16:32
TED2010

David Byrne: How architecture helped music evolve

デビッド・バーン:いかにして建築が音楽を進化させたか

Filmed:

CBGBからカーネギー・ホールまで― キャリアの広がりにつれデビッド・バーンはさまざまな場所で演奏してきました。会場が音楽を作るのでしょうか?野外ドラムからワグナーオペラ、アリーナロックまで、いかに音楽のおかれた環境が音楽自体を進化させていったかを探っていきます。

- Musician, artist, writer
David Byrne builds an idiosyncratic world of music, art, writing and film. Full bio

This is the venue
このライブハウスは
00:16
where, as a young man,
私が若い頃 自作の曲を
00:18
some of the music that I wrote was first performed.
初めて演奏した場所です
00:20
It was, remarkably,
とても音響効果の
00:23
a pretty good sounding room.
いい会場でした
00:25
With all the uneven walls and all the crap everywhere,
壁は全部デコボコで ゴミだらけなんだけど
00:27
it actually sounded pretty good.
音は非常に良かったです
00:29
This is a song that was recorded there.
この曲は そこで録られたものです
00:31
(Music)
(音楽)
00:34
This is not Talking Heads,
まあこの写真はトーキング・ヘッズ
00:36
in the picture anyway.
じゃないんだけど
00:39
(Music: "A Clean Break (Let's Work)" by Talking Heads)
(曲:クリーンブレイク 作:トーキング・ヘッズ)
00:41
So the nature of the room
あの場所では
00:49
meant that words could be understood.
言葉が良く聞き取れて
00:51
The lyrics of the songs could be pretty much understood.
歌詞もよく理解してもらえた
00:53
The sound system was kind of decent.
サウンドシステムもそこそこで
00:55
And there wasn't a lot of reverberation in the room.
残響音もあまりなかった
00:58
So the rhythms
なのでリズムも
01:01
could be pretty intact too,
ちゃんと正確に聴こえ
01:03
pretty concise.
きっちり演奏できました
01:05
Other places around the country had similar rooms.
他の地域にも似たような場所があります
01:07
This is Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in Nashville.
これはナッシュビルのトゥッティーズです
01:09
The music was in some ways different,
違うタイプの音楽を扱ってましたが
01:12
but in structure and form,
建物の構造や形は
01:14
very much the same.
よく似ていました
01:17
The clientele behavior was very much the same too.
クラブ常連の行動も似たようなもので
01:19
And so the bands at Tootsie's
トゥッティーズや
01:24
or at CBGB's
CBGBで演奏するとき
01:26
had to play loud enough --
バンドは暴れたり叫んだり
01:28
the volume had to be loud enough to overcome
好き勝手なことをする観客に
01:31
people falling down, shouting out
目一杯音量を上げて
01:33
and doing whatever else they were doing.
対抗してましたね
01:35
Since then, I've played other places
その後私は もう少し高級な会場で
01:37
that are much nicer.
演奏するようになりました
01:39
I've played the Disney Hall here
ここLAのディズニーホールや
01:41
and Carnegie Hall and places like that.
カーネギーホールといった場所です
01:44
And it's been very exciting.
すごくエキサイティングでしたが
01:47
But I also noticed that sometimes the music
そのとき気づいたんです
01:49
that I had written,
その当時や過去に作った
01:51
or was writing at the time,
音楽はこういったホールでは
01:53
didn't sound all that great
それほどいい音に
01:55
in some of those halls.
聴こえないということに
01:57
We managed,
何とかやってみましたが
01:59
but sometimes those halls didn't seem exactly suited
ホールではどうも当時の私の作品が
02:01
to the music I was making
しっくり聴こえて
02:04
or had made.
こないんです
02:06
So I asked myself:
なので自問しました
02:08
Do I write stuff
私の作品は
02:10
for specific rooms?
空間を意識していたか
02:11
Do I have a place, a venue,
場所や会場のことを考え
02:13
in mind when I write?
曲を書いていただろうか
02:15
Is that a kind of model for creativity?
これは創作のひとつの方法ではないのか
02:17
Do we all make things with
私達は何かモノを創るとき
02:19
a venue, a context, in mind?
場所や背景のことを考えているのかと
02:21
