sponsored links
TED2010

John Kasaona: How poachers became caretakers

ジョン・カサオナ:密猟者から世話人へ

February 10, 2010

ジョン・カサオナは、生まれ故郷のナミビアで絶滅の危機に瀕した動物を守る画期的な方法を見出しました。密猟していた人たちを含む近隣の村人たちに、野生動物の管理をさせるのです。このやり方は成果をあげています。

John Kasaona - Conservationist
John Kasaona is a pioneer of community-based conservation -- working with the people who use and live on fragile land to enlist them in protecting it. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
アフリカにはこんな諺があります
00:16
In Africa we say,
''神は白人に時計を与え
00:18
"God gave the white man a watch
黒人に時間を与えた"
00:21
and gave the black man time."
(笑)
00:23
(Laughter)
時間をたっぷりと与えられた人間が
00:27
I think, how is it possible
18分で話をするなんてことが
00:29
for a man with so much time
できるのでしょうか
00:31
to tell his story in 18 minutes?
それは至難の業です
00:33
I think it will be quite a challenge for me.
このところアフリカに関する話といえば
00:36
Most African stories these days,
飢餓や
00:38
they talk about famine,
エイズ
00:40
HIV and AIDS,
貧困や戦争のことばかりです
00:42
poverty or war.
でも私がこれから話したいのは
00:45
But my story that I would like to share with you today
成功についての話です
00:47
is the one about success.
南西アフリカにある
00:50
It is about a country
ナミビアという国についての話です
00:52
in the southwest of Africa
ナミビアは人口210万人
00:55
called Namibia.
面積はカリフォルニアの2倍ほどです
00:57
Namibia has got 2.1 million people,
私はナミビア北西部の
01:01
but it is only twice the size of California.
田舎出身です
01:05
I come from a region
クネネ州というところです
01:07
in the remote northwest part of the country.
クネネ州の中心にある
01:10
It's called Kunene region.
セスフォンテインという村で私は生まれました
01:12
And in the center of Kunene region
これが私の故郷です
01:14
is the village of Sesfontein. This is where I was born.
アンジェリーナ ジョリーと
01:17
This is where I'm coming from.
ブラッド ピットの話に
01:19
Most people that are following the story
詳しい人ならば
01:21
of Angelina Jolie
ナミビアがどこにあるのかご存知でしょう
01:23
and Brad Pitt
彼らは
01:25
will know where Namibia is.
エンパイア ステート ビルよりも高い
01:28
They love Namibia
ナミビアの美しい砂丘を
01:30
for its beautiful dunes,
愛しています
01:32
that are even taller
風と時間が
01:34
than the Empire State Building.
奇妙な景観を作り上げました
01:38
Wind and time have twisted our landscape
そしてこうした風景の中で
01:42
into very strange shapes,
この厳しく変わった大地での生活に
01:45
and these shapes are speckled with wildlife
適応した野生動物が暮らしています
01:48
that has become so adapted
私はヒンバ族です
01:50
to this harsh and strange land.
なぜ洋服を着ているのかと不思議に思われるかもしれません
01:53
I'm a Himba.
私はヒンバ族でもありナミビア人でもあります
01:55
You might wonder, why are you wearing these Western clothes?
ヒンバはナミビアに住む
01:59
I'm a Himba and Namibian.
29の民族のひとつです
02:01
A Himba is one of the 29
非常に伝統的な暮らしをしています
02:03
ethnic groups in Namibia.
私は放牧をしながら育ちました
02:05
We live a very traditional lifestyle.
ヤギや羊、牛など
02:09
I grew up herding,
家畜の面倒をみるのです
02:11
looking after our livestock --
ある日
02:13
goats, sheep and cattle.
父が私を茂みに連れ出して言いました
02:16
And one day,
''ジョン お前には
02:19
my father actually took me into the bush.
立派な遊牧民になってほしい
02:21
He said, "John,
もしお前が動物の世話をしていて
02:23
I want you to become a good herder.
チーターがうちのヤギを
02:26
Boy, if you are looking after our livestock
食べているのを見つけたら
02:29
and you see a cheetah
チーターはとても神経質だから
02:31
eating our goat --
そいつに向かって歩いて行くんだ
02:33
cheetah is very nervous --
歩いて行ってお尻を引っ叩け"
02:35
just walk up to it.
(笑)
02:37
Walk up to it and smack it on the backside."
