaking
現代の生物医学は
14:37
biomedical advances.
著しい進展を遂げています
14:39
So today, we get our flu vaccines from ...
そんな時代ですから インフルエンザワクチンは―
14:41
chicken eggs,
―鶏卵から作ります
14:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:46
hundreds of millions of chicken eggs.
数百万個の卵からです
14:48
Almost nothing has changed.
ほとんど何も変わっていません
14:50
The system is reliable
まぁ 信頼できるシステムです
14:52
but the problem is you never know how well
問題は あるウイルスの株が
14:54
a strain is going to grow.
育てやすいかどうか分からないことです
14:56
This year's swine flu strain
今年のブタ系のインフルエンザは
14:59
grew very poorly in early production:
生産の初期にはあまり増殖せず
15:01
basically .6 doses per egg.
卵1個につきワクチン0.6本分でした
15:04
So, here's an alarming thought.
こんなことが心配になります
15:08
What if that wild bird flies by again?
あの野鳥がまた飛んできたらどうするのか
15:10
You could see an avian strain
家禽の群れに感染するタイプの
15:12
that would infect the poultry flocks,
鳥インフルエンザが流行したら
15:14
and then we would have no eggs for our vaccines.
ワクチンを作る卵がなくなるわけです
15:16
So, Dan [Barber], if you want
ダン 魚を育てるのに
15:18
billions of chicken pellets
チキンペレットを
15:20
for your fish farm,
何億個も使うなら
15:22
I know where to get them.
ここで手に入るみたいですよ
15:24
So right now, the world can produce
現在 世界中合わせて
15:26
about 350 million doses
3つの型のインフルエンザワクチンを
15:28
of flu vaccine for the three strains,
3億5千万本ずつ製造できます
15:30
and we can up that to about 1.2 billion doses
豚インフルエンザのように
15:33
if we want to target a single variant
1種類だけをターゲットにすれば
15:36
like swine flu.
合計12億本まで増やせます
15:38
But this assumes that our factories are humming
工場がきちんと稼働しているとしてです
15:40
because, in 2004,
2004年には
15:43
the U.S. supply was cut in half
1つの工場で雑菌が混入しただけで
15:45
by contamination at one single plant.
アメリカでの供給は半減したのです
15:47
And the process still takes
それに 製造プロセスには
15:50
more than half a year.
今でも半年以上かかります
15:52
So are we better prepared
いったい我々の備えは1918年より
15:54
than we were in 1918?
改善していると言えるのでしょうか
15:56
Well, with the new technologies emerging now,
新しい技術も開発されているので
15:58
I hope we can say definitively, "Yes."
「もちろん」と言えるようになればと思います
16:00
Imagine we could produce enough flu vaccine
世界中の誰もに行き渡るだけの
16:02
for everyone in the entire world
インフルエンザワクチンを
16:05
for less than half of what we're currently spending
アメリカが今 投じている費用の半分で
16:08
now in the United States.
製造できたらどうでしょう
16:10
With a range of new technologies, we could.
最新の技術によって それは可能になります
16:12
Here's an example:
例を示します
16:15
A company I'm engaged with has found
私も関係している会社ですが
16:17
a specific piece of the H spike of flu
免疫系を活性化するウイルスのH型突起の
16:19
that sparks the immune system.
ある特別な部分を発見しました
16:21
If you lop this off and attach it
この部分を切り取って
16:23
to the tail of a different bacterium,
別のバクテリアの先端に付ければ
16:25
which creates a vigorous immune response,
すさまじい免疫反応を起こすので
16:28
they've created a very powerful flu fighter.
非常に強力な抗インフルエンザ剤ができます
16:30
This vaccine is so small
このワクチンは非常に小さく
16:32
it can be grown in a common bacteria, E. coli.
ありふれた大腸菌の中で増殖できます
16:34
Now, as you know, bacteria reproduce quickly --
ご存知のようにバクテリアの繁殖は早く
16:37
it's like making yogurt --
ヨーグルトを作るようなものです
16:40
and so we could produce enough swine origin flu
そこで 数箇所の工場で数週間もあれば
16:42
for the entire world in a few factories, in a few weeks,
豚由来インフルエンザ用のワクチンを
16:44
with no eggs,
全世界で必要な分 製造できます
16:47
for a fraction of the cost of current methods.