Okay, Africa.
さて アフリカ音楽です
02:25
(Music: "Wenlenga" / Various artists)
(曲:ウェンレンガ / オムニバス)
02:27
Most of the popular music that we know now
ポピュラーミュージックのルーツの大部分が
02:34
has a big part of its roots in West Africa.
西アフリカを起源とすることはご存知ですね
02:37
And the music there,
アフリカの音楽は
02:40
I would say, the instruments,
そう 楽器も
02:42
the intricate rhythms,
複雑なリズムも
02:44
the way it's played, the setting, the context,
演奏法も 情景や背景も
02:46
it's all perfect. It all works perfect.
すべてが完璧なんです
02:49
The music works perfectly in that setting.
その環境にぴったり合っている
02:51
There's no big room
大きな会場が
02:54
to create reverberation and confuse the rhythms.
反響してリズムを狂わせることもないです
02:56
The instruments are loud enough
楽器には十分な音量があるので
02:59
that they can be heard without amplification, etc., etc.
アンプやその他がなくても聴こえます
03:01
It's no accident.
機材トラブルもなし
03:03
It's perfect for that particular context.
アフリカの環境に対し完璧なのです
03:05
And it would be a mess
でも 次のような状況には
03:08
in a context like this. This is a gothic cathedral.
合わないでしょう ゴシック式の大聖堂です
03:10
(Music: "Spem In Alium" by Thomas Tallis)
(曲:御身よりほかにわれは 作:トマス・タリス)
03:13
In a gothic cathedral, this kind of music is perfect.
ゴシック式大聖堂にはこういう音楽が合います
03:19
It doesn't change key, the notes are long,
音階の変更はせず 音色は長く伸ばされます
03:25
there's almost no rhythm whatsoever,
リズムもほとんどありません
03:27
and the room flatters the music.
建築が音楽を引き立たせています
03:32
It actually improves it.
実際に音質を向上させるのです
03:34
This is the room that Bach
この空間でバッハは
03:36
wrote some of his music for. This is the organ.
作曲していました これがオルガンです
03:38
It's not as big as a gothic cathedral,
大聖堂のように大きくないので
03:41
so he can write things that are a little bit more intricate.
複雑な音楽を書くことが出来ました
03:43
He can, very innovatively,
大きな不協和音のリスクなく
03:46
actually change keys
キーを変えるという
03:48
without risking huge dissonances.
革新をすることが出来たんです
03:50
(Music: "Fantasia On Jesu, Mein Freunde" by Johann S. Bach)
(曲:幻想曲「イエスわが喜び」 作:バッハ)
03:52
This is a little bit later.
これはその少し後
04:00
This is the kind of rooms that Mozart wrote in.
こういう場所でモーツァルトは曲を書いてました
04:02
I think we're in like 1770, somewhere around there.
確か1770年あたりだったと思います
04:05
They're smaller, even less reverberant,
空間が小さくなり反響音も少ないので
04:08
so he can write really frilly music
本当に装飾的な音楽が書けました
04:10
that's very intricate -- and it works.
複雑ですが うまくいってます
04:12
(Music: "Sonata in F," KV 13, by Wolfgang A. Mozart)
(曲:ピアノソナタ第13番 作:モーツァルト)
04:16
It fits the room perfectly.
空間にぴったり合っている
04:19
This is La Scala.
これはスカラ座です
04:25
It's around the same time,
ほぼ同時期の建物です
04:27
I think it was built around 1776.
1776年に建てられたと思います
04:29
People in the audience in these opera houses, when they were built,
これらのオペラハウスが建てられた頃の観客は
04:31
they used to yell out to one another.
歓声をあげるのが普通でした
04:34
They used to eat, drink and yell out to people on the stage,
飲食をしながらステージに向かって歓声を送りました
04:36
just like they do at CBGB's and places like that.
CBGBとかでみんながやるようにね
04:39
If they liked an aria,
アリアが好きだと思ったら
04:41
they would holler and suggest
大声をあげて
04:43
that it be done again as an encore,
アンコールを促しました
04:45
not at the end of the show, but immediately.
終演後だけじゃなく ショーの途中でも突然ね
04:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:50