"そうすればチーターはヤギを放して
02:40
(Laughter)
逃げていくだろう"
02:42
"And he will let go of the goat
父は続けました
02:44
and run off."
''もしお前がライオンに出くわしたら
02:46
But then he said,
動くんじゃないぞ
02:49
"Boy, if you run into a lion,
動かずにじっと立っていろ
02:54
don't move.
胸を張ってそいつの目をじっと見つめるんだ
02:56
Don't move. Stand your ground.
そうしたら お前とは喧嘩したくないと思うかもしれない"
02:59
Puff up and just look it in the eye
(笑)
03:02
and it may not want to fight you."
父はこんなことも言いました
03:05
(Laughter)
"でも もしヒョウを見たら
03:09
But then, he said,
一目散に逃げるんだぞ"
03:11
"If you see a leopard,
(笑)
03:16
boy, you better run like hell."
"世話をしているヤギよりも速く走るつもりで逃げろ"
03:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:23
"Imagine you run faster than those goats you are looking after."
こんな風にして 私は自然のことを学び始めたのです
03:26
In this way --
普通のナミビア人であり
03:28
(Laughter)
ヒンバ族であることに加えて
03:31
In this way, I actually started to learn about nature.
私は訓練を受けた自然保護論者でもあります
03:35
In addition to being an ordinary Namibian
草原に出るならば
03:38
and in addition to being a Himba
向き合えるものと逃げるべきものを
03:40
I'm also a trained conservationist.
知ることはとても重要です
03:43
And it is very important if you are in the field
私は1971年に生まれました
03:46
to know what to confront
アパルトヘイトの時代です
03:48
and what to run from.
白人たちは農場も放牧も
03:51
I was born in 1971.
狩猟も好きなように行えました
03:53
We lived under apartheid regime.
でも私たち黒人は野生動物を扱ってよいとは
03:57
The whites could farm, graze
見なされていませんでした
04:00
and hunt as they wished,
私たちが狩りをしようとすると
04:02
but we black, we were not regarded as responsible
決まって密猟者呼ばわりされました
04:05
to use wildlife.
そして罰金を科され刑務所に入れられたのです
04:07
Whenever we tried to hunt,
1966年から1990年の間
04:09
we were called poachers.
アメリカとソ連が
04:11
And as a result, we were fined and locked up in jail.
ナミビアの支配権をめぐって争いました
04:16
Between 1966 and 1990,
戦時中は
04:19
the U.S. and Soviet interests
軍隊が動き回ります
04:22
fought for control over my country.
軍人たちは貴重なサイの角と牙を
04:25
And you know, during war time,
求めて狩りをしました
04:27
there are militaries, armies, that are moving around.
キロあたり5,000ドル程度で
04:30
And the army hunted for valuable rhino horns
売れたのです
04:33
and tusks.
その当時
04:35
They could sell these things for anything between
ヒンバ族はほとんど皆ライフル銃を持っていました
04:38
$5,000 a kilo.
戦時中だったので
04:40
During the same year
.303ブリティッシュ式のライフルが
04:42
almost every Himba had a rifle.
国中いたるところにありました
04:45
Because it was wartime,
同じ頃 - 1980年頃ですが
04:47
the British .303 rifle
深刻な干ばつが起こりました
04:49
was just all over the whole country.
残っていたほとんど全ての動物が死にました
04:53
Then in the same time, around 1980,
私たちの家畜も
04:55
we had a very big drought.
守られていたとはいえ
04:58
It killed almost everything that was left.
ほぼ全滅しかかっていました
05:01
Our livestock was
皆お腹を空かせていました
05:03
almost at the brink of extinction,
ある晩のことを覚えています
05:05
protected as well.
腹を空かせたヒョウが
05:07
We were hungry.
近所の家に入り込み
05:09
I remember a night
眠っていた子どもを
05:11
when a hungry leopard
連れ去ったのです
05:13
went into the house
とても悲しい話です
05:15
of one of our neighbors
現在でさえ
05:17
and took a sleeping child out of the bed.
その記憶は消えず
05:19
It's a very sad story.
この事件は
05:22
But even today,
誰も忘れることができません
05:24
that memory is still in people's minds.
そして同じ年
05:26
They can pinpoint the exact location
私たちはほとんど全てを失いました
05:28
where this all happened.
父が言いました"学校に行ったらどうだ?"
05:31
And then, in the same year,
そして私は 何かすることがあるだろうと学校に送られたのです