卵を使わないので今の何分の一かのコストです
16:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:52
So here's a comparison of several of these new vaccine technologies.
そんな新しいワクチン技術の比較表です
16:57
And, aside from the radically increased production
劇的に改善した製造技術と
17:00
and huge cost savings --
大幅なコスト低減に加えて
17:03
for example, the E. coli method I just talked about --
今 説明した大腸菌の手法では
17:05
look at the time saved: this would be lives saved.
期間も短縮出来ます―命が救えるということです
17:08
The developing world,
発展途上国は
17:11
mostly left out of the current response,
現在のインフルエンザ対応から取り残されがちなため
17:13
sees the potential of these alternate technologies
これらの新技術には期待しており
17:16
and they're leapfrogging the West.
西側諸国より進んでいます
17:19
India, Mexico and others are already
インドやメキシコその他の国ですでに
17:21
making experimental flu vaccines,
インフルエンザワクチンの試作が始まり
17:23
and they may be the first place
これらのワクチンが初めて実用されるのも
17:25
we see these vaccines in use.
これらの国かもしれません
17:27
Because these technologies are so efficient
この新しい技術は大変効率的で
17:29
and relatively cheap,
比較的費用もかからないので
17:32
billions of people can have access to lifesaving vaccines
流通手段を開発できれば
17:34
if we can figure out how to deliver them.
何十億もの人に 命を救うワクチンを届けられます
17:37
Now think of where this leads us.
この次はどうなるか考えてみて下さい
17:39
New infectious diseases
新しい伝染病は
17:41
appear or reappear
数年ごとに
17:43
every few years.
出現したり再発したりしています
17:45
Some day, perhaps soon,
いつか もしかしたら近いうちに
17:47
we'll have a virus that is going to threaten all of us.
我々皆を狙うウイルスが現れるでしょう
17:49
Will we be quick enough to react
そのとき何百万人も亡くなる前に
17:52
before millions die?
素早く対応できるでしょうか?
17:54
Luckily, this year's flu was relatively mild.
幸いにも 今年のインフルエンザは比較的弱いものでした
17:56
I say, "luckily" in part
「幸いにも」と言った理由のひとつは
17:59
because virtually no one in the developing world
発展途上国では予防接種を受けた人は
18:01
was vaccinated.
ほとんどいなかったからです
18:04
So if we have the political and financial foresight
これまでの投資を無駄にしないための
18:06
to sustain our investments,
政治的 財政的先見があるなら
18:09
we will master these and new tools of vaccinology,
これらをワクチン学の新しいツールと共に使いこなし
18:11
and with these tools we can produce
世界の皆に十分なワクチンを
18:14
enough vaccine for everyone at low cost
安価に製造できるようにして
18:16
and ensure healthy productive lives.
健康で創造的な生活を保証することができます
18:18
No longer must flu have to kill half a million people a year.
インフルエンザで年に50万人も亡くすことはないのです
18:21
No longer does AIDS
エイズで年に200万人も
18:24
need to kill two million a year.
亡くすことはないのです
18:26
No longer do the poor and vulnerable
貧しい弱者が
18:28
need to be threatened by infectious diseases,
伝染病におびえる必要はないのです
18:30
or indeed, anybody.
―もちろん他の人たちもです
18:33
Instead of having Vaclav Smil's
バーツラフ・スミルが言っている
18:35
"massively fatal discontinuity" of life,
生命の大断絶の代わりに
18:38
we can ensure
生命が継続して行くことを
18:41
the continuity of life.
保証することができるのです
18:43
What the world needs now are these new vaccines,
今 世界に必要なのは新しいワクチンです
18:45
and we can make it happen.
これは実現できることなのです
18:47
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
18:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:51
Chris Anderson: Thank you.
ありがとう
18:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:01
Thank you.
ありがとう
19:07
So, the science is changing.
科学は進んでいますね
19:09
In your mind, Seth -- I mean, you must dream about this --
セス 聞かせてほしいのですが―これが実現するのは
19:12
what is the kind of time scale
どれぐらいの時間スケールで考えていますか
19:15
on, let's start with HIV,
HIVの方から伺いましょう
19:18
for a game-changing vaccine that's actually out there and usable?