And well, that was an opera experience.
でも それがオペラってものだったんですよ
04:54
This is the opera house that Wagner built for himself.
これはワグナーが自分の為に建てたオペラハウスです
04:57
And the size of the room is not that big.
そんなに大きな空間じゃなくて
05:01
It's smaller than this.
ここよりも小さいぐらいかな
05:04
But Wagner made an innovation.
でもね ワグナーは革新を起こました
05:06
He wanted a bigger band.
もっと大きな楽団が欲しかった
05:08
He wanted a little more bombast,
豪勢に見せたかったんですね
05:10
so he increased the size of the orchestra pit
オーケストラ・ピットを大きくすることで
05:12
so he could get more low-end instruments in there.
ローエンドの楽器を加えることができた
05:14
(Music: "Lohengrin / Prelude to Act III" by Richard Wagner)
(曲:『ローエングリン』第3幕への前奏曲 作:ワグナー)
05:17
Okay.
さて
05:27
This is Carnegie Hall.
これはカーネギーホールです
05:30
Obviously, this kind of thing became popular.
ご存知のようにこの手のホールが主流になりました
05:33
The halls got bigger. Carnegie Hall's fair-sized.
サイズは大きくなり カーネギーは特に
05:35
It's larger than some of the other symphony halls.
他のシンフォニーホールよりも大きいですね
05:38
And they're a lot more reverberant
こういった場所はスカラ座より
05:41
than La Scala.
よく音が反響します
05:43
Around the same,
この頃ニューヨーカーに
05:45
according to Alex Ross who writes for the New Yorker,
執筆中だったアレックス・ロス曰く
05:47
this kind of rule came into effect
観客はショーの間 静かにして
05:50
that audiences had to be quiet --
食事 飲酒 歓声や
05:53
no more eating, drinking and yelling at the stage,
ひそひそ話などをしないことが
05:55
or gossiping with one another
ルールになってきたと
05:57
during the show.
いうことです
05:59
They had to be very quiet.
会場は静かになりました
06:01
So those two things combined meant that
ホールの反響と静けさにより
06:03
a different kind of music
今までとは違う種類の音楽が
06:05
worked best in these kind of halls.
そこにぴったりと来るようになりました
06:07
It meant that there could be extreme dynamics,
この種の音楽に今までなかったような
06:10
which there weren't in some of these
極端な強弱法が
06:12
other kinds of music.
使用できるようになったのです
06:14
Quiet parts could be heard
今まで世間話や歓声によって
06:16
that would have been drowned out
掻き消されていた静かなパートが
06:18
by all the gossiping and shouting.
聞こえるようになりました
06:20
But because of the reverberation
反響音があったせいで
06:22
in those rooms like Carnegie Hall,
カーネギーホールのような場所では
06:24
the music had to be maybe a little less rhythmic
音楽はややリズムを抑え 構成的に
06:26
and a little more textural.
ならざるを得ませんでした
06:28
(Music: "Symphony No. 8 in E Flat Major" by Gustav Mahler)
(曲:交響曲第8番変ホ長調 作:マーラー)
06:30
This is Mahler.
これはマーラーです
06:33
It looks like Bob Dylan, but it's Mahler.
ボブ・ディランに見えるけど マーラーです
06:36
That was Bob's last record, yeah.
写真はボブの最新作だね
06:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:44
Popular music, coming along at the same time.
この頃ポピュラー音楽が出現しました
06:47
This is a jazz band.
これはジャズバンドですね
06:50
According to Scott Joplin, the bands were playing
スコット・ジョップリンによると バンドは
06:52
on riverboats and clubs.
リバーボートやクラブで演奏していた
06:55
Again, it's noisy. They're playing for dancers.
またもや 騒がしい場所だね
06:57
There's certain sections of the song -- the songs had different sections
ダンスの伴奏をしてたのだけど その中に
06:59
that the dancers really liked.
ダンサー達のお気に入りの箇所があった
07:02
And they'd say, "Play that part again."
で 「今のとこもう一回」って言われる
07:04
Well, there's only so many times
ダンサーの為に何回も
07:06
you can play the same section of a song over and over again for the dancers.