05:33
we almost lost everything.
私が学校に通い始めた年
05:36
And my father said, "Why don't you just go to school?"
父はNGOで職を得ました
05:40
And they sent me off to school, just to get busy somewhere there.
IRDNC (地域開発および自然保護総合トラスト) です
05:43
And the year I went to school,
彼らは多くの時間をコミュニティの人とともに過ごし
05:45
my father actually got a job with a non-governmental organization
村の長であるジョシュア カンゴンベなど
05:48
called IRDNC, Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation.
地元の人々から信頼されていました
05:52
They actually spend a lot of time a year in the communities.
ジョシュアは事態に気がつきました
05:56
They were trusted by the local communities
野生動物が消え
05:59
like our leader, Joshua Kangombe.
密猟が激増していたのです
06:02
Joshua Kangombe saw what was happening:
絶望的な状況のように思えました
06:04
wildlife disappearing,
死と絶望がジョシュアと
06:06
poaching was skyrocketing,
コミュニティ全体を覆いました
06:09
and the situation seemed very hopeless.
でもその時IRDNCの人たちがジョシュアに提案しました
06:12
Death and despair surrounded Joshua
あなたが信頼する人々に我々が給与を払い
06:15
and our entire communities.
野生動物の面倒を見てもらってはどうか?
06:18
But then, the people from IRDNC proposed to Joshua:
コミュニティの中に草原と野生動物のことを
06:23
What if we pay people that you trust
よく知っている人は
06:27
to look after wildlife?
いないのか?
06:30
Do you have anybody in your communities, or people,
長は答えました"いるよ 密猟者たちだ"
06:33
that know the bush very well
"何だって?密猟者?"
06:35
and that know wildlife very well?
"そうだ 密猟者たちだ"
06:38
The headman said: "Yes. Our poachers."
それが私の父だったのです
06:42
"Eh? The poachers?"
父は長いことずっと密猟をしていました
06:44
"Yes. Our poachers."
アフリカのどこかでは
06:46
And that was my father.
密猟者たちの借金を棒引きにしましたが
06:49
My father has been a poacher for quite a long time.
IRDNCは人々が自らを管理する能力と
06:53
Instead of shooting poachers dead
野生動物を保持 管理する権利を
06:56
like they were doing elsewhere in Africa,
取り戻す手助けをしたのです
06:59
IRDNC has helped men reclaim their abilities
こうして人々が野生動物は自分たちのものだと思うようになると
07:04
to manage their peoples
動物たちの数が増え始めました
07:06
and their rights to own and manage wildlife.
それがナミビアにおける動物保護の基礎となったのです
07:10
And thus, as people started feeling ownership over wildlife,
ナミビアの独立後 コミュニティ主導のこの方法は
07:14
wildlife numbers started coming back,
新政府に支持されました
07:17
and that's actually becoming a foundation for conservation in Namibia.
この原則を支えるものが3つあります
07:22
With independence, the whole approach of community getting involved
一つ目は
07:25
was embraced by our new government.
伝統を尊重しつつ新しい考え方を受け入れることです
07:28
Three things that actually help to build on this foundation:
これは私たちの伝統です
07:31
The very first one is
ヒンバ族の村には聖火があります
07:33
honoring of tradition and being open to new ideas.
聖火のある場所ではご先祖様の魂が
07:37
Here is our tradition:
村の長を通して
07:39
At every Himba village, there is a sacred fire.
水や牧草がどこにあるのか
07:43
And at this sacred fire, the spirit of our ancestors
どこに狩りに行けばよいのかを
07:46
speak through the headman
語ります
07:49
and advise us where to get water,
これが私たち自身を環境と調和させる
07:52
where to get grazings,
最良の方法だと私は思います
07:54
and where to go and hunt.
ここに新しいアイデアを組み合わせるのです
07:57
And I think this is the best way of regulating ourselves
ヘリコプターでサイを移動させることは
08:00
on the environment.
見えない魂を通して語りかけることよりも
08:03
And here are the new ideas.
ずっとたやすいことではないでしょうか
08:06
Transporting rhinos using helicopters
こうしたことは外部の人から教わったのです
08:09
I think is much easier
外部の人から学んだのです
08:11