この革命的ワクチンが登場して使えるようになるのはいつ頃ですか
19:20
SB: The game change can come at any time,
ワクチンは今すぐにでも実用化します
19:24
because the problem we have now is
ワクチンが人体で働くことは示されましたので
19:26
we've shown we can get a vaccine to work in humans;
今や問題は
19:28
we just need a better one.
その改良だけです
19:30
And with these types of antibodies, we know humans can make them.
人がこの種の抗体を作れることはわかっています
19:32
So, if we can figure out how to do that,
どうすればよいか 方法が分かれば
19:34
then we have the vaccine,
ワクチンができるのです
19:36
and what's interesting is there already is
そしてその問題についての手がかりも
19:38
some evidence that we're beginning to crack that problem.
得られつつあるという証拠があがっています
19:40
So, the challenge is full speed ahead.
ゴールに向かって全速で進んでいます
19:42
CA: In your gut, do you think it's probably going to be at least another five years?
少なくとも5年はかかるという感じですか?
19:44
SB: You know, everybody says it's 10 years,
だいたい皆さん10年と言います
19:46
but it's been 10 years every 10 years.
ずっと あと10年したらと言われ続けています
19:48
So I hate to put a timeline
科学的なイノベーションに
19:50
on scientific innovation,
時間の線引きは難しいですね
19:52
but the investments that have occurred are now paying dividends.
ただ 投資に対する配当は行われています
19:54
CA: And that's the same with universal flu vaccine, the same kind of thing?
では万能のインフルエンザワクチンはどうですか?同じような状況ですか?
19:57
SB: I think flu is different. I think what happened with flu is
インフルエンザはまた違います こちらは
20:00
we've got a bunch -- I just showed some of this --
今すぐ投入できる 優れた実用的な技術が
20:02
a bunch of really cool and useful technologies that are ready to go now.
いくつも見いだされていると思います
20:04
They look good. The problem has been that,
見通しも良さそうです
20:07
what we did is we invested in traditional technologies
問題は 従来の技術に投資してきていることです
20:09
because that's what we were comfortable with.
そちらのほうが理解されていたからです
20:12
You also can use adjuvants, which are chemicals you mix.
補助剤を混ぜることもできます
20:14
That's what Europe is doing, so we could have diluted out
ヨーロッパのやり方で ワクチンを薄め
20:17
our supply of flu and made more available,
より多くの人に行き渡るようにします
20:19
but, going back to what Michael Specter said,
ただ マイケル・スペクターが述べたように
20:21
the anti-vaccine crowd didn't really want that to happen.
ワクチン反対派は補助剤に抵抗しました
20:24
CA: And malaria's even further behind?
マラリアはもっと遅れていますか?
20:27
SB: No, malaria, there is a candidate
いいえ マラリアにも
20:29
that actually showed efficacy in an earlier trial
初期試験で効果の見られた候補薬があり
20:31
and is currently in phase three trials now.
今ではフェーズ3の治験に進んでいます
20:34
It probably isn't the perfect vaccine, but it's moving along.
完全なワクチンというわけではありませんが 進展しています
20:36
CA: Seth, most of us do work where every month,
セス 多くの人の仕事は
20:39
we produce something;
毎月何か成果が出て
20:41
we get that kind of gratification.
手応えを感じられるものが多いのですが
20:43
You've been slaving away at this for more than a decade,
研究チームの皆さんと 十年以上もこの研究を
20:45
and I salute you and your colleagues for what you do.
続けられていることに敬意を表したいと思います
20:48
The world needs people like you. Thank you.
あなた方のような人が必要なんです ありがとう
20:51
SB: Thank you.
ありがとう
20:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:55
Translator:Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewer:Sawa Horibe

sponsored links

Seth Berkley - Vaccine visionary
Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

Why you should listen

Seth Berkley is an epidemiologist and the CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the global health organization protecting lives by improving access to vaccines in developing countries. Seth joined Gavi in 2011 in a period of rapid acceleration of Gavi’s programs. Now, with more than half a billion children immunized, he is leading Gavi’s efforts to reach a further 300 million children in the next five years and build sustainability into country immunization programs. Prior to Gavi, he spearheaded the development of vaccines for HIV as founder and CEO of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.