同じ箇所ばかり演奏させられると しまいに飽きて
07:08
So the bands started to improvise new melodies.
バンドが即興でメロディーを作るようになった
07:11
And a new form of music was born.
新しい音楽が生まれた瞬間でした
07:14
(Music: "Royal Garden Blues" by W.C. Handy / Ethel Waters)
(曲:ロイヤル・ガーデン・ブルース 作:ハンディ/ウォーターズ)
07:16
These are played mainly in small rooms.
ジャズが演奏されたのは小さな会場ばかりで
07:26
People are dancing, shouting and drinking.
みんな踊り 声を上げ 酒を飲んでいた
07:30
So the music has to be loud enough
だからそれより大きな音で演奏しないと
07:32
to be heard above that.
ちゃんと聴こえなかったんです
07:34
Same thing goes true for -- that's the beginning of the century --
これは20世紀の初めでしたが 同じことは
07:36
for the whole of 20th-century popular music,
この世紀全体のポピュラー音楽にも言えます
07:39
whether it's rock or Latin music or whatever.
ロックとかラテンミュージックといったね
07:42
[Live music] doesn't really change that much.
ライブ音楽に関してあまり変化はないです
07:44
It changes about a third of the way into the 20th century,
20世紀も三分の一を過ぎる頃には変化が起こり
07:47
when this became
ラジオが
07:50
one of the primary venues for music.
音源の主流になり
07:53
And this was one way
マイクが音楽を
07:56
that the music got there.
進化させる一要因となったのです
07:58
Microphones enabled singers, in particular,
マイクの存在がミュージシャンや作曲家
08:00
and musicians and composers,
そして特に歌手たちに
08:03
to completely change the kind of music
全く違ったタイプの曲を書く事を
08:05
that they were writing.
可能にさせたのです
08:07
So far, a lot of the stuff that was on the radio was live music,
ラジオで掛けられる曲の多くは生演奏でしたが
08:09
but singers, like Frank Sinatra,
フランク・シナトラのようなシンガーには
08:12
could use the mic
マイクなしでは
08:15
and do things
絶対出来なかったようなことが
08:17
that they could never do without a microphone.
出来るようになりました
08:19
Other singers after him
シナトラ後のシンガー達には
08:22
went even further.
変化はさらに顕著でした
08:24
(Music: "My Funny Valentine" by Chet Baker)
(曲:マイ・ファニー・バレンタイン 作:チェット・ベイカー)
08:26
This is Chet Baker.
チェット・ベイカーです
08:33
And this kind of thing
こういう風に歌うことは
08:35
would have been impossible without a microphone.
マイクなしでは不可能でした
08:37
It would have been impossible without recorded music as well.
録音技術なしにも不可能だったでしょう
08:39
And he's singing right into your ear.
彼の歌声は右側から聞こえてきます
08:42
He's whispering into your ears.
彼のささやきが耳に入ってきます
08:44
The effect is just electric.
この効果はマイクによるものです
08:46
It's like the guy is sitting next to you,
まるであなたの横に座っているかのように
08:48
whispering who knows what into your ear.
ささやきが聞こえてきます
08:50
So at this point, music diverged.
そしてこの時点で 音楽は二つに分かれます
08:55
There's live music,
ライブ・ミュージックと
08:57
and there's recorded music.
レコーディング・ミュージックです
08:59
And they no longer have to be exactly the same.
もう双方が全く同じである必要はないのです
09:01
Now there's venues like this, a discotheque,
そして今 この写真のような会場もあります ディスコですね
09:04
and there's jukeboxes in bars,
バーにはジュークボックスがあって
09:07
where you don't even need to have a band.
そこではバンドはもう必要ありません
09:09
There doesn't need to be any
生バンドの演奏の類は
09:11
live performing musicians whatsoever,
もはや必要ないのです
09:13
and the sound systems are good.
音響システムはいいですね
09:16
People began to make music
そしてディスコや音響システムに
09:19
specifically for discos
特別に合わせた
09:21
and for those sound systems.
音楽が創られ始めました
09:24
And, as with jazz,
また ジャズのように
09:26
the dancers liked certain sections
ダンサー達は曲のある一部分を