than talking through a spirit that you can't see, isn't it?
私たちはヒンバ族の伝統的な土地の大きさを把握する術が必要でした
08:14
And these things we were taught by outsiders.
GPSが土地の姿を正しく映し出しているのか
08:17
We learned these things from outsiders.
それともただ西洋で作られたというだけのものなのかを
08:20
We needed new boundaries to describe our traditional lands;
知るためには
08:24
we needed to learn more things like GPS
私たちがGPSのことをより良く知る必要がありました
08:28
just to see whether --
先祖伝来の地図とどこか別の場所で作られたデジタル地図が
08:31
can GPS really reflect the true reflection of the land
一致するのかどうかも知りたかったのです
08:34
or is this just a thing made somewhere in the West?
こうしたことを通じて
08:37
And we then wanted to see whether we can match our
我々は自分たちの夢を認識し
08:41
ancestral maps with digital maps made somewhere in the world.
伝統を尊びながら
08:45
And through this,
新しいアイデアを取り入れるようになったのです
08:48
we actually started realizing our dreams,
二つ目には 私たちはいろいろなものから
08:52
and we maintained honoring our traditions
恩恵を受けられる より良い暮らしがしたかったのです
08:55
but we were still open to new ideas.
父のようにほとんどの密猟者は
08:57
The second element is that we wanted to have a life,
私たち自身のコミュニティ出身でした
09:00
a better life where we can benefit through many things.
部外者ではなく
09:03
Most poachers, like my father,
私たちの仲間だったのです
09:07
were people from our own community.
時々彼らが捕まった時でも
09:10
They were not people from outside.
大切に扱われコミュニティに戻って来ました
09:12
These were our own people.
そしてより良い暮らしへの夢を共有するようになりました
09:14
And sometimes, once they were caught,
父のように一番優れていた人は -父を売り込んでいる訳ではありません -
09:17
they were treated with respect, brought back into the communities
(笑)
09:20
and they were made part of the bigger dreams.
他の者が密猟するのをやめさせる責任者になりました
09:23
The best one, like my father -- I'm not campaigning for my father --
こうしたことが行われるようになると
09:26
(Laughter)
私たちはひとつのコミュニティとなり
09:28
they were put in charge to stop others from poaching.
自然とのつながりを知るようになりました
09:32
And when this thing started going on,
ナミビアではそれはとても強力なことなのです
09:35
we started becoming one community,
最後の要素は これらのことを実現する手助けとなるのは
09:38
renewing our connection to nature.
パートナーシップだということです
09:40
And that was a very strong thing in Namibia.
ナミビア政府は我々の伝統的な土地に法的地位を与えました
09:46
The last element that actually helped develop these things
もうひとつの協力者は
09:49
was the partnerships.
ビジネス社会です
09:51
Our government has given legal status over our traditional lands.
ビジネス界によってナミビアに世界の眼が向けられるようになり
09:56
The other partners that we have got
野生動物が 農業など他のどんな方法にも劣らぬ
09:59
is business communities.
貴重な土地の利用法になりました
10:01
Business communities helped bring Namibia onto the world map
現在ナミビアにいる
10:06
and they have also helped make wildlife
自然保護を行う私の同僚たちのほとんどが
10:09
a very valuable land use like any other land uses
WWF (世界自然保護基金)の
10:14
such as agriculture.
協力によって行われた
10:16
And most of my conservation colleagues today
最新の保護訓練を受けています
10:19
that you find in Namibia
WWFはまた プログラム全体に
10:21
have been trained through the initiative,
20年間資金を提供してきました
10:23
through the involvement of World Wildlife Fund
WWFの支援を受けて
10:26
in the most up-to-date conservation practices.
私たちはとても小規模だったプログラムを
10:29
They have also given funding for two decades
全国的なものに発展させてきました
10:32
to this whole program.
セスフォンテインは
10:35
And so far, with the support of World Wildlife Fund,
もはやナミビアのどこかに埋もれた
10:38
we've been able to scale up the very small programs