09:29
more than they did others.
他の箇所より気に入ってました
09:32
So the early hip-hop guys would loop certain sections.
初期ヒップホップが曲の一部を繰り返すようになった所以です
09:34
(Music: "Rapper's Delight" by The Sugarhill Gang)
(曲:ラッパーズ・ディライト 作:シュガーヒル・ギャング)
09:37
The MC would improvise lyrics
ジャズ・ミュージシャンが即興演奏したように
09:45
in the same way that the jazz players would improvise melodies.
MCも即興でラップするようになりました
09:47
And another new form of music was born.
またここで 新しい音楽が生まれたのです
09:50
Live performance, when it was incredibly successful,
ライブが人気を博すようになると
09:54
ended up in what is probably, acoustically,
キャパ的理由から 音響的に地上最悪の
09:57
the worst sounding venues on the planet:
スタジアムやバスケットボールアリーナ
10:00
sports stadiums,
ホッケーアリーナなどで
10:03
basketball arenas and hockey arenas.
演奏する羽目になります
10:05
Musicians who ended up there did the best they could.
そうなったミュージシャン達は全力を尽くしました
10:08
They wrote what is now called arena rock,
今ではアリーナロックと呼ばれる
10:10
which is medium-speed ballads.
ミディアムバラードを書き始めたのです
10:12
(Music: "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" by U2)
(曲:終りなき旅 作:U2)
10:14
They did the best they could
彼らは曲作りに
10:22
given that this is what they're writing for.
最善を尽くそうとしたのですね
10:24
The tempos are medium. It sounds big.
ミディアムテンポで壮大に聞こえる曲です。
10:27
It's more a social situation
これは音楽的状況からというより
10:30
than a musical situation.
社会的状況に迫られたものです
10:32
And in some ways, the music
こういった会場のために書かれた曲は
10:34
that they're writing for this place
彼らの状況にも
10:36
works perfectly.
ぴったりなわけです
10:38
So there's more new venues.
そしてさらに新しい空間が出来ました
10:41
One of the new ones is the automobile.
車の中もその一つですね
10:44
I grew up with a radio in a car.
私はカーラジオと一緒に育ちました
10:46
But now that's evolved into something else.
しかし今はラジオも進化しました
10:48
The car is a whole venue.
車はライブ会場そのものですね
10:50
(Music: "Who U Wit" by Lil' Jon & the East Side Boyz)
(曲:フーユーウィズ 作:リル・ジョン&ザ・イースト・サイド・ボーイズ )
10:52
The music that, I would say, is written
私は この音楽は
10:57
for automobile sound systems
車向けに作られたと言いたい
11:00
works perfectly on it.
バッチリはまってますよね
11:02
It might not be what you want to listen to at home,
家の中で聞きたいとは思わないかもしれないけど
11:04
but it works great in the car --
車の中で聞くにはすごくいい
11:07
has a huge frequency spectrum,
周波数スペクトラムが広範囲で
11:09
you know, big bass and high-end
大きなベース音とハイエンド
11:12
and the voice kind of stuck in the middle.
ボーカルはミドルレンジで留まってる
11:14
Automobile music, you can share with your friends.
車で聞く音楽は友達とシェアできますからね
11:17
There's one other kind of new venue,
その他の新しい音楽の聞き方として
11:21
the private MP3 player.
MP3プレイヤーがあります
11:23
Presumably, this is just for Christian music.
おそらく このプレイヤーはクリスチャン専用でしょうね
11:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:28
And in some ways it's like Carnegie Hall,
音のひとつひとつがよく聞こえるので
11:34
or when the audience had to hush up,
カーネギーホールとか 観客が静かにしている
11:37
because you can now hear every single detail.
場所で音楽を聴くようなものですね
11:39
In other ways, it's more like the West African music
別の言い方をすれば 西アフリカの音楽にも似ています
11:42
because if the music in an MP3 player gets too quiet,
MP3プレイヤーの音楽が静かになったとき
11:44
you turn it up, and the next minute,
音量を上げますね すると次の瞬間
11:47
your ears are blasted out by a louder passage.
大音量の一節が流れ出し 鼓膜が破れそうになる
11:49
So that doesn't really work.
これはあまりよくありません
11:52
I think pop music, mainly,
特に最近の
11:54
it's written today,
ポップミュージックにおいて
11:56
to some extent, is written for these kind of players,
ある程度はMP3プレイヤーを念頭に
11:58
for this kind of personal experience
曲が書かれているので
12:01
where you can hear extreme detail,
ものすごく細部まで聞き取れるんですが
12:03
but the dynamic doesn't change that much.
音のダイナミズムが余りないんです
12:05
So I asked myself:
そこで自問しました
12:08
Okay, is this
私達が
12:11
a model for creation,
環境に合わせることは
12:13
this adaptation that we do?
創作のひとつの方法だろうか
12:15
And does it happen anywhere else?
他の場所でも起こっているのだろうか
12:18
Well, according to David Attenborough and some other people,
デービッド・アッテンボローや他の人も言ってますが
12:20
birds do it too --
鳥も同じだそうです
12:23
that the birds in the canopy,
あの木の枝にいる鳥は
12:25
where the foliage is dense,
葉っぱが密集している所では
12:28
their calls tend to be
鳴き声が高くなって
12:30
high-pitched, short and repetitive.
短く繰り返しがちになる傾向があります
12:32
And the birds on the floor
地面に立っている時の鳴き声は
12:36
tend to have lower pitched calls,
低い音になる傾向があるため
12:38
so that they don't get distorted
森の地面から飛び立つ時は
12:40
when they bounce off the forest floor.
声の響きが増幅されにくいです
12:42
And birds like this Savannah sparrow,
サバンナスパロウという鳥は
12:45
they tend to have a buzzing
ブンブンと鳴く傾向が
12:49
(Sound clip: Savannah sparrow song)
(サウンドクリップ: サバンナスパロウ)
12:51
type call.
あります
12:53
And it turns out that
こういう鳴き方は
12:55
a sound like this
草原やサバンナで
12:58
is the most energy efficient and practical way
仲間に呼びかける時に 最も実用的で
13:00
to transmit their call
エネルギー効率のいい
13:03
across the fields and savannahs.
方法だということが分かっています
13:06
Other birds, like this tanager,
他に この風琴鳥という鳥のように
13:10
have adapted within the same species.
同じ種なのに別の鳴き方をする鳥もいます
13:13
The tananger on the East Coast of the United States,
風琴鳥はアメリカ東海岸の
13:16
where the forests are a little denser,
少し深い森の中では
13:18
has one kind of call,
こういう鳴き方をしますが
13:20
and the tananger on the other side, on the west
反対の西海岸では
13:22
(Sound clip: Scarlet tanager song)
(サウンドクリップ: 赤風琴鳥)
13:25
has a different kind of call.
違った鳴き方をします
13:27
(Sound clip: Scarlet tanager song)
(サウンドクリップ: 赤風琴鳥)
13:30
So birds do it too.
鳥も環境に適応しています
13:35
And I thought:
そこで考えました
13:38
Well, if this is a model for creation,
これは創作のひとつの形だろうか
13:40
if we make music,
大まかな形でもいい
13:43
primarily the form at least,
環境を頭に入れて曲を
13:45
to fit these contexts,
書くのだろうか
13:48
and if we make art to fit gallery walls or museum walls,
美術館の壁に似合うアートを作るのか
13:50
and if we write software to fit existing operating systems,
ソフトウェアを現存のOSに合わせて作れば
13:53
is that how it works?
上手くいくのか
13:58
Yeah. I think it's evolutionary.
そう 革新的なことだと思います
14:01
It's adaptive.
環境順応です
14:03
But the pleasure and the passion and the joy
しかし 楽しみや情熱 喜びは
14:05
is still there.
失われません
14:07
This is a reverse view of things
これは伝統的でロマンチックな
14:10
from the kind of traditional Romantic view.
考え方とは真逆の考え方です
14:12
The Romantic view is that
ロマンチックな考え方では
14:14
first comes the passion
まず情熱があり
14:16
and then the outpouring of emotion,
次に感情を流し込み
14:18
and then somehow it gets shaped into something.
それから詳細な形がつくられていきます
14:20
And I'm saying,
この理論は
14:23
well, the passion's still there,