孤立した村ではありません
10:41
to national programs today.
こうした資産があるので今ではグローバルビレッジの一部です
10:43
Namibia ... or Sesfontein
父がコミュニティで動物を守る
10:46
was no more an isolated village somewhere,
仕事を始めてから30年になります
10:49
hidden away in Namibia.
今は亡き父が現在の成功を
10:52
With these assets we are now part of the global village.
見ることができないのが残念です
10:55
Thirty years have passed
私が1995年に学校を終えた時
10:58
since my father's first job as a community game guard.
我々の住む北西地方全域でライオンは20頭しかいませんでした
11:02
It's very unfortunate that he passed away and he cannot see the success
今では130頭以上になりました
11:06
as I and my children see it today.
(拍手)
11:09
When I finished school in 1995,
もしナミビアを訪れることがあれば
11:11
there were only 20 lions in the entire Northwest -- in our area.
絶対にテントで寝泊まりして下さい
11:16
But today, there are more than 130 lions.
夜に歩き回ってはいけません!
11:22
(Applause)
(笑)
11:28
So please, if you go to Namibia,
クロサイは1982年には絶滅しかかっていましたが
11:30
make sure that you stay in the tents.
現在はクネネ地方に世界最大の
11:32
Don't walk out at night!
自由に歩き回るクロサイの集住地があります
11:34
(Laughter)
そこは保護区の外なのです
11:35
The black rhino -- they were almost extinct in 1982.
(拍手)
11:40
But today, Kunene has the largest concentration of black rhino --
今ではヒョウの数も増えました
11:44
free-roaming black rhinos -- in the world.
でも彼らは村から遠い場所にいます
11:47
This is outside the protected area.
シマウマやガゼルなど野生の獲物が
11:50
(Applause)
何倍にも増えたので
11:53
The leopard -- they are now in big numbers
ずっと遠くにいるのです
11:57
but they are now far away from our village,
千頭にも満たなかったところから
11:59
because the natural plain has multiplied,
何万頭にまで増えました
12:02
like zebras, springboks and everything.
コミュニティの管理人が地域を巻き込んでいくという
12:05
They stay very much far away
小さな活動として始めたものが
12:08
because this other thing has multiplied
今ではいくつもの「管理委員会」へと成長しました
12:10
from less than a thousand to tens of thousands of animals.
管理委員会は政府により法律で定められた
12:14
What started as very small,
機関です
12:18
community rangers getting community involved,
コミュニティに恩恵をもたらすため 自らの手で運営されています
12:21
has now grown into something that we call conservancies.
今では60の管理委員会があり
12:25
Conservancies are legally instituted institutions
ナミビアの1300万ヘクタール以上の土地を
12:31
by the government,
保護 管理しています
12:33
and these are run by the communities themselves, for their benefit.
私たちは国全体の保護活動を作りなおしたのです
12:36
Today, we have got 60 conservancies
世界中でこれほど大規模な
12:39
that manage and protect over 13 million hectares
コミュニティ主導の保護活動を行っているところはありません
12:43
of land in Namibia.
(拍手)
12:46
We have already reshaped conservation in the entire country.
管理委員会は2008年には570万ドルを生み出しました
12:51
Nowhere else in the world
自然資源を尊重することに
12:53
has community-adopted conservation at this scale.
基礎をおく新しい経済です
12:57
(Applause)
このお金をいろいろなことに使うことができます
13:02
In 2008, conservancy generated 5.7 million dollars.
非常に重要なのは教育に使うことです
13:07
This is our new economy --
次にインフラ整備や食料のために使います
13:10
an economy based on the respect of our natural resources.
同様に重要なのはエイズ教育にお金を使うことです
13:13
And we are able to use this money for many things:
アフリカではエイズが蔓延しているからです
13:16
Very importantly, we put it in education.
こうしたアフリカからの良い知らせを
13:19
Secondly, we put it for infrastructure. Food.
私たちは声を大にして伝えたいのです
13:22
Very important as well -- we invest this money in AIDS and HIV education.
(拍手)
13:27
You know that Africa is being affected by these viruses.
今 世界に必要なのは
13:31
And this is the good news from Africa
あなた方が私やパートナーたちを手助けして
13:35
that we have to shout from the rooftops.
我々がナミビアで学んだことを
13:38
(Applause)
同じような問題を抱えた他の地域に伝えることです
13:45
And now, what the world really needs
例えばモンゴルや
13:49
is for you to help me and our partners
あるいは あなた方の裏庭である
13:56
take some of what we have learned in Namibia
グレート プレーンズの北部などです
14:00
to other places with similar problems:
そこではバッファローなどの動物が苦しんでいて
14:04
places like Mongolia,
多くのコミュニティが衰退しています
14:08
or even in your own backyards,
私はこう考えるのが好きです
14:12
the Northern Great Plains,
ナミビアがアフリカの手本となり
14:15
where buffalo and other animals have suffered
アフリカがアメリカの手本となるのです
14:18
and many communities are in decline.
(拍手)
14:21
I like that one:
私たちがナミビアで成功したのは
14:24
Namibia serving as a model to Africa,
野生動物を健全な状態にするということよりも
14:28
and Africa serving as a model to the United States.
ずっと大きなことを夢見ていたからです
14:33
(Applause)
地元のコミュニティの暮らしを改善できなければ
14:41
We were successful in Namibia
自然保護は失敗するだろうと皆わかっていたのです
14:43
because we dreamed of a future
私とともにナミビアのことを語りましょう
14:46
that was much more than just a healthy wildlife.
いやむしろ ナミビアに来て
14:51
We knew conservation would fail
私たちの成し遂げたことを自身で見て下さい
14:55
if it doesn't work to improve the lives of the local communities.
また 私たちのウェブサイトに来て
15:02
So, come and talk to me about Namibia,
世界中で行われているコミュニティ主導型自然資源管理の取り組みや
15:07
and better yet, come to Namibia
どうやったらその手助けができるのかを知って下さい
15:10
and see for yourself how we have done it.
どうもありがとうございました
15:12
And please, do visit our website
(拍手)
15:15
to learn more and see how you can help CBNRM
15:18
in Africa and across the world.
15:21
Thank you very much.
15:24
(Applause)
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:Takako Sato

sponsored links

John Kasaona - Conservationist
John Kasaona is a pioneer of community-based conservation -- working with the people who use and live on fragile land to enlist them in protecting it.

Why you should listen

John Kasaona is a leader in the drive to reinvent conservation in Namibia -- turning poachers into protectors of species. It’s a standard nature-documentary scenario: a pristine animal habitat under constant threat by the people who live there, hunting, camping, setting fires. But John Kasaona knows there is a better way to see this relationship between people and environment. As the assistant director for the Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation (IRDNC) , Kasaona works on ways to improve the lives of rural people in Namibia by involving them in the management of the lands they live on -- and the species that live there with them.

Kasanoa's Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) program helps rural villages set up communal conservancies, which manage and use local natural resources in a sustainable manner. Essentially, it's about restoring the balance of land and people to that of pre-colonial times, and allowing the people with the most interest in the survival of their environment to have control of it. His work was featured in the recent film Milking the Rhino.

The World Wildlife Fund has set up a portal for TEDsters to help in John Kasaona's work. Learn more >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.