まず型があって
14:25
but the vessel
最初に本能と直感で
14:27
that it's going to be injected into and poured into,
まず形を作り 後から情熱をそこに
14:29
that is instinctively and intuitively
注ぎ込んでいくという
14:32
created first.
やり方です
14:34
We already know where that passion is going.
情熱を注ぎ込む場所はもう決まっているのです
14:36
But this conflict of views is kind of interesting.
まあ こういう考え方の違いも面白いですね
14:43
The writer,
作家の
14:46
Thomas Frank,
トーマス・フランクは
14:48
says that
どうして有権者が
14:50
this might be a kind of explanation
時として自らの支持と反した
14:52
why some voters vote
投票をしてしまうのかという
14:54
against their best interests,
説明をしています
14:56
that voters, like a lot of us,
私達のような多くの有権者は
14:58
assume, that if they hear something that sounds like it's sincere,
誠実そうな言葉を 信頼できる
15:01
that it's coming from the gut, that it's passionate,
心からの 情熱からのものだと
15:04
that it's more authentic.
思い込みがちです
15:06
And they'll vote for that.
だから投票するのです
15:08
So that, if somebody can fake sincerity,
もし誰か誠実さを装ったり
15:10
if they can fake passion,
情熱を装うことが出来たら
15:12
they stand a better chance
そういった方法で当選する
15:15
of being selected in that way,
チャンスも高くなるのです
15:17
which seems a little dangerous.
少し危険ですよね
15:21
I'm saying the two, the passion, the joy,
情熱と喜びは お互いに
15:25
are not mutually exclusive.
相容れないものではないんです
15:28
Maybe what the world needs now is for us to realize
今 私達も鳥達のようなものだと
15:30
that we are like the birds.
気づく必要があるのでしょう
15:33
We adapt.
環境に適応し
15:35
We sing.
歌う
15:37
And like the birds, the joy is still there,
環境に合わせて自分たちを変えても
15:39
even though we have changed what we do
鳥と同じく 私達も喜びを変わらず
15:41
to fit the context.
持ち続けています
15:44
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
15:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:48
Translated by Osamu Kumamoto
Reviewed by Junko Fundeis

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

David Byrne - Musician, artist, writer
David Byrne builds an idiosyncratic world of music, art, writing and film.

Why you should listen

Musician, author, filmmaker, curator, conservationist, digital music theorist, bicycle advocate, urban designer, visual artist, humanist ... David Byrne has many ways of expressing himself -- all of them heartfelt, authentic and thought-provoking.

From his groundbreaking recording career, first with Talking Heads and then as a solo artist and collaborator, to his recent use of digital media to connnect his creations to the world, he has been meshing art and technology to create jaw-dropping, soulful masterpieces that tell a story, and often invoke his audience to create some masterpieces of their own. In a recent art installation, Playing the Building, Byrne transformed an empty building into a musical instrument, and then invited visitors to play it. 

His book Bicycle Diaries is a journal of what he thought and experienced while cycling through the cities of the world. And his 2012 book How Music Works expands on his 2010 TEDTalk to imagine how music is shaped by its time and place. 

In David Byrne's 2010 TEDTalk, the image of CBGB comes from Joseph O. Holmes' CBGB series >>  

More profile about the speaker
David Byrne | Speaker | TED